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News Slideshows (10/08/2019 15 hours)


  • 1/79   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


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    Press Review


    Blizzard   58% of Americans   PlayStation 5   O Israel   Steve Kerr   RIP Wendy   George Bush   Ambassador Sondland   Good Tuesday   James Peebles   The Dispatch   Nobel Prize in Physics   Target Center   Tencent   Liberate Hong Kong   Today the Supreme Court   PAY YOUR BILLS   thanks ellen   Title VII   Samuel Little   Mayor Frey   as sea levels rise   WESH   
  • 2/79   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


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  • 3/79   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


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  • 4/79   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


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  • 5/79   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


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  • 6/79   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


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  • 7/79   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


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  • 8/79   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


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  • 9/79   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


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  • 10/79   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


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  • 11/79   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


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  • 12/79   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


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  • 13/79   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


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  • 14/79   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named.  Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does.  At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


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  • 15/79   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


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  • 16/79   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


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  • 17/79   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


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  • 18/79   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


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  • 19/79   IMF to postpone planned quota increase due to U.S. resistance - source
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The International Monetary Fund is set to postpone its plan to raise its funding quotas, or voting shares, that would see China replace Japan as the second-most-influential voice at the body, a Japanese official with knowledge of the matter told Reuters.  Washington, which as the largest shareholder in the global lender wields an effective right of veto, has previously expressed opposition to increasing the IMF's overall funding and shareholder quotas, a move that would also reshuffle voting rights.  Voting power in the body is tied to what proportion of funding a member contributes, and that proportion is in turn linked to the member's gross domestic product.

    The International Monetary Fund is set to postpone its plan to raise its funding quotas, or voting shares, that would see China replace Japan as the second-most-influential voice at the body, a Japanese official with knowledge of the matter told Reuters. Washington, which as the largest shareholder in the global lender wields an effective right of veto, has previously expressed opposition to increasing the IMF's overall funding and shareholder quotas, a move that would also reshuffle voting rights. Voting power in the body is tied to what proportion of funding a member contributes, and that proportion is in turn linked to the member's gross domestic product.


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  • 20/79   Boeing to invest $20 million in Richard Branson's Virgin Galactic
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Branson founded space ventures like Virgin Galactic and Virgin Orbit to cash in on rising demand for space travel and launch services for a boom in the number of smaller satellites.  Reuters earlier reported Virgin Galactic's plans for going public by the year-end.  Boeing would receive new shares of Virgin Galactic in return for the investment made by its venture capital arm Boeing HorizonX Ventures.

    Branson founded space ventures like Virgin Galactic and Virgin Orbit to cash in on rising demand for space travel and launch services for a boom in the number of smaller satellites. Reuters earlier reported Virgin Galactic's plans for going public by the year-end. Boeing would receive new shares of Virgin Galactic in return for the investment made by its venture capital arm Boeing HorizonX Ventures.


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  • 21/79   Wall Street eyes weaker open on escalating trade concerns
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The report came as tensions escalated after the U.S. widened its trade blacklist to include Chinese video surveillance firm Hikvision and surveillance equipment maker Zhejiang Dahua Technology among others, drawing a sharp rebuke from Beijing.  Adding to the pessimism, a South China Morning Post report said China had toned down its expectations ahead of the high-level trade talks set to begin on Thursday and that the Chinese delegation could depart Washington a day earlier than planned.

    The report came as tensions escalated after the U.S. widened its trade blacklist to include Chinese video surveillance firm Hikvision and surveillance equipment maker Zhejiang Dahua Technology among others, drawing a sharp rebuke from Beijing. Adding to the pessimism, a South China Morning Post report said China had toned down its expectations ahead of the high-level trade talks set to begin on Thursday and that the Chinese delegation could depart Washington a day earlier than planned.


