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News Slideshows (12/31/2018 15 hours)


  • 1/74   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


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    Press Review


    Josh Johnson   Adrian Peterson   Army   Chris Rock   Reid Travis   Chisora   Michael Floyd   David Hogg   Frampton   The Titans   Luke Maye   Wake Forest   West Brook   Harold Landry   Bruno Fernando   Major Applewhite   Jerry Seinfeld   D.C. and the First Lady   Haynes King   Louis CK   Coby White   Tyler Herro   Mason Foster   Murray State   Jay Gruden   Juwan Morgan   Nate Burleson   United Center   Paul Byron   DePaul   Kyle Young   Trent Williams   Patrice Bergeron   Mike Vrabel   Dion Lewis   Ed Oliver   Indiana State   Crowder   Paddy Ashdown   
  • 2/74   Why Are We So Addicted to Mysteries Like ‘Making a Murderer?’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Why we can’t turn away from shows like Serial and Making a Murderer. (Photo: Getty Images)

    Why we can’t turn away from shows like Serial and Making a Murderer. (Photo: Getty Images)


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  • 3/74   New A&E Show ‘Fit to Fat to Fit’ Makes Trainers Gain Weight — But What Does it Prove?
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Adonis Hill, a trainer on the upcoming show “Fit to Fat to Fit,” went from weighing 217 pounds to 286 pounds by consuming 8,000 calories a day.

    Adonis Hill, a trainer on the upcoming show “Fit to Fat to Fit,” went from weighing 217 pounds to 286 pounds by consuming 8,000 calories a day.


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  • 4/74   Daily Digit: Why are there so few African-American baseball players?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It’s been 71 years since Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier, but African-American participation in the MLB has sharply declined since its peak in the early ’80s.

    It’s been 71 years since Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier, but African-American participation in the MLB has sharply declined since its peak in the early ’80s.


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  • 5/74   How That Pro Cyclist Hid a Motor in Her Bike
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    "Mechanical doping" made its way into the popular culture last week when a professional bike racer got caught.?

    "Mechanical doping" made its way into the popular culture last week when a professional bike racer got caught.?


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  • 6/74   Millions Will Watch the Super Bowl — But Is the Football Generation Ending?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    One NFL player after another — from former Raiders quarterback Ken Stabler, 69, who died in July 2015, to 27-year-old Giants safety Tyler Sash, who died two months after Stabler — has been diagnosed with chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated trauma. The New York Times reports that well over 100 football players, including several Pro Football Hall of Famers, have CTE so far.

    One NFL player after another — from former Raiders quarterback Ken Stabler, 69, who died in July 2015, to 27-year-old Giants safety Tyler Sash, who died two months after Stabler — has been diagnosed with chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated trauma. The New York Times reports that well over 100 football players, including several Pro Football Hall of Famers, have CTE so far.


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  • 7/74   Muslim Teen Defies Tradition to Become First Hijab-Wearing Ballerina
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    With a dream of becoming the first hijab-wearing Muslim ballerina, 14-year-old Stephanie Kurlow recently launched a fundraising page in the hopes of pulling together more than $7,000 so that she can get her certification to open a performing arts program in her native Sydney because she said, “I don’t want certain people who are discriminatory to hold anyone back from achieving their dreams and being unique.” 

    With a dream of becoming the first hijab-wearing Muslim ballerina, 14-year-old Stephanie Kurlow recently launched a fundraising page in the hopes of pulling together more than $7,000 so that she can get her certification to open a performing arts program in her native Sydney because she said, “I don’t want certain people who are discriminatory to hold anyone back from achieving their dreams and being unique.” 


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  • 8/74   Cheerleading Coach Fired for Sabotaging Rival Teen
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    A cheering coach lost her job after allegedly tripping a cheerleader. Video shows the cheerleader backflipping and Teresa Fann sticking a leg out to stop her.

    A cheering coach lost her job after allegedly tripping a cheerleader. Video shows the cheerleader backflipping and Teresa Fann sticking a leg out to stop her.


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  • 9/74   Schools No Longer Punishing Athletes Harshly for Marijuana
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    At least one-third of the Power Five conference schools are not punishing athletes as harshly as they were 10 years ago for testing positive for marijuana and other so-called recreational drugs, according to an investigation by The Associated Press.

    At least one-third of the Power Five conference schools are not punishing athletes as harshly as they were 10 years ago for testing positive for marijuana and other so-called recreational drugs, according to an investigation by The Associated Press.


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  • 10/74   World's Longest Bicycle Spans 117-Feet—Half a City Block!
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Clear the streets! Dutch cycling group Mijl Van Mares Werkploeg just broke the 2016 world record for longest bicycle.  At a whopping 117 feet long, the bike stretches half a city block and spans farther than the word’s longest limo, at 100 feet long.  Per Guinness World Record’s requirements, it has just two wheels and is actually operable.  The bike stretches half a city block. (Photo: Guinness World Records) In the video, Mara Montalbano shows us how it rides.

    Clear the streets! Dutch cycling group Mijl Van Mares Werkploeg just broke the 2016 world record for longest bicycle.  At a whopping 117 feet long, the bike stretches half a city block and spans farther than the word’s longest limo, at 100 feet long. Per Guinness World Record’s requirements, it has just two wheels and is actually operable. The bike stretches half a city block. (Photo: Guinness World Records) In the video, Mara Montalbano shows us how it rides.


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  • 11/74   Why I Like It When My 8-year-old Loses at Sports
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “In business, you either close a deal or you don’t — and if you don’t, you can’t just say, ‘Well, everybody tried hard, right?’” Jen Welter, a sports psychologist and the first female coach in the NFL, tells Yahoo Parenting.

    “In business, you either close a deal or you don’t — and if you don’t, you can’t just say, ‘Well, everybody tried hard, right?’” Jen Welter, a sports psychologist and the first female coach in the NFL, tells Yahoo Parenting.


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  • 12/74   Study Finds Benefit of Cheerleading
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Could cheerleading be the most progressive sport in terms of gender roles?  New research from the University of East Anglia indicates that the traditionally female-centered activity can help participants of both sexes challenge stereotypes about girls in sports.  The study, which was published in the journal Sport in Society: Cultures, Commerce, Media, Politics, tracked the growing popularity of cheerleading in the U.K. and focused on the members of four cheerleading teams.  “The participants in our study talked about flipping gender norms in cheerleading,” Dr. Amy Pressland, a co-author of the study, tells Yahoo Parenting.

    Could cheerleading be the most progressive sport in terms of gender roles? New research from the University of East Anglia indicates that the traditionally female-centered activity can help participants of both sexes challenge stereotypes about girls in sports. The study, which was published in the journal Sport in Society: Cultures, Commerce, Media, Politics, tracked the growing popularity of cheerleading in the U.K. and focused on the members of four cheerleading teams. “The participants in our study talked about flipping gender norms in cheerleading,” Dr. Amy Pressland, a co-author of the study, tells Yahoo Parenting.


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  • 13/74   Tom Brady on Coca-Cola and Frosted Flakes: 'That's Poison'
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Tom Brady and wife Gisele Bundchen. (Photo: Instagram.com/gisele) A run-of-the-mill post-game radio interview with Tom Brady ended up being a lot more than that, when the Patriots quarterback took a swing at the processed food industry — calling out Coca-Cola and Frosted Flakes, specifically.  Brady’s been known to stick to an extremely healthy diet — avocado “ice cream,” anyone? — but this interview revealed the passion behind his healthy habits.

