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News Slideshows (08/14/2019 03 hours)


  • 1/77   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


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    Press Review


    Prince Eric   Wii U   Demi and Jordan   Barstool   Four Loko   Dwight Howard   Gary Apple   Joe Ross   Max Fried   Dave Portnoy   bad for america   Andrew Luck   Mr. Basco   Jake Rogers   Grapefruit   Mean Street Posse   Magic Johnson   Victor Robles   Welcome to Miami   Joe Torre   Chrisley Knows Best   Pears   
  • 2/77   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


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  • 3/77   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


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  • 4/77   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


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  • 5/77   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


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  • 6/77   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


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  • 7/77   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


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  • 8/77   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


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  • 9/77   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


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  • 10/77   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


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  • 11/77   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


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  • 12/77   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


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  • 13/77   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


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  • 14/77   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named.  Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does.  At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


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  • 15/77   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


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  • 16/77   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


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  • 17/77   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


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  • 18/77   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


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  • 19/77   Trump assailed for hands-off stance on Hong Kong
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    President Donald Trump was assailed Tuesday for his hands-off approach to pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong, avoiding criticizing Beijing even as he cited US intelligence reports of Chinese troops moving to the territory's border.  Critics on both sides of the political spectrum accused Trump of abandoning longstanding US policy to support democratic movements and giving Beijing a green light to intervene in one of the world's most important financial and trade centers, a semi-autonomous Chinese region.  'I hope it works out for everybody including China.

    President Donald Trump was assailed Tuesday for his hands-off approach to pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong, avoiding criticizing Beijing even as he cited US intelligence reports of Chinese troops moving to the territory's border. Critics on both sides of the political spectrum accused Trump of abandoning longstanding US policy to support democratic movements and giving Beijing a green light to intervene in one of the world's most important financial and trade centers, a semi-autonomous Chinese region. 'I hope it works out for everybody including China.


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  • 20/77   Why Leoch International Technology Limited (HKG:842) Is A Top Dividend Stock
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Could Leoch International Technology Limited (HKG:842) be an attractive dividend share to own for the long haul...

    Could Leoch International Technology Limited (HKG:842) be an attractive dividend share to own for the long haul...


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  • 21/77   The Latest: Nevada AG says plutonium fight will continue
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Nevada's attorney general says he'll continue to pursue all legal options to block unlawful shipments of weapons-grade plutonium to a site near Las Vegas after a U.S. appeals court denied the state's appeal in an ongoing battle with the federal government.  It said the matter is moot because the Energy Department already shipped the radioactive material in question and has promised no more will be hauled to Nevada.

    Nevada's attorney general says he'll continue to pursue all legal options to block unlawful shipments of weapons-grade plutonium to a site near Las Vegas after a U.S. appeals court denied the state's appeal in an ongoing battle with the federal government. It said the matter is moot because the Energy Department already shipped the radioactive material in question and has promised no more will be hauled to Nevada.


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  • 22/77   Is Waterco (ASX:WAT) A Risky Investment?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Warren Buffett famously said, 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' When we think about how risky a company...

    Warren Buffett famously said, 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' When we think about how risky a company...


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  • 23/77   Japan Stock Traders Look Past Bad Earnings to Bet on Turnaround
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Japan’s equity investors are looking beyond the most disappointing earnings in three years, betting on a turnaround in the market on the view that valuations are cheap and the Bank of Japan will step up easing.Some 60% of the 1,572 companies that reported first fiscal quarter earnings as of Aug. 6 are behind schedule, achieving less than 25% their annual net profit targets, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Analysis from Mitsubishi UFJ Morgan Stanley shows that the proportion of the firms beating earnings expectations dropped to the lowest in fiscal 2017.Still, stock bulls are quick to point out that shares are getting cheap now that the Topix has erased its year-to-date gain. Japan’s benchmark has been one of the worst-performers among the 24 developed markets tracked by Bloomberg for months. Its forward P/E ratio dropped to around 12 times, compared with a five-year average of 13.4 times.“It’s definitely worth dipping in,” Mikio Kumada, a Hong Kong based global strategist at LGT Capital Partners, said in a phone interview. “I do expect Japan to be performing -- maybe not outperforming globally in the second half -- but certainly catching up with the other markets.”According to Kumada, the equity market in Japan shouldn’t be falling so far behind the U.S. and China, given that monetary policies are accomodative at home and abroad. He also expects a bottoming out of China’s economy to support growth in Japan. Both the S&P 500 Index and Shanghai Composite Index are up more than 10% this year.For those investors worried about the yen’s strength, Daiwa Securities Co. says don’t fret too much. The currency’s surge to a seven-month high against the dollar isn’t drastic enough to alter the outlook for profit growth for the second half of this fiscal year, according to the firm. The yen is at about 106.4 per dollar, versus the rate of 108 forecast in many companies’ annual results.Daiwa Securities estimates that companies on the first-section of the Tokyo Stock Exchange are likely to report an average growth of 12.5% in ordinary profit in the second half. While that is lower than its previous estimates, it would be a turnaround from profit declines expected for the first half ending September. The forecasts exclude figures for SoftBank Group Corp. and Tokyo Electric Power Co.“We’re looking at a turnaround in earnings in the second half of this fiscal year,” said Hideyuki Ishiguro, a senior strategist at Daiwa Securities in Tokyo. “The recovery scenario is intact.”Not everyone is that optimistic. Mitsushige Akino, the executive officer at Ichiyoshi Asset Management Co., said the market lacks confidence to boost stock prices. The leading coincident index, a key economic measure, fell in June to a level unseen since the wake of the financial crisis, fueling concern about the economy before an October sales-tax hike.Some bulls like LGT’s Kumada are betting the BOJ will come to the equity market’s rescue. The central bank said last month it’s “more positive” about adding monetary stimulus as it eyes a global shift toward interest rate cuts. Governor Haruhiko Kuroda kept policy unchanged in July, while trimming inflation forecasts.READ MORE: BOJ Watchers See Growing Chance of More Stimulus in September“As bottom-up investors, we are looking for opportunities to buy stocks at prices which do not factor in future earnings growth,” said Tony Glover, a senior investment specialist at BNP Paribas Asset Management Japan based in Tokyo. “We’d like to think that at times like this where the market is being sold off, the chances of being able to do so increase.”(Updates yen exchange rate in sixth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Miwako Ono, Natsuki Nishiwaki, Takuya Nagasawa and Arisa Wada.To contact the reporters on this story: Min Jeong Lee in Tokyo at mlee754@bloomberg.net;Toshiro Hasegawa in Tokyo at thasegawa6@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Lianting Tu at ltu4@bloomberg.net, Naoto HosodaFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Japan’s equity investors are looking beyond the most disappointing earnings in three years, betting on a turnaround in the market on the view that valuations are cheap and the Bank of Japan will step up easing.Some 60% of the 1,572 companies that reported first fiscal quarter earnings as of Aug. 6 are behind schedule, achieving less than 25% their annual net profit targets, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Analysis from Mitsubishi UFJ Morgan Stanley shows that the proportion of the firms beating earnings expectations dropped to the lowest in fiscal 2017.Still, stock bulls are quick to point out that shares are getting cheap now that the Topix has erased its year-to-date gain. Japan’s benchmark has been one of the worst-performers among the 24 developed markets tracked by Bloomberg for months. Its forward P/E ratio dropped to around 12 times, compared with a five-year average of 13.4 times.“It’s definitely worth dipping in,” Mikio Kumada, a Hong Kong based global strategist at LGT Capital Partners, said in a phone interview. “I do expect Japan to be performing -- maybe not outperforming globally in the second half -- but certainly catching up with the other markets.”According to Kumada, the equity market in Japan shouldn’t be falling so far behind the U.S. and China, given that monetary policies are accomodative at home and abroad. He also expects a bottoming out of China’s economy to support growth in Japan. Both the S&P 500 Index and Shanghai Composite Index are up more than 10% this year.For those investors worried about the yen’s strength, Daiwa Securities Co. says don’t fret too much. The currency’s surge to a seven-month high against the dollar isn’t drastic enough to alter the outlook for profit growth for the second half of this fiscal year, according to the firm. The yen is at about 106.4 per dollar, versus the rate of 108 forecast in many companies’ annual results.Daiwa Securities estimates that companies on the first-section of the Tokyo Stock Exchange are likely to report an average growth of 12.5% in ordinary profit in the second half. While that is lower than its previous estimates, it would be a turnaround from profit declines expected for the first half ending September. The forecasts exclude figures for SoftBank Group Corp. and Tokyo Electric Power Co.“We’re looking at a turnaround in earnings in the second half of this fiscal year,” said Hideyuki Ishiguro, a senior strategist at Daiwa Securities in Tokyo. “The recovery scenario is intact.”Not everyone is that optimistic. Mitsushige Akino, the executive officer at Ichiyoshi Asset Management Co., said the market lacks confidence to boost stock prices. The leading coincident index, a key economic measure, fell in June to a level unseen since the wake of the financial crisis, fueling concern about the economy before an October sales-tax hike.Some bulls like LGT’s Kumada are betting the BOJ will come to the equity market’s rescue. The central bank said last month it’s “more positive” about adding monetary stimulus as it eyes a global shift toward interest rate cuts. Governor Haruhiko Kuroda kept policy unchanged in July, while trimming inflation forecasts.READ MORE: BOJ Watchers See Growing Chance of More Stimulus in September“As bottom-up investors, we are looking for opportunities to buy stocks at prices which do not factor in future earnings growth,” said Tony Glover, a senior investment specialist at BNP Paribas Asset Management Japan based in Tokyo. “We’d like to think that at times like this where the market is being sold off, the chances of being able to do so increase.”(Updates yen exchange rate in sixth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Miwako Ono, Natsuki Nishiwaki, Takuya Nagasawa and Arisa Wada.To contact the reporters on this story: Min Jeong Lee in Tokyo at mlee754@bloomberg.net;Toshiro Hasegawa in Tokyo at thasegawa6@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Lianting Tu at ltu4@bloomberg.net, Naoto HosodaFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 24/77   Do Institutions Own Taste Gourmet Group Limited (HKG:8371) Shares?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The big shareholder groups in Taste Gourmet Group Limited (HKG:8371) have power over the company. Generally speaking...

    The big shareholder groups in Taste Gourmet Group Limited (HKG:8371) have power over the company. Generally speaking...


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  • 25/77   Here are some of the USA's most endangered species
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The Trump administration announced a major overhaul Monday to the Endangered Species Act that it said would reduce regulations.

    The Trump administration announced a major overhaul Monday to the Endangered Species Act that it said would reduce regulations.


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  • 26/77   Vardhman Acrylics (NSE:VARDHACRLC) Seems To Use Debt Quite Sensibly
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Some say volatility, rather than debt, is the best way to think about risk as an investor, but Warren Buffett famously...

    Some say volatility, rather than debt, is the best way to think about risk as an investor, but Warren Buffett famously...


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  • 27/77   Not enough smoke detectors in Pennsylvania day care where 5 children died, officials say
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Investigators apparently only found one smoke detector in the aftermath of a Pennsylvania daycare fire where four of the five victims were siblings.

    Investigators apparently only found one smoke detector in the aftermath of a Pennsylvania daycare fire where four of the five victims were siblings.


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  • 28/77   What Type Of Shareholder Owns Southern Petrochemical Industries Corporation Limited's (NSE:SPIC)?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    If you want to know who really controls Southern Petrochemical Industries Corporation Limited (NSE:SPIC), then you'll...

    If you want to know who really controls Southern Petrochemical Industries Corporation Limited (NSE:SPIC), then you'll...


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  • 29/77   Suven Life Sciences (NSE:SUVEN) Has A Pretty Healthy Balance Sheet
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Legendary fund manager Li Lu (who Charlie Munger backed) once said, 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility...

    Legendary fund manager Li Lu (who Charlie Munger backed) once said, 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility...


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  • 30/77   Why Covetrus Stock Plunged 40% Today
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The veterinary technology platform provider's Q2 earnings and forward guidance had investors running for the exits.

    The veterinary technology platform provider's Q2 earnings and forward guidance had investors running for the exits.


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  • 31/77   Did Changing Sentiment Drive Keong Hong Holdings's (SGX:5TT) Share Price Down By 18%?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    It's easy to match the overall market return by buying an index fund. When you buy individual stocks, you can make...

    It's easy to match the overall market return by buying an index fund. When you buy individual stocks, you can make...


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  • 32/77   Does Regal Hotels International Holdings Limited (HKG:78) Have A Good P/E Ratio?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today, we'll introduce the concept of the P/E ratio for those who are learning about investing. We'll look at Regal...

    Today, we'll introduce the concept of the P/E ratio for those who are learning about investing. We'll look at Regal...


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  • 33/77   Parsons Corporation (PSN) Q2 2019 Earnings Call Transcript
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    PSN earnings call for the period ending June 30, 2019.

    PSN earnings call for the period ending June 30, 2019.


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  • 34/77   Chris Cuomo’s ‘nuts,’ Curt Schilling’s a ‘patriot’ and more from Trump's day on Twitter
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    While on vacation at his club in Bedminster, N.J., the president has tweeted or retweeted posts over 30 times so far on Tuesday. Topics included CNN's Chris Cuomo, a potential run for office by baseball legend Curt Schilling and the protests in Hong Kong.

    While on vacation at his club in Bedminster, N.J., the president has tweeted or retweeted posts over 30 times so far on Tuesday. Topics included CNN's Chris Cuomo, a potential run for office by baseball legend Curt Schilling and the protests in Hong Kong.


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  • 35/77   Tilray Q2 Beats on Revenue, Misses on Earnings
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The Canadian grower and distributor posts a sharp top-line increase thanks to relatively new product categories.

    The Canadian grower and distributor posts a sharp top-line increase thanks to relatively new product categories.


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  • 36/77   Does Hopson Development Holdings Limited (HKG:754) Have A Place In Your Dividend Portfolio?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today we'll take a closer look at Hopson Development Holdings Limited (HKG:754) from a dividend investor's...

    Today we'll take a closer look at Hopson Development Holdings Limited (HKG:754) from a dividend investor's...


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  • 37/77   Kaveri Seed Company Limited (NSE:KSCL): A Fundamentally Attractive Investment
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Kaveri Seed Company Limited (NSE:KSCL) is a stock with outstanding fundamental characteristics. When we build an...

    Kaveri Seed Company Limited (NSE:KSCL) is a stock with outstanding fundamental characteristics. When we build an...


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  • 38/77   Stock Rally Spreads to Asia on Tariff-Delay Relief: Markets Wrap
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Asian stocks climbed after the Trump administration de-escalated its trade war with China, providing relief to risk assets that had been under pressure earlier in the week. Treasuries steadied.Shares in Japan opened about 1% higher after the S&P 500 Index had its biggest intraday gain in more than two months. Washington said it was delaying until mid-December the 10% tariff on some Chinese-made products that are high on many holiday-shopping lists such as phones, laptops and toys. The Korean won and the country’s equities surged. The dollar held steady.President Donald Trump said he delayed the tariffs to spare the Christmas shopping season after his representatives had a “productive” call with China. That provided the impetus for renewed appetite for riskier assets, a welcome respite from the souring trade tensions that are investors’ number one concern. Next up is a slew of Chinese economic data due on Wednesday.The decision to delay has “prompted a relief rally in the markets,” said Tom Orlik, chief economist for Bloomberg Economics. “From the perspective of the immediate risk to corporate earnings, this makes sense. Thinking about the trade war’s deeper impact on growth, the problem remains unresolved.”Meanwhile, Hong Kong’s airport resumed normal operations after a chaotic night of protest in which demonstrators beat and detained two suspected infiltrators and Trump warned of Chinese troops massing on the border.Elsewhere, oil edged lower after jumping the most since early January.Here are some key events coming up:Companies releasing results include Tencent and Alibaba; Cisco, Walmart and Nvidia of the U.S.; the U.K.’s Prudential; Australia’s Telstra; Europe’s Swisscom and brewer Carlsberg.Wednesday brings data on China retail sales, industrial production and the jobless rate.Thursday sees the release of U.S. jobless claims, industrial production and retail sales data.These are the main moves in markets:StocksJapan’s Topix index climbed 1% as of 9:02 a.m. in Tokyo.The S&P 500 Index rose 1.5% on Tuesday. Futures were little changed.South Korea’s Kospi index advanced 1.1%.Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 Index added 0.3%.CurrenciesThe yen was up 0.2% at 106.58 per dollar after tumbling 1.4%.The offshore yuan traded at 7.0173 per dollar.The Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index was stable after advancing 0.2%.The euro bought $1.1174, little changed.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries dipped one basis point to 1.69%.Australia’s 10-year yield added three basis points to 0.96%.CommoditiesGold was little changed at $1,502.20 an ounce.West Texas Intermediate crude slipped 0.6% to $56.75 a barrel.\--With assistance from Luke Kawa.To contact the reporter on this story: Adam Haigh in Sydney at ahaigh1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Christopher Anstey at canstey@bloomberg.net, Andreea PapucFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Asian stocks climbed after the Trump administration de-escalated its trade war with China, providing relief to risk assets that had been under pressure earlier in the week. Treasuries steadied.Shares in Japan opened about 1% higher after the S&P 500 Index had its biggest intraday gain in more than two months. Washington said it was delaying until mid-December the 10% tariff on some Chinese-made products that are high on many holiday-shopping lists such as phones, laptops and toys. The Korean won and the country’s equities surged. The dollar held steady.President Donald Trump said he delayed the tariffs to spare the Christmas shopping season after his representatives had a “productive” call with China. That provided the impetus for renewed appetite for riskier assets, a welcome respite from the souring trade tensions that are investors’ number one concern. Next up is a slew of Chinese economic data due on Wednesday.The decision to delay has “prompted a relief rally in the markets,” said Tom Orlik, chief economist for Bloomberg Economics. “From the perspective of the immediate risk to corporate earnings, this makes sense. Thinking about the trade war’s deeper impact on growth, the problem remains unresolved.”Meanwhile, Hong Kong’s airport resumed normal operations after a chaotic night of protest in which demonstrators beat and detained two suspected infiltrators and Trump warned of Chinese troops massing on the border.Elsewhere, oil edged lower after jumping the most since early January.Here are some key events coming up:Companies releasing results include Tencent and Alibaba; Cisco, Walmart and Nvidia of the U.S.; the U.K.’s Prudential; Australia’s Telstra; Europe’s Swisscom and brewer Carlsberg.Wednesday brings data on China retail sales, industrial production and the jobless rate.Thursday sees the release of U.S. jobless claims, industrial production and retail sales data.These are the main moves in markets:StocksJapan’s Topix index climbed 1% as of 9:02 a.m. in Tokyo.The S&P 500 Index rose 1.5% on Tuesday. Futures were little changed.South Korea’s Kospi index advanced 1.1%.Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 Index added 0.3%.CurrenciesThe yen was up 0.2% at 106.58 per dollar after tumbling 1.4%.The offshore yuan traded at 7.0173 per dollar.The Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index was stable after advancing 0.2%.The euro bought $1.1174, little changed.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries dipped one basis point to 1.69%.Australia’s 10-year yield added three basis points to 0.96%.CommoditiesGold was little changed at $1,502.20 an ounce.West Texas Intermediate crude slipped 0.6% to $56.75 a barrel.\--With assistance from Luke Kawa.To contact the reporter on this story: Adam Haigh in Sydney at ahaigh1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Christopher Anstey at canstey@bloomberg.net, Andreea PapucFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 39/77   The Dilip Buildcon (NSE:DBL) Share Price Has Gained 62% And Shareholders Are Hoping For More
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    It hasn't been the best quarter for Dilip Buildcon Limited (NSE:DBL) shareholders, since the share price has fallen...

    It hasn't been the best quarter for Dilip Buildcon Limited (NSE:DBL) shareholders, since the share price has fallen...