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  • 22/79   Pound drops as PM tells Merkel that Brexit deal is ‘essentially impossible’ — live updates
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Pound falls to one-month low against the euro on reports PM told German Chancellor Brexit deal is “essentially impossible” Productivity slowdown fears as output per hour fell by 0.5pc in second quarter, as UK economy contracted FTSE flat as European shares slide ahead of US-China trade talks Recruiters knocked as global economic fears prompt hiring slowdown Hong Kong bourse scraps £32bn bid for London Stock Exchange Tories risk trashing their reputation for competence with Corbynesque spending spree, IFS warns Matthew Lynn: This decade has been pretty average for investment returns – but the 2020s will be worse 1:44PM Nissan picks China executive as new chief executive Makoto Uchida is currently head of the car giant’s Chinese operations Credit: Kyodo News New from Japan: Nissan has selected Makoto Uchida, the head of its China business, as its new chief executive — filling the hole left by Hiroto Saikawa’s exit last month. Mr Uchida was selected because of his close understanding of the car giant’s oversees markets, sources told the Wall Street Journal. The move comes after an international scandal that began when former Chairman Carlos Ghosn was arrested last year. The new boss has a full in-tray: the Japanese car firm faces falling sales, a restructuring plan, and continued tensions in its alliance with France’s Renault. 1:22PM Full report: UK economy nears ‘productivity recession’ The manufacturing sector suffered a sharp decline in productivity during the second quarter Credit: OLI SCARFF/AFP My colleague Tom Rees has a full report on this morning’s productivity figures. He writes: Productivity contracted 0.5pc year-on-year in the second quarter as the economy stumbled, capping off 12 months of no growth in output per hour, the Office for National Statistics revealed.  The latest slump reflects the continuation of the UK’s jobs miracle in the second quarter even as GDP slipped back. The “productivity puzzle” has plagued the economy since the financial crisis but has worsened in the last year as Brexit uncertainty holds back business investment. Read more here: Economy on brink of ‘productivity recession’ as factories lead fastest drop in five years 12:28PM Pound hovers near one-month low against the dollar The pound is hovering just above its lowest intraday level against the dollar in a month. Sterling has had a wild ride over the past two months, and appears to be today entrenching a drop that began in mid-September. 12:15PM US stock futures sink on reports Washington could restrict capital flows to China Futures trading on Wall Street (which indicates how the markets will open) has taken a sharp turn of the worse in recent minutes, as storm cloud gather over the upcoming US-China trade talks. As of a few minutes ago, futures were indicating a chunky drop of over 200 points from the Dow Jones Industrial Average. Ahead of the Chinese delegation’s arrival in Washington on Thursday, Bloomberg reports that the US government is considering levying restrictions on investment into China, including a focus on stopping US government pension funds from pushing money into the country’s businesses. Garry White | Latest columns 11:56AM Losses deepen across Europe as Brexit talks look set for collapse The picture is only getting worse across Europe, with several of the continent’s  blue-chip bourses now surpassing losses of 1pc. Credit: Bloomberg TV 11:48AM Donald Tusk: Brexit not about ‘some stupid blame game’ Looks like I may have posted slightly too soon then: this tweet from European Council president Donald Tusk certainly looks like a gauntlet being thrown down. .@BorisJohnson, what’s at stake is not winning some stupid blame game. At stake is the future of Europe and the UK as well as the security and interests of our people. You don’t want a deal, you don’t want an extension, you don’t want to revoke, quo vadis?— Donald Tusk (@eucopresident) October 8, 2019 The pound has extended its its losses against the euro, and is just inches from a month low against the dollar.  Slew of negative remarks weighing on the pound with the rhetoric from both sides increasingly hostile. GBPUSD now back near its lowest level in a month around 1.2205 pic.twitter.com/wyeilHiaT6— David Cheetham, CFA (@DavidCheetham3) October 8, 2019 The FTSE 100 is still holding flat (remember, many London-listed companies don’t have a large exposure to the UK itself, and actually benefit from the pound being weaker), while the mid-cap (and more Brexit-exposed) FTSE 250 is down about 0.75pc. 11:44AM Berlin refuses to comment on Johnson call claims as Juncker spokesperson says EU position is unchanged Berlin, according to reports, has declined to offer further detail on the phone call between Angela Merkel and Boris Johnson this morning, so it looks like we only have Number 10’s side of the story to go on currently. Berlin, government spokesperson: "I can confirm that Chancellor Merkel and British PM Johnson spoke on the phone this morning. As usual, we do not report such confidential conversations." https://t.co/3WvpCcwHNZpic.twitter.com/zZQuRnoZyg— Adam Parsons (@adamparsons) October 8, 2019 Meanwhile, the Democratic Unionist Party had labelled the idea of keeping Northern Ireland in the Customs Union (as was allegedly discussed) is “beyond crazy”: ??https://t.co/Lesuu9Df9Mpic.twitter.com/3cZOOd32Ed— DUP (@duponline) October 8, 2019 For the EU’s part, Mine Andreeva, a spokesperson for outgoing European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, has said the bloc wants a Brexit deal and has not changed its position. 