    Tom Brady and wife Gisele Bundchen. (Photo: Instagram.com/gisele) A run-of-the-mill post-game radio interview with Tom Brady ended up being a lot more than that, when the Patriots quarterback took a swing at the processed food industry — calling out Coca-Cola and Frosted Flakes, specifically.  Brady’s been known to stick to an extremely healthy diet — avocado “ice cream,” anyone? — but this interview revealed the passion behind his healthy habits.


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  • 14/74   When Someone You Love Spirals Out of Control, When Do You Stay and When Do You Go?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Though the two are still legally married, Khloe Kardashian left the basketball star after five years together in 2013, reportedly over his struggle with substance abuse and, primarily, his addiction to cocaine.  Odom remains in critical condition, still unconscious, with Kardashian by his side after she rushed to Las Vegas upon hearing the news.  Earlier this week, University of Southern California football coach Steve Sarkisian was fired, allegedly as a result of his own struggle with alcoholism and his violation of the school’s zero-tolerance policy regarding alcohol use.  The 41-year-old has three children with his estranged wife.  Also this week, reality TV star Scott Disick, the former boyfriend of Kourtney Kardashian and father of her children, checked into rehab to get help for his addiction problems.

    Though the two are still legally married, Khloe Kardashian left the basketball star after five years together in 2013, reportedly over his struggle with substance abuse and, primarily, his addiction to cocaine.  Odom remains in critical condition, still unconscious, with Kardashian by his side after she rushed to Las Vegas upon hearing the news.  Earlier this week, University of Southern California football coach Steve Sarkisian was fired, allegedly as a result of his own struggle with alcoholism and his violation of the school’s zero-tolerance policy regarding alcohol use. The 41-year-old has three children with his estranged wife.  Also this week, reality TV star Scott Disick, the former boyfriend of Kourtney Kardashian and father of her children, checked into rehab to get help for his addiction problems.


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  • 15/74   As NFL Player Daniel Fells Contracts MRSA, a Look at How Serious Staph Infections Work
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Daniel Fells in January 2015.  “This is a serious situation that has been taken seriously from the beginning,” Giants spokesman Pat Hanlon told NFL.com.  “We’re all fighting for Daniel.” But what is MRSA, exactly?  “I can’t count how many MRSA infections I see.  While MRSA infections have leveled off in the last few years following a rapid increase from the 1960s to mid-2000s, they have the potential to turn deadly — and do.

    Daniel Fells in January 2015.  “This is a serious situation that has been taken seriously from the beginning,” Giants spokesman Pat Hanlon told NFL.com. “We’re all fighting for Daniel.” But what is MRSA, exactly? “I can’t count how many MRSA infections I see. While MRSA infections have leveled off in the last few years following a rapid increase from the 1960s to mid-2000s, they have the potential to turn deadly — and do.


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  • 16/74   High School Quarterback’s Tragic Death Highlights Silent Danger of an Enlarged Spleen
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    A spleen can become enlarged for many reasons, including genetic diseases, William Katkov, MD, a gastroenterologist at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, Calif., tells Yahoo Health.  Here’s why that’s a problem: A person may feel better and resume their normal activities, but their enlarged spleen is more susceptible to rupturing and may no longer be protected by their ribcage, leaving it incredibly vulnerable to injury.  “An enlarged spleen is at an increased risk for rupture or injury in the setting of normal trauma, like a football game, diving into a pool, or minor car accident,” Katkov says.  While an enlarged spleen can be asymptomatic, Katkov says a person can feel uncomfortable or have a feeling of fullness in their upper abdomen on the left side.

    A spleen can become enlarged for many reasons, including genetic diseases, William Katkov, MD, a gastroenterologist at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, Calif., tells Yahoo Health. Here’s why that’s a problem: A person may feel better and resume their normal activities, but their enlarged spleen is more susceptible to rupturing and may no longer be protected by their ribcage, leaving it incredibly vulnerable to injury. “An enlarged spleen is at an increased risk for rupture or injury in the setting of normal trauma, like a football game, diving into a pool, or minor car accident,” Katkov says. While an enlarged spleen can be asymptomatic, Katkov says a person can feel uncomfortable or have a feeling of fullness in their upper abdomen on the left side.


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  • 17/74   Novak Djokovic’s Inspiring Dad Comments: How Being a Parent Heightens Happy Moments
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Novak Djokovic, who beat Roger Federer to claim the U.S. Open title on Sunday, says parenthood has made him a better player.  Since then, the tennis champ has credited fatherhood with improving his game.

    Novak Djokovic, who beat Roger Federer to claim the U.S. Open title on Sunday, says parenthood has made him a better player. Since then, the tennis champ has credited fatherhood with improving his game.


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  • 18/74   Little League Team’s Heartwarming Last Act for Dad and His Son
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Gary Parrish, center, died on Thursday of liver cancer.  Gary Parrish was diagnosed with stage IV colon cancer and metastasis to the liver in June.  STORY: Late Dad Makes Stunning Appearance in Photo With Widow, Baby When this year’s baseball season started, 11-year-old Ryan Parrish’s coach, Caison Whatley, who also coached him last season, noticed the boy was unusually distracted.  He’s got a whole lot more on his mind than we could ever have,” Whatley told WSFA.

    Gary Parrish, center, died on Thursday of liver cancer. Gary Parrish was diagnosed with stage IV colon cancer and metastasis to the liver in June. STORY: Late Dad Makes Stunning Appearance in Photo With Widow, Baby When this year’s baseball season started, 11-year-old Ryan Parrish’s coach, Caison Whatley, who also coached him last season, noticed the boy was unusually distracted. He’s got a whole lot more on his mind than we could ever have,” Whatley told WSFA.


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  • 19/74   What We Can Learn About Sibling Rivalry From Serena and Venus Williams
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Serena and Venus Williams share a hug after Serena’s victory over her big sister on Tuesday night. (Photo: Corbis Images) After Serena Williams beat her sister Venus on Tuesday night in a competitive three-set U.S. Open quarterfinals match, the two met at the net and embraced. Venus, the older Williams sibling, whispered to her sister: “I’m so happy for you.”

    Serena and Venus Williams share a hug after Serena’s victory over her big sister on Tuesday night. (Photo: Corbis Images) After Serena Williams beat her sister Venus on Tuesday night in a competitive three-set U.S. Open quarterfinals match, the two met at the net and embraced. Venus, the older Williams sibling, whispered to her sister: “I’m so happy for you.”


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  • 20/74   Michael Sam Makes Up With Dad Who Criticized Him for Being Gay
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Former NFL player Michael Sam, who had been estranged from his father since coming out as gay in February 2014, tweeted this week that the two have spoken for the first time since then. (Photo: Getty Images) When former NFL player Michael Sam announced to the world that he was gay back in February 2014, he was largely praised for his bravery and honesty by fellow players, various celebrities, the NFL, and ESPN — pretty much everyone, it seemed, except his father, Michael Sam Sr., who was quoted at the time as saying, “I’m old school. I’m a man-and-a-woman type of guy.” STORY: NFL Dad Sends Powerful Message by Confiscating Kids’ ‘Trophies for Nothing’ Shortly after, Sam discussed his estrangement from his dad during a segment of Dancing With the Stars, while he was a contestant.

    Former NFL player Michael Sam, who had been estranged from his father since coming out as gay in February 2014, tweeted this week that the two have spoken for the first time since then. (Photo: Getty Images) When former NFL player Michael Sam announced to the world that he was gay back in February 2014, he was largely praised for his bravery and honesty by fellow players, various celebrities, the NFL, and ESPN — pretty much everyone, it seemed, except his father, Michael Sam Sr., who was quoted at the time as saying, “I’m old school. I’m a man-and-a-woman type of guy.” STORY: NFL Dad Sends Powerful Message by Confiscating Kids’ ‘Trophies for Nothing’ Shortly after, Sam discussed his estrangement from his dad during a segment of Dancing With the Stars, while he was a contestant.