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  • 40/77   Norway mosque "terror attack" suspect remanded in custody
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A Norwegian man suspected of killing his stepsister and opening fire in a mosque near Oslo this weekend was remanded in custody Monday, suspected of murder, and a 'terrorist act' that police say he filmed himself.  The man, identified as 21-year old Philip Manshaus, appeared in the Oslo court with two black eyes and scrapes and bruises on his face, neck and hands, probably obtained when he was overpowered at the mosque.  The Norway incident comes amid a rise in white supremacy attacks around the world.

    A Norwegian man suspected of killing his stepsister and opening fire in a mosque near Oslo this weekend was remanded in custody Monday, suspected of murder, and a 'terrorist act' that police say he filmed himself. The man, identified as 21-year old Philip Manshaus, appeared in the Oslo court with two black eyes and scrapes and bruises on his face, neck and hands, probably obtained when he was overpowered at the mosque. The Norway incident comes amid a rise in white supremacy attacks around the world.


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  • 41/77   Airport Cancels Flight Check-Ins: Hong Kong Update
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Hong Kong’s airport halted check-ins for remaining departures for a second straight day, as embattled local leader Carrie Lam warned that the city risked sliding into an “abyss.”Hundreds of black-shirted protesters staged a sit-in at the departures hall at Hong Kong International Airport, preventing checked-in passengers from reaching their planes. Airlines including Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd. had already cancelled hundreds more flights Tuesday, the day after the government decided to briefly shut the airport during a mass demonstration in the arrivals area.Thousands of black-clad demonstrators occupied the airport on Monday following a weekend of violence that saw police fire tear gas into a subway station and rubber bullets at close range.Here’s the latest:Key Developments:Crowds of demonstrators congregated again at the airport Tuesday, and the main terminal’s departures gates were forced to close. Shares of Cathay Pacific extended their slide after falling to a 10-year low Monday. The carrier fell 2.6% Tuesday in Hong Kong, closing at the lowest since April 2009.Lam defended the police response and warned of long-term consequences to city from the unrest. The Civil Human Rights Front detailed plans for peaceful march Sunday. China said protesters showed signs of “terrorism.”Hu Xijin, editor-in-chief of China’s state-run Global Times, said that if the situation in Hong Kong doesn’t improve, he thinks China will intervene.antiELAB protesters stream out of the Hong Kong airport HongKongProtests ?? pic.twitter.com/He5Sfal5Ol— Bloomberg TicToc (@tictoc) August 12, 2019 Check-ins for Remaining Flights Cancelled (5:35 p.m.)Hong Kong’s Airport Authority said Tuesday that check-ins for all remaining departing flights had been cancelled.Cathay Pacific’s parent company, Swire Pacific Ltd., said it has “consistently and resolutely” supported Hong Kong’s development and remains fully committed to the city.Departure Gates Closed (4:23 p.m.)The airport closed its north and south departure gates at international Terminal 1, leaving long lines of passengers who had already checked in to wait for further instruction.The closures came as Hong Kong police said at a daily briefing that officers fired 58 rounds of tear gas and seven rounds of rubber bullets as violence escalated Saturday, moves that helped fuel protester anger.Protests Spread to Departures Hall (3:32 p.m.)Hundreds of black-shirted protesters spread to the airport’s departures area, bringing passenger check-ins to a crawl. They sat on the floor and blocked the route to the terminal’s north departure gates as they chanted “Shame on Hong Kong police.” A trickle of passengers were still getting through, but others remained in a long line, some sitting warily with their luggage carts. The crew channel was closed off. As the crowd of protesters shifted, the arrivals hall largely emptied out.“They shoot press, they shoot first aid, they are HK police,” one protester’s sign read.Plans for Sunday March Detailed (1:19 p.m.)The Civil Human Rights Front, the group that organized three historically large marches against the extradition bill in June and July, detailed plans to hold a similar public procession at 3 p.m. Sunday. The group’s challenge will be maintaining the largely peaceful atmosphere of the earlier events as some protests turn to violence and the police employ more forceful measures to disperse them. It’s unclear whether CHRF will get sign-off from the police, who have been withholding approval from some marches.Opposition lawmaker Claudia Mo, a prominent participant in CHRF protests, separately called Lam’s contention that she didn’t have authority over the police force “irresponsible.” “It’s very clear right now who is running Hong Kong, and that’s Beijing,” Mo said.Airport Train Services Cut (12:51 p.m.)Hong Kong’s Airport Authority announced that trains between downtown and the terminals would depart less frequently after 1 p.m. in a bid to control crowds. The agency said fewer trains were necessary due to reduced flights at the airport. Trains would run at 15-minute intervals instead of the usual 10-minute span, an agency spokesman said.Travelers Confront Protesters at Airport (11:15 a.m.)Some travelers whose flights were disrupted by the airport protests confronted demonstrators, including one man speaking the Mandarin Chinese dialect preferred on the mainland, who complained that his trip had been delayed by a day. One protester apologized to the man, explaining that the government wouldn’t listen to their demands. Others shrugged off the delays.?? pic.twitter.com/BguBaLJjIN— Bloomberg TicToc (@tictoc) August 12, 2019 Lam: Police Used ‘Lowest Level’ Force (10:14 a.m.)Lam said police used the “lowest level of force” when asked why they had fired tear gas in residential areas, as she held a regular Q+A session ahead of a meeting of the city’s Executive Council. She urged calm, a refrain in recent weeks as violence between protesters and police worsens and tear gas is regularly deployed in crowded areas across the city.At one point, she was interrupted by reporters as she sidestepped questions on whether she would resign -- a key protester demand -- and whether she had concrete proposals to ease residents’ fears.“It would take a very long time to restore Hong Kong,” she said, choking up. “I again call on everyone to set aside prejudice, and be calm to look at the city, our home -- do we really want to push it into the abyss?”Read more on the potential toll of the unrest on Hong Kong’s economyLam Says Hong Kong in Chaos (9:48 a.m.)After her session began, Lam asked the public whether they wanted to see Hong Kong fall into an abyss and said the city was in a chaotic situation.The city’s rule of law is being hurt, she said, and non-cooperation events affected the airport and traffic. Lam also said she saw further suffering for the city’s economy, and that dialogue between the two sides could resume after violence stops.Protesters Call for Return to Airport (9 a.m.)Some protesters called for a return to the airport at 1 p.m. Tuesday, circulating a flyer online calling for people to gather featuring an airplane and blue sky.Hong Kong Airlines vowed its support for the city’s government and police and condemned protester violence in a half-page advertisement in pro-Beijing local newspaper Wen Wei Po. It came as state-run Air China Ltd. canceled dozens of scheduled flights to the city on Tuesday, citing issues at the airport in a post to its official account on Chinese social media platform Weibo.Read more from Monday’s scene at Hong Kong’s airportAirport Resumes Normal Operation (6:40 a.m.)The airport was operating normally as of now, a staff at the airport’s customer service hotline said by phone. It is re-scheduling 90 canceled flights from Monday.It may cancel more flights Tuesday depending on the situation as some protesters remained at the arrival hall. Meanwhile, Cathay Pacific has canceled more than 200 flights to and out of Hong Kong Tuesday.Airport Protesters Largely Depart (1:14 a.m.)The vast majority of the thousands of protesters who occupied the airport have now left, picking up their posters and tidying up as they departed. After a day of drama, the airport is largely quiet. Now the question will be how many return later in the morning.Separately, Hu Xijin, the editor-in-chief of China’s state-run Global Times, said on his Weibo account that if the situation in Hong Kong doesn’t improve, he thinks China will intervene. Earlier, the Chinese People’s Armed Police were seen assembling in Shenzhen city ahead of “apparent large-scale exercises,” Global Times reported on its website, citing videos it obtained.Police Warn Separate Protesting Group (8:21 p.m. Monday)Officers warned a separate group of protesters to disperse after they gathered outside the police headquarters in the downtown area of Wan Chai.At one point, a policeman came out to accept a letter from a protester, and both of them shook hands. Still, the crowds continued to linger.Protesters Depart on Foot (7:06 p.m. Monday)The crowd at the airport thinned out as large groups of black-shirted protesters left the airport and began walking en masse down Airport Road, a major artery which didn’t have much traffic headed toward the airport. Most people were headed to Tung Chung -- a neighborhood whose metro station leads back to central areas -- according to video feed from local news outlet Apple Daily.Stranded passengers walking with luggage were also seen on the Apple Daily feed. Amid the exodus, police concluded a marathon hours-long media briefing by saying they had completed road tests of water cannon vehicles that could now be deployed depending on the situation.Government Warns Protesters to Leave (5:43 p.m. Monday)A top Hong Kong official urged demonstrators to head home as concerns grew that police would take action to clear the area.“For the safety of all flights, passengers and people who work in the airport, I urge all the people assembled at the Hong Kong International Airport to leave as soon as possible,” Hong Kong’s Secretary for Transport and Housing Frank Chan told reporters.It was unclear how many flights were impacted, according to Doris Lai, a spokesperson for the Hong Kong Airport Authority. The airport said in an earlier statement that it was aiming to restore operations as soon as possible.Tear Gas Possible at Airport (5:25 p.m. Monday)Police don’t rule out the possibility of tear gas being deployed at the airport on Monday, deputy police commissioner Tang Ping-keung told reporters gathered at police headquarters in Wan Chai.He said it will be up to the commander at the scene to decide on the appropriate use of force. Police don’t characterize the current protests as “terrorism” and instead see themselves as dealing with radical “rioters,” said another official at the briefing, Li Kwai-wah, senior superintendent of the police’s Organized Crime and Triad Bureau.Cathay Pacific Flights Canceled (5:24 p.m. Monday)Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd., Hong Kong’s main airline, said flights departing from the city will be canceled until Tuesday morning, the company said in a travel advisory on its website. Customers should postpone non-essential travel, it said.Shares of the company tumbled to a 10-year low after the news. The Stoxx Europe 600 Index came off its session high and contracts for all three main U.S. equity indexes erased earlier gains.Armed Police Gather: Global Times (4:56 p.m. Monday)China’s state-run Global Times newspaper said on its website that its paramilitary People’s Armed Police have been assembling in Shenzhen, a megacity just across the border between Hong Kong and the mainland, ahead of “apparent large-scale exercises.”“Numerous” armored personnel carriers, trucks and other vehicles of the force were seen heading toward Shenzhen over the weekend, it said. The paper, a tabloid run by the People’s Daily, the Chinese Communist Party’s flagship mouthpiece, cited videos it obtained.Flights Canceled (4:18 p.m. Monday)Hong Kong’s Airport Authority announced that all departing flights and arrivals not already en route the city have been canceled for the rest of the day.Operations “have been seriously disrupted as a result of the public assembly at the airport today,” it said in a statement. “The traffic to the airport is very congested, and the car park spaces at all carparks are already full. Members of the public are advised not to come to the airport.”China says Protesters Show Signs of Terrorism (4:07 p.m.)China stepped up its rhetoric on Monday, with a key mainland official saying protesters have committed serious crimes and showed signs of “terrorism.”Hong Kong has come to a “critical juncture” and all people who care about its future should say no to violence, Yang Guang, a spokesman for its Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office, told reporters on Monday.(Airport Authority corrects to show flights still departing, check-in closed.)\--With assistance from Fion Li, Justin Chin, Sheryl Tian Tong Lee, Iain Marlow, Jacob Gu, Justin Blum, Bill Faries, Jinshan Hong, Shiyin Chen, Annabelle Droulers, Stephen Engle, Dominic Lau, Natalie Lung, Stephen Tan and Will Davies.To contact the reporters on this story: Annie Lee in Hong Kong at olee42@bloomberg.net;Yvonne Man in Hong Kong at yman9@bloomberg.net;Sebastian Chau in Hong Kong at schau30@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.net, ;Daniel Ten Kate at dtenkate@bloomberg.net, Karen LeighFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Hong Kong’s airport halted check-ins for remaining departures for a second straight day, as embattled local leader Carrie Lam warned that the city risked sliding into an “abyss.”Hundreds of black-shirted protesters staged a sit-in at the departures hall at Hong Kong International Airport, preventing checked-in passengers from reaching their planes. Airlines including Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd. had already cancelled hundreds more flights Tuesday, the day after the government decided to briefly shut the airport during a mass demonstration in the arrivals area.Thousands of black-clad demonstrators occupied the airport on Monday following a weekend of violence that saw police fire tear gas into a subway station and rubber bullets at close range.Here’s the latest:Key Developments:Crowds of demonstrators congregated again at the airport Tuesday, and the main terminal’s departures gates were forced to close. Shares of Cathay Pacific extended their slide after falling to a 10-year low Monday. The carrier fell 2.6% Tuesday in Hong Kong, closing at the lowest since April 2009.Lam defended the police response and warned of long-term consequences to city from the unrest. The Civil Human Rights Front detailed plans for peaceful march Sunday. China said protesters showed signs of “terrorism.”Hu Xijin, editor-in-chief of China’s state-run Global Times, said that if the situation in Hong Kong doesn’t improve, he thinks China will intervene.antiELAB protesters stream out of the Hong Kong airport HongKongProtests ?? pic.twitter.com/He5Sfal5Ol— Bloomberg TicToc (@tictoc) August 12, 2019 Check-ins for Remaining Flights Cancelled (5:35 p.m.)Hong Kong’s Airport Authority said Tuesday that check-ins for all remaining departing flights had been cancelled.Cathay Pacific’s parent company, Swire Pacific Ltd., said it has “consistently and resolutely” supported Hong Kong’s development and remains fully committed to the city.Departure Gates Closed (4:23 p.m.)The airport closed its north and south departure gates at international Terminal 1, leaving long lines of passengers who had already checked in to wait for further instruction.The closures came as Hong Kong police said at a daily briefing that officers fired 58 rounds of tear gas and seven rounds of rubber bullets as violence escalated Saturday, moves that helped fuel protester anger.Protests Spread to Departures Hall (3:32 p.m.)Hundreds of black-shirted protesters spread to the airport’s departures area, bringing passenger check-ins to a crawl. They sat on the floor and blocked the route to the terminal’s north departure gates as they chanted “Shame on Hong Kong police.” A trickle of passengers were still getting through, but others remained in a long line, some sitting warily with their luggage carts. The crew channel was closed off. As the crowd of protesters shifted, the arrivals hall largely emptied out.“They shoot press, they shoot first aid, they are HK police,” one protester’s sign read.Plans for Sunday March Detailed (1:19 p.m.)The Civil Human Rights Front, the group that organized three historically large marches against the extradition bill in June and July, detailed plans to hold a similar public procession at 3 p.m. Sunday. The group’s challenge will be maintaining the largely peaceful atmosphere of the earlier events as some protests turn to violence and the police employ more forceful measures to disperse them. It’s unclear whether CHRF will get sign-off from the police, who have been withholding approval from some marches.Opposition lawmaker Claudia Mo, a prominent participant in CHRF protests, separately called Lam’s contention that she didn’t have authority over the police force “irresponsible.” “It’s very clear right now who is running Hong Kong, and that’s Beijing,” Mo said.Airport Train Services Cut (12:51 p.m.)Hong Kong’s Airport Authority announced that trains between downtown and the terminals would depart less frequently after 1 p.m. in a bid to control crowds. The agency said fewer trains were necessary due to reduced flights at the airport. Trains would run at 15-minute intervals instead of the usual 10-minute span, an agency spokesman said.Travelers Confront Protesters at Airport (11:15 a.m.)Some travelers whose flights were disrupted by the airport protests confronted demonstrators, including one man speaking the Mandarin Chinese dialect preferred on the mainland, who complained that his trip had been delayed by a day. One protester apologized to the man, explaining that the government wouldn’t listen to their demands. Others shrugged off the delays.?? pic.twitter.com/BguBaLJjIN— Bloomberg TicToc (@tictoc) August 12, 2019 Lam: Police Used ‘Lowest Level’ Force (10:14 a.m.)Lam said police used the “lowest level of force” when asked why they had fired tear gas in residential areas, as she held a regular Q+A session ahead of a meeting of the city’s Executive Council. She urged calm, a refrain in recent weeks as violence between protesters and police worsens and tear gas is regularly deployed in crowded areas across the city.At one point, she was interrupted by reporters as she sidestepped questions on whether she would resign -- a key protester demand -- and whether she had concrete proposals to ease residents’ fears.“It would take a very long time to restore Hong Kong,” she said, choking up. “I again call on everyone to set aside prejudice, and be calm to look at the city, our home -- do we really want to push it into the abyss?”Read more on the potential toll of the unrest on Hong Kong’s economyLam Says Hong Kong in Chaos (9:48 a.m.)After her session began, Lam asked the public whether they wanted to see Hong Kong fall into an abyss and said the city was in a chaotic situation.The city’s rule of law is being hurt, she said, and non-cooperation events affected the airport and traffic. Lam also said she saw further suffering for the city’s economy, and that dialogue between the two sides could resume after violence stops.Protesters Call for Return to Airport (9 a.m.)Some protesters called for a return to the airport at 1 p.m. Tuesday, circulating a flyer online calling for people to gather featuring an airplane and blue sky.Hong Kong Airlines vowed its support for the city’s government and police and condemned protester violence in a half-page advertisement in pro-Beijing local newspaper Wen Wei Po. It came as state-run Air China Ltd. canceled dozens of scheduled flights to the city on Tuesday, citing issues at the airport in a post to its official account on Chinese social media platform Weibo.Read more from Monday’s scene at Hong Kong’s airportAirport Resumes Normal Operation (6:40 a.m.)The airport was operating normally as of now, a staff at the airport’s customer service hotline said by phone. It is re-scheduling 90 canceled flights from Monday.It may cancel more flights Tuesday depending on the situation as some protesters remained at the arrival hall. Meanwhile, Cathay Pacific has canceled more than 200 flights to and out of Hong Kong Tuesday.Airport Protesters Largely Depart (1:14 a.m.)The vast majority of the thousands of protesters who occupied the airport have now left, picking up their posters and tidying up as they departed. After a day of drama, the airport is largely quiet. Now the question will be how many return later in the morning.Separately, Hu Xijin, the editor-in-chief of China’s state-run Global Times, said on his Weibo account that if the situation in Hong Kong doesn’t improve, he thinks China will intervene. Earlier, the Chinese People’s Armed Police were seen assembling in Shenzhen city ahead of “apparent large-scale exercises,” Global Times reported on its website, citing videos it obtained.Police Warn Separate Protesting Group (8:21 p.m. Monday)Officers warned a separate group of protesters to disperse after they gathered outside the police headquarters in the downtown area of Wan Chai.At one point, a policeman came out to accept a letter from a protester, and both of them shook hands. Still, the crowds continued to linger.Protesters Depart on Foot (7:06 p.m. Monday)The crowd at the airport thinned out as large groups of black-shirted protesters left the airport and began walking en masse down Airport Road, a major artery which didn’t have much traffic headed toward the airport. Most people were headed to Tung Chung -- a neighborhood whose metro station leads back to central areas -- according to video feed from local news outlet Apple Daily.Stranded passengers walking with luggage were also seen on the Apple Daily feed. Amid the exodus, police concluded a marathon hours-long media briefing by saying they had completed road tests of water cannon vehicles that could now be deployed depending on the situation.Government Warns Protesters to Leave (5:43 p.m. Monday)A top Hong Kong official urged demonstrators to head home as concerns grew that police would take action to clear the area.“For the safety of all flights, passengers and people who work in the airport, I urge all the people assembled at the Hong Kong International Airport to leave as soon as possible,” Hong Kong’s Secretary for Transport and Housing Frank Chan told reporters.It was unclear how many flights were impacted, according to Doris Lai, a spokesperson for the Hong Kong Airport Authority. The airport said in an earlier statement that it was aiming to restore operations as soon as possible.Tear Gas Possible at Airport (5:25 p.m. Monday)Police don’t rule out the possibility of tear gas being deployed at the airport on Monday, deputy police commissioner Tang Ping-keung told reporters gathered at police headquarters in Wan Chai.He said it will be up to the commander at the scene to decide on the appropriate use of force. Police don’t characterize the current protests as “terrorism” and instead see themselves as dealing with radical “rioters,” said another official at the briefing, Li Kwai-wah, senior superintendent of the police’s Organized Crime and Triad Bureau.Cathay Pacific Flights Canceled (5:24 p.m. Monday)Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd., Hong Kong’s main airline, said flights departing from the city will be canceled until Tuesday morning, the company said in a travel advisory on its website. Customers should postpone non-essential travel, it said.Shares of the company tumbled to a 10-year low after the news. The Stoxx Europe 600 Index came off its session high and contracts for all three main U.S. equity indexes erased earlier gains.Armed Police Gather: Global Times (4:56 p.m. Monday)China’s state-run Global Times newspaper said on its website that its paramilitary People’s Armed Police have been assembling in Shenzhen, a megacity just across the border between Hong Kong and the mainland, ahead of “apparent large-scale exercises.”“Numerous” armored personnel carriers, trucks and other vehicles of the force were seen heading toward Shenzhen over the weekend, it said. The paper, a tabloid run by the People’s Daily, the Chinese Communist Party’s flagship mouthpiece, cited videos it obtained.Flights Canceled (4:18 p.m. Monday)Hong Kong’s Airport Authority announced that all departing flights and arrivals not already en route the city have been canceled for the rest of the day.Operations “have been seriously disrupted as a result of the public assembly at the airport today,” it said in a statement. “The traffic to the airport is very congested, and the car park spaces at all carparks are already full. Members of the public are advised not to come to the airport.”China says Protesters Show Signs of Terrorism (4:07 p.m.)China stepped up its rhetoric on Monday, with a key mainland official saying protesters have committed serious crimes and showed signs of “terrorism.”Hong Kong has come to a “critical juncture” and all people who care about its future should say no to violence, Yang Guang, a spokesman for its Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office, told reporters on Monday.(Airport Authority corrects to show flights still departing, check-in closed.)\--With assistance from Fion Li, Justin Chin, Sheryl Tian Tong Lee, Iain Marlow, Jacob Gu, Justin Blum, Bill Faries, Jinshan Hong, Shiyin Chen, Annabelle Droulers, Stephen Engle, Dominic Lau, Natalie Lung, Stephen Tan and Will Davies.To contact the reporters on this story: Annie Lee in Hong Kong at olee42@bloomberg.net;Yvonne Man in Hong Kong at yman9@bloomberg.net;Sebastian Chau in Hong Kong at schau30@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.net, ;Daniel Ten Kate at dtenkate@bloomberg.net, Karen LeighFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 42/77   Russia Says Small Nuclear Reactor Blew Up in Deadly Accident
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The blast occurred Aug. 8 during a test of a missile