11:19AM Sterling suffers as no-deal showdown looms The pound has extended its losses against the euro in recent minutes, although it appears to have found a resting place around 0.6pc down against the dollar. Markets.com’s Neil Wilson says: Sterling is under the cosh again as hopes of a deal between the UK and EU fade. The last flicker of hope was snuffed out this morning after a call between the PM and chancellor Merkel of Germany left the process at an impasse. The news across the wires is that Merkel said a deal will only work if NI stays in the customs union. No 10 said this demand is impossible and that the EU is not engaging seriously. It’s become clear a deal cannot be done, with the wording from Number 10 that a deal is ‘essentially impossible not just now, but ever’. Stalemate. We are now heading towards the Revoke versus No Deal showdown.  No deal Brexit | How will different industries react? 11:15AM Bloomberg: Germany and London will be hit ‘especially hard’ by Deutsche Bank cuts A man leaves the Deutsche Bank building in central London with some belongings on July 8  Credit: Leon Neal/Getty  Deutsche Bank will make about half its 18,000 planned jobs cuts in Germany, while its London offices will be hit “especially hard”, reports Bloomberg, citing anonymous sources. The German lender has not yet fully detailed where the axe will land as it undertakes major restructuring plans, but it looks like retail units in its home country will be bearing much of the brunt. 11:06AM Reactions to Johnson/Merkel call mixed Here are more responses to reports about the call between PM Boris Johnson and Chancellor Angela Merkel this morning. It looks like we might be waiting a bit longer for Germany’s side of of the story. Merkel call was indeed a disaster, as others have reported. But worse even than briefings I’m told. She essentially instructed Johnson to tell NI to accept full alignment on customs and regulation. Ordering either side in NI to do stuff is usually a good idea I’m told... 1/4— Tom McTague (@TomMcTague) October 8, 2019 The "no problem" attribution to Merkel is so implausible that it suggests taking the rest of this "readout" with a giant fistful of salt. https://t.co/huGFkhAqQQ— Tom Nuttall (@tom_nuttall) October 8, 2019 11:01AM Pound drops to lowest level in a month against the euro Bad news for hopes of a Brexit deal, and some better-than expected figures from German have dragged the pound to a one-month low against the euro (it is at its lowest level against the dollar since last Tuesday). That drop puts it near an overall fall against the currency for the year: 10:57AM European share losses extend after Brexit talks stall Europe’s stock exchanges have sunk deeper into the red following those reports of stalled Brexit talks, with all major bourses on the continent now off more than 0.5pc on the day. In London, the FTSE 100 has returned to being flat, with a weaker sterling offering some support the index’s exporters. 10:45AM Sky: Prepare for no-deal showdown Sky News’ political editor Beth Rigby tweets: So 30 min call btwn PM & Merkel confirms what No 10 was expecting: a deal on Johnson new terms ‘overwhelmingly unlikely’. Source says Merkel position means deal ‘essentially impossible not just now but ever’ > So we pivot to a No Deal and legal showdown over Benn Act?— Beth Rigby (@BethRigby) October 8, 2019  While Christopher Cook (formerly of the BBC and now part of Tortoise) says: This has been the Irish position since January 2017. It was a feature of the Joint Report, the EU draft WA and the final WA. https://t.co/pac2y1cCYg— Chris Cook (@xtophercook) October 8, 2019 10:42AM Follow updates from Westminster on our politics live blog...   Brexit latest news: Downing Street prepares for Brexit talks to collapse this week, as Number 10 source says party will fight election on no-deal platform 10:34AM Javid: Recruitment process to replace Mark Carney at Bank of England is ‘on track’ Outgoing Bank of England governor Mark Carney Credit: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg Chancellor Sajid Javid has told MPs the process to appoint Mark Carney’s replacement as Bank of England Governor is “on track”. In a letter to the Treasurt Select Committee, Mr Javid wrote: You asked for an update on this important recruitment process. It is on track. In terms of the appointment itself, we will make an announcement in due course, ahead of the start of the next Governor’s term on 1 February 2020. I would like to assure you that the Committee will have the opportunity and time to scrutinise the successful candidate after the appointment has been made but before the individual has taken up the role. Mr Carney has previously signalled he would be willing to remain in the role if the Government desired him to do so. 10:29AM FSB says new Brexit tariff plans aren’t enough HGVs queue at Dover port Credit: Andrew Matthews/PA The Federation of Small Businesses has responded to adjusted post-Brexit tariff plans unveiled by the government this morning. Adjustments have been made to the charges on HGVs, bioethanol and clothing. The Department for International Trade said the new tariffs were introduced in order to: lower tariffs on HGVs entering the UK market, striking a better balance between the needs of British producers and the  SMEs  that make up the UK haulage industry, ensuring that crucial fleet replacement programmes that help to lower carbon emissions can continue adjust tariffs on bioethanol to retain support for UK producers, as the supply of this fuel is important to critical national infrastructure apply tariffs to