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  • 21/74   Amazon Alexa and Google Assistant duke it out at CES 2018

    CES 2018 had more than its fair share of wacky items and compelling gadgets, but one of the biggest trends to emerge, once again, from the popular tech expo was voice-enabled devices. And, of course, it was all about Amazon Alexa and Google Assistant.

    CES 2018 had more than its fair share of wacky items and compelling gadgets, but one of the biggest trends to emerge, once again, from the popular tech expo was voice-enabled devices. And, of course, it was all about Amazon Alexa and Google Assistant.


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  • 22/74   The weirdest tech of CES 2018

    Here are seven items at CES 2018, some of which address legitimate use cases and some of which may be closer to mad-scientist territory.

    Here are seven items at CES 2018, some of which address legitimate use cases and some of which may be closer to mad-scientist territory.


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  • 23/74   Sennheiser co-CEO: Why we're betting on AR and VR with 3-D audio

    At CES 2018, Sennheiser announced two new products that focus on recording or playing back 3-D audio.

    At CES 2018, Sennheiser announced two new products that focus on recording or playing back 3-D audio.


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  • 24/74   Honda wants to prove robots can help you, not kill you

    Honda wants to change your perception of robots. And it's hoping to do so with four new concept robots.

    Honda wants to change your perception of robots. And it's hoping to do so with four new concept robots.


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  • 25/74   Ford will begin testing self-driving cars in an unnamed city

    At CES 2018, Ford announced it is working with a city in which it will operate its self-driving cars. The automaker wouldn't identify the city but did say how autonomous vehicles can change the way people live.

    At CES 2018, Ford announced it is working with a city in which it will operate its self-driving cars. The automaker wouldn't identify the city but did say how autonomous vehicles can change the way people live.


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  • 26/74   Intel wants this drone to fly you around

    Intel is betting that Volocopter 2X will be one of the first passenger-carrying drones to operate in the U.S. A prototype of the pilotless two-seat helicopter-like drone was shown off at CES 2018 in Las Vegas.

    Intel is betting that Volocopter 2X will be one of the first passenger-carrying drones to operate in the U.S. A prototype of the pilotless two-seat helicopter-like drone was shown off at CES 2018 in Las Vegas.


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  • 27/74   AMD CEO on chip security flaws: ‘We're absolutely all over this’

    AMD CEO Lisa Su told Yahoo Finance that the Austin, Texas-based computer and graphics chip company is quickly working to resolve and address a recently-discovered security flaw that affects AMD computer chips.

    AMD CEO Lisa Su told Yahoo Finance that the Austin, Texas-based computer and graphics chip company is quickly working to resolve and address a recently-discovered security flaw that affects AMD computer chips.


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  • 28/74   Nvidia went all out for PC gaming at CES 2018

    Nvidia rolled out a slew of updates for its GeForce line of gaming products at CES 2018 including massive computer screens and cloud game streaming.

    Nvidia rolled out a slew of updates for its GeForce line of gaming products at CES 2018 including massive computer screens and cloud game streaming.


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  • 29/74   What a security expert thought of a few new smart-home devices at CES 2018

    It's hard to figure out which of the connected household devices on display at CES 2018 is worth buying, but it's even more difficult to know if they are secure from hackers. A security expert visits exhibits and tries to help.

    It's hard to figure out which of the connected household devices on display at CES 2018 is worth buying, but it's even more difficult to know if they are secure from hackers. A security expert visits exhibits and tries to help.


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  • 30/74   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


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  • 31/74   Twitter tests longer character limit

    You may soon get to say a lot more on Twitter.  The social media giant announced it is testing a longer character limit.  The change will extend the current 140 characters to 280 for all languages except Japanese, Chinese and Korean.  Users won’t see this change right away, though.  Only a small percentage will be testing it at first, and according to the company, it is just a test and there is no guarantee this change will be available to everyone.  Via Business Insider: http://www.businessinsider. ...

    You may soon get to say a lot more on Twitter. The social media giant announced it is testing a longer character limit. The change will extend the current 140 characters to 280 for all languages except Japanese, Chinese and Korean. Users won’t see this change right away, though. Only a small percentage will be testing it at first, and according to the company, it is just a test and there is no guarantee this change will be available to everyone. Via Business Insider: http://www.businessinsider. ...


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  • 32/74   Mac OS High Sierra makes the Mac a teeny, tiny bit better — for free

    Mac OS High Sierra (macOS 10.13). As the new name suggests, it’s just a refinement of last year’s Mac OS Sierra. In fact, you could sum up what's new in an article about as short as this one.

    Mac OS High Sierra (macOS 10.13). As the new name suggests, it’s just a refinement of last year’s Mac OS Sierra. In fact, you could sum up what's new in an article about as short as this one.


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  • 33/74   Pogue's Basics: Access YouTube's free music and sound effects

    Want to add some cool sound effects or music to your YouTube video (or any video)?

    Want to add some cool sound effects or music to your YouTube video (or any video)?


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  • 34/74   The top 8 features we expect from Apple's next iPhone

    Apple's 10th anniversary iPhone is nearly upon us. Here's everything we expect from what could be Apple's most important product in years.

    Apple's 10th anniversary iPhone is nearly upon us. Here's everything we expect from what could be Apple's most important product in years.


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  • 35/74   Apple's App Store is about to get a lot better with iOS 11

    Apple's App Store is getting a major update in iOS 11, and it's going to make finding new apps far better.

    Apple's App Store is getting a major update in iOS 11, and it's going to make finding new apps far better.


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  • 36/74   Why Equifax needs to give up some details about how it got hacked

    Equifax was hacked and lost the information of 143 million Americans, and they need to tell us how.

    Equifax was hacked and lost the information of 143 million Americans, and they need to tell us how.


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  • 37/74   The best alternatives to Apple's new iPhone

    Apple's iPhone 8 is nearly upon us, but not everyone is psyched. Here are the best alternatives for Apple's upcoming iPhone.

    Apple's iPhone 8 is nearly upon us, but not everyone is psyched. Here are the best alternatives for Apple's upcoming iPhone.


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  • 38/74   Samsung Galaxy Note 8 review: A big phone with bigger expectations

    Samsung's Galaxy Note 8 is a wonderful smartphone, but its high price is a tough pill to swallow.

    Samsung's Galaxy Note 8 is a wonderful smartphone, but its high price is a tough pill to swallow.


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  • 39/74   Pogue's Basics: Link to a Facebook post

    Yahoo's David Pogue has a sneaky way you can create a universal link to a Facebook item so that you can send or post to anyone.

    Yahoo's David Pogue has a sneaky way you can create a universal link to a Facebook item so that you can send or post to anyone.


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  • 40/74   4 amazing new gadgets you can't get in the US

    There are some gadgets that are just too cool for us Americans.

    There are some gadgets that are just too cool for us Americans.


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  • 41/74   Why you might not want a laptop with a 4K display

    More laptop makers are pushing the limits of design and performance, but high-resolution panels are hurting their batteries.

    More laptop makers are pushing the limits of design and performance, but high-resolution panels are hurting their batteries.


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  • 42/74   The most important iPhone features ever

    Apple's iPhone is one of the most important consumer gadgets ever made, and it has a lot to do with these simple features.

    Apple's iPhone is one of the most important consumer gadgets ever made, and it has a lot to do with these simple features.