    The blast occurred Aug. 8 during a test of a missile


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  • 43/77   Charlottesville Survivor Blasts Terry McAuliffe’s ‘Ahistorical’ Book About Deadly Attack
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast/GettyFormer Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe’s new book, Beyond Charlottesville, tries to tackle the issues of white supremacy that resulted in a deadly neo-Nazi rally in August 2017. But the book isn’t a hit with everyone in its namesake city.Beyond Charlottesville centers on Unite the Right, the 2017 white supremacist rally where a neo-Nazi drove his car into a crowd of anti-racist protesters, killing one. Two state troopers also died in a helicopter crash while monitoring the rally. Activists and independent investigators criticized the police response to the rally, claiming that miscommunications between a variety of police forces allowed the event to devolve into violence. McAuliffe’s book omits context about the bureaucratic chaos—and at points is outright wrong, critics say.“The book is about racism and white nationalism, the rise of it in the country,” McAuliffe told The Daily Beast. “I talk about the issues we’ve had in Virginia. As I always say, horrible as Charlottesville was, the one benefit was it did rip off the scab on racism and we need to have a frank discussion.”But some survivors of the Unite the Right car attack say McAuliffe’s version of the story isn’t completely frank. Some of those survivors have interrupted McAuliffe’s book talks, including an event at D.C.’s Politics and Prose earlier this month.“The story he’s telling in Beyond Charlottesville is ahistorical. It’s not accurate,” Anna Malinowski, one of the protesters, told The Daily Beast.A report this week in Charlottesville’s Daily Progress, the city’s sole daily newspaper, highlighted some of the inaccuracies, from small factual errors, to larger issues of framing.In Beyond Charlottesville, McAuliffe says he “knew without a doubt that we’d done everything we could at the state level to prepare for Charlottesville, but obviously somewhere in the implementation and coordination, those plans went off the rails.”But, as the Daily Progress noted, an official Charlottesville investigation revealed a high level of dysfunction at the local and state levels, including miscommunication between local and state police forces during the rally.The Progress also took issue with McAuliffe’s explanation for why it took so long for state officials to declare a state of emergency. (McAuliffe wrote that he was waiting for the city to declare an unlawful assembly, which in fact they had declared during the previous night’s torchlit march, and again on the rally’s second day, in addition to a local state of emergency.). In the book, McAuliffe also describes calling Charlottesville’s then-mayor Mike Signer and recommending he ban guns from the rally area, a move Signer could not legally make. Signer objected to elements of the book in his own op-ed for the Richmond Times-Dispatch. “It’s well-written and contains a powerful personal condemnation of white supremacy that deserves attention. However, it also contains errors and omissions,” Signer wrote, accusing McAuliffe of shifting too much blame onto the city.The American Civil Liberties Union of Virginia released a similar critique.“Governor McAuliffe’s book is yet another example of a politician’s effort to pass the buck of responsibility when there was a clear failure of leadership,” the ACLU of Virginia told the Progress in a statement. “The leaders had ineffective and uncoordinated plans for managing the protest.”Survivors and investigators blamed some of the day’s chaos on poor police coordination between too many agencies.“They pretty much brought in the cavalry when they found out there would be a lot of white nationalists there. There were Virginia State Police, there were National Guard, there were city and county police,” Malinowski, who narrowly avoided being hit by the car, said. “There was lots of fighting going on that was incited by the white supremacists, and the police basically did nothing either to prevent it or stop it while it was happening.”At the D.C. protest this month, Malinowski and other protesters accused McAuliffe of “using black folks as political currency” and not paying attention to what they say are white supremacists in law enforcement.They also objected to McAuliffe’s plan to donate some proceedings to the Virginia State Police Association. This last point is of particular contention between the former governor and the Charlottesville activists.At least one person at the D.C. protest chanted “cops and Klan go hand in hand,” a slogan popular among some activists on the left. They mean some of the chant literally (a number of law enforcement officers have been found to have white supremacist ties) and some of it more figuratively, in the context of police brutality against people of color. (After Unite the Right, many Charlottesville locals turned an eye to stop-and-frisks by the city’s police, which disproportionately affect minorities in the city.)McAuliffe’s book also addresses structural racism. But he said the chant was beyond the pale.“They call the KKK and the police the same thing and that, to me, is very disrespectful to all law enforcement,” McAuliffe said. “Everybody had the same goal that day, and it was to keep everybody safe. But to call police the KKK is highly offensive, highly disrespectful.”Malinowski and others said the money would be better spent on survivors, some of whom have struggled to pay medical bills, or to make rent after injuries from the car attack pushed them into unemployment. Matthew Christensen, who recently served as an advocate for victims of the attack, said the problem is the result of a complicated victim support system, which sees many survivors relying on a private victims’ fund called Heal Charlottesville. “I have a Master’s in social work,” Christensen said. “Some of the bureaucracy we were working with was difficult for me. For anyone else, especially people dealing with trauma, it’d be exponentially more difficult.”Survivors can technically apply for a state fund that compensates victims of crimes. But that system only pays out in cases of “last resort,” and has redirected survivors to the Heal Charlottesville fund. As of June, the fund had expended all its funds, a spokesperson told The Daily Beast. Since the protests, McAuliffe said he would split the book’s proceeds between the police association, the Heather Heyer Foundation (as originally planned), and the Heal Charlottesville Fund.“I say to anybody: if you’ve got outstanding bills, all of us—the whole community, the whole state —ought to be involved in assisting,” he said. “We reached out to a couple of the groups, which is somewhat surprising to me because the main one, [the administrators of the Heal Fund], said they have a surplus left and they have no claims in front of them.”(The Heal Fund told The Daily Beast it does not have a surplus, although it has secured money for survivors’ ongoing claims.)McAuliffe said his book was especially timely as President Donald Trump launches Twitter attacks against legislators of color. “It’s a very opportune time to have this big discussion on where we go as a nation, because we are so split today as a country,” he said. “The hatred and the racism and what’s going on in the country today needs to be addressed and we need to have a conversation. We need elected officials to do something about it.”Malinowski, meanwhile, said the book was too late.“The only thing he should be saying is ‘I messed up, I should have done more to protect these people,’ and he’s not saying that. He’s trying to be the hero in his book.”Editor's note: this story has been updated to clarify the recipients of McAuliffe's book proceeds.Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

    Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast/GettyFormer Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe’s new book, Beyond Charlottesville, tries to tackle the issues of white supremacy that resulted in a deadly neo-Nazi rally in August 2017. But the book isn’t a hit with everyone in its namesake city.Beyond Charlottesville centers on Unite the Right, the 2017 white supremacist rally where a neo-Nazi drove his car into a crowd of anti-racist protesters, killing one. Two state troopers also died in a helicopter crash while monitoring the rally. Activists and independent investigators criticized the police response to the rally, claiming that miscommunications between a variety of police forces allowed the event to devolve into violence. McAuliffe’s book omits context about the bureaucratic chaos—and at points is outright wrong, critics say.“The book is about racism and white nationalism, the rise of it in the country,” McAuliffe told The Daily Beast. “I talk about the issues we’ve had in Virginia. As I always say, horrible as Charlottesville was, the one benefit was it did rip off the scab on racism and we need to have a frank discussion.”But some survivors of the Unite the Right car attack say McAuliffe’s version of the story isn’t completely frank. Some of those survivors have interrupted McAuliffe’s book talks, including an event at D.C.’s Politics and Prose earlier this month.“The story he’s telling in Beyond Charlottesville is ahistorical. It’s not accurate,” Anna Malinowski, one of the protesters, told The Daily Beast.A report this week in Charlottesville’s Daily Progress, the city’s sole daily newspaper, highlighted some of the inaccuracies, from small factual errors, to larger issues of framing.In Beyond Charlottesville, McAuliffe says he “knew without a doubt that we’d done everything we could at the state level to prepare for Charlottesville, but obviously somewhere in the implementation and coordination, those plans went off the rails.”But, as the Daily Progress noted, an official Charlottesville investigation revealed a high level of dysfunction at the local and state levels, including miscommunication between local and state police forces during the rally.The Progress also took issue with McAuliffe’s explanation for why it took so long for state officials to declare a state of emergency. (McAuliffe wrote that he was waiting for the city to declare an unlawful assembly, which in fact they had declared during the previous night’s torchlit march, and again on the rally’s second day, in addition to a local state of emergency.). In the book, McAuliffe also describes calling Charlottesville’s then-mayor Mike Signer and recommending he ban guns from the rally area, a move Signer could not legally make. Signer objected to elements of the book in his own op-ed for the Richmond Times-Dispatch. “It’s well-written and contains a powerful personal condemnation of white supremacy that deserves attention. However, it also contains errors and omissions,” Signer wrote, accusing McAuliffe of shifting too much blame onto the city.The American Civil Liberties Union of Virginia released a similar critique.“Governor McAuliffe’s book is yet another example of a politician’s effort to pass the buck of responsibility when there was a clear failure of leadership,” the ACLU of Virginia told the Progress in a statement. “The leaders had ineffective and uncoordinated plans for managing the protest.”Survivors and investigators blamed some of the day’s chaos on poor police coordination between too many agencies.“They pretty much brought in the cavalry when they found out there would be a lot of white nationalists there. There were Virginia State Police, there were National Guard, there were city and county police,” Malinowski, who narrowly avoided being hit by the car, said. “There was lots of fighting going on that was incited by the white supremacists, and the police basically did nothing either to prevent it or stop it while it was happening.”At the D.C. protest this month, Malinowski and other protesters accused McAuliffe of “using black folks as political currency” and not paying attention to what they say are white supremacists in law enforcement.They also objected to McAuliffe’s plan to donate some proceedings to the Virginia State Police Association. This last point is of particular contention between the former governor and the Charlottesville activists.At least one person at the D.C. protest chanted “cops and Klan go hand in hand,” a slogan popular among some activists on the left. They mean some of the chant literally (a number of law enforcement officers have been found to have white supremacist ties) and some of it more figuratively, in the context of police brutality against people of color. (After Unite the Right, many Charlottesville locals turned an eye to stop-and-frisks by the city’s police, which disproportionately affect minorities in the city.)McAuliffe’s book also addresses structural racism. But he said the chant was beyond the pale.“They call the KKK and the police the same thing and that, to me, is very disrespectful to all law enforcement,” McAuliffe said. “Everybody had the same goal that day, and it was to keep everybody safe. But to call police the KKK is highly offensive, highly disrespectful.”Malinowski and others said the money would be better spent on survivors, some of whom have struggled to pay medical bills, or to make rent after injuries from the car attack pushed them into unemployment. Matthew Christensen, who recently served as an advocate for victims of the attack, said the problem is the result of a complicated victim support system, which sees many survivors relying on a private victims’ fund called Heal Charlottesville. “I have a Master’s in social work,” Christensen said. “Some of the bureaucracy we were working with was difficult for me. For anyone else, especially people dealing with trauma, it’d be exponentially more difficult.”Survivors can technically apply for a state fund that compensates victims of crimes. But that system only pays out in cases of “last resort,” and has redirected survivors to the Heal Charlottesville fund. As of June, the fund had expended all its funds, a spokesperson told The Daily Beast. Since the protests, McAuliffe said he would split the book’s proceeds between the police association, the Heather Heyer Foundation (as originally planned), and the Heal Charlottesville Fund.“I say to anybody: if you’ve got outstanding bills, all of us—the whole community, the whole state —ought to be involved in assisting,” he said. “We reached out to a couple of the groups, which is somewhat surprising to me because the main one, [the administrators of the Heal Fund], said they have a surplus left and they have no claims in front of them.”(The Heal Fund told The Daily Beast it does not have a surplus, although it has secured money for survivors’ ongoing claims.)McAuliffe said his book was especially timely as President Donald Trump launches Twitter attacks against legislators of color. “It’s a very opportune time to have this big discussion on where we go as a nation, because we are so split today as a country,” he said. “The hatred and the racism and what’s going on in the country today needs to be addressed and we need to have a conversation. We need elected officials to do something about it.”Malinowski, meanwhile, said the book was too late.“The only thing he should be saying is ‘I messed up, I should have done more to protect these people,’ and he’s not saying that. He’s trying to be the hero in his book.”Editor's note: this story has been updated to clarify the recipients of McAuliffe's book proceeds.Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


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  • 44/77   Devastating photos show the damage of Typhoon Lekima, which left at least 44 people dead and forced 1 million to evacuate in China
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A million people were evacuated from their homes and thousands of flights were cancelled across major airports in China.

    A million people were evacuated from their homes and thousands of flights were cancelled across major airports in China.


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  • 45/77   'The fire was just nuts': At least 5 children dead in Erie blaze, authorities say
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    At least five children died in a Pennsylvania house fire that blew flames out of every first-floor window early Sunday morning, authorities said.

    At least five children died in a Pennsylvania house fire that blew flames out of every first-floor window early Sunday morning, authorities said.


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  • 46/77   Airline leaves group of children as young as eight ‘unaccompanied overnight after flight delayed’
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Hudson Hoyt was ecstatic for his first time at Camp New Friends.The 8-year-old, who lives in Beaverton, Oregon, flew east in early August for the camp's week-long summer program outside of Charlottesville, Virginia, specifically for children with neurofibromatosis, a genetic disorder that causes tumours to grow on nerve tissue.It was a dream experience for Hudson - at least, until the return flight home via American Airlines, for which point Hudson's mother says he and eight other unaccompanied minors from the camp were temporarily stranded, deprived of food and met with conditions so poor it's made her son reluctant to fly again."I felt scared," Hudson, who suffers from anxiety, said in an interview with The Washington Post. "When the plane stopped moving, I was afraid I was never going to see my mum again."The first plane arrived late for a layover in Charlotte, North Carolina, according to Hudson's mother, Kristie Hoyt, and the children were rushed to their Portland, Oregon, flight without stopping for food. But then the second plane was stalled by delays that were not communicated to the parents. First, fuel spilled on the tarmac. Then, she learned that the airline needed to find replacements for the pilot and co-pilot, who had worked too many hours.When Ms Hoyt asked for a direct phone number for someone with American Airlines who could keep her updated on the children's situation, the mother says she was denied. Updates came after a 12-year-old in the group called her and gave the phone to a flight attendant. The airline never reached out to her directly, she says, even though she was listed as the contact for two children on the trip.With their flight delayed until the next morning, the children's' problems worsened at the Charlotte airport. They stayed overnight in an unaccompanied-minor room, where some of the kids had to sleep on the floor because there were not enough beds and furniture, Ms Hoyt said. Hudson and his friends still hadn't eaten a full meal since breakfast at camp that morning, and the vending machines inside didn't work.Some of the children on the flight required medication with a full meal to prevent seizures and migraines, she says.Ms Hoyt detailed the saga in Facebook posts."American Airlines, how are you okay with leaving 9 unaccompanied children all with medical needs on a plane for over 5 hours and not giving their parents updates?" she wrote Friday night. "Or allowing the kids access to electricity to charge their phones to talk to their parents? You are disgraceful! And harming these children!"After their overnight stay at the airport, Hoyt says the children were rushed onto a plane at about 6am. The children did not receive breakfast aboard the plane as promised, she said, even when the takeoff time was delayed again because "the catering service wasn't delivered."The confusion came to a head when the kids arrived in Portland and the mother was asked to sign for a child who was not hers.In all, Ms Hoyt said the children went more than 24 hours without a full meal. In a 5am text from her son, which she later posted to Facebook, Hudson wrote: "[Our] plane has not take off yet I [have] not had lunch dinner or breakfast."After his adoption, Hudson has struggled with anxiety and abandonment issues, something his mother says they are working to overcome. She and other parents say they were never contacted by the airline, even though American Airlines' policy requires staffers to "call the contacts on the unaccompanied minor form" in the event of a delay or cancelled flight.Kelley Phillips, identified by KATU as another child on the plane, told the network she and her friends had "limited" access to the bathroom and were only provided with snacks."The only thing we had were crackers and soda, which isn't good because we need real food to be able to take our medication," she said.American Airlines issued a public statement of apology and attributed the overnight delay to a mechanical problem. It said the children were kept "safe and comfortable" in the care of airline personnel."Our team is in the process of reaching out to the families involved and sincerely apologises for this travel experience. We will be reviewing with our teams internally to understand how we can do better next time," the airline wrote.Hudson, she said, wants to go back to camp but now has trepidation about flying. After meeting with a counsellor Monday, however, they've narrowed that scope to American Airlines flights, specifically."We're just trying to work through the trauma of it," she said.The Washington Post