additional clothing products to ensure the preferential access to the UK market currently available to developing countries (compared to other countries) is maintained Mike Cherry, chairman of the FSB, said: While these tariff adjustments will be good news for businesses in certain sectors – particularly smaller firms in our vital haulage industry – the cold hard fact remains that two thirds of small businesses that fear the impacts of no-deal feel they cannot prepare for this outcome. The average cost of preparation to small exporters and importers of putting contingencies in place is £3,000. Fundamentally, small firms are crying out for two things at this point: a pro-business Brexit deal and financial assistance to help manage the costs of uncertainty. The urgent issuing of £3,000export vouchers is a must. It’s also important to stress that these tariffs only apply to the 12 month period after a no-deal scenario. What small businesses really want – with confidence currently suffering an unprecedented losing streak – is a return to an environment where they can plan three, five and ten years in advance. Business Briefing Newsletter REFERRAL (Article) 10:15AM Kuenssberg: Feels like chance of Brexit deal this month ‘just died’ Here’s more from the BBC’s Laura Kuenssberg:  4. Feels like any chance of a deal this month just died— Laura Kuenssberg (@bbclaurak) October 8, 2019  There may be reason to be sceptical of the claims, however. The Telegraph’s James Crisp tweets: This would be very significant. But it is very unMerkelesque to close down talks in this way w/ bald bold ultimatums. So not convinced this source telling whole truth tbh. Thoughts @justinhuggler? https://t.co/U2kQhy10CG— James Crisp (@JamesCrisp6) October 8, 2019 10:10AM BBC: Merkel tells Johnson Brexit deal ‘overwhelmingly unlikely’ if Northern Ireland is not in Customs Union The pound has dropped sharply following this tweet by BBC Politics Editor Laura Kuenssberg: 2. No 10 says PM stressed to Merkel UK believes they had put forward a reasonable new deal, but with no desire to engage on EU side + this demand on NI staying in Customs Union a deal is 'essentially impossible'— Laura Kuenssberg (@bbclaurak) October 8, 2019 Sterling is about 0.6pc off against the dollar compared to yesterday’s close.  10:03AM Figures highlight UK’s productivity ‘puzzle’ UK productivity fell at its fastest rate since 2014 Credit: DANIEL SORABJI/AFP Reflecting on those downbeat productivity figures, the ONS’s statisticians write: This sustained period of declining labour productivity represents a continuation of the UK’s “productivity puzzle”, with productivity since the economic downturn in 2008 growing more slowly than during the long period prior to downturn. Despite occasional periods of growth, this sustained general pattern of stagnation contrasts with patterns following previous UK economic downturns, when productivity initially fell, but subsequently recovered in a relatively sustained fashion whilst returning to the previous trend rate of growth.  A breakdown of which sectors contributed to the decline shows non-manufacturing and construction couldn’t offset a wider slip: Credit: ONS 9:52AM Productivity drop is worst in five years Reuters’ Andy Bruce tweets: UK Q2 productivity performance revised up slightly vs the flash reading... ...but still the biggest drop in annual terms in 5 years. ?? Poor ???? productivity record continues ?? pic.twitter.com/qpp5guJVZ1— Andy Bruce (@BruceReuters) October 8, 2019 9:49AM UK productivity slipped during quarter of contraction Labour productivity in the UK (measured as output per hour) slipped by 0.5pc compared to the same quarter last year, after two consecutive quarters of stagnation.  The Office for National Statistics says: Both services and manufacturing saw a fall in labour productivity growth of 0.8pc and 1.9pc respectively, compared with the same quarter in the previous year. UK productivity (output per hour) fell -0.5%y/y in Q2. Professional services, manufacturing, transport services & financial services contributed most to the fall, though there was also a contribution from labour moving from more to less productive sectors ("allocation effect"). pic.twitter.com/V8qOsDPZZV— Rupert Seggins (@Rupert_Seggins) October 8, 2019 9:42AM LSE: We remain committed to Refinitiv tie-up London Stock Exchange Group has responded to HKEX’s decision to pull its takeover bid — confirming its intention to push ahead towards a tie-up with data giant Refinitiv, that would position the company as a major player in the financial data sector. LSE said: LSEG remains committed to and continues to make good progress on its proposed acquisition of Refinitiv. Regulatory approval processes are underway and shareholder approval for the transaction is expected to be sought at an Extraordinary General Meeting in November 2019. The transaction remains on track to close in H2 2020. 9:34AM China: ‘Stay tuned’ for US tech blacklist response A  spokesperson for China’s foreign ministry has told reporters to “stay tuned” for the country’s response after Donald Trump’s administration placed eight Chinese tech giants on a blacklist. AI startups and security firms were placed on the list, which was unveiled shortly ahead of trade talks between the two countries. The impact of the US-China trade war on global GDP by 2021-2022 9:14AM What will ‘Red October’ means for stock markets? Logo: The Think Tank  Are you ready for a tough October’s trading? The tenth month of the year is often to deadliest for financial markets, reports Tom Rees for today’s Think Tank. He writes: Market volatility in October is on average 25pc higher than other months, according to Goldman Sachs, meaning sharp swings are more likely than usual. Furthermore, six of the top 10 biggest historical drops in US stocks have occurred this month, including the Wall Street Crash in 1929 and Black Monday in 1987.  