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  • 43/74   Fall games guide 2017: Your free time is history

    Hope you had a nice outdoorsy summer, because for the foreseeable future, you’re going to have a hard time leaving the living room. The fall video game season is just about underway, and the 2017 edition is keeping with tradition by slinging enough massive games your way to tax both your wallet and your eyesight. From Mario to Marvel, here’s what the next few months have in store. “Destiny 2”

    Hope you had a nice outdoorsy summer, because for the foreseeable future, you’re going to have a hard time leaving the living room. The fall video game season is just about underway, and the 2017 edition is keeping with tradition by slinging enough massive games your way to tax both your wallet and your eyesight. From Mario to Marvel, here’s what the next few months have in store. “Destiny 2”


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  • 44/74   'Mario + Rabbids Kingdom Battle' review: An insane mix of strategy and absurdity

    "Mario + Rabbids Kingdom Battle" offers a ridiculous strategy experience with surprising depth and a pinch of toilet humor.

    "Mario + Rabbids Kingdom Battle" offers a ridiculous strategy experience with surprising depth and a pinch of toilet humor.


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  • 45/74   Hate and violence around the globe? There’s an app for that.

    The plague of “fake news” may be news to Facebook (FB), but it’s a familiar foe to a small non-profit in Washington that’s trying to use mobile apps, big data and social media to promote peace and accountability in places like Iraq, Kenya and Mexico where those technologies have often been abused to spread lies and hate.  The PeaceTech Lab aims to develop “technology that can be applied to tackle the triggers of violence,” president and CEO Sheldon Himelfarb said in an interview at the lab’s Washington headquarters at the U.S. Institute of Peace.

    The plague of “fake news” may be news to Facebook (FB), but it’s a familiar foe to a small non-profit in Washington that’s trying to use mobile apps, big data and social media to promote peace and accountability in places like Iraq, Kenya and Mexico where those technologies have often been abused to spread lies and hate. The PeaceTech Lab aims to develop “technology that can be applied to tackle the triggers of violence,” president and CEO Sheldon Himelfarb said in an interview at the lab’s Washington headquarters at the U.S. Institute of Peace.


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  • 46/74   With U.S. departure, Syria's Manbij braces for upheaval
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    U.S. forces have underpinned stability in Manbij since Islamic State's defeat here in 2016.  Some 30 km (20 miles) from the Turkish border, it occupies a critical spot in the map of the Syrian conflict, near the junction of three separate blocks of territory that form spheres of Russian, Turkish and - for now - U.S. influence.  While U.S. forces have yet to leave, the consequences of Trump's decision are already playing out in Manbij.

    U.S. forces have underpinned stability in Manbij since Islamic State's defeat here in 2016. Some 30 km (20 miles) from the Turkish border, it occupies a critical spot in the map of the Syrian conflict, near the junction of three separate blocks of territory that form spheres of Russian, Turkish and - for now - U.S. influence. While U.S. forces have yet to leave, the consequences of Trump's decision are already playing out in Manbij.


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  • 47/74   California authorities seek motive in triple slaying
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    ORCUTT, Calif. (AP) — California authorities are trying to determine why a Central Coast man stabbed and beat his sister, mother and a third person to death in their home.

    ORCUTT, Calif. (AP) — California authorities are trying to determine why a Central Coast man stabbed and beat his sister, mother and a third person to death in their home.


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  • 48/74   Two-year-old, whose Yemeni mother was initially denied a visa under Trump's travel ban, dies in California hospital
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    After an international outcry, the mother was allowed to travel from Egypt to be with her dying son at California hospital.

    After an international outcry, the mother was allowed to travel from Egypt to be with her dying son at California hospital.


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  • 49/74   Bangladesh opposition calls for fresh election as Sheikh Hasina wins amid violence and vote-rigging claims
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Bangladesh's main opposition called for a fresh vote on Sunday as the country's prime minister, Sheikh Hasina, and her ruling Awami League were declared the winners of an election tainted by violence and vote-rigging allegations. At least 17 people were said to have been killed in election day clashes, while reports flowed in of alleged vote manipulation and people being blocked from entering polling stations by ruling party supporters. As Mrs Hasina's alliance sailed past the 151 seats needed to form a government and headed for a landslide third consecutive term, the country's main opposition leader called for the "farcical" election to be declared void.  Kamal Hossain, head of the Jatiya Oikya Front (JOF), the largest opposition alliance, told a press conference in Dhaka that votes had been "rigged on a massive scale across the country".  He urged Bangladesh's election commission to dismiss the result and call "fresh elections under a non-partisan caretaker government as soon as possible".  Salahuddin Ahmed, a candidate for the Bangladesh Nationalist Party, the largest single party in the opposition alliance, was stabbed in Dhaka as the election unfolded Credit: Reuters Election Commission Secretary Helal Uddin Ahmed finished delivering the results of the voting early on Monday. Ahmed said the ruling Awami League-led alliance won 288 seats while the JOF, led by former president H.M.Ershad, had 20 seats. An opposition alliance led by Mr Hossain had only seven and others got three out of 300 seats. The poll followed a campaign that had been marred by violence and a crackdown on freedom of speech. Human Rights Watch and other international groups had decried repressive measures which they said had created a climate of fear. Some 600,000 security personnel had been deployed for the election, while authorities ordered the shutdown of high speed internet to prevent the spread of "rumours" that might spark unrest. Vehicles in Dhaka burn after an opposition rally which ended with police using tear gas and batons after the election was announced Credit: AFP On Sunday, polling agents alleged that they had stayed away out of fear. Others claimed they had been beaten up and forced out of voting centres. Rumana Mahmood, a JOF candidate in Sirajganj, 68 miles northwest of Dhaka, claimed that 90 percent of her supporters had been prevented from voting for her. "In most cases they were not allowed to enter the voting centres. Police and the ruling Awami League party cadres blocked them,” she alleged to the Telegraph, claiming that supporters of the ruling party had stuffed ballot boxes in favour of the government. Supporters of Bangladesh Awami League march along a street as they take part in a rally ahead of December 30 general election vote Credit:  MUNIR UZ ZAMAN/AFP One 65-year-old woman in Ms Mahmood’s constituency claimed that the police had not allowed her to vote freely. "We were around 20 or 25 women from the same locality. The policemen at the gate of the centre said that he would allow us inside if we voted for the boat (symbol of the Awami League),” she said."In my locality there are hundreds of people who have not been allowed in any voting centre today."  Bangladesh has become increasingly authoritarian under Mrs Hasina’s rule, moving closer towards a de-facto one-party state while Begum Khaleda Zia, her arch-rival, and leader of the largest opposition party, the Bangladesh National Party, serves a lengthy prison sentence on corruption charges. 