    Hudson Hoyt was ecstatic for his first time at Camp New Friends.The 8-year-old, who lives in Beaverton, Oregon, flew east in early August for the camp's week-long summer program outside of Charlottesville, Virginia, specifically for children with neurofibromatosis, a genetic disorder that causes tumours to grow on nerve tissue.It was a dream experience for Hudson - at least, until the return flight home via American Airlines, for which point Hudson's mother says he and eight other unaccompanied minors from the camp were temporarily stranded, deprived of food and met with conditions so poor it's made her son reluctant to fly again."I felt scared," Hudson, who suffers from anxiety, said in an interview with The Washington Post. "When the plane stopped moving, I was afraid I was never going to see my mum again."The first plane arrived late for a layover in Charlotte, North Carolina, according to Hudson's mother, Kristie Hoyt, and the children were rushed to their Portland, Oregon, flight without stopping for food. But then the second plane was stalled by delays that were not communicated to the parents. First, fuel spilled on the tarmac. Then, she learned that the airline needed to find replacements for the pilot and co-pilot, who had worked too many hours.When Ms Hoyt asked for a direct phone number for someone with American Airlines who could keep her updated on the children's situation, the mother says she was denied. Updates came after a 12-year-old in the group called her and gave the phone to a flight attendant. The airline never reached out to her directly, she says, even though she was listed as the contact for two children on the trip.With their flight delayed until the next morning, the children's' problems worsened at the Charlotte airport. They stayed overnight in an unaccompanied-minor room, where some of the kids had to sleep on the floor because there were not enough beds and furniture, Ms Hoyt said. Hudson and his friends still hadn't eaten a full meal since breakfast at camp that morning, and the vending machines inside didn't work.Some of the children on the flight required medication with a full meal to prevent seizures and migraines, she says.Ms Hoyt detailed the saga in Facebook posts."American Airlines, how are you okay with leaving 9 unaccompanied children all with medical needs on a plane for over 5 hours and not giving their parents updates?" she wrote Friday night. "Or allowing the kids access to electricity to charge their phones to talk to their parents? You are disgraceful! And harming these children!"After their overnight stay at the airport, Hoyt says the children were rushed onto a plane at about 6am. The children did not receive breakfast aboard the plane as promised, she said, even when the takeoff time was delayed again because "the catering service wasn't delivered."The confusion came to a head when the kids arrived in Portland and the mother was asked to sign for a child who was not hers.In all, Ms Hoyt said the children went more than 24 hours without a full meal. In a 5am text from her son, which she later posted to Facebook, Hudson wrote: "[Our] plane has not take off yet I [have] not had lunch dinner or breakfast."After his adoption, Hudson has struggled with anxiety and abandonment issues, something his mother says they are working to overcome. She and other parents say they were never contacted by the airline, even though American Airlines' policy requires staffers to "call the contacts on the unaccompanied minor form" in the event of a delay or cancelled flight.Kelley Phillips, identified by KATU as another child on the plane, told the network she and her friends had "limited" access to the bathroom and were only provided with snacks."The only thing we had were crackers and soda, which isn't good because we need real food to be able to take our medication," she said.American Airlines issued a public statement of apology and attributed the overnight delay to a mechanical problem. It said the children were kept "safe and comfortable" in the care of airline personnel."Our team is in the process of reaching out to the families involved and sincerely apologises for this travel experience. We will be reviewing with our teams internally to understand how we can do better next time," the airline wrote.Hudson, she said, wants to go back to camp but now has trepidation about flying. After meeting with a counsellor Monday, however, they've narrowed that scope to American Airlines flights, specifically."We're just trying to work through the trauma of it," she said.The Washington Post


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  • 47/77   Ohio teen who had 10,000 ammo rounds arrested for threatening ‘every’ agent, FBI says
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    An Ohio teen was arrested on Wednesday after making a number of threats to law enforcement online, officials say.

    An Ohio teen was arrested on Wednesday after making a number of threats to law enforcement online, officials say.


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  • 48/77   Latest: Hong Kong police: 5 arrested after airport protests
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Hong Kong police say they have arrested five people for unlawful assembly, assaulting police officers and possessing weapons after a second day of mass protests at the city's airport.  Officials said in a statement that some protesters detained, harassed and assaulted a traveler and a journalist, and obstructed ambulance workers from taking the two men to the hospital.  Hong Kong's busy airport was the latest setting for large-scale pro-democracy protests that have rocked the city for months, with authorities canceling dozens of flights on Monday and Tuesday.

    Hong Kong police say they have arrested five people for unlawful assembly, assaulting police officers and possessing weapons after a second day of mass protests at the city's airport. Officials said in a statement that some protesters detained, harassed and assaulted a traveler and a journalist, and obstructed ambulance workers from taking the two men to the hospital. Hong Kong's busy airport was the latest setting for large-scale pro-democracy protests that have rocked the city for months, with authorities canceling dozens of flights on Monday and Tuesday.


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  • 49/77   From D-Day beaches to the Champs-Elysees
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Paris (AFP) - It took less than three months of fighting from the Allied troop landings on France's Normandy beaches for Paris to be liberated from the Nazis, whose surrender in 1945 ended World War II in Europe.

    Paris (AFP) - It took less than three months of fighting from the Allied troop landings on France's Normandy beaches for Paris to be liberated from the Nazis, whose surrender in 1945 ended World War II in Europe.


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  • 50/77   These species went extinct in 2018. More may be doomed to follow in 2019
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    They'd been on our planet for millions of years, but 2018 was the year several species officially vanished forever.

    They'd been on our planet for millions of years, but 2018 was the year several species officially vanished forever.


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  • 51/77   Lightning strikes detected within 300 miles of North Pole amid escalating climate change emergency in Arctic
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Multiple lightning strikes have been detected within 300 miles of the North Pole, in the latest extraordinary weather event amid an escalating climate change emergency. The bolts on Saturday, which were spotted by the US’s National Weather Service (NWS), were the result of towering storm clouds that in lower latitudes would amount to ordinary thunderstorms. But polar lightning is so rare, due to temperatures usually being too low to allow the phenomenon, that the NWS decided to issue a public information statement over the weekend. “A number of lightning strikes were recorded between 4pm and 6pm today within 300 miles of the North Pole,” it said. According to the statement, the thunderstorm was around 700 miles north of Siberia’s Lena River Delta and the strikes hit the surface, which was probably made up of sea ice or areas of open ocean waters mixed with ice.“This is one of the furthest north lightning strikes in Alaska forecaster memory,” the NWS stated after its office in Fairbanks, Alaska, detected the incident.The thunderstorms at the top of the world struck in the midst of an extreme summer that has featured record-low sea ice levels and much-above-average temperatures across much of the Arctic Ocean, including at the pole itself.In Greenland in late July and early August, an extreme weather event led to record levels of ice melt into the sea, tangibly raising global sea levels. A wildfire has been burning in western Greenland for more than a month, illustrating the unusually dry and warm conditions there.Reached by phone Monday morning, NWS Fairbanks meteorologist Ryan Metzger hesitated to say that lightning so close to the pole has never been seen before, in part because forecasters are not always looking there.“I wouldn’t say it’s never happened before, but it’s certainly unusual, and it piqued our attention,” Mr Metzger said.He said he was confident the strikes were not errors in the lightning detection network, which spans the globe, because they tracked along with the clouds’ movements.The lightning strikes mean that the atmosphere near the pole was unstable enough, with sufficient warm and moist air in the lower atmosphere, to give rise to thunderstorms.The loss of sea ice across the Arctic has led to sea surface temperatures that are much above average for this time of year, which may be contributing to unusually unstable air masses being pushed across the central Arctic Ocean.The vast majority of Earth’s thunderstorms occur at lower latitudes, where the combination of higher temperatures and humidity more easily sparks such weather phenomena.However, as Alaska and other parts of the Arctic have warmed in response to human-caused global climate change, there is evidence thunderstorms are starting earlier in the year and are extending to areas that previously rarely saw such events, such as Alaska’s North Slope.One reason to be cautious about interpreting the lightning as an unprecedented event is that lightning can also occur in intense nontropical storms that affect the Arctic, though no such large and potent storm was present Saturday. This does make the weekend lightning stand out, however.The Arctic climate has seemingly gone off the rails this summer. There is no longer any sea ice present in Alaskan waters, with Bering Sea ice having melted out beginning in February, and ice in the Chukchi Sea already pulling back hundreds of miles north of the state.Alaska had its hottest month on record in July. Wildfires are burning across the state, and fires in Siberia have sent plumes of dark smoke into the Arctic, where soot particles can land on the ice and snow and speed up melting.In July alone, the Greenland ice sheet poured 197 billion tons of water into the North Atlantic, which was enough to raise sea levels by 0.5mm, or 0.02 inches, in a one-month time frame. On 1 August, Greenland had its biggest single-day melt event on record, with 12.5 billion tons of surface ice lost to the sea.Across the Arctic, sea ice is at record to near-record low levels for this time of year and is likely to end the melt season with one of the five lowest ice extents on record in the satellite era, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colorado.Sea-ice extent is probably the lowest it has been in at least 1,500 years, based on recent research.Additional reporting by agencies

    Multiple lightning strikes have been detected within 300 miles of the North Pole, in the latest extraordinary weather event amid an escalating climate change emergency. The bolts on Saturday, which were spotted by the US’s National Weather Service (NWS), were the result of towering storm clouds that in lower latitudes would amount to ordinary thunderstorms. But polar lightning is so rare, due to temperatures usually being too low to allow the phenomenon, that the NWS decided to issue a public information statement over the weekend. “A number of lightning strikes were recorded between 4pm and 6pm today within 300 miles of the North Pole,” it said. According to the statement, the thunderstorm was around 700 miles north of Siberia’s Lena River Delta and the strikes hit the surface, which was probably made up of sea ice or areas of open ocean waters mixed with ice.“This is one of the furthest north lightning strikes in Alaska forecaster memory,” the NWS stated after its office in Fairbanks, Alaska, detected the incident.The thunderstorms at the top of the world struck in the midst of an extreme summer that has featured record-low sea ice levels and much-above-average temperatures across much of the Arctic Ocean, including at the pole itself.In Greenland in late July and early August, an extreme weather event led to record levels of ice melt into the sea, tangibly raising global sea levels. A wildfire has been burning in western Greenland for more than a month, illustrating the unusually dry and warm conditions there.Reached by phone Monday morning, NWS Fairbanks meteorologist Ryan Metzger hesitated to say that lightning so close to the pole has never been seen before, in part because forecasters are not always looking there.“I wouldn’t say it’s never happened before, but it’s certainly unusual, and it piqued our attention,” Mr Metzger said.He said he was confident the strikes were not errors in the lightning detection network, which spans the globe, because they tracked along with the clouds’ movements.The lightning strikes mean that the atmosphere near the pole was unstable enough, with sufficient warm and moist air in the lower atmosphere, to give rise to thunderstorms.The loss of sea ice across the Arctic has led to sea surface temperatures that are much above average for this time of year, which may be contributing to unusually unstable air masses being pushed across the central Arctic Ocean.The vast majority of Earth’s thunderstorms occur at lower latitudes, where the combination of higher temperatures and humidity more easily sparks such weather phenomena.However, as Alaska and other parts of the Arctic have warmed in response to human-caused global climate change, there is evidence thunderstorms are starting earlier in the year and are extending to areas that previously rarely saw such events, such as Alaska’s North Slope.One reason to be cautious about interpreting the lightning as an unprecedented event is that lightning can also occur in intense nontropical storms that affect the Arctic, though no such large and potent storm was present Saturday. This does make the weekend lightning stand out, however.The Arctic climate has seemingly gone off the rails this summer. There is no longer any sea ice present in Alaskan waters, with Bering Sea ice having melted out beginning in February, and ice in the Chukchi Sea already pulling back hundreds of miles north of the state.Alaska had its hottest month on record in July. Wildfires are burning across the state, and fires in Siberia have sent plumes of dark smoke into the Arctic, where soot particles can land on the ice and snow and speed up melting.In July alone, the Greenland ice sheet poured 197 billion tons of water into the North Atlantic, which was enough to raise sea levels by 0.5mm, or 0.02 inches, in a one-month time frame. On 1 August, Greenland had its biggest single-day melt event on record, with 12.5 billion tons of surface ice lost to the sea.Across the Arctic, sea ice is at record to near-record low levels for this time of year and is likely to end the melt season with one of the five lowest ice extents on record in the satellite era, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colorado.Sea-ice extent is probably the lowest it has been in at least 1,500 years, based on recent research.Additional reporting by agencies


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  • 52/77   New Jersey’s largest city is distributing bottled water — another sign that its water crisis may be mirroring Flint
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The EPA warned residents on Friday that water filters distributed by the city "may not be reliably effective" at removing lead.

    The EPA warned residents on Friday that water filters distributed by the city "may not be reliably effective" at removing lead.


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  • 53/77   Climate deniers get more media play than scientists: study
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Climate deniers have garnered far more media attention than prominent climate scientists over the years, fuelling public confusion and slowing the response to global warming, researchers reported Tuesday.  From 2000 through 2016, hundreds of academics, business people and politicians who doubted global warming or attributed rising temperatures to 'natural' causes got 50 percent more ink than an equal number of top scientists, according to a study in Nature Communications, a peer-reviewed journal.  In reality, there has long been overwhelming agreement among climate scientists that global warming -- caused mainly by burning fossil fuels -- poses a major threat to civilisation and much of life on Earth.

    Climate deniers have garnered far more media attention than prominent climate scientists over the years, fuelling public confusion and slowing the response to global warming, researchers reported Tuesday. From 2000 through 2016, hundreds of academics, business people and politicians who doubted global warming or attributed rising temperatures to 'natural' causes got 50 percent more ink than an equal number of top scientists, according to a study in Nature Communications, a peer-reviewed journal. In reality, there has long been overwhelming agreement among climate scientists that global warming -- caused mainly by burning fossil fuels -- poses a major threat to civilisation and much of life on Earth.


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  • 54/77   California, other states sue Trump administration over replacement of Obama's Clean Power Plan
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    As part of a 22-state coalition, California is taking action against Trump's coal-protecting policy.

    As part of a 22-state coalition, California is taking action against Trump's coal-protecting policy.


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  • 55/77   Farmers use tech to squeeze every drop from Colorado River
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    A drone soared over a blazing hot cornfield in northeastern Colorado on a recent morning, snapping images with an infrared camera to help researchers decide how much water they would give the crops the next day.  This U.S. Department of Agriculture station outside Greeley and other sites across the Southwest are experimenting with drones, specialized cameras and other technology to squeeze the most out of every drop of water in the Colorado River — a vital but beleaguered waterway that serves an estimated 40 million people.  Cellphone apps collect data from agricultural weather stations and calculate how much water different crops are consuming.

    A drone soared over a blazing hot cornfield in northeastern Colorado on a recent morning, snapping images with an infrared camera to help researchers decide how much water they would give the crops the next day. This U.S. Department of Agriculture station outside Greeley and other sites across the Southwest are experimenting with drones, specialized cameras and other technology to squeeze the most out of every drop of water in the Colorado River — a vital but beleaguered waterway that serves an estimated 40 million people. Cellphone apps collect data from agricultural weather stations and calculate how much water different crops are consuming.


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  • 56/77   Is a global food crisis avoidable?
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    A dire United Nations report warns that humanity may not be able to create enough food in the future. What steps can mankind take to avoid a global food crisis?

    A dire United Nations report warns that humanity may not be able to create enough food in the future. What steps can mankind take to avoid a global food crisis?


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  • 57/77   Cramped and basic: Greta Thunberg's voyage to New York
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Facing two weeks at sea, eating freeze-dried food and using a bucket as a toilet, Greta Thunberg admits a racing yacht is not the most comfortable way to cross the Atlantic.  Pierre Casiraghi, a member of the Monaco royal family, has offered the yacht's services for free for the 3,000 nautical miles to New York and will skipper it with German sailor Boris Herrmann.  A monohull racing yacht with foils that help it lift out of the water, Malizia II was built in 2015 but has since been fitted with state-of-the-art solar panels and underwater turbines.

    Facing two weeks at sea, eating freeze-dried food and using a bucket as a toilet, Greta Thunberg admits a racing yacht is not the most comfortable way to cross the Atlantic. Pierre Casiraghi, a member of the Monaco royal family, has offered the yacht's services for free for the 3,000 nautical miles to New York and will skipper it with German sailor Boris Herrmann. A monohull racing yacht with foils that help it lift out of the water, Malizia II was built in 2015 but has since been fitted with state-of-the-art solar panels and underwater turbines.


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  • 58/77   Conservationists urge 'tighter wildlife laws' after Trump move
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Countries should be strengthening their laws protecting endangered species, not weakening them, international conservationists said Tuesday, after US President Donald Trump's administration announced plans to alter the country's Endangered Species Act.  Amid growing global alarm over the accelerating pace of species extinction, leading figures from the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) called for stronger protections of animals and plants under threat.  'Parties are all encouraged to strengthen their wildlife laws.

    Countries should be strengthening their laws protecting endangered species, not weakening them, international conservationists said Tuesday, after US President Donald Trump's administration announced plans to alter the country's Endangered Species Act. Amid growing global alarm over the accelerating pace of species extinction, leading figures from the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) called for stronger protections of animals and plants under threat. 'Parties are all encouraged to strengthen their wildlife laws.


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  • 59/77   Mallinckrodt Enrolls First Patient in Liver Disease Study
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Mallinckrodt (MNK) recruits the first patient in a mid-stage study on MNK-6106 for the treatment of hepatic cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy.

    Mallinckrodt (MNK) recruits the first patient in a mid-stage study on MNK-6106 for the treatment of hepatic cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy.


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  • 60/77   UN urges reluctant EU nations to help stranded migrants
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The United Nations refugee agency urgently appealed to European governments Tuesday to let two migrant rescue ships disembark more than 500 passengers who remain stranded at sea as countries bicker over who should take responsibility for them.  The people rescued while attempting to cross the Mediterranean Sea from North Africa are on ships chartered by humanitarian aid groups that the Italian government has banned from its territory.  The archipelago nation of Malta also has refused to let the ships into that country's ports.

    The United Nations refugee agency urgently appealed to European governments Tuesday to let two migrant rescue ships disembark more than 500 passengers who remain stranded at sea as countries bicker over who should take responsibility for them. The people rescued while attempting to cross the Mediterranean Sea from North Africa are on ships chartered by humanitarian aid groups that the Italian government has banned from its territory. The archipelago nation of Malta also has refused to let the ships into that country's ports.