Goldman analyst John Marshall argues that high October volatility “is more than just a coincidence” and in fact reflects that this month marks a “critical period” for investors and companies just before the end of the year. Read more here: Could Red October torpedo your stocks again? The Think Tank | Read more 9:05AM EasyJet shares fall, analysts highlight lack of forward guidance Shares in EasyJet have fallen about 5.5pc so far today, despite the company unveiling ‘solid’ profit figures in a confident-sounding update to the City this morning. Bloomberg notes that the update was light on guidance for 2020, which appears to have left some analysts feeling let down. Goodbody writes: Combining with the company’s decision not to hold a meeting or hosting a conference call, this could be seen a disappointing. 8:56AM FT: Odey fund lost 12.7pc last month Crispin Odey’s fund is shorting several British firms Credit: REX Crispin Odey’s European hedge fund lost 12.7pc amid last month’s market turbulence as bets against the pound and financial firms came back to bite, the Financial Times reports. The paper says: Mr Odey, founder of London-based Odey Asset Management, lost 12.7 per cent in September in his European hedge fund, according to numbers sent to investors and reviewed by the Financial Times. That left his fund down 18.1 per cent for the year. September proved a major challenge for hedge funds, many of which have been riding rising stock and bond markets this year. The Brexit-backer’s losses were offset somewhat by the payoff from a bet against Metro Bank. Read more here: FT: Crispin Odey hit in volatile September for hedge funds (£) That make deal some damage to a popular conspiracy theory that has been doing the round on Twitter: Brexit conspiracies and crackpot blogs are taking us all for mugs 8:44AM Sterling weakens as euro strengthens The pound has weakened slightly this morning, as the euro strengthens following better-than-expected industrial data from Germany. Seasonally-adjusted German industrial production increased by 0.3pc month-on-month in August, against estimates of a flat figure. That is one of the first glimmers of positive industry news to emerge from Europe’s largest economy in a while — and investors have the added positive motivation that they know stimulus is coming from the European Central Bank. Germany's industrial production was up 0.3% in August, better than expected, but the YoY number at -4.0% remains pretty weak. pic.twitter.com/AbhvGx176p— jeroen blokland (@jsblokland) October 8, 2019 8:29AM PageGroup plummets after profit warning Recruitment slowed down in several of PageGroup’s key markets Credit: ANDY RAIN/EPA-EFE/REX Shares in PageGroup have dropped by around 15pc this morning, after it downgraded its profit expectations in the face of political and economic uncertainty. The FTSE 250 recruitment firm said slowing growth in the US and Germany, Brexit uncertainty and ongoing disruption in Hong Kong has reduced its growth during the third quarter, as companies delayed permanant hiring decisions. It said: Given the heightened political and macro-economic challenges seen in the quarter, together with our limited forward visibility, we currently expect 2019 operating profit to be in the range of £140m to £150m Its chief executive, Steve Ingham, said: Looking ahead, the deterioration in trading conditions seen during Q3 across the majority of our regions is anticipated to continue. 8:22AM LSE Group drops nearly 7pc after Hong Kong exchange pulls bid The withdrawal of HKEX’s interest in LSE has brought the latter’s shares down a peg, as hopes of a buyout fade. It fell nearly 7pc at the open, but has pared back those losses a little: Read more here: Hong Kong bourse scraps $39bn bid for London Stock Exchange 8:19AM EasyJet hails ‘solid’ performance as rivals suffer from strikes Easyjet planes at Geneva airport Credit:  FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP EasyJet has said it expects profit before tax to land in the upper half of its estimates, after strike disruption placed pressure on industry rivals during the summer. My colleague Michael O’Dwyer reports:   The budget airline boosted passenger numbers by 8.6pc to 96 million after increasing its capacity by 10.3pc to 105 million seats. However load factor — the proportion of available seats sold — will fall 1.4pc to 91.5pc for the full year, easyJet said.  EasyJey’s chief executive Jonah Lundgren said: As a result of our self-help initiatives and the increased demand due to disruption at British Airways and Ryanair, we anticipate achieving headline profit before tax for the full year 2019 of between £420m and £430m, in the upper half of our previous guidance range. Read more here: Upbeat EasyJet enjoys profit boost as rivals are hit by strikes 7:39AM Hong Kong/LSE: The numbers behind the failed deal HKEX chief executive Charles Li Credit: Anthony Kwan/Bloomberg Hong Kong's stock exchange has been forced to scrap its £32bn bid for the London Stock Exchange.  The proposed deal was met with scepticism by investors and suspicion among politicians.Even if the deal's economics had been made to work, there would have been plenty of regulatory hurdles to jump, as we have explained previously on Telegraph Business.  