    Bangladesh's main opposition called for a fresh vote on Sunday as the country's prime minister, Sheikh Hasina, and her ruling Awami League were declared the winners of an election tainted by violence and vote-rigging allegations. At least 17 people were said to have been killed in election day clashes, while reports flowed in of alleged vote manipulation and people being blocked from entering polling stations by ruling party supporters. As Mrs Hasina's alliance sailed past the 151 seats needed to form a government and headed for a landslide third consecutive term, the country's main opposition leader called for the "farcical" election to be declared void.  Kamal Hossain, head of the Jatiya Oikya Front (JOF), the largest opposition alliance, told a press conference in Dhaka that votes had been "rigged on a massive scale across the country".  He urged Bangladesh's election commission to dismiss the result and call "fresh elections under a non-partisan caretaker government as soon as possible".  Salahuddin Ahmed, a candidate for the Bangladesh Nationalist Party, the largest single party in the opposition alliance, was stabbed in Dhaka as the election unfolded Credit: Reuters Election Commission Secretary Helal Uddin Ahmed finished delivering the results of the voting early on Monday. Ahmed said the ruling Awami League-led alliance won 288 seats while the JOF, led by former president H.M.Ershad, had 20 seats. An opposition alliance led by Mr Hossain had only seven and others got three out of 300 seats. The poll followed a campaign that had been marred by violence and a crackdown on freedom of speech. Human Rights Watch and other international groups had decried repressive measures which they said had created a climate of fear. Some 600,000 security personnel had been deployed for the election, while authorities ordered the shutdown of high speed internet to prevent the spread of "rumours" that might spark unrest. Vehicles in Dhaka burn after an opposition rally which ended with police using tear gas and batons after the election was announced Credit: AFP On Sunday, polling agents alleged that they had stayed away out of fear. Others claimed they had been beaten up and forced out of voting centres. Rumana Mahmood, a JOF candidate in Sirajganj, 68 miles northwest of Dhaka, claimed that 90 percent of her supporters had been prevented from voting for her. "In most cases they were not allowed to enter the voting centres. Police and the ruling Awami League party cadres blocked them,” she alleged to the Telegraph, claiming that supporters of the ruling party had stuffed ballot boxes in favour of the government. Supporters of Bangladesh Awami League march along a street as they take part in a rally ahead of December 30 general election vote Credit:  MUNIR UZ ZAMAN/AFP One 65-year-old woman in Ms Mahmood’s constituency claimed that the police had not allowed her to vote freely. "We were around 20 or 25 women from the same locality. The policemen at the gate of the centre said that he would allow us inside if we voted for the boat (symbol of the Awami League),” she said."In my locality there are hundreds of people who have not been allowed in any voting centre today."  Bangladesh has become increasingly authoritarian under Mrs Hasina’s rule, moving closer towards a de-facto one-party state while Begum Khaleda Zia, her arch-rival, and leader of the largest opposition party, the Bangladesh National Party, serves a lengthy prison sentence on corruption charges. 


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  • 50/74   Bali's Agung volcano spews ash in fresh eruption
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A volcano on the Indonesian holiday island of Bali erupted Sunday, belching ash high into the air and over nearby villages as officials warned tourists to keep clear of the area.  Mount Agung has been erupting periodically since it rumbled back to life in 2017, when it grounded hundreds of flights and left 120,000 visitors stranded.  'Residents near Mount Agung as well as climbers and tourists should not carry out any activity in the danger zone or within four-kilometre radius from the crater,' the centre said in a statement.

    A volcano on the Indonesian holiday island of Bali erupted Sunday, belching ash high into the air and over nearby villages as officials warned tourists to keep clear of the area. Mount Agung has been erupting periodically since it rumbled back to life in 2017, when it grounded hundreds of flights and left 120,000 visitors stranded. 'Residents near Mount Agung as well as climbers and tourists should not carry out any activity in the danger zone or within four-kilometre radius from the crater,' the centre said in a statement.


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  • 51/74   How F-22 and F-35 'DNA' Will Make the 'New' F-16 Viper a Real Killer
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Here is all we know. 

    Here is all we know. 


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  • 52/74   Russia: 4 dead in apartment collapse, apparent gas explosion
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    MOSCOW (AP) — At least four people died Monday when an apartment building's section collapsed after an apparent gas explosion in Russia's Ural Mountains region, and hundreds of rescuers searched for survivors under the rubble in the frigid weather.

    MOSCOW (AP) — At least four people died Monday when an apartment building's section collapsed after an apparent gas explosion in Russia's Ural Mountains region, and hundreds of rescuers searched for survivors under the rubble in the frigid weather.


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  • 53/74   8th Largest Mega Millions Jackpot in History Up for Grabs on New Year's Day
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The jackpot climbed to $415 million in a drawing set to take place Tuesday

    The jackpot climbed to $415 million in a drawing set to take place Tuesday


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  • 54/74   Key Senator Says Trump Taking Seriously a Shift in Syria Plan
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Graham, a South Carolina Republican who sits on the Senate Armed Forces Committee, has been a vocal critic of Trump’s plan to pull forces from the conflict.  “I feel better about Syria than I felt before I had lunch,” Graham told reporters after leaving the White House.  “I think the president is taking this really seriously, and the trip to Iraq was well timed.” Trump has forged a plan with his generals in the field that “makes sense,” Graham added.

    Graham, a South Carolina Republican who sits on the Senate Armed Forces Committee, has been a vocal critic of Trump’s plan to pull forces from the conflict. “I feel better about Syria than I felt before I had lunch,” Graham told reporters after leaving the White House. “I think the president is taking this really seriously, and the trip to Iraq was well timed.” Trump has forged a plan with his generals in the field that “makes sense,” Graham added.


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  • 55/74   Germany: Drugged driver forces car onto airport tarmac
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    BERLIN (AP) — A man forced open a locked gate on the security perimeter of Hannover Airport in northern Germany and drove a car onto the airfield Saturday before coming to a halt underneath an airliner and being detained, police said.

    BERLIN (AP) — A man forced open a locked gate on the security perimeter of Hannover Airport in northern Germany and drove a car onto the airfield Saturday before coming to a halt underneath an airliner and being detained, police said.


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  • 56/74   Ocado Pips Adyen to Take Crown of 2018's Best European Stock
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    In the end, U.K. grocery delivery company Ocado Group Plc took the crown, with a 99 percent gain for the year putting it just ahead of a 98 percent advance by 2018’s IPO star Adyen NV.  Ocado has long been among 2018’s top stocks, but its share price surge cooled a little in the second half of the year on a dearth of new deals with international retailers to follow those which had lit up the first half.  New agreements, like the one signed with U.S. retailer Kroger Co. which helped its stock rocket, will be the key aspect of Ocado news flow going forward, Morgan Stanley said in a note after this month’s fourth-quarter update.

    In the end, U.K. grocery delivery company Ocado Group Plc took the crown, with a 99 percent gain for the year putting it just ahead of a 98 percent advance by 2018’s IPO star Adyen NV. Ocado has long been among 2018’s top stocks, but its share price surge cooled a little in the second half of the year on a dearth of new deals with international retailers to follow those which had lit up the first half. New agreements, like the one signed with U.S. retailer Kroger Co. which helped its stock rocket, will be the key aspect of Ocado news flow going forward, Morgan Stanley said in a note after this month’s fourth-quarter update.


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  • 57/74   Iran's Revolutionary Guards plan to upgrade speed boats with stealth technology
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Iran's Revolutionary Guards said on Monday they plan to upgrade their speed boats in the Gulf with radar-evading stealth technology and new missile launchers as tensions rise between Tehran and Washington in the vital oil shipping route.  Ending a long absence of U.S. aircraft carriers in the region, the USS John C. Stennis entered the Gulf last week, and was shadowed by the Revolutionary Guards' speed boats.

    Iran's Revolutionary Guards said on Monday they plan to upgrade their speed boats in the Gulf with radar-evading stealth technology and new missile launchers as tensions rise between Tehran and Washington in the vital oil shipping route. Ending a long absence of U.S. aircraft carriers in the region, the USS John C. Stennis entered the Gulf last week, and was shadowed by the Revolutionary Guards' speed boats.


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  • 58/74   Brent crude rises over $1, but set for first yearly drop since 2015
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Oil prices rose more than 2 percent on the final day of the year, mirroring gains in stock markets, but were on track for their first annual decline in three years as concerns of a persistent supply glut lingered.  Hints of progress on a possible U.S.-China trade deal, with U.S. President Donald Trump saying he had a 'very good call' with Chinese President Xi Jinping, helped bolster sentiment for oil.  Brent crude futures  were up $1.53 cents at $54.74 a barrel by 1205 GMT.