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  • 61/77   U.K. Gears Up for Brexit-Driven Election That Johnson Can't Call
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s staff talk about an imminent general election as though it were a fact, and on Tuesday, a Conservative politician accidentally published a draft email about his “GE2019 team.”But amid growing expectations that the next chapter in the U.K.’s political crisis will see the country go to the polls, it’s still not clear how it will happen.The argument for an election is clear. Johnson has a governing majority in Parliament of just one seat, meaning he doesn’t have the votes to pass any controversial legislation. It’s also far from clear there’s majority for any kind of Brexit deal, while MPs are plotting to block his “do or die” plan to take Britain out of the European Union on Oct. 31, without a deal if necessary.Calling an election would stop those plots -- MPs would cease to be MPs and have to fight again for their seats -- and could potentially deliver Johnson a majority. The Conservatives see the prime minister as an electoral asset, a politician who’s also a celebrity. If he could argue the election had been forced on him and fight a “Parliament versus the People” campaign, the Tories hope Johnson could sweep up voters frustrated that Brexit hasn’t been delivered.Yet the days when prime ministers could go to the monarch and request an election are over. Under 2011 legislation, a national ballot can be called only if two-thirds of MPs opt for one -- or if the government loses a confidence vote. Unless either of those happen, under the Fixed-term Parliaments Act the next election isn’t scheduled until 2022.If Johnson wants an election “to break the parliamentary deadlock, or get a mandate for a no-deal Brexit, then he will not only need the support of all of his party but also a sizable chunk of opposition MPs,” said Maddy Thimont Jack at the Institute for Government. “A lot depends on when he calls it.”Opponents of a no-deal Brexit fear Johnson might go for a date just after Oct. 31, allowing Britain to leave the EU without a deal during the election campaign when there would be no Parliament to stop it. Opposition Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has argued this would be “unconstitutional and anti-democratic.”A person familiar with Corbyn’s thinking, speaking privately, said that if Johnson asked Parliament to vote for an election before Oct. 31, Labour would support it. If he asked for a later date, they said, it would be a much trickier decision. Labour’s backing, which Johnson needs given his wafer-thin majority, would likely depend on the prime minister agreeing to delay Brexit.There is a potential way around the 2011 election law: To amend it, requiring only a simple majority in Parliament. But it would also need the agreement of the upper House of Lords, and the timing of Brexit makes this complicated.Farage ThreatAn election while Britain is still an EU member is an unappealing prospect to Conservatives, who have seen their vote eroded by Nigel Farage’s new Brexit Party. He would be sure to stand candidates arguing that the Tories couldn’t be trusted to get Britain out of the EU, splitting the pro-Brexit vote. Two special elections this year saw the Tories defeated by other parties after the Brexit Party siphoned off anti-EU votes.So if it’s hard to see how Johnson can force an election, might Parliament force one on him instead?There’s much talk of a confidence vote when Parliament returns next month. If Johnson lost, a 14-day period follows in which someone else could try to form a government, or he could try to win a new confidence vote. An election would be automatically triggered if those efforts fail.For the government to lose a confidence vote, at least one Conservative MP -- though probably more -- would have to vote against their own side. That would see them expelled from the party and unable to stand for it in any subsequent election. Some have said privately they would be willing to do so as a last-resort to avert a no-deal Brexit.Stopping BrexitEven then, it might not mean an election. A memo written by Conservative Brexit opponent Dominic Grieve and Labour’s Margaret Becket, seen by Bloomberg, argues that the 14-day period after a confidence vote should be used to change the law and force a Brexit delay. That would then be followed, it’s implied in the strategy, by another confidence vote to cancel the election. The memo is clear that their goal is a second referendum on Brexit.That plan could easily go wrong, meaning an election by accident, potentially along with an accidental no-deal Brexit.There is a clear route to an election -- and it’s one that will most appeal to Johnson. If he can deliver Brexit, with a deal or without, the parliamentary arithmetic will likely lead him to call one afterward. British political parties prefer to campaign in spring than winter, so he might have to wait.But if he could argue he had solved Brexit, he’ll be strongly tempted to seek his own mandate early next year to take on other problems as well.To contact the reporter on this story: Robert Hutton in London at rhutton1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Stuart Biggs, Robert JamesonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s staff talk about an imminent general election as though it were a fact, and on Tuesday, a Conservative politician accidentally published a draft email about his “GE2019 team.”But amid growing expectations that the next chapter in the U.K.’s political crisis will see the country go to the polls, it’s still not clear how it will happen.The argument for an election is clear. Johnson has a governing majority in Parliament of just one seat, meaning he doesn’t have the votes to pass any controversial legislation. It’s also far from clear there’s majority for any kind of Brexit deal, while MPs are plotting to block his “do or die” plan to take Britain out of the European Union on Oct. 31, without a deal if necessary.Calling an election would stop those plots -- MPs would cease to be MPs and have to fight again for their seats -- and could potentially deliver Johnson a majority. The Conservatives see the prime minister as an electoral asset, a politician who’s also a celebrity. If he could argue the election had been forced on him and fight a “Parliament versus the People” campaign, the Tories hope Johnson could sweep up voters frustrated that Brexit hasn’t been delivered.Yet the days when prime ministers could go to the monarch and request an election are over. Under 2011 legislation, a national ballot can be called only if two-thirds of MPs opt for one -- or if the government loses a confidence vote. Unless either of those happen, under the Fixed-term Parliaments Act the next election isn’t scheduled until 2022.If Johnson wants an election “to break the parliamentary deadlock, or get a mandate for a no-deal Brexit, then he will not only need the support of all of his party but also a sizable chunk of opposition MPs,” said Maddy Thimont Jack at the Institute for Government. “A lot depends on when he calls it.”Opponents of a no-deal Brexit fear Johnson might go for a date just after Oct. 31, allowing Britain to leave the EU without a deal during the election campaign when there would be no Parliament to stop it. Opposition Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has argued this would be “unconstitutional and anti-democratic.”A person familiar with Corbyn’s thinking, speaking privately, said that if Johnson asked Parliament to vote for an election before Oct. 31, Labour would support it. If he asked for a later date, they said, it would be a much trickier decision. Labour’s backing, which Johnson needs given his wafer-thin majority, would likely depend on the prime minister agreeing to delay Brexit.There is a potential way around the 2011 election law: To amend it, requiring only a simple majority in Parliament. But it would also need the agreement of the upper House of Lords, and the timing of Brexit makes this complicated.Farage ThreatAn election while Britain is still an EU member is an unappealing prospect to Conservatives, who have seen their vote eroded by Nigel Farage’s new Brexit Party. He would be sure to stand candidates arguing that the Tories couldn’t be trusted to get Britain out of the EU, splitting the pro-Brexit vote. Two special elections this year saw the Tories defeated by other parties after the Brexit Party siphoned off anti-EU votes.So if it’s hard to see how Johnson can force an election, might Parliament force one on him instead?There’s much talk of a confidence vote when Parliament returns next month. If Johnson lost, a 14-day period follows in which someone else could try to form a government, or he could try to win a new confidence vote. An election would be automatically triggered if those efforts fail.For the government to lose a confidence vote, at least one Conservative MP -- though probably more -- would have to vote against their own side. That would see them expelled from the party and unable to stand for it in any subsequent election. Some have said privately they would be willing to do so as a last-resort to avert a no-deal Brexit.Stopping BrexitEven then, it might not mean an election. A memo written by Conservative Brexit opponent Dominic Grieve and Labour’s Margaret Becket, seen by Bloomberg, argues that the 14-day period after a confidence vote should be used to change the law and force a Brexit delay. That would then be followed, it’s implied in the strategy, by another confidence vote to cancel the election. The memo is clear that their goal is a second referendum on Brexit.That plan could easily go wrong, meaning an election by accident, potentially along with an accidental no-deal Brexit.There is a clear route to an election -- and it’s one that will most appeal to Johnson. If he can deliver Brexit, with a deal or without, the parliamentary arithmetic will likely lead him to call one afterward. British political parties prefer to campaign in spring than winter, so he might have to wait.But if he could argue he had solved Brexit, he’ll be strongly tempted to seek his own mandate early next year to take on other problems as well.To contact the reporter on this story: Robert Hutton in London at rhutton1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Stuart Biggs, Robert JamesonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 62/77   Airport Cleans Up After Night of Protest Chaos: Hong Kong Update
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Hong Kong’s airport resumed normal operations after a chaotic night of protest in which demonstrators beat and detained two suspected infiltrators and President Donald Trump warned of Chinese troops massing on the border.Only a few dozen protesters remained at Hong Kong International Airport as of 6 a.m. Wednesday, most having caught the last trains away from the airport rather than face dispersal by authorities. Flights appeared to be largely running as scheduled. Earlier Tuesday, hundreds of people staged a sit-in at the departure gates, disrupting flights at Asia’s busiest international airport for the second straight day.The interruptions follow a weekend of violence that saw police fire tear gas into a subway station and shoot rubber bullets at close range. Hong Kong’s embattled leader Carrie Lam warned Tuesday that the city risked sliding into an “abyss” as continuing unrest weighed on the economy.Here’s the latest:Airport Works to Reschedule Flights (6:22 a.m.)Hong Kong International Airport had resumed normal operations and was working to reschedule flights, an Airport Authority spokesman said by phone Wednesday. A few dozen protesters were still camped out in the terminals’ public areas, with most having cleared out before the trains back to the city centers stopped running. Most banners were gone.Few Protesters Remain at Airport (6 a.m.)Only a few dozen protesters were still camped out in the Hong Kong International Airport’s arrival hall early Wednesday, with most having cleared out before the trains back to the city centers stopped running. Most banners were gone and airport seemed to be operating fine, with flight boards showing most flights scheduled to depart.U.S. Urges Respect for Hong Kong’s Rights (1:51 a.m.)A U.S. State Department official urged China to adhere to the agreements it made when taking control of Hong Kong from the U.K. and allow the city to “exercise a high degree of autonomy” while respecting freedom of expression and peaceful assembly.The statement -- from an official who asked not to be identified -- was the most forceful to date from the U.S. and followed a tweet from Trump, who said reports from American intelligence agencies show China is moving troops to its border with Hong Kong. It wasn’t immediately clear if Trump was referring to new developments or mobilizations that have been underway for the past week.“Our Intelligence has informed us that the Chinese Government is moving troops to the Border with Hong Kong,” Trump said in a tweet. “Everyone should be calm and safe!”Chinese State Media Reporter Evacuated (12:25 a.m.)A second man who was tied up and beaten by protesters has been evacuated by paramedics. He appeared conscious as he was carried away on a stretcher.Protesters accused the man of being an undercover police officer from the mainland. But the editor-in-chief of the Chinese and English editions of the Global Times said he’s a reporter for the paper, which is affiliated with the Communist Party in China. “He has no other task except for reporting,” Hu Xijin said in a tweet.Trump Says He Hopes No One Gets Hurt, Killed (12:15 a.m.)China is facing a “tough situation” in Hong Kong, Trump told reporters in New Jersey. “I’m sure it will work out. I hope nobody gets hurt, I hope nobody gets killed.”Trump earlier this month referred to the protests in Hong Kong as “riots,” adopting the language used by Beijing and suggesting the U.S. would stay out of an issue that was “between Hong Kong and China.” That gets harder and harder as the situation escalates.Police Leave the Building, Protesters Dig in (11:46 p.m.)Protesters tied up another man they say was an undercover police officer from the mainland -- this one they accused of pretending to be a reporter.Riot Police Enter Airport (11:20 p.m.)Hong Kong police enter airport wearing riot gear and appeared to make several arrests. They used pepper spray outside the building.Police tweeted that it isn’t “a dispersal operation.” Officers were seen lingering outside the terminal building after an initial fracas.Injured Man is Evacuated from Airport (11:00 p.m.)Medics carrying the man on a stretcher push their way through crowds to an ambulance waiting outside. Scuffles break out between remaining police and protesters.Protesters Beat Man, Prevent Rescuers From Helping (10:23 p.m.)Protesters beat and tied up a man they say is a mainland police officer who was pretending to be one of them. For the past few hours they have prevented paramedics from evacuating the man while shouting “You’ll bear the consequences for your own actions.”Ten weeks of protests have seen serious injuries, but so far no fatalities. A death at the hands of protesters would ramp up pressure on authorities to crack down further, and increase the odds that the Chinese government mobilizes mainland forces to help maintain order.First Aiders Help Man Who Appears to Have Fainted (9:31 p.m.)Protesters tied up the hands a man they allege is a mainland public security officer, saying he was masquerading as one of them. Hundreds of people gather round as ambulance and airport staff try to help the man.Remaining Check-Ins Canceled (6:52 p.m.)Hong Kong’s airport halted check-ins for remaining departures for a second straight day, the airport authority said in a statement, after protesters blocked outgoing gates in a dramatic sit-in. The cancellation of all check-ins was announced after hundreds of black-shirted protesters sat down in the airport’s departure halls. The move came a day after authorities shut the airport amid a mass rally in the arrival hall Monday.China’s Leader Faces a Dilemma (6:14 p.m.)It’s the question worrying some in Hong Kong: Will Chinese President Xi Jinping send in troops to restore order? Xi now faces a dilemma over whether to wait the protesters out or bring in his forces. The likelihood he’ll do that remains low. While Xi could choose to do away with the city’s autonomy, there would be immense cost to both the Chinese leader and his country. It could dwarf any fallout from the weekslong protest movement. Among those risk factors is his protracted trade war with the U.S.Mainland Airports Stand To Benefit (5:52 p.m.)The disruptions at Hong Kong’s airport could be a boon for its competitors. It drove big gains Tuesday in shares of airports just over the Chinese border. Shenzhen Airport Co. soared by the 10% daily limit, while Guangzhou Baiyun International Airport Co. was up 4.5% to a record high. They had also rallied Monday. The unrest may lead global carriers to re-evaluate Hong Kong’s role as an international hub and flights allocated there, helping megacity Shenzhen establish itself as a hub in the longer run, Citic Securities Co. said.Cathay Parent Backs Government (5:35 p.m.)Cathay Pacific’s parent company, Swire Pacific Ltd., said it has “consistently and resolutely” supported Hong Kong’s development and remains fully committed to the city.UN Agency Urges Restraint (5:29 p.m.)The United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights condemned police for firing tear gas directly at protesters, saying they created “a considerable risk of death or serious injury.” It also urged protesters to express their views peacefully. The office “reviewed credible evidence of law enforcement officials employing less-lethal weapons in ways that are prohibited by international norms and standards,” spokesman Rupert Colville said in a statement.Departure Gates Closed (4:23 p.m.)The airport closed its north and south departure gates at international Terminal 1, leaving long lines of passengers who had already checked in to wait for further instruction.The closures came as Hong Kong police said at a daily briefing that officers fired 58 rounds of tear gas and seven rounds of rubber bullets as violence escalated Saturday, moves that helped fuel protester anger.Protests Spread to Departures Hall (3:32 p.m.)Hundreds of black-shirted protesters spread to the airport’s departures area, bringing passenger check-ins to a crawl. Demonstrators sat on the floor and blocked the route to the terminal’s north departure gates as they chanted “Shame on Hong Kong police.” A trickle of passengers were still getting through, but others remained in a long line, some sitting warily with their luggage carts. The crew channel was closed off. As the crowd of protesters shifted, the arrivals hall largely emptied out.“They shoot press, they shoot first aid, they are HK police,” one protester’s sign read.Patten: China Intervention Would Be ‘Catastrophe’ (2:20 p.m.)Hong Kong’s last colonial governor, Chris Patten, told the BBC on Tuesday that the government’s refusal to formally withdraw the extradition bill and set up an independent inquiry into the protests was to blame for pushing Hong Kong to the abyss. He urged President Xi Jinping and the local government to seek reconciliation avoid forcibly suppressing protests. “That would be a catastrophe,” said Patten, who served as governor from 1992 to 1997.Plans for Sunday March Detailed (1:19 p.m.)The Civil Human Rights Front, the group that organized three historically large marches against the extradition bill in June and July, detailed plans to hold a similar public procession at 3 p.m. Sunday. The group’s challenge will be maintaining the largely peaceful atmosphere of the earlier events as some protests turn to violence and the police employ more forceful measures to disperse them. It’s unclear whether CHRF will get sign-off from the police, who have been withholding approval from some marches.Opposition lawmaker Claudia Mo, a prominent participant in CHRF protests, separately called Lam’s contention that she didn’t have authority over the police force “irresponsible.” “It’s very clear right now who is running Hong Kong, and that’s Beijing,” Mo said.Airport Train Services Cut (12:51 p.m.)Hong Kong’s Airport Authority announced that trains between downtown and the terminals would depart less frequently after 1 p.m. in a bid to control crowds. The agency said fewer trains were necessary due to reduced flights at the airport. Trains would run at 15-minute intervals instead of the usual 10-minute span, an agency spokesman said.Travelers Confront Protesters at Airport (11:15 a.m.)Some travelers whose flights were disrupted by the airport protests confronted demonstrators, including one man speaking the Mandarin Chinese dialect preferred on the mainland, who complained that his trip had been delayed by a day. One protester apologized to the man, explaining that the government wouldn’t listen to their demands. Others shrugged off the delays.Lam: Police Used ‘Lowest Level’ Force (10:14 a.m.)Lam said police used the “lowest level of force” when asked why they had fired tear gas in residential areas, as she held a regular question and answer session ahead of a meeting of the city’s Executive Council. She urged calm, a refrain in recent weeks as violence between protesters and police worsens and tear gas is regularly deployed in crowded areas across the city.At one point, she was interrupted by reporters as she sidestepped questions on whether she would resign -- a key protester demand -- and whether she had concrete proposals to ease residents’ fears.“It would take a very long time to restore Hong Kong,” she said, choking up. “I again call on everyone to set aside prejudice, and be calm to look at the city, our home -- do we really want to push it into the abyss?”Read more on the potential toll of the unrest on Hong Kong’s economyLam Says Hong Kong in Chaos (9:48 a.m.)After her session began, Lam asked the public whether they wanted to see Hong Kong fall into an abyss and said the city was in a chaotic situation.The city’s rule of law is being hurt, she said, and non-cooperation events affected the airport and traffic. Lam also said she saw further suffering for the city’s economy, and that dialogue between the two sides could resume after violence stops.Protesters Call for Return to Airport (9 a.m.)Some protesters called for a return to the airport at 1 p.m. Tuesday, circulating a flier online calling for people to gather featuring an airplane and blue sky.Hong Kong Airlines vowed its support for the city’s government and police and condemned protester violence in a half-page advertisement in pro-Beijing local newspaper Wen Wei Po. It came as state-run Air China Ltd. canceled dozens of scheduled flights to the city on Tuesday, citing issues at the airport in a post to its official account on Chinese social media platform Weibo.Read more from Monday’s scene at Hong Kong’s airport(A previous version of this story was corrected after the Airport Authority revised its statement to show flights still departing, check-in closed.)\--With assistance from Iain Marlow, Sebastian Chau, Annabelle Droulers, Stephen Engle, Justin Sink and Annie Lee.To contact the reporters on this story: Yvonne Man in Hong Kong at yman9@bloomberg.net;Fion Li in Hong Kong at fli59@bloomberg.net;Natalie Lung in Hong Kong at flung6@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.net, John HarneyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Hong Kong’s airport resumed normal operations after a chaotic night of protest in which demonstrators beat and detained two suspected infiltrators and President Donald Trump warned of Chinese troops massing on the border.Only a few dozen protesters remained at Hong Kong International Airport as of 6 a.m. Wednesday, most having caught the last trains away from the airport rather than face dispersal by authorities. Flights appeared to be largely running as scheduled. Earlier Tuesday, hundreds of people staged a sit-in at the departure gates, disrupting flights at Asia’s busiest international airport for the second straight day.The interruptions follow a weekend of violence that saw police fire tear gas into a subway station and shoot rubber bullets at close range. Hong Kong’s embattled leader Carrie Lam warned Tuesday that the city risked sliding into an “abyss” as continuing unrest weighed on the economy.Here’s the latest:Airport Works to Reschedule Flights (6:22 a.m.)Hong Kong International Airport had resumed normal operations and was working to reschedule flights, an Airport Authority spokesman said by phone Wednesday. A few dozen protesters were still camped out in the terminals’ public areas, with most having cleared out before the trains back to the city centers stopped running. Most banners were gone.Few Protesters Remain at Airport (6 a.m.)Only a few dozen protesters were still camped out in the Hong Kong International Airport’s arrival hall early Wednesday, with most having cleared out before the trains back to the city centers stopped running. Most banners were gone and airport seemed to be operating fine, with flight boards showing most flights scheduled to depart.U.S. Urges Respect for Hong Kong’s Rights (1:51 a.m.)A U.S. State Department official urged China to adhere to the agreements it made when taking control of Hong Kong from the U.K. and allow the city to “exercise a high degree of autonomy” while respecting freedom of expression and peaceful assembly.The statement -- from an official who asked not to be identified -- was the most forceful to date from the U.S. and followed a tweet from Trump, who said reports from American intelligence agencies show China is moving troops to its border with Hong Kong. It wasn’t immediately clear if Trump was referring to new developments or mobilizations that have been underway for the past week.“Our Intelligence has informed us that the Chinese Government is moving troops to the Border with Hong Kong,” Trump said in a tweet. “Everyone should be calm and safe!”Chinese State Media Reporter Evacuated (12:25 a.m.)A second man who was tied up and beaten by protesters has been evacuated by paramedics. He appeared conscious as he was carried away on a stretcher.Protesters accused the man of being an undercover police officer from the mainland. But the editor-in-chief of the Chinese and English editions of the Global Times said he’s a reporter for the paper, which is affiliated with the Communist Party in China. “He has no other task except for reporting,” Hu Xijin said in a tweet.Trump Says He Hopes No One Gets Hurt, Killed (12:15 a.m.)China is facing a “tough situation” in Hong Kong, Trump told reporters in New Jersey. “I’m sure it will work out. I hope nobody gets hurt, I hope nobody gets killed.”Trump earlier this month referred to the protests in Hong Kong as “riots,” adopting the language used by Beijing and suggesting the U.S. would stay out of an issue that was “between Hong Kong and China.” That gets harder and harder as the situation escalates.Police Leave the Building, Protesters Dig in (11:46 p.m.)Protesters tied up another man they say was an undercover police officer from the mainland -- this one they accused of pretending to be a reporter.Riot Police Enter Airport (11:20 p.m.)Hong Kong police enter airport wearing riot gear and appeared to make several arrests. They used pepper spray outside the building.Police tweeted that it isn’t “a dispersal operation.” Officers were seen lingering outside the terminal building after an initial fracas.Injured Man is Evacuated from Airport (11:00 p.m.)Medics carrying the man on a stretcher push their way through crowds to an ambulance waiting outside. Scuffles break out between remaining police and protesters.Protesters Beat Man, Prevent Rescuers From Helping (10:23 p.m.)Protesters beat and tied up a man they say is a mainland police officer who was pretending to be one of them. For the past few hours they have prevented paramedics from evacuating the man while shouting “You’ll bear the consequences for your own actions.”Ten weeks of protests have seen serious injuries, but so far no fatalities. A death at the hands of protesters would ramp up pressure on authorities to crack down further, and increase the odds that the Chinese government mobilizes mainland forces to help maintain order.First Aiders Help Man Who Appears to Have Fainted (9:31 p.m.)Protesters tied up the hands a man they allege is a mainland public security officer, saying he was masquerading as one of them. Hundreds of people gather round as ambulance and airport staff try to help the man.Remaining Check-Ins Canceled (6:52 p.m.)Hong Kong’s airport halted check-ins for remaining departures for a second straight day, the airport authority said in a statement, after protesters blocked outgoing gates in a dramatic sit-in. The cancellation of all check-ins was announced after hundreds of black-shirted protesters sat down in the airport’s departure halls. The move came a day after authorities shut the airport amid a mass rally in the arrival hall Monday.China’s Leader Faces a Dilemma (6:14 p.m.)It’s the question worrying some in Hong Kong: Will Chinese President Xi Jinping send in troops to restore order? Xi now faces a dilemma over whether to wait the protesters out or bring in his forces. The likelihood he’ll do that remains low. While Xi could choose to do away with the city’s autonomy, there would be immense cost to both the Chinese leader and his country. It could dwarf any fallout from the weekslong protest movement. Among those risk factors is his protracted trade war with the U.S.Mainland Airports Stand To Benefit (5:52 p.m.)The disruptions at Hong Kong’s airport could be a boon for its competitors. It drove big gains Tuesday in shares of airports just over the Chinese border. Shenzhen Airport Co. soared by the 10% daily limit, while Guangzhou Baiyun International Airport Co. was up 4.5% to a record high. They had also rallied Monday. The unrest may lead global carriers to re-evaluate Hong Kong’s role as an international hub and flights allocated there, helping megacity Shenzhen establish itself as a hub in the longer run, Citic Securities Co. said.Cathay Parent Backs Government (5:35 p.m.)Cathay Pacific’s parent company, Swire Pacific Ltd., said it has “consistently and resolutely” supported Hong Kong’s development and remains fully committed to the city.UN Agency Urges Restraint (5:29 p.m.)The United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights condemned police for firing tear gas directly at protesters, saying they created “a considerable risk of death or serious injury.” It also urged protesters to express their views peacefully. The office “reviewed credible evidence of law enforcement officials employing less-lethal weapons in ways that are prohibited by international norms and standards,” spokesman Rupert Colville said in a statement.Departure Gates Closed (4:23 p.m.)The airport closed its north and south departure gates at international Terminal 1, leaving long lines of passengers who had already checked in to wait for further instruction.The closures came as Hong Kong police said at a daily briefing that officers fired 58 rounds of tear gas and seven rounds of rubber bullets as violence escalated Saturday, moves that helped fuel protester anger.Protests Spread to Departures Hall (3:32 p.m.)Hundreds of black-shirted protesters spread to the airport’s departures area, bringing passenger check-ins to a crawl. Demonstrators sat on the floor and blocked the route to the terminal’s north departure gates as they chanted “Shame on Hong Kong police.” A trickle of passengers were still getting through, but others remained in a long line, some sitting warily with their luggage carts. The crew channel was closed off. As the crowd of protesters shifted, the arrivals hall largely emptied out.“They shoot press, they shoot first aid, they are HK police,” one protester’s sign read.Patten: China Intervention Would Be ‘Catastrophe’ (2:20 p.m.)Hong Kong’s last colonial governor, Chris Patten, told the BBC on Tuesday that the government’s refusal to formally withdraw the extradition bill and set up an independent inquiry into the protests was to blame for pushing Hong Kong to the abyss. He urged President Xi Jinping and the local government to seek reconciliation avoid forcibly suppressing protests. “That would be a catastrophe,” said Patten, who served as governor from 1992 to 1997.Plans for Sunday March Detailed (1:19 p.m.)The Civil Human Rights Front, the group that organized three historically large marches against the extradition bill in June and July, detailed plans to hold a similar public procession at 3 p.m. Sunday. The group’s challenge will be maintaining the largely peaceful atmosphere of the earlier events as some protests turn to violence and the police employ more forceful measures to disperse them. It’s unclear whether CHRF will get sign-off from the police, who have been withholding approval from some marches.Opposition lawmaker Claudia Mo, a prominent participant in CHRF protests, separately called Lam’s contention that she didn’t have authority over the police force “irresponsible.” “It’s very clear right now who is running Hong Kong, and that’s Beijing,” Mo said.Airport Train Services Cut (12:51 p.m.)Hong Kong’s Airport Authority announced that trains between downtown and the terminals would depart less frequently after 1 p.m. in a bid to control crowds. The agency said fewer trains were necessary due to reduced flights at the airport. Trains would run at 15-minute intervals instead of the usual 10-minute span, an agency spokesman said.Travelers Confront Protesters at Airport (11:15 a.m.)Some travelers whose flights were disrupted by the airport protests confronted demonstrators, including one man speaking the Mandarin Chinese dialect preferred on the mainland, who complained that his trip had been delayed by a day. One protester apologized to the man, explaining that the government wouldn’t listen to their demands. Others shrugged off the delays.Lam: Police Used ‘Lowest Level’ Force (10:14 a.m.)Lam said police used the “lowest level of force” when asked why they had fired tear gas in residential areas, as she held a regular question and answer session ahead of a meeting of the city’s Executive Council. She urged calm, a refrain in recent weeks as violence between protesters and police worsens and tear gas is regularly deployed in crowded areas across the city.At one point, she was interrupted by reporters as she sidestepped questions on whether she would resign -- a key protester demand -- and whether she had concrete proposals to ease residents’ fears.“It would take a very long time to restore Hong Kong,” she said, choking up. “I again call on everyone to set aside prejudice, and be calm to look at the city, our home -- do we really want to push it into the abyss?”Read more on the potential toll of the unrest on Hong Kong’s economyLam Says Hong Kong in Chaos (9:48 a.m.)After her session began, Lam asked the public whether they wanted to see Hong Kong fall into an abyss and said the city was in a chaotic situation.The city’s rule of law is being hurt, she said, and non-cooperation events affected the airport and traffic. Lam also said she saw further suffering for the city’s economy, and that dialogue between the two sides could resume after violence stops.Protesters Call for Return to Airport (9 a.m.)Some protesters called for a return to the airport at 1 p.m. Tuesday, circulating a flier online calling for people to gather featuring an airplane and blue sky.Hong Kong Airlines vowed its support for the city’s government and police and condemned protester violence in a half-page advertisement in pro-Beijing local newspaper Wen Wei Po. It came as state-run Air China Ltd. canceled dozens of scheduled flights to the city on Tuesday, citing issues at the airport in a post to its official account on Chinese social media platform Weibo.Read more from Monday’s scene at Hong Kong’s airport(A previous version of this story was corrected after the Airport Authority revised its statement to show flights still departing, check-in closed.)\--With assistance from Iain Marlow, Sebastian Chau, Annabelle Droulers, Stephen Engle, Justin Sink and Annie Lee.To contact the reporters on this story: Yvonne Man in Hong Kong at yman9@bloomberg.net;Fion Li in Hong Kong at fli59@bloomberg.net;Natalie Lung in Hong Kong at flung6@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.net, John HarneyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 63/77   Pakistan seeks urgent UN meeting on India action in Kashmir
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Pakistan called Tuesday for an urgent meeting of the U.N. Security Council, saying India's decision to strip its part of disputed Kashmir of autonomy poses 'an imminent threat' to international peace and could lead to ethnic cleansing and genocide in the Muslim-majority region.  Quereshi accused India in a letter to the council obtained by The Associated Press of implementing a 'racist ideology' aimed at turning its part of Kashmir from a Muslim-majority into a Hindu-majority territory.