Here are some of the key numbers behind the two companies: HKEX v LSE - A tale of two stock exchanges  The failed bid may yet have a legacy in shaping the UKs approach to regulating foreign takeovers in the future. Our Mergers and Acquisitions reporter Vinjeru Mkandawire took a look previously at how the Hong Kong bid had sparked debate on the rules regarding foreign takeovers:  Hong Kong’s bid for London Stock Exchange stirs debate on foreign buyers 7:21AM Agenda: Hong Kong abandons bid for London Stock Exchange The LSE has been the subject of frequent M&A; interest over the past two decades Credit: Chris J. Ratcliffe/Bloomberg Good morning. The Hong Kong Stock Exchange has dropped its multibillion-dollar bid for the prized London Stock Exchange Group, which would have created a global markets titan. We'll be bringing you all the latest news on that story which broke overnight.  Elsewhere, official German data yesterday showed a drop in industrial orders in August but the news failed to shake European stocks, which pushed higher to close in positive territory. US stocks however fluctuated throughout the day ahead of a meeting between the US and China later this week. 5 things to start your day 1) The Conservatives risk trashing their reputation for sound financial management after experts warned that day-to-day spending is set to surge to levels promised by Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour party. Boris Johnson’s new Government is “now adrift without any effective fiscal anchor” and will break its budget rules in its first full year, the Institute for Fiscal Studies said. 2) Could Red October torpedo your stocks again? While traders will be praying to escape unscathed, doomsayers (and admittedly some financial journalists) are rubbing their hands with glee. The previous years when October proved brutal stand long in the memory. 1929, 1987, 2008, 2018 - and now 2019?  3) Walmart plays nice: How retail giant is battling its image problem. The retail behemoth, which started life as Sam Walton’s Five and Dime store in Bentonville, Arkansas in 1950, has not always enjoyed the best of reputations. 4) The Turkish lira slumped to its lowest level against the dollar in more than a month following Donald Trump’s threats to “totally destroy and obliterate” Turkey’s economy. The currency fell as much as 2.1pc to 5.8178 (81p) against the dollar yesterday, its lowest level since September 3. ....the captured ISIS fighters and families. The U.S. has done far more than anyone could have ever expected, including the capture of 100% of the ISIS Caliphate. It is time now for others in the region, some of great wealth, to protect their own territory. THE USA IS GREAT!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 7, 2019 5) A Hong Kong raider targeting the London Stock Exchange may be forced to rack up massive debts as it scrambles to sweeten its £32bn bid in the face of sceptical investors. Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing has only won the backing of one shareholder among the top 10 since making its audacious offer for the London market (LSE) last month, sources said. What happened overnight Hong Kong’s bourse on Tuesday dropped its unsolicited $39 billion bid for London Stock Exchange Group (LSE), conceding it hadn’t won over LSE management for a move that could have transformed both global financial services businesses. The surprise approach, made last month, had threatened to upend the LSE's own $27 billion plan to buy data and analytics company Refinitiv. The Hong Kong exchange had said the LSE would have to ditch the Refinitiv purchase for its offer to go ahead. In a statement on Tuesday, Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing Ltd (HKEX), said it still believed the combination of the two exchanges would be "strategically compelling". In the markets, meanwhile, Asian shares inched up, with Chinese shares making modest gains after a week-long holiday, though investors remained cautious over US-China trade talks after President Donald Trump said a quick trade deal was unlikely. Japan's Nikkei climbed 1pc while MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan rose 0.7pc, led by gains in tech shares in South Korea and Taiwan. South Korea's Samsung Electronics rose 1.2pc after its profit guidance. The semiconductor firm said its third-quarter operating profit likely fell 56pc on a downturn in global memory chip prices, but that was better than what analysts had anticipated. Taiwan's stock index gained 0.7pc to hit five-month highs while Hong Kong shares extended gains after the territory's leader said she had no plans to use the emergency regulation ordinance to introduce other laws. Shanghai shares rose 0.3pc after the week-long break though gains were led mainly by defensive shares ahead of the crucial trade talks. Coming up today Turbulence puns are well-worn when it comes to the performance of Britain’s airlines, but easyJet truly has been flying through a storm in recent months: a sharp oil price spike following the attack on Saudi oil facilities, offset by a wider fall; the collapse of rival Thomas Cook; major rivals hit by strike action; and difficulties faced by several of its sector rivals. After a record loss in the first half of the year, it could be on course for a record profit in the second, says Hargreaves Lansdown’s Nicholas Hyett. “Take fuel out of the equation, and other operating costs are one of the important areas in which airlines can influence their own destiny,” says Hyett. “The focus on reducing non-fuel costs looks set to deliver better results in the second half, having fallen 4pc in the third quarter. That’s despite an improved pay deal for staff, and sustainable progress here would set easyJet up well for next year.” Preliminary results: YouGov Trading update: EasyJet, Electrocomponents, Ferrexpo Economics: PPI (US)

    Pound falls to one-month low against the euro on reports PM told German Chancellor Brexit deal is “essentially impossible” Productivity slowdown fears as output per hour fell by 0.5pc in second quarter, as UK economy contracted FTSE flat as European shares slide ahead of US-China trade talks Recruiters knocked as global economic fears prompt hiring slowdown Hong Kong bourse scraps £32bn bid for London Stock Exchange Tories risk trashing their reputation for competence with Corbynesque spending spree, IFS warns Matthew Lynn: This decade has been pretty average for investment returns – but the 2020s will be worse 1:44PM Nissan picks China executive as new chief executive Makoto Uchida is currently head of the car giant’s Chinese operations Credit: Kyodo News New from Japan: Nissan has selected Makoto Uchida, the head of its China business, as its new chief executive — filling the hole left by Hiroto Saikawa’s exit last month. Mr Uchida was selected because of his close understanding of the car giant’s oversees markets, sources told the Wall Street Journal. The move comes after an international scandal that began when former Chairman Carlos Ghosn was arrested last year. The new boss has a full in-tray: the Japanese car firm faces falling sales, a restructuring plan, and continued tensions in its alliance with France’s Renault. 1:22PM Full report: UK economy nears ‘productivity recession’ The manufacturing sector suffered a sharp decline in productivity during the second quarter Credit: OLI SCARFF/AFP My colleague Tom Rees has a full report on this morning’s productivity figures. He writes: Productivity contracted 0.5pc year-on-year in the second quarter as the economy stumbled, capping off 12 months of no growth in output per hour, the Office for National Statistics revealed.  The latest slump reflects the continuation of the UK’s jobs miracle in the second quarter even as GDP slipped back. The “productivity puzzle” has plagued the economy since the financial crisis but has worsened in the last year as Brexit uncertainty holds back business investment. Read more here: Economy on brink of ‘productivity recession’ as factories lead fastest drop in five years 12:28PM Pound hovers near one-month low against the dollar The pound is hovering just above its lowest intraday level against the dollar in a month. Sterling has had a wild ride over the past two months, and appears to be today entrenching a drop that began in mid-September. 12:15PM US stock futures sink on reports Washington could restrict capital flows to China Futures trading on Wall Street (which indicates how the markets will open) has taken a sharp turn of the worse in recent minutes, as storm cloud gather over the upcoming US-China trade talks. As of a few minutes ago, futures were indicating a chunky drop of over 200 points from the Dow Jones Industrial Average. Ahead of the Chinese delegation’s arrival in Washington on Thursday, Bloomberg reports that the US government is considering levying restrictions on investment into China, including a focus on stopping US government pension funds from pushing money into the country’s businesses. Garry White | Latest columns 11:56AM Losses deepen across Europe as Brexit talks look set for collapse The picture is only getting worse across Europe, with several of the continent’s  blue-chip bourses now surpassing losses of 1pc. Credit: Bloomberg TV 11:48AM Donald Tusk: Brexit not about ‘some stupid blame game’ Looks like I may have posted slightly too soon then: this tweet from European Council president Donald Tusk certainly looks like a gauntlet being thrown down. .@BorisJohnson, what’s at stake is not winning some stupid blame game. At stake is the future of Europe and the UK as well as the security and interests of our people. You don’t want a deal, you don’t want an extension, you don’t want to revoke, quo vadis?— Donald Tusk (@eucopresident) October 8, 2019 The pound has extended its its losses against the euro, and is just inches from a month low against the dollar.  Slew of negative remarks weighing on the pound with the rhetoric from both sides increasingly hostile. GBPUSD now back near its lowest level in a month around 1.2205 pic.twitter.com/wyeilHiaT6— David Cheetham, CFA (@DavidCheetham3) October 8, 2019 The FTSE 100 is still holding flat (remember, many London-listed companies don’t have a large exposure to the UK itself, and actually benefit from the pound being weaker), while the mid-cap (and more Brexit-exposed) FTSE 250 is down about 0.75pc. 11:44AM Berlin refuses to comment on Johnson call claims as Juncker spokesperson says EU position is unchanged Berlin, according to reports, has declined to offer further detail on the phone call between Angela Merkel and Boris Johnson this morning, so it looks like we only have Number 10’s side of the story to go on currently. Berlin, government spokesperson: "I can confirm that Chancellor Merkel and British PM Johnson spoke on the phone this morning. As usual, we do not report such confidential conversations." https://t.co/3WvpCcwHNZpic.twitter.com/zZQuRnoZyg— Adam Parsons (@adamparsons) October 8, 2019 Meanwhile, the Democratic Unionist Party had labelled the idea of keeping Northern Ireland in the Customs Union (as was allegedly discussed) is “beyond crazy”: ??https://t.co/Lesuu9Df9Mpic.twitter.com/3cZOOd32Ed— DUP (@duponline) October 8, 2019 For the EU’s part, Mine Andreeva, a spokesperson for outgoing European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, has said the bloc wants a Brexit deal and has not changed its position. 11:19AM Sterling suffers as no-deal showdown looms The pound has extended its losses against the euro in recent minutes, although it appears to have found a resting place around 0.6pc down against the dollar. Markets.com’s Neil Wilson says: Sterling is under the cosh again as hopes of a deal between the UK and EU fade. The last flicker of hope was snuffed out this morning after a call between the PM and chancellor Merkel of Germany left the process at an impasse. The news across the wires is that Merkel said a deal will only work if NI stays in the customs union. No 10 said this demand is impossible and that the EU is not engaging seriously. It’s become clear a deal cannot be done, with the wording from Number 10 that a deal is ‘essentially impossible not just now, but ever’. Stalemate. We are now heading towards the Revoke versus No Deal showdown.  No deal Brexit | How will different industries react? 11:15AM Bloomberg: Germany and London will be hit ‘especially hard’ by Deutsche Bank cuts A man leaves the Deutsche Bank building in central London with some belongings on July 8  Credit: Leon Neal/Getty  Deutsche Bank will make about half its 18,000 planned jobs cuts in Germany, while its London offices will be hit “especially hard”, reports Bloomberg, citing anonymous sources. The German lender has not yet fully detailed where the axe will land as it undertakes major restructuring plans, but it looks like retail units in its home country will be bearing much of the brunt. 11:06AM Reactions to Johnson/Merkel call mixed Here are more responses to reports about the call between PM Boris Johnson and Chancellor Angela Merkel this morning. It looks like we might be waiting a bit longer for Germany’s side of of the story. Merkel call was indeed a disaster, as others have reported. But worse even than briefings I’m told. She essentially instructed Johnson to tell NI to accept full alignment on customs and regulation. Ordering either side in NI to do stuff is usually a good idea I’m told... 1/4— Tom McTague (@TomMcTague) October 8, 2019 The "no problem" attribution to Merkel is so implausible that it suggests taking the rest of this "readout" with a giant fistful of salt. https://t.co/huGFkhAqQQ— Tom Nuttall (@tom_nuttall) October 8, 2019 11:01AM Pound drops to lowest level in a month against the euro Bad news for hopes of a Brexit deal, and some better-than expected figures from German have dragged the pound to a one-month low against the euro (it is at its lowest level against the dollar since last Tuesday). That drop puts it near an overall fall against the currency for the year: 10:57AM European share losses extend after Brexit talks stall Europe’s stock exchanges have sunk deeper into the red following those reports of stalled Brexit talks, with all major bourses on the continent now off more than 0.5pc on the day. In London, the FTSE 100 has returned to being flat, with a weaker sterling offering some support the index’s exporters. 10:45AM Sky: Prepare for no-deal showdown Sky News’ political editor Beth Rigby tweets: So 30 min call btwn PM & Merkel confirms what No 10 was expecting: a deal on Johnson new terms ‘overwhelmingly unlikely’. Source says Merkel position means deal ‘essentially impossible not just now but ever’ > So we pivot to a No Deal and legal showdown over Benn Act?— Beth Rigby (@BethRigby) October 8, 2019  While Christopher Cook (formerly of the BBC and now part of Tortoise) says: This has been the Irish position since January 2017. It was a feature of the Joint Report, the EU draft WA and the final WA. https://t.co/pac2y1cCYg— Chris Cook (@xtophercook) October 8, 2019 10:42AM Follow updates from Westminster on our politics live blog...   Brexit latest news: Downing Street prepares for Brexit talks to collapse this week, as Number 10 source says party will fight election on no-deal platform 10:34AM Javid: Recruitment process to replace Mark Carney at Bank of England is ‘on track’ Outgoing Bank of England governor Mark Carney Credit: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg Chancellor Sajid Javid has told MPs the process to appoint Mark Carney’s replacement as Bank of England Governor is “on track”. In a letter to the Treasurt Select Committee, Mr Javid wrote: You asked for an update on this important recruitment process. It is on track. In terms of the appointment itself, we will make an announcement in due course, ahead of the start of the next Governor’s term on 1 February 2020. I would like to assure you that the Committee will have the opportunity and time to scrutinise the successful candidate after the appointment has been made but before the individual has taken up the role. Mr Carney has previously signalled he would be willing to remain in the role if the Government desired him to do so. 10:29AM FSB says new Brexit tariff plans aren’t enough HGVs queue at Dover port Credit: Andrew Matthews/PA The Federation of Small Businesses has responded to adjusted post-Brexit tariff plans unveiled by the government this morning. Adjustments have been made to the charges on HGVs, bioethanol and clothing. The Department for International Trade said the new tariffs were introduced in order to: lower tariffs on HGVs entering the UK market, striking a better balance between the needs of British producers and the  SMEs  that make up the UK haulage industry, ensuring that crucial fleet replacement programmes that help to lower carbon emissions can continue adjust tariffs on bioethanol to retain support for UK producers, as the supply of this fuel is important to critical national infrastructure apply tariffs to additional clothing products to ensure the preferential access to the UK market currently available to developing countries (compared to other countries) is maintained Mike Cherry, chairman of the FSB, said: While these tariff adjustments will be good news for businesses in certain sectors – particularly smaller firms in our vital haulage industry – the cold hard fact remains that two thirds of small businesses that fear the impacts of no-deal feel they cannot prepare for this outcome. The average cost of preparation to small exporters and importers of putting contingencies in place is £3,000. Fundamentally, small firms are crying out for two things at this point: a pro-business Brexit deal and financial assistance to help manage the costs of uncertainty. The urgent issuing of £3,000export vouchers is a must. It’s also important to stress that these tariffs only apply to the 12 month period after a no-deal scenario. What small businesses really want – with confidence currently suffering an unprecedented losing streak – is a return to an environment where they can plan three, five and ten years in advance. Business Briefing Newsletter REFERRAL (Article) 10:15AM Kuenssberg: Feels like chance of Brexit deal this month