    Oil prices rose more than 2 percent on the final day of the year, mirroring gains in stock markets, but were on track for their first annual decline in three years as concerns of a persistent supply glut lingered. Hints of progress on a possible U.S.-China trade deal, with U.S. President Donald Trump saying he had a 'very good call' with Chinese President Xi Jinping, helped bolster sentiment for oil. Brent crude futures were up $1.53 cents at $54.74 a barrel by 1205 GMT.


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  • 59/74   2018 was one of the least active years on record for US tornadoes; No twister rated EF4 or higher
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    In a year that featured catastrophic hurricanes and historic wildfires, 2018 could close out as one of the quietest and least-deadly years for tornadoes in United States history.

    In a year that featured catastrophic hurricanes and historic wildfires, 2018 could close out as one of the quietest and least-deadly years for tornadoes in United States history.


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  • 60/74   AT&T wireless charging battery to power smartphones and watches
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Entries in both the Federal Communications Commission on Saturday and the Wireless Power Consortium two weeks ago reveal and confirm AT&T's seemingly finished development of a portable Power Drum.  Fear not, AT&T is working on a compact battery capable of recharging both simultaneously, as confirmed by the device's entries in the FCC and Wireless Power Consortium databases.  This device, whose base is about six by six centimeters and height looks about to be the same, can potentially charge any Qi-compatible smartphone and smartwatch whether you're loyal to Apple, Samsung, or Asus.

    Entries in both the Federal Communications Commission on Saturday and the Wireless Power Consortium two weeks ago reveal and confirm AT&T's seemingly finished development of a portable Power Drum. Fear not, AT&T is working on a compact battery capable of recharging both simultaneously, as confirmed by the device's entries in the FCC and Wireless Power Consortium databases. This device, whose base is about six by six centimeters and height looks about to be the same, can potentially charge any Qi-compatible smartphone and smartwatch whether you're loyal to Apple, Samsung, or Asus.


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  • 61/74   Mild weather to highlight 118th Mummers Parade in Philadelphia
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Dry, mild and gusty weather is expected for the 118th annual Mummers Parade in Philadelphia on Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019.

    Dry, mild and gusty weather is expected for the 118th annual Mummers Parade in Philadelphia on Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019.


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  • 62/74   UK invests in micro-robots which could make roadworks a thing of the past
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Roadworks may soon be a thing of the past as small robots will be sent down pipes to make repairs instead of digging up roads. Four universities in the UK are working together to develop a collection of “insect-like” robots that will fix and inspect underground pipes. The robots, around one centimetre in size, will be able to fly, swim and crawl through pipes used for water, gas and sewage. They will also allow utility companies to make a “Google Maps-style” plan of their pipe networks as the devices travel underground.    The Government has now invested £26.6m in the project, as it hopes the technology will put an end to the disruption caused by 1.5 million road excavations that take place every year. These roadworks cost the country more than £5bn a year in traffic closures and lost business, according to the Government.   The scientists behind the project believe the robots will also be able to tap the pipes to understand their condition, using the sound and vibrations to analysis the quality of the pipe walls. This will mean workmen will not have to examine the exterior of the pipes. “It is like keyhole surgery for the ground, so instead of cutting up the whole road, send a small robot down a pipe and conduct repairs and inspections,” Professor Kirill Horoshenkov, from the University of Sheffield, told The Daily Telegraph. The academic, who specialises in acoustics, explains that, as they will be going through dark pipes, fitting them with cameras will not be an option. So instead the robots will use sound to navigate and investigate the pipes, using a system called sonar. Sonar works by detecting objects through water by emitting sound pulses and then measuring how long it takes for the pulse to come back to the robot. The delay tells the robot how far away it is from the object that the soundwave deflected from. Technology intelligence - newsletter promo - EOA Professor Horoshenkov claims the robots could also have applications in aerospace, nuclear reactors and medicine. He said his colleagues were speaking to people in these sectors about using the robots in these different environments. The technology, which could also be used to remove blockages in pipes, is expected to be in operation in five years time. The pipe robots will come in two different types, Professor Horoshenkov explains. The first will be an “inspection bot” that is agile enough to easily examine pipes quickly and autonomously, and the second a slightly larger robot, dubbed a “worker bot”, that will have more energy and materials to carry out maintenance work. This robot is more likely to be remote-controlled from humans on the service, who will use cement mix and adhesives to repair pipes.   Additionally it could use a high powered jet to remove sediment that might be building up in the pipes. These exact tools are still being developed by the researchers. Other instruments or designs could be created over the next five years of development.    Rise of the machines | Industrial robot sales The robots will be developed by researchers at universities in Bristol, Birmingham, Leeds and Sheffield. The project is one of fifteen schemes, being backed by the Government, to use robotics and artificial intelligence to overcome problems brought about by difficult or hazardous work conditions. These additional schemes will receive £93m in funding to create robots to take people out of dangerous environments and go into areas beyond human limits, for industries such as offshore energy, nuclear energy, space and deep mining. Science Minister Chris Skidmore said: “While for now we can only dream of a world without roadworks disrupting our lives, these pipe-repairing robots herald the start of technology that could make that dream a reality in the future. “From deploying robots in our pipe network so cutting down traffic delays, to using robots in workplaces to keep people safer, this new technology could change the world we live in for the better. Experts in our top UK universities across the country are well-equipped to develop this innovative new technology.”

    Roadworks may soon be a thing of the past as small robots will be sent down pipes to make repairs instead of digging up roads. Four universities in the UK are working together to develop a collection of “insect-like” robots that will fix and inspect underground pipes. The robots, around one centimetre in size, will be able to fly, swim and crawl through pipes used for water, gas and sewage. They will also allow utility companies to make a “Google Maps-style” plan of their pipe networks as the devices travel underground.    The Government has now invested £26.6m in the project, as it hopes the technology will put an end to the disruption caused by 1.5 million road excavations that take place every year. These roadworks cost the country more than £5bn a year in traffic closures and lost business, according to the Government.   The scientists behind the project believe the robots will also be able to tap the pipes to understand their condition, using the sound and vibrations to analysis the quality of the pipe walls. This will mean workmen will not have to examine the exterior of the pipes. “It is like keyhole surgery for the ground, so instead of cutting up the whole road, send a small robot down a pipe and conduct repairs and inspections,” Professor Kirill Horoshenkov, from the University of Sheffield, told The Daily Telegraph. The academic, who specialises in acoustics, explains that, as they will be going through dark pipes, fitting them with cameras will not be an option. So instead the robots will use sound to navigate and investigate the pipes, using a system called sonar. Sonar works by detecting objects through water by emitting sound pulses and then measuring how long it takes for the pulse to come back to the robot. The delay tells the robot how far away it is from the object that the soundwave deflected from. Technology intelligence - newsletter promo - EOA Professor Horoshenkov claims the robots could also have applications in aerospace, nuclear reactors and medicine. He said his colleagues were speaking to people in these sectors about using the robots in these different environments. The technology, which could also be used to remove blockages in pipes, is expected to be in operation in five years time. The pipe robots will come in two different types, Professor Horoshenkov explains. The first will be an “inspection bot” that is agile enough to easily examine pipes quickly and autonomously, and the second a slightly larger robot, dubbed a “worker bot”, that will have more energy and materials to carry out maintenance work. This robot is more likely to be remote-controlled from humans on the service, who will use cement mix and adhesives to repair pipes.   Additionally it could use a high powered jet to remove sediment that might be building up in the pipes. These exact tools are still being developed by the researchers. Other instruments or designs could be created over the next five years of development.    Rise of the machines | Industrial robot sales The robots will be developed by researchers at universities in Bristol, Birmingham, Leeds and Sheffield. The project is one of fifteen schemes, being backed by the Government, to use robotics and artificial intelligence to overcome problems brought about by difficult or hazardous work conditions. These additional schemes will receive £93m in funding to create robots to take people out of dangerous environments and go into areas beyond human limits, for industries such as offshore energy, nuclear energy, space and deep mining. Science Minister Chris Skidmore said: “While for now we can only dream of a world without roadworks disrupting our lives, these pipe-repairing robots herald the start of technology that could make that dream a reality in the future. “From deploying robots in our pipe network so cutting down traffic delays, to using robots in workplaces to keep people safer, this new technology could change the world we live in for the better. Experts in our top UK universities across the country are well-equipped to develop this innovative new technology.”


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  • 63/74   Chuck Todd Refuses To Give Air Time To Climate Deniers: 'The Science Is Settled'
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    In a special "Meet the Press" episode dedicated to global warming, NBC's Chuck

    In a special "Meet the Press" episode dedicated to global warming, NBC's Chuck


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  • 64/74   Injection to halt the progress of Alzheimer’s 'available within decade'
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    An injection capable of halting the progress of Alzheimer’s could be available to patients within a decade, Britain’s leading dementia organisation predicts. The Alzheimer’s Society says a series of recent breakthroughs in treatments that disrupt harmful genes has brought scientists to a “tipping point” in their fight against the disease. For decades, researchers have sought without success a treatment for Alzheimer’s based on targeting damaging proteins that build up in the brain. However, the “remarkable” results of a recent trial which set out to silence the troublesome genes which regulate proteins in children with a rare spinal condition, has convinced scientists they could adopt the same approach in people at high risk of dementia In an interview with The Daily Telegraph, Dr James Pickett, head of research at the Alzheimer’s Society, said an injection to the spine which prevents certain forms of the disease taking hold could be available in under 10 years. The treatment, using so-called “molecular scissors”, would not alter a person’s fundamental genetic code, but rather the way specific genes known to play a role in dementia communicate. Such a drug would principally benefit around 18,000 people in the UK with a high risk of hereditary Alzheimer’s, approximately 2 per cent of the overall population of those with the degenerative disease. These include early onset Alzheimer’s which can affect people as early as in their thirties. There is currently no cure for any form of the disease. “2019 is a tipping point for dementia gene therapy,” said Dr Pickett. “There are lots of different pieces of the puzzle coming together. “We’ve got all of this genetic knowledge, like cancer researchers did 30 years ago, and we’re now investing in understanding it and exploiting it.” The early signs of dementia Currently scientists know of 25 genes which significantly increase a person’s risk of Alzheimer’s, up from just one in 2012. Researchers increasingly believe that the expression of these genes could be manipulated by means of CRISPR gene editing technology, which exploits a process used by the immune system to cut up the DNA of invading bacteria. The technology gained widespread publicity last month after He Jiankui, a Chinese scientist, claimed to have used it to help create the world’s first genetically-edited babies. The development would have been illegal in the UK and was roundly condemned by the scientific community. By contrast, the proposed Alzheimer’s treatments would be in the form of “messenger therapies”, targeting the way genes regulate the activity of damaging proteins, such as tau and Apo, in the brain. Children suffering from spinal muscular atrophy who were given that style of treatment are currently still able to walk and are not relying on a ventilator, years after they were expected to have progressed to a debilitated state. Similarly, a gene therapy trial at University College London aimed at reducing the levels of toxic protein in Huntington disease patients has also returned promising results. “What we learn from one disease we can take on to another,” said Dr Pickett. “There is going to be a leap of faith moment. “There is a global network of people with dominantly inherited Alzheimer’s disease genes and these unfortunate people are very willing to take part in trials.” He said the priority should be to attract CRISPR scientists currently working on the technology in other fields, such as fertility, to turn their attentions towards dementia in order to improve its precision. Dr Pickett added that for non-familial or “sporadic” Alzheimer’s disease, the form suffered by the majority of patients which usually develops after 65, preventative treatments remain “further away”. However, he pointed to a current trial targeting tau which concludes in January 2020 as a potential building block for more broadly applicable therapies. The new-found optimism follows a series of blows to Alzheimer’s research over recent years where high-profile trials returned disappointing results. In January the pharmaceuticals giant Pfizer announced it was pulling out of research and development into an Alzheimer’s drug. There are currently around 850,000 people in the UK living with some form of dementia. Around one in 14 over the age of 65 will develop the disease, with one in six over the age of 80. Case study: Husband diagnosed with Alzheimer's at 36 Daniel was diagnosed with dementia in September 2017 after experiencing problems with his short term memory Last year, Daniel Bradbury, 31, was diagnosed with a rare form of Alzheimer’s caused by a mutation in the gene called PSEN1. He inherited the gene from his father, Adrian, who died from the condition himself aged just 36. Daniel struggles with his mobility and short-term memory as a result of his condition, and is now unable to work his previous job as a landscape gardener.  He has also experienced changes to his behaviour and mood. Daniel’s wife, Jordan - a medical photographer - said: “It breaks my heart to see my husband so unwell. For Daniel, it's mentally exhausting. His brain is dying and he's mentally exhausted by that. It's kind of mental torture for you too because you're seeing your loved one decline.” “I wouldn't wish this condition on anybody. It's this massive wedge and elephant in the room and you try and have these non-dementia days but it's here, you see it, you hear it, you feel it in our house. It's like this horrible dark cloud over our family all the time.” There is a 50 per cent chance that Daniel and Jordan's two-year-old twins, Lola and Jasper, have inherited the PSEN1 gene. Jordan is worried not only for her husband, but also for her children. Jordan believes that if something doesn’t change in the development of Alzheimer treatment, history will simply repeat itself. "I'm going to be caring for my children who will have Alzheimer's in their early thirties. I could lose my entire family unit before I retire. That for me is a very scary feeling, a very scary reality,” she adds. "I want there to be something available for my children should they need it.” The hope for many Alzheimer sufferers and their relatives is that a cure will eventually be found, not just a treatment to slow down the disease. “Treatments are great, but for me, as somebody who is watching their partner live with the condition and manage it every day, nothing short of a cure will do.”

    An injection capable of halting the progress of Alzheimer’s could be available to patients within a decade, Britain’s leading dementia organisation predicts. The Alzheimer’s Society says a series of recent breakthroughs in treatments that disrupt harmful genes has brought scientists to a “tipping point” in their fight against the disease. For decades, researchers have sought without success a treatment for Alzheimer’s based on targeting damaging proteins that build up in the brain. However, the “remarkable” results of a recent trial which set out to silence the troublesome genes which regulate proteins in children with a rare spinal condition, has convinced scientists they could adopt the same approach in people at high risk of dementia In an interview with The Daily Telegraph, Dr James Pickett, head of research at the Alzheimer’s Society, said an injection to the spine which prevents certain forms of the disease taking hold could be available in under 10 years. The treatment, using so-called “molecular scissors”, would not alter a person’s fundamental genetic code, but rather the way specific genes known to play a role in dementia communicate. Such a drug would principally benefit around 18,000 people in the UK with a high risk of hereditary Alzheimer’s, approximately 2 per cent of the overall population of those with the degenerative disease. These include early onset Alzheimer’s which can affect people as early as in their thirties. There is currently no cure for any form of the disease. “2019 is a tipping point for dementia gene therapy,” said Dr Pickett. “There are lots of different pieces of the puzzle coming together. “We’ve got all of this genetic knowledge, like cancer researchers did 30 years ago, and we’re now investing in understanding it and exploiting it.” The early signs of dementia Currently scientists know of 25 genes which significantly increase a person’s risk of Alzheimer’s, up from just one in 2012. Researchers increasingly believe that the expression of these genes could be manipulated by means of CRISPR gene editing technology, which exploits a process used by the immune system to cut up the DNA of invading bacteria. The technology gained widespread publicity last month after He Jiankui, a Chinese scientist, claimed to have used it to help create the world’s first genetically-edited babies. The development would have been illegal in the UK and was roundly condemned by the scientific community. By contrast, the proposed Alzheimer’s treatments would be in the form of “messenger therapies”, targeting the way genes regulate the activity of damaging proteins, such as tau and Apo, in the brain. Children suffering from spinal muscular atrophy who were given that style of treatment are currently still able to walk and are not relying on a ventilator, years after they were expected to have progressed to a debilitated state. Similarly, a gene therapy trial at University College London aimed at reducing the levels of toxic protein in Huntington disease patients has also returned promising results. “What we learn from one disease we can take on to another,” said Dr Pickett. “There is going to be a leap of faith moment. “There is a global network of people with dominantly inherited Alzheimer’s disease genes and these unfortunate people are very willing to take part in trials.” He said the priority should be to attract CRISPR scientists currently working on the technology in other fields, such as fertility, to turn their attentions towards dementia in order to improve its precision. Dr Pickett added that for non-familial or “sporadic” Alzheimer’s disease, the form suffered by the majority of patients which usually develops after 65, preventative treatments remain “further away”. However, he pointed to a current trial targeting tau which concludes in January 2020 as a potential building block for more broadly applicable therapies. The new-found optimism follows a series of blows to Alzheimer’s research over recent years where high-profile trials returned disappointing results. In January the pharmaceuticals giant Pfizer announced it was pulling out of research and development into an Alzheimer’s drug. There are currently around 850,000 people in the UK living with some form of dementia. Around one in 14 over the age of 65 will develop the disease, with one in six over the age of 80. Case study: Husband diagnosed with Alzheimer's at 36 Daniel was diagnosed with dementia in September 2017 after experiencing problems with his short term memory Last year, Daniel Bradbury, 31, was diagnosed with a rare form of Alzheimer’s caused by a mutation in the gene called PSEN1. He inherited the gene from his father, Adrian, who died from the condition himself aged just 36. Daniel struggles with his mobility and short-term memory as a result of his condition, and is now unable to work his previous job as a landscape gardener.  He has also experienced changes to his behaviour and mood. Daniel’s wife, Jordan - a medical photographer - said: “It breaks my heart to see my husband so unwell. For Daniel, it's mentally exhausting. His brain is dying and he's mentally exhausted by that. It's kind of mental torture for you too because you're seeing your loved one decline.” “I wouldn't wish this condition on anybody. It's this massive wedge and elephant in the room and you try and have these non-dementia days but it's here, you see it, you hear it, you feel it in our house. It's like this horrible dark cloud over our family all the time.” There is a 50 per cent chance that Daniel and Jordan's two-year-old twins, Lola and Jasper, have inherited the PSEN1 gene. Jordan is worried not only for her husband, but also for her children. Jordan believes that if something doesn’t change in the development of Alzheimer treatment, history will simply repeat itself. "I'm going to be caring for my children who will have Alzheimer's in their early thirties. I could lose my entire family unit before I retire. That for me is a very scary feeling, a very scary reality,” she adds. "I want there to be something available for my children should they need it.” The hope for many Alzheimer sufferers and their relatives is that a cure will eventually be found, not just a treatment to slow down the disease. “Treatments are great, but for me, as somebody who is watching their partner live with the condition and manage it every day, nothing short of a cure will do.”


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  • 65/74   NASA spaceship zooms toward farthest world ever photographed
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    A NASA spaceship is zooming toward the farthest, and quite possibly the oldest, cosmic body ever photographed by humankind, a tiny, distant world called Ultima Thule some four billion miles (6.4 billion kilometers) away.  The US space agency will ring in the New Year with a live online broadcast to mark historic flyby of the mysterious object in a dark and frigid region of space known as the Kuiper Belt at 12:33 am January 1 (0533 GMT Tuesday).  A guitar anthem recorded by legendary Queen guitarist Brian May -- who also holds an advanced degree in astrophysics -- will be released just after midnight to accompany a video simulation of the flyby, as NASA commentators describe the close pass on www.nasa.gov/nasalive.

    A NASA spaceship is zooming toward the farthest, and quite possibly the oldest, cosmic body ever photographed by humankind, a tiny, distant world called Ultima Thule some four billion miles (6.4 billion kilometers) away. The US space agency will ring in the New Year with a live online broadcast to mark historic flyby of the mysterious object in a dark and frigid region of space known as the Kuiper Belt at 12:33 am January 1 (0533 GMT Tuesday). A guitar anthem recorded by legendary Queen guitarist Brian May -- who also holds an advanced degree in astrophysics -- will be released just after midnight to accompany a video simulation of the flyby, as NASA commentators describe the close pass on www.nasa.gov/nasalive.


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  • 66/74   How Many Calories Should I Eat to Lose Weight?
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    Spoiler: quality matters more than quantity.

    Spoiler: quality matters more than quantity.


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  • 67/74   Myths and Facts About Vaccines for Children
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    Cases of measles—which had been declining for two decades—spiked in 2017, according to a new report from the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CD...

    Cases of measles—which had been declining for two decades—spiked in 2017, according to a new report from the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CD...


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  • 68/74   These Are the Best Ways to Lose Weight in Your Face
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    A few all-natural tweaks may be just what you need.

    A few all-natural tweaks may be just what you need.


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  • 69/74   When You Don't Have to Finish Your Antibiotics
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    For decades, doctors and public-health officials have given those who have been prescribed antibiotics the same advice: Finish the whole bottle—even if you’re feeling better. But an analysis publ...

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  • 70/74   Guard Your Health Before and After a Natural Disaster
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Hurricane season is far from over on the East Coast of the U.S., and wildfires continue to rage across the west. If you're facing a storm or other major disaster, there are a number of measures y...

    Hurricane season is far from over on the East Coast of the U.S., and wildfires continue to rage across the west. If you're facing a storm or other major disaster, there are a number of measures y...


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  • 71/74   What to Feed Your Family When the Power Goes Out
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...


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  • 72/74   When Disaster Strikes: What to Put in Your Medication Go Bag
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    A well-stocked medication go bag can be used to soothe a cut or burn—or to save your life during a hurricane, flood, fire, or other emergency.   But it’s important not to wait until you’re faced ...

    A well-stocked medication go bag can be used to soothe a cut or burn—or to save your life during a hurricane, flood, fire, or other emergency.   But it’s important not to wait until you’re faced ...


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  • 73/74   9 Surprisingly Salty Foods
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Almost half the sodium in the American diet comes from just 10 foods. Some of them, such as cheese, pizza, and salty snacks, are obvious. But sometimes sodium hides where you least expect it—and ...

    Almost half the sodium in the American diet comes from just 10 foods. Some of them, such as cheese, pizza, and salty snacks, are obvious. But sometimes sodium hides where you least expect it—and ...


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  • 74/74   5 Turkey Cooking Tips That'll Guarantee You Have the Perfect Bird
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    There's no need to wing it at Thanksgiving this year.

    There's no need to wing it at Thanksgiving this year.


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