    Pakistan called Tuesday for an urgent meeting of the U.N. Security Council, saying India's decision to strip its part of disputed Kashmir of autonomy poses 'an imminent threat' to international peace and could lead to ethnic cleansing and genocide in the Muslim-majority region. Quereshi accused India in a letter to the council obtained by The Associated Press of implementing a 'racist ideology' aimed at turning its part of Kashmir from a Muslim-majority into a Hindu-majority territory.


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  • 64/77   Beijing 'preparing tanks at Hong Kong border', warns Trump as protesters clash with police at airport
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    Protesters clashed with riot police at Hong Kong's international airport on Tuesday evening after flights were disrupted for a second day, as Donald Trump warned that China is moving troops to the border. The airport scuffles broke out in the evening between police and protesters, after demonstrators allegedly detained two men suspected of being undercover Chinese officials. Trouble began as about 10-15 regular police officers entered the airport without riot gear to assist paramedics after a man collapsed. The man was accused by demonstrators of being a member of Chinese state security. Protesters then drove the police out of the terminal building. Shortly after, about 50 riot police arrived and clashes broke out in and around the entrance of the airport. Police used pepper spray and made a handful of arrests as scenes briefly turned violent. A policeman was cornered and beaten with his own baton before protesters dispersed when he drew his pistol. Cameramen and photographers film a detained man, who protesters claimed was a police officer from mainland China Credit: Vincent Yu/AP Protesters also detained a second man who they suspected of being an undercover agent. After emptying out his belongings, they found a blue T-shirt that has been worn by pro-Beijing supporters that they said was evidence he was a spy. The editor-in-chief of the Global Times claimed one of the men seen detained and tied to a trolley was a reporter for the Chinese state newspaper.  About 30 protesters remained at the airport early on Wednesday while workers scrubbed it clean of blood and debris from overnight. Check-in counters reopened to queues of weary travellers who had waited overnight for their flights. Dominic Raab, the foreign secretary, tweeted: "Concerning to see what's happening in Hong Kong and the worrying pictures of clashes between police & protesters at the airport. As I said to Carrie Lam during my call last week, we condemn the violence & encourage constructive dialogue to find a peaceful way forward." Meanwhile, Chinese paramilitary police were assembling across the border in the city of Shenzhen for exercises. While China has yet to threaten sending in the army - as it did against pro-democracy protesters in Beijing in 1989 - the Shenzhen exercises were a sign of its ability to crush the demonstrations, even at the cost to Hong Kong's reputation as a safe haven for business and international exchange. Images on the internet showed armored personnel carriers belonging to the People's Armed Police driving in a convoy on Monday towards the site of the exercises. Mr Trump said in a tweet: "Our Intelligence has informed us that the Chinese Government is moving troops to the Border with Hong Kong. Everyone should be calm and safe!" He retweeted a video purporting to show army trucks queuing in Shenzhen, the Chinese city that borders Hong Kong.  Disturbing video taken in Shenzhen just across the boarder with HongKong. Something extraordinarily bad is about happen. ChinaHongKongProtestsDemocracySaveHongKongpic.twitter.com/Gad5R5HVZL— Alexandre Krauss (@AlexandreKrausz) August 12, 2019 The US president, who is embroiled in a major trade dispute with China, added: "Many are blaming me, and the United States, for the problems going on in Hong Kong. I can’t imagine why?" Ten weeks of increasingly violent clashes between police and protesters have roiled the Asian financial hub as thousands of residents chafe at a perceived erosion of freedoms and autonomy under Chinese rule. The United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights urged Hong Kong to exercise restraint and investigate evidence of its forces firing tear gas at protesters in ways banned under international law. China later rejected what it called a "wrongful statement" by the UN, saying it amounted to interference in its domestic affairs. Riot police clashed with pockets of protesters at the airport as demonstrations crippled terminals Credit: THOMAS PETER/ REUTERS At a news conference in the government headquarters complex, which is fortified behind 6-foot (1.8-m) -high water-filled barricades, Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam said: "Take a minute to look at our city, our home." Her voice cracked as she added: "Can we bear to push it into the abyss and see it smashed to pieces?" Ms Lam’s repeated refusals to make any concessions or show sympathy towards protesters, some of whom have been injured as police shoot tear gas and rubber bullets, has only upset them more and boosted public support for the activists plunging the city into its worst political crisis in decades. Chris Patten, the last governor under British colonial rule, said that Hong Kong was "close to the abyss", because Ms Lam refused to withdraw a controversial extradition bill. "I think there is a degree of frustration and anger at the government refusing to give any sensible ground at all, which probably provokes more violence," Mr Patten told BBC Radio 4's Today programme. He urged Boris Johnson to take a firmer line with Beijing, and to put pressure on visiting National Security Advisor John Bolton for US help. Tom Tugendhat, chairman of the foreign affairs committee, said the UK should extend citizenship rights to Hong Kong citizens. The White House has also urged "all sides" to avoid violence in Hong Kong. Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell, a Republican, on Monday praised protesters for standing up to the Chinese Communist Party, warning that the "world is watching" for any violent crackdown by authorities. Mr Trump earlier said he hoped no one would be killed. The crisis was a "very tricky situation," the president told reporters in New Jersey. "I hope it works out peacefully, nobody gets hurt, nobody gets killed," he said. Hong Kong protests | Read more China this week condemned some protesters for using dangerous tools to attack police, calling the clashes "sprouts of terrorism". They present President Xi Jinping with one of his biggest challenges since he came to power in 2012. Hong Kong legal experts say Beijing might be paving the way to use anti-terrorism laws to try to quell the demonstrations. The clashes at the airport followed an unprecedented airport shutdown on Monday. Again on Tuesday, thousands of black-clad protesters jammed the terminal, chanting, singing and waving banners. Floors and walls were covered with missives penned by activists and other artwork. Initially, the scene was peaceful as knots of protesters spoke to travellers, explaining their aims. "Sorry for the inconvenience, we are fighting for the future of our home," read one protest banner at the airport. "I think paralysing the airport will be effective in forcing Carrie Lam to respond to us ... it can further pressure Hong Kong's economy," said Dorothy Cheng, 17. The weeks of protests began as opposition to a now-suspended bill that would have allowed suspects to be extradited to mainland China, but have swelled into wider calls for democracy. Demonstrators say they are fighting the erosion of the "one country, two systems" arrangement that enshrined some autonomy for Hong Kong since China took it back from Britain in 1997. They want Ms Lam to resign. She says she will stay. Fu Guohao, reporter of GT website is being seized by demonstrators at HK airport. I affirm this man being tied in this video is the reporter himself. He has no other task except for reporting. I sincerely ask the demonstrators to release him. I also ask for help of West reporters pic.twitter.com/sbFb0L3s92— Hu Xijin ??? (@HuXijin_GT) August 13, 2019 "My responsibility goes beyond this particular range of protest," Ms Lam said on Tuesday, adding that violence had pushed the territory into a state of "panic and chaos". As she spoke, the benchmark Hang Seng index hit a seven-month low. It shed more than 2%, dragging down markets across Asia. Ms Lam did not respond to questions at a press briefing to clarify if she had the power to withdraw the extradition bill and satisfy a key demand made by the protesters, or if she needed Beijing's approval. Airport authorities had earlier suspended check-in operations. Crowds of protesters continued to swell in the evening. "Terminal operations at Hong Kong International Airport have been seriously disrupted as a result of the public assembly," the airport authority said. Some passengers challenged protesters over the delays as tempers began to fray, while the demonstrators, using a Chinese term of encouragement, chanted, "Hong Kong people - add oil!" Flag carrier Cathay Pacific said: "There is potential for further flight disruptions at short notice". The airline, whose British heritage makes it a symbol of Hong Kong's colonial past, is also in a political bind. China's civil aviation regulator demanded that the airline suspend staff who joined or backed the protests from flights in its airspace, pushing the carrier's shares past Monday's 10-year low. Other Chinese airlines have offered passengers wanting to avoid Hong Kong a free switch to nearby destinations, such as Guangzhou, Macau, Shenzhen or Zhuhai, with the disruption sending shares in Shenzhen Airport Co Ltd surging.

    Protesters clashed with riot police at Hong Kong's international airport on Tuesday evening after flights were disrupted for a second day, as Donald Trump warned that China is moving troops to the border. The airport scuffles broke out in the evening between police and protesters, after demonstrators allegedly detained two men suspected of being undercover Chinese officials. Trouble began as about 10-15 regular police officers entered the airport without riot gear to assist paramedics after a man collapsed. The man was accused by demonstrators of being a member of Chinese state security. Protesters then drove the police out of the terminal building. Shortly after, about 50 riot police arrived and clashes broke out in and around the entrance of the airport. Police used pepper spray and made a handful of arrests as scenes briefly turned violent. A policeman was cornered and beaten with his own baton before protesters dispersed when he drew his pistol. Cameramen and photographers film a detained man, who protesters claimed was a police officer from mainland China Credit: Vincent Yu/AP Protesters also detained a second man who they suspected of being an undercover agent. After emptying out his belongings, they found a blue T-shirt that has been worn by pro-Beijing supporters that they said was evidence he was a spy. The editor-in-chief of the Global Times claimed one of the men seen detained and tied to a trolley was a reporter for the Chinese state newspaper.  About 30 protesters remained at the airport early on Wednesday while workers scrubbed it clean of blood and debris from overnight. Check-in counters reopened to queues of weary travellers who had waited overnight for their flights. Dominic Raab, the foreign secretary, tweeted: "Concerning to see what's happening in Hong Kong and the worrying pictures of clashes between police & protesters at the airport. As I said to Carrie Lam during my call last week, we condemn the violence & encourage constructive dialogue to find a peaceful way forward." Meanwhile, Chinese paramilitary police were assembling across the border in the city of Shenzhen for exercises. While China has yet to threaten sending in the army - as it did against pro-democracy protesters in Beijing in 1989 - the Shenzhen exercises were a sign of its ability to crush the demonstrations, even at the cost to Hong Kong's reputation as a safe haven for business and international exchange. Images on the internet showed armored personnel carriers belonging to the People's Armed Police driving in a convoy on Monday towards the site of the exercises. Mr Trump said in a tweet: "Our Intelligence has informed us that the Chinese Government is moving troops to the Border with Hong Kong. Everyone should be calm and safe!" He retweeted a video purporting to show army trucks queuing in Shenzhen, the Chinese city that borders Hong Kong.  Disturbing video taken in Shenzhen just across the boarder with HongKong. Something extraordinarily bad is about happen. ChinaHongKongProtestsDemocracySaveHongKongpic.twitter.com/Gad5R5HVZL— Alexandre Krauss (@AlexandreKrausz) August 12, 2019 The US president, who is embroiled in a major trade dispute with China, added: "Many are blaming me, and the United States, for the problems going on in Hong Kong. I can’t imagine why?" Ten weeks of increasingly violent clashes between police and protesters have roiled the Asian financial hub as thousands of residents chafe at a perceived erosion of freedoms and autonomy under Chinese rule. The United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights urged Hong Kong to exercise restraint and investigate evidence of its forces firing tear gas at protesters in ways banned under international law. China later rejected what it called a "wrongful statement" by the UN, saying it amounted to interference in its domestic affairs. Riot police clashed with pockets of protesters at the airport as demonstrations crippled terminals Credit: THOMAS PETER/ REUTERS At a news conference in the government headquarters complex, which is fortified behind 6-foot (1.8-m) -high water-filled barricades, Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam said: "Take a minute to look at our city, our home." Her voice cracked as she added: "Can we bear to push it into the abyss and see it smashed to pieces?" Ms Lam’s repeated refusals to make any concessions or show sympathy towards protesters, some of whom have been injured as police shoot tear gas and rubber bullets, has only upset them more and boosted public support for the activists plunging the city into its worst political crisis in decades. Chris Patten, the last governor under British colonial rule, said that Hong Kong was "close to the abyss", because Ms Lam refused to withdraw a controversial extradition bill. "I think there is a degree of frustration and anger at the government refusing to give any sensible ground at all, which probably provokes more violence," Mr Patten told BBC Radio 4's Today programme. He urged Boris Johnson to take a firmer line with Beijing, and to put pressure on visiting National Security Advisor John Bolton for US help. Tom Tugendhat, chairman of the foreign affairs committee, said the UK should extend citizenship rights to Hong Kong citizens. The White House has also urged "all sides" to avoid violence in Hong Kong. Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell, a Republican, on Monday praised protesters for standing up to the Chinese Communist Party, warning that the "world is watching" for any violent crackdown by authorities. Mr Trump earlier said he hoped no one would be killed. The crisis was a "very tricky situation," the president told reporters in New Jersey. "I hope it works out peacefully, nobody gets hurt, nobody gets killed," he said. Hong Kong protests | Read more China this week condemned some protesters for using dangerous tools to attack police, calling the clashes "sprouts of terrorism". They present President Xi Jinping with one of his biggest challenges since he came to power in 2012. Hong Kong legal experts say Beijing might be paving the way to use anti-terrorism laws to try to quell the demonstrations. The clashes at the airport followed an unprecedented airport shutdown on Monday. Again on Tuesday, thousands of black-clad protesters jammed the terminal, chanting, singing and waving banners. Floors and walls were covered with missives penned by activists and other artwork. Initially, the scene was peaceful as knots of protesters spoke to travellers, explaining their aims. "Sorry for the inconvenience, we are fighting for the future of our home," read one protest banner at the airport. "I think paralysing the airport will be effective in forcing Carrie Lam to respond to us ... it can further pressure Hong Kong's economy," said Dorothy Cheng, 17. The weeks of protests began as opposition to a now-suspended bill that would have allowed suspects to be extradited to mainland China, but have swelled into wider calls for democracy. Demonstrators say they are fighting the erosion of the "one country, two systems" arrangement that enshrined some autonomy for Hong Kong since China took it back from Britain in 1997. They want Ms Lam to resign. She says she will stay. Fu Guohao, reporter of GT website is being seized by demonstrators at HK airport. I affirm this man being tied in this video is the reporter himself. He has no other task except for reporting. I sincerely ask the demonstrators to release him. I also ask for help of West reporters pic.twitter.com/sbFb0L3s92— Hu Xijin ??? (@HuXijin_GT) August 13, 2019 "My responsibility goes beyond this particular range of protest," Ms Lam said on Tuesday, adding that violence had pushed the territory into a state of "panic and chaos". As she spoke, the benchmark Hang Seng index hit a seven-month low. It shed more than 2%, dragging down markets across Asia. Ms Lam did not respond to questions at a press briefing to clarify if she had the power to withdraw the extradition bill and satisfy a key demand made by the protesters, or if she needed Beijing's approval. Airport authorities had earlier suspended check-in operations. Crowds of protesters continued to swell in the evening. "Terminal operations at Hong Kong International Airport have been seriously disrupted as a result of the public assembly," the airport authority said. Some passengers challenged protesters over the delays as tempers began to fray, while the demonstrators, using a Chinese term of encouragement, chanted, "Hong Kong people - add oil!" Flag carrier Cathay Pacific said: "There is potential for further flight disruptions at short notice". The airline, whose British heritage makes it a symbol of Hong Kong's colonial past, is also in a political bind. China's civil aviation regulator demanded that the airline suspend staff who joined or backed the protests from flights in its airspace, pushing the carrier's shares past Monday's 10-year low. Other Chinese airlines have offered passengers wanting to avoid Hong Kong a free switch to nearby destinations, such as Guangzhou, Macau, Shenzhen or Zhuhai, with the disruption sending shares in Shenzhen Airport Co Ltd surging.


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  • 65/77   Street Protests Might Bring Down Putin—Or Make Him Even More Dangerous to U.S.
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Vasily Maximov/GettyThe well-known Russian political scientist Valery Solovey has talked a lot recently about possible political change in his country, but he was particularly emphatic in a tweet on Sunday, the day after 60,000 Russians protested on the streets of Moscow: "I have a growing feeling that this fall mass protests will enter a self-sustaining trajectory.  This is even faster than I expected and what I have publicly talked about. The underbrush of mass discontent has become parched. And the government is stubbornly bringing a match to it."But does Solovey's scenario—based on the premise that the Putin regime has gone too far in suppressing peaceful protesters—take into account the huge punitive machine that the Kremlin has to douse the flames it is igniting?  A Missile Explosion, a Radiation Spike, and Kremlin Secrecy Bring Back Memories of ChernobylNot only are Putin's loyal siloviki (those who run the “institutions of force”) showing no hesitation in unleashing their might against the democratic opposition; the rank and file forces under them are zealously following orders and unlikely to rebel. As one responder to Solovey tweeted:"No one has explained to ordinary police officers what would happen to them when the power changes, so they will continue to come down furiously with their clubs. After all, they, like Putin, are very afraid of revolution."This video of police on Saturday beating up a young woman illustrates the point and has caused a huge stir in the Russian independent media. She later was hospitalized with a concussion:Russia's mass street protests over election fraud in 2011-12 shook the Kremlin to its core and were a nightmare for Putin, who blamed Secretary of State Hillary Clinton for the unrest. She publicly expressed “serious concern” about irregularities in the 2011 Duma election, and former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper among others has suggested Putin's enduring grudge against Clinton may partly explain his aggressive support for Trump in 2016.Mindful of those protests eight years ago, Putin has long been preparing for another such outbreak, which this time began in July and was fueled by the decision of Russia's Central Election Commission to ban numerous independent candidates from running in Moscow's municipal election on September 8.  In 2016, Putin created a National Guard (Rosgvardia), which reports directly to him and numbers an estimated 350,000 men, including special forces and internal troops that used to be under the MVD (the Ministry of Internal Affairs).  A Battered Professor Leads Moscow’s Growing Grassroots Protests Against PutinDesigned to quell mass unrest, Rosgvardia is headed by Viktor Zolotov, a KGB veteran who became a close Putin ally when the two worked for the St. Petersburg mayor, Anatoly Sobchak, in the early '90s. (Zolotov was Sobchak's bodyguard.) The FSB (Federal Security Service) not only arrests and investigates Russian citizens for such crimes as "extremism," and corruption; it also has its own special forces, which are designated mainly for anti-terrorism, but could be called upon to suppress public disorders.  FSB chief Aleksandr Bortnikov, who joined the KGB in Leningrad in 1975, is a direct protégé of Putin. The MVD, which operates the regular police, is also loyal to Putin. MVD chief Vladimir Kolokoltsev is not a "piterskii" (part of Putin's St. Petersburg clan), but he is a dedicated career cop, (he formerly headed the Moscow police) known for coming down hard against real or perceived lawbreakers. And finally, the powerful Russian Investigative Committee, which recently opened a criminal case against Aleksei Navalny's Foundation Against Corruption (FBK) on charges of money laundering, is also under Putin's thumb. Its chief is Aleksandr Bastrykin, a fellow law student with Putin at Leningrad State University in the '70s and a long-time Putin crony. (The Kremlin has reportedly awarded staffers from the Investigative Committee a 20 percent pay raise.) Navalny, a leading opposition figure, and several of his colleagues are languishing in jail for organizing unauthorized protests; if the Investigative Committee's criminal case against them proceeds, they could end up in labor camps, like Mikhail Khodorkovsky, the exiled former head of the oil company Yukos, who was arrested in 2003 on Putin’s orders and spent 10 years behind bars.The Putin regime may have overreacted in its response to the protests, with the bungled jail poisoning of Navalny recently, the thousands of arrests, and the excessive, indiscriminate use of force against protesters. The whole crisis might have been avoided if the authorities had allowed at least a few candidates to appear on the Moscow ballot, which would have hardly threatened the Kremlin's grip on the city's government.  But the siloviki have good reason to maintain their resolve. They are all incredibly corrupt, as demonstrated in the numerous exposes by Navalny's FBK, and would suffer bad consequences if Putin's regime fell. (Recall the fate of the corrupt Ukrainian president, Viktor Yanukovich, who was forced to flee to Russia by the seat of his pants in 2014.) As for ordinary policemen and guard troops, rather than getting their news from the internet, where Navalny and others make their case against the Kremlin, they apparently watch state-controlled television, which portrays the protesters as pawns of the West.  Radio Liberty's Mike Eckel wrote last week: "Conspiracies of foreign intelligence agency meddling have also trickled down to the precinct level for Moscow police. One man who was detained during the protests, even though he said he was merely a bystander, was berated by an officer during his two days in police custody: 'Guys, you understand nothing. You’re being controlled. It’s the CIA that is manipulating you… The protests are just the beginning. This is part of a protracted campaign to oust the regime and seize Russia’s resources.'”As in 2011-2012,  the authorities prefer to see the current ferment as Western inspired, rather than to question their own policies.  After the August 3 street demonstrations, the Russian Foreign Ministry accused the U.S. Embassy in Moscow of encouraging turnout and "interfering in the internal affairs of our country" because the embassy published a map of the planned route: In fact, the Americans intended the map as a warning to its citizens to stay away from the protests.  And on Sunday, Roskomnadzor, the government agency that oversees the internet, demanded in a formal complaint that Google prohibit users of YouTube, its subsidiary, from posting notifications about  the protests. Roskomnadzor threatened Google with an “adequate response” in case of refusal to comply with its requirements: “The Russian Federation will regard this as interference in the sovereign affairs of the state, and also as hostile and hindering the conduction of democratic elections in Russia.”Russian journalist Iulia Latynina (forced to flee Russia in 2017 because her life was threatened) observed after Saturday's protests: "It is very interesting to watch [on YouTube] the riot police, because they have the special tactics and strategy of a war against their own people. These police went through combat coordination, that is, they know how to act… They beat people as if they were going after Germans at the entrance to the Kremlin."  Latynina claims that members of the riot police and the security organs think of themselves as a righteous sect, surrounded by enemies who are supported by the U.S. State Department. Their violence is arbitrary because it doesn't matter to them whether the person who is arrested or beaten is just an innocent bystander or an oppositionist.  Drawing parallels with Stalin's terror, Latynina concludes: "We have a lot of commentators who say: 'This violence is ineffective. It only makes people angry.' Well guys, sorry, please. Of course, violence is effective… and the history of our country, unfortunately, is direct evidence of this. Look what Stalin did. Stalin destroyed the Russian people and not only the Russian people but the Soviet people, all the people that were there. How many rebellions were there against Stalin?" Former FSB lieutenant-colonel Gennady Gudkov, who used to serve in the Russian Duma, seems to share Latynina's pessimism. In a blog for radio Echo of Moscow on Sunday, Gudkov wrote:  "If we discard the version that the Kremlin and its inhabitants are completely crazy, then we are left with one single impression: that the regime ordered its police to act extremely cruel with only one purpose—to anger society, sow indignation, hatred, and a desire to take revenge."  Gudkov goes on to explain that the Kremlin's end game may be to provoke enough public unrest to justify the declaration of a state of emergency, which would result in a cancellation of all future elections, complete censorship of the press and the internet, a shutdown of the independent media, and even curfews.   "One gets the impression," Gudkov continued, "that today the regime deliberately acts on the principle of  'the worse, the better.' If so, then you and I have entered the last stage of Putin's rule: the masks are dropped, the image in the world is gone, there is only one way—a la North Korea and the complete 'freezing' of public life for decades. And holding on until there are no longer enough forces, money, and ammunition for the fighters of the 'Rosgvardiya.' A bloody road to nowhere."Whatever the likelihood of these grim prognoses, which probably give the Kremlin too much credit for having a strategy, the authorities are keeping up some appearance of abiding by the rules. On Saturday, when police with black masks arrested Lyubov Sobol, a lawyer and producer of videos for Navalny's FBK, as well as a would-be candidate for the Moscow elections, they came with policewomen. Thirty-one-year-old Sobol, who has been on a hunger strike for over three weeks in protest against the election commission's decision, tweeted later: "The female police were hauled along just 'for show.' They were under the command of other officers… The police car that took me away stopped literally around the corner and let the policewomen out."  Sobol, the mother of a toddler, was released only after several hours of questioning, so she missed the demonstration. On the way home she thanked all the protesters for their solidarity with the opposition and urged them not to give up.  On Monday, the FBK posted a stunning expose, revealing the extensive corruption of a key member of the Central Election Commission, Boris Ebzeyev. Noting that Navalny and several colleagues are sitting behind bars and that its offices were raided last week, the FBK voiced defiance: "They are obviously trying to destroy us and make it so that we cannot go about our business—the fight against corruption. But this, of course, will not work. And to be honest, it only infuriates and energizes us." The democratic opposition is calling for another street demonstration on August 17, despite the fact that the Moscow mayor's office has refused to authorize it.  Political scientist Solovey observed in May that revolutions aren’t made by majorities, but by ambitious minorities “who suddenly understand that they have a chance to do now what they could not do earlier." Maybe he is right, after all.  Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

    Vasily Maximov/GettyThe well-known Russian political scientist Valery Solovey has talked a lot recently about possible political change in his country, but he was particularly emphatic in a tweet on Sunday, the day after 60,000 Russians protested on the streets of Moscow: "I have a growing feeling that this fall mass protests will enter a self-sustaining trajectory.  This is even faster than I expected and what I have publicly talked about. The underbrush of mass discontent has become parched. And the government is stubbornly bringing a match to it."But does Solovey's scenario—based on the premise that the Putin regime has gone too far in suppressing peaceful protesters—take into account the huge punitive machine that the Kremlin has to douse the flames it is igniting?  A Missile Explosion, a Radiation Spike, and Kremlin Secrecy Bring Back Memories of ChernobylNot only are Putin's loyal siloviki (those who run the “institutions of force”) showing no hesitation in unleashing their might against the democratic opposition; the rank and file forces under them are zealously following orders and unlikely to rebel. As one responder to Solovey tweeted:"No one has explained to ordinary police officers what would happen to them when the power changes, so they will continue to come down furiously with their clubs. After all, they, like Putin, are very afraid of revolution."This video of police on Saturday beating up a young woman illustrates the point and has caused a huge stir in the Russian independent media. She later was hospitalized with a concussion:Russia's mass street protests over election fraud in 2011-12 shook the Kremlin to its core and were a nightmare for Putin, who blamed Secretary of State Hillary Clinton for the unrest. She publicly expressed “serious concern” about irregularities in the 2011 Duma election, and former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper among others has suggested Putin's enduring grudge against Clinton may partly explain his aggressive support for Trump in 2016.Mindful of those protests eight years ago, Putin has long been preparing for another such outbreak, which this time began in July and was fueled by the decision of Russia's Central Election Commission to ban numerous independent candidates from running in Moscow's municipal election on September 8.  In 2016, Putin created a National Guard (Rosgvardia), which reports directly to him and numbers an estimated 350,000 men, including special forces and internal troops that used to be under the MVD (the Ministry of Internal Affairs).  A Battered Professor Leads Moscow’s Growing Grassroots Protests Against PutinDesigned to quell mass unrest, Rosgvardia is headed by Viktor Zolotov, a KGB veteran who became a close Putin ally when the two worked for the St. Petersburg mayor, Anatoly Sobchak, in the early '90s. (Zolotov was Sobchak's bodyguard.) The FSB (Federal Security Service) not only arrests and investigates Russian citizens for such crimes as "extremism," and corruption; it also has its own special forces, which are designated mainly for anti-terrorism, but could be called upon to suppress public disorders.  FSB chief Aleksandr Bortnikov, who joined the KGB in Leningrad in 1975, is a direct protégé of Putin. The MVD, which operates the regular police, is also loyal to Putin. MVD chief Vladimir Kolokoltsev is not a "piterskii" (part of Putin's St. Petersburg clan), but he is a dedicated career cop, (he formerly headed the Moscow police) known for coming down hard against real or perceived lawbreakers. And finally, the powerful Russian Investigative Committee, which recently opened a criminal case against Aleksei Navalny's Foundation Against Corruption (FBK) on charges of money laundering, is also under Putin's thumb. Its chief is Aleksandr Bastrykin, a fellow law student with Putin at Leningrad State University in the '70s and a long-time Putin crony. (The Kremlin has reportedly awarded staffers from the Investigative Committee a 20 percent pay raise.) Navalny, a leading opposition figure, and several of his colleagues are languishing in jail for organizing unauthorized protests; if the Investigative Committee's criminal case against them proceeds, they could end up in labor camps, like Mikhail Khodorkovsky, the exiled former head of the oil company Yukos, who was arrested in 2003 on Putin’s orders and spent 10 years behind bars.The Putin regime may have overreacted in its response to the protests, with the bungled jail poisoning of Navalny recently, the thousands of arrests, and the excessive, indiscriminate use of force against protesters. The whole crisis might have been avoided if the authorities had allowed at least a few candidates to appear on the Moscow ballot, which would have hardly threatened the Kremlin's grip on the city's government.  But the siloviki have good reason to maintain their resolve. They are all incredibly corrupt, as demonstrated in the numerous exposes by Navalny's FBK, and would suffer bad consequences if Putin's regime fell. (Recall the fate of the corrupt Ukrainian president, Viktor Yanukovich, who was forced to flee to Russia by the seat of his pants in 2014.) As for ordinary policemen and guard troops, rather than getting their news from the internet, where Navalny and others make their case against the Kremlin, they apparently watch state-controlled television, which portrays the protesters as pawns of the West.  Radio Liberty's Mike Eckel wrote last week: "Conspiracies of foreign intelligence agency meddling have also trickled down to the precinct level for Moscow police. One man who was detained during the protests, even though he said he was merely a bystander, was berated by an officer during his two days in police custody: 'Guys, you understand nothing. You’re being controlled. It’s the CIA that is manipulating you… The protests are just the beginning. This is part of a protracted campaign to oust the regime and seize Russia’s resources.'”As in 2011-2012,  the authorities prefer to see the current ferment as Western inspired, rather than to question their own policies.  After the August 3 street demonstrations, the Russian Foreign Ministry accused the U.S. Embassy in Moscow of encouraging turnout and "interfering in the internal affairs of our country" because the embassy published a map of the planned route: In fact, the Americans intended the map as a warning to its citizens to stay away from the protests.  And on Sunday, Roskomnadzor, the government agency that oversees the internet, demanded in a formal complaint that Google prohibit users of YouTube, its subsidiary, from posting notifications about  the protests. Roskomnadzor threatened Google with an “adequate response” in case of refusal to comply with its requirements: “The Russian Federation will regard this as interference in the sovereign affairs of the state, and also as hostile and hindering the conduction of democratic elections in Russia.”Russian journalist Iulia Latynina (forced to flee Russia in 2017 because her life was threatened) observed after Saturday's protests: "It is very interesting to watch [on YouTube] the riot police, because they have the special tactics and strategy of a war against their own people. These police went through combat coordination, that is, they know how to act… They beat people as if they were going after Germans at the entrance to the Kremlin."  Latynina claims that members of the riot police and the security organs think of themselves as a righteous sect, surrounded by enemies who are supported by the U.S. State Department. Their violence is arbitrary because it doesn't matter to them whether the person who is arrested or beaten is just an innocent bystander or an oppositionist.  Drawing parallels with Stalin's terror, Latynina concludes: "We have a lot of commentators who say: 'This violence is ineffective. It only makes people angry.' Well guys, sorry, please. Of course, violence is effective… and the history of our country, unfortunately, is direct evidence of this. Look what Stalin did. Stalin destroyed the Russian people and not only the Russian people but the Soviet people, all the people that were there. How many rebellions were there against Stalin?" Former FSB lieutenant-colonel Gennady Gudkov, who used to serve in the Russian Duma, seems to share Latynina's pessimism. In a blog for radio Echo of Moscow on Sunday, Gudkov wrote:  "If we discard the version that the Kremlin and its inhabitants are completely crazy, then we are left with one single impression: that the regime ordered its police to act extremely cruel with only one purpose—to anger society, sow indignation, hatred, and a desire to take revenge."  Gudkov goes on to explain that the Kremlin's end game may be to provoke enough public unrest to justify the declaration of a state of emergency, which would result in a cancellation of all future elections, complete censorship of the press and the internet, a shutdown of the independent media, and even curfews.   "One gets the impression," Gudkov continued, "that today the regime deliberately acts on the principle of  'the worse, the better.' If so, then you and I have entered the last stage of Putin's rule: the masks are dropped, the image in the world is gone, there is only one way—a la North Korea and the complete 'freezing' of public life for decades. And holding on until there are no longer enough forces, money, and ammunition for the fighters of the 'Rosgvardiya.' A bloody road to nowhere."Whatever the likelihood of these grim prognoses, which probably give the Kremlin too much credit for having a strategy, the authorities are keeping up some appearance of abiding by the rules. On Saturday, when police with black masks arrested Lyubov Sobol, a lawyer and producer of videos for Navalny's FBK, as well as a would-be candidate for the Moscow elections, they came with policewomen. Thirty-one-year-old Sobol, who has been on a hunger strike for over three weeks in protest against the election commission's decision, tweeted later: "The female police were hauled along just 'for show.' They were under the command of other officers… The police car that took me away stopped literally around the corner and let the policewomen out."  Sobol, the mother of a toddler, was released only after several hours of questioning, so she missed the demonstration. On the way home she thanked all the protesters for their solidarity with the opposition and urged them not to give up.  On Monday, the FBK posted a stunning expose, revealing the extensive corruption of a key member of the Central Election Commission, Boris Ebzeyev. Noting that Navalny and several colleagues are sitting behind bars and that its offices were raided last week, the FBK voiced defiance: "They are obviously trying to destroy us and make it so that we cannot go about our business—the fight against corruption. But this, of course, will not work. And to be honest, it only infuriates and energizes us." The democratic opposition is calling for another street demonstration on August 17, despite the fact that the Moscow mayor's office has refused to authorize it.  Political scientist Solovey observed in May that revolutions aren’t made by majorities, but by ambitious minorities “who suddenly understand that they have a chance to do now what they could not do earlier." Maybe he is right, after all.  Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


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  • 66/77   Merkel Puts the First Crack in Her Opposition to Fiscal Stimulus
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. Chancellor Angela Merkel adopted a more somber tone on the state of Germany’s economy, saying a difficult patch lay ahead that the government may have to react to."It’s true, we’re heading into a difficult phase," Merkel said at a town hall event in the northern city of Stralsund. The government will closely monitor second quarter economic development and then look at the third quarter, she said. "We will react depending on the situation."It is the first time Merkel suggested the government may need to become more proactive in to respond to the country’s economic slowdown, saying that she didn’t see the need for a growth package "so far".In recent weeks there have been growing calls in business and politics for the chancellor to adopt stimulus measures. Merkel’s Christian Democratic-led bloc as well as her junior coalition partner, the Social Democrats, have plummeted in opinion polls ahead of key regional elections next month.Economic growth this year is forecast at just 0.6%, as fallout from the trade war hits Germany’s export-driven industry. Growth slowed from 2.2% in 2017 to 1.4% in 2018. Second-quarter GDP data is due tomorrow, and economists predict the economy contracted 0.1% in the three months through June."Domestic demand is still somewhat propping up the economy," said Merkel, reiterating that she would not seek another public office after her term ends in 2021.Based on details from the draft 2020 budget proposal published by parliament today, the government will stick to its policy of not increasing net debt.(Adds details and context throughout.)\--With assistance from Zoe Schneeweiss.To contact the reporters on this story: Birgit Jennen in Berlin at bjennen1@bloomberg.net;Brian Parkin in Berlin at bparkin@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Ben Sills at bsills@bloomberg.net, Raymond ColittFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. Chancellor Angela Merkel adopted a more somber tone on the state of Germany’s economy, saying a difficult patch lay ahead that the government may have to react to."It’s true, we’re heading into a difficult phase," Merkel said at a town hall event in the northern city of Stralsund. The government will closely monitor second quarter economic development and then look at the third quarter, she said. "We will react depending on the situation."It is the first time Merkel suggested the government may need to become more proactive in to respond to the country’s economic slowdown, saying that she didn’t see the need for a growth package "so far".In recent weeks there have been growing calls in business and politics for the chancellor to adopt stimulus measures. Merkel’s Christian Democratic-led bloc as well as her junior coalition partner, the Social Democrats, have plummeted in opinion polls ahead of key regional elections next month.Economic growth this year is forecast at just 0.6%, as fallout from the trade war hits Germany’s export-driven industry. Growth slowed from 2.2% in 2017 to 1.4% in 2018. Second-quarter GDP data is due tomorrow, and economists predict the economy contracted 0.1% in the three months through June."Domestic demand is still somewhat propping up the economy," said Merkel, reiterating that she would not seek another public office after her term ends in 2021.Based on details from the draft 2020 budget proposal published by parliament today, the government will stick to its policy of not increasing net debt.(Adds details and context throughout.)\--With assistance from Zoe Schneeweiss.To contact the reporters on this story: Birgit Jennen in Berlin at bjennen1@bloomberg.net;Brian Parkin in Berlin at bparkin@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Ben Sills at bsills@bloomberg.net, Raymond ColittFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 67/77   Russian authorities clear villages near nuclear test site as it emerges radiation levels rose after recent blast
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    As concerns over another possible nuclear incident in the Russian Arctic grow, authorities in Arkhangelsk region have asked residents of a town near a missile test range to evacuate their homes tomorrow while the military conducts “planned activities,” it has been reported. “We have received a notification... about the planned activities of the military authorities,” the Interfax news agency quoted local authorities as saying. “In this regard, residents of Nyonoksa were asked to leave the territory of the village from August 14.” The town was the site of a mysterious blast on August 8. Initial reports suggested the explosion went off at the test range, but more recent official statements place the incident on a platform just offshore.  The nature of the blast, which killed five nuclear scientists, has not yet been established. Russia nuclear map However, suspicion has generally fallen on a failed test of Russia’s Burevestnik nuclear-powered cruise missile - called "Skyfall" by Nato. The weapon was announced by Vladimir Putin, the Russian president, in a speech last year.  Donald Trump, the US president, on Monday night claimed America has a more advanced version of the weapon. The Kremlin, in its first comments on the situation, countered by saying Mr Putin has made it clear that Russia has the best technology in this field. The evacuation of Nyonoksa suggests that, despite an apparent failure of some kind of nuclear or radioactive device last week, the Russian military is preparing for another test. People gather for the funerals of five Russian nuclear engineers killed by a rocket explosion in Sarov Credit: Russian State Atomic Energy Corporation ROSATOM via AP Moving locals out of the area is seen as tacit recognition that something dangerous is being tested.  The Ministry of Defense has repeatedly said no toxic substances were released in last week’s explosion. This was contradicted by monitors in the nearby town of Severodvinsk, who reported a brief jump in radiation levels. The Severodvinsk city government statement quietly disappeared from the city government’s website over the weekend. But, on Tuesday, Russia’s federal weather service confirmed that radiation levels jumped to 16 times their normal level on August 8 for a period of two hours.  The TASS news agency reported Tuesday that medics who treated those wounded by the August 8 explosion have been sent to Moscow for medical examinations. Unconfirmed videos of the medical response teams last week showed them wearing hazmat suits.

    As concerns over another possible nuclear incident in the Russian Arctic grow, authorities in Arkhangelsk region have asked residents of a town near a missile test range to evacuate their homes tomorrow while the military conducts “planned activities,” it has been reported. “We have received a notification... about the planned activities of the military authorities,” the Interfax news agency quoted local authorities as saying. “In this regard, residents of Nyonoksa were asked to leave the territory of the village from August 14.” The town was the site of a mysterious blast on August 8. Initial reports suggested the explosion went off at the test range, but more recent official statements place the incident on a platform just offshore.  The nature of the blast, which killed five nuclear scientists, has not yet been established. Russia nuclear map However, suspicion has generally fallen on a failed test of Russia’s Burevestnik nuclear-powered cruise missile - called "Skyfall" by Nato. The weapon was announced by Vladimir Putin, the Russian president, in a speech last year.  Donald Trump, the US president, on Monday night claimed America has a more advanced version of the weapon. The Kremlin, in its first comments on the situation, countered by saying Mr Putin has made it clear that Russia has the best technology in this field. The evacuation of Nyonoksa suggests that, despite an apparent failure of some kind of nuclear or radioactive device last week, the Russian military is preparing for another test. People gather for the funerals of five Russian nuclear engineers killed by a rocket explosion in Sarov Credit: Russian State Atomic Energy Corporation ROSATOM via AP Moving locals out of the area is seen as tacit recognition that something dangerous is being tested.  The Ministry of Defense has repeatedly said no toxic substances were released in last week’s explosion. This was contradicted by monitors in the nearby town of Severodvinsk, who reported a brief jump in radiation levels. The Severodvinsk city government statement quietly disappeared from the city government’s website over the weekend. But, on Tuesday, Russia’s federal weather service confirmed that radiation levels jumped to 16 times their normal level on August 8 for a period of two hours.  The TASS news agency reported Tuesday that medics who treated those wounded by the August 8 explosion have been sent to Moscow for medical examinations. Unconfirmed videos of the medical response teams last week showed them wearing hazmat suits.


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  • 68/77   Iran Says It Expects Tanker Held by U.K. to Be Released Soon
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Iran expects an oil tanker seized by the U.K. in the Strait of Gibraltar in July will be released soon, the semi-official Fars News agency reported Tuesday, a move that could help to ease concerns about the safety of shipping routes in the Middle East.“Official and unofficial documents have been exchanged to resolve the matter and we hope the problem will be dealt with in the very near future,” Fars cited Jalil Eslami, deputy for maritime affairs at Iran’s Ports and Maritime Organization, as saying. The future of a U.K.-flagged tanker that Iran seized later in the Persian Gulf depends on “the necessary judicial processes,” Eslami added.Iran’s Grace 1 tanker was seized by the Royal Navy on suspicion it was sending crude oil to Syria in violation of European Union sanctions. Tehran denied breaking sanctions and two weeks later impounded the U.K.-flagged Stena Impero near the Strait of Hormuz, the world’s most important chokepoint for oil.Gibraltar’s Supreme Court is scheduled to hold its next hearing on the vessel on Thursday, according to the official Gibraltar news service in Spain. The current detention order for the ship expires late on Saturday, local media reported. A spokesperson for the U.K. Foreign Office said that the “ongoing investigation” into the Grace 1 was a matter for Gibraltar authorities. The tanker seizures and other suspected Iranian operations against shipping in the Persian Gulf region have inflamed a crisis between Iran and the West triggered by the Trump administration’s decision to quit the multiparty nuclear deal with Iran a year ago and renew crippling economic sanctions. Iran has responded by abandoning some restrictions on uranium enrichment imposed by the 2015 accord.The frictions on the seas have led the U.S. and U.K. to mount a joint mission to protect commercial shipping lanes in the Middle East. Reports of Israeli involvement in that mission have drawn fire from Tehran, and on Tuesday, the commander of Iran’s Revolutionary Guards Corp’s naval forces warned against “any illegal presence in the Persian Gulf and Strait of Hormuz, especially Israel’s.”“We in the Iranian Revolutionary Guards Corps are in charge of providing security for the Strait of Hormuz and the Persian Gulf, and there is no need for strangers,” Rear Admiral Alireza Tangsiri said, according to the semi-official Iranian Students’ News Agency.Last week, Israel’s Ynet website reported that Israel is providing intelligence and other, unspecified assistance to U.S.-led efforts to protect Persian Gulf shipping routes. It cited Foreign Minister Israel Katz’s remarks to parliament’s foreign affairs and defense committee.Israel considers Iran to be its most formidable enemy, due to its nuclear work, ballistic missile program and support for anti-Israel militant groups in the Middle East. Iranian officials have also referred multiple times to Israel’s annihilation. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu lobbied hard against the nuclear deal, and pressed President Donald Trump to abandon it.Israel has been striking Iranian targets in Syria over the past few years in an effort to limit the Islamic Republic’s presence in its immediate neighborhood, and according to recent reports, has expanded those operations to hit Iranian-backed militias in Iraq.(Updates with Thursday hearing at Gibraltar court in fourth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Alex Morales and Charles Penty.To contact the reporter on this story: Arsalan Shahla in Tehran at ashahla@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Lin Noueihed at lnoueihed@bloomberg.net, Amy Teibel, Mark WilliamsFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Iran expects an oil tanker seized by the U.K. in the Strait of Gibraltar in July will be released soon, the semi-official Fars News agency reported Tuesday, a move that could help to ease concerns about the safety of shipping routes in the Middle East.“Official and unofficial documents have been exchanged to resolve the matter and we hope the problem will be dealt with in the very near future,” Fars cited Jalil Eslami, deputy for maritime affairs at Iran’s Ports and Maritime Organization, as saying. The future of a U.K.-flagged tanker that Iran seized later in the Persian Gulf depends on “the necessary judicial processes,” Eslami added.Iran’s Grace 1 tanker was seized by the Royal Navy on suspicion it was sending crude oil to Syria in violation of European Union sanctions. Tehran denied breaking sanctions and two weeks later impounded the U.K.-flagged Stena Impero near the Strait of Hormuz, the world’s most important chokepoint for oil.Gibraltar’s Supreme Court is scheduled to hold its next hearing on the vessel on Thursday, according to the official Gibraltar news service in Spain. The current detention order for the ship expires late on Saturday, local media reported. A spokesperson for the U.K. Foreign Office said that the “ongoing investigation” into the Grace 1 was a matter for Gibraltar authorities. The tanker seizures and other suspected Iranian operations against shipping in the Persian Gulf region have inflamed a crisis between Iran and the West triggered by the Trump administration’s decision to quit the multiparty nuclear deal with Iran a year ago and renew crippling economic sanctions. Iran has responded by abandoning some restrictions on uranium enrichment imposed by the 2015 accord.The frictions on the seas have led the U.S. and U.K. to mount a joint mission to protect commercial shipping lanes in the Middle East. Reports of Israeli involvement in that mission have drawn fire from Tehran, and on Tuesday, the commander of Iran’s Revolutionary Guards Corp’s naval forces warned against “any illegal presence in the Persian Gulf and Strait of Hormuz, especially Israel’s.”“We in the Iranian Revolutionary Guards Corps are in charge of providing security for the Strait of Hormuz and the Persian Gulf, and there is no need for strangers,” Rear Admiral Alireza Tangsiri said, according to the semi-official Iranian Students’ News Agency.Last week, Israel’s Ynet website reported that Israel is providing intelligence and other, unspecified assistance to U.S.-led efforts to protect Persian Gulf shipping routes. It cited Foreign Minister Israel Katz’s remarks to parliament’s foreign affairs and defense committee.Israel considers Iran to be its most formidable enemy, due to its nuclear work, ballistic missile program and support for anti-Israel militant groups in the Middle East. Iranian officials have also referred multiple times to Israel’s annihilation. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu lobbied hard against the nuclear deal, and pressed President Donald Trump to abandon it.Israel has been striking Iranian targets in Syria over the past few years in an effort to limit the Islamic Republic’s presence in its immediate neighborhood, and according to recent reports, has expanded those operations to hit Iranian-backed militias in Iraq.(Updates with Thursday hearing at Gibraltar court in fourth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Alex Morales and Charles Penty.To contact the reporter on this story: Arsalan Shahla in Tehran at ashahla@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Lin Noueihed at lnoueihed@bloomberg.net, Amy Teibel, Mark WilliamsFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 69/77   How the Strait of Hormuz, a narrow stretch of water where ships transport $1.2 billion worth of oil every day, is at the heart of spiraling tensions with Iran
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The US blames Iran for two tanker explosions and a drone shooting near the Strait of Hormuz. Some 21 million barrels of oil pass through it every day.

    The US blames Iran for two tanker explosions and a drone shooting near the Strait of Hormuz. Some 21 million barrels of oil pass through it every day.


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  • 70/77   How to Spot and Avoid Algal Blooms
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...


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  • 71/77   Get These 4 Vaccines for College
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If your child is a college student—or soon to be one—making sure he or she is fully vaccinated is critically important, especially for those who will be living in a dorm or other shared space. Th...

    If your child is a college student—or soon to be one—making sure he or she is fully vaccinated is critically important, especially for those who will be living in a dorm or other shared space. Th...


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  • 72/77   DNA detectives: New tech can mean a diagnosis for your child, but not a lot of answers
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Four-year-old Eli Kadkhoda is one of a handful of children with IRF2BPL-related condition, named after the gene to which it is linked. Its patients are all healthy at birth, stumbling and losing speech by kindergarten, wheelchair-dependent soon after.

    Four-year-old Eli Kadkhoda is one of a handful of children with IRF2BPL-related condition, named after the gene to which it is linked. Its patients are all healthy at birth, stumbling and losing speech by kindergarten, wheelchair-dependent soon after.


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  • 73/77   Will Your Health Insurance Cover You Overseas?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you’re traveling abroad this summer, the last thing you probably want to think about is what you’ll do if you get sick or injured. But experts say 15 percent of travelers encounter some kind o...

    If you’re traveling abroad this summer, the last thing you probably want to think about is what you’ll do if you get sick or injured. But experts say 15 percent of travelers encounter some kind o...


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  • 74/77   9 Easy Ways to Make Your Jack-o'-Lanterns Last Longer
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    A little bleach goes a long way.

    A little bleach goes a long way.


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  • 75/77   Don't Forget These Vaccines When You Travel
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you're planning a summer trip overseas, you may be preoccupied with booking airfare and finding lodging, but certain destinations require an extra step of planning: travel vaccines. You might...

    If you're planning a summer trip overseas, you may be preoccupied with booking airfare and finding lodging, but certain destinations require an extra step of planning: travel vaccines. You might...


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  • 76/77   How to Get Kids to Wear Sunscreen
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Being a kid in the summer is often about playing outside, but if you don’t protect your child from the sun’s ultraviolet rays, he or she has a greater chance of developing skin cancer as an adult...

    Being a kid in the summer is often about playing outside, but if you don’t protect your child from the sun’s ultraviolet rays, he or she has a greater chance of developing skin cancer as an adult...


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  • 77/77   Get a Good Sunscreen at a Great Price
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    No doubt about it: If you’re using sunscreen properly, you’re going to go through a lot of it over the course of a summer. Let’s do the math. It takes a full ounce to cover your body, and you nee...

    No doubt about it: If you’re using sunscreen properly, you’re going to go through a lot of it over the course of a summer. Let’s do the math. It takes a full ounce to cover your body, and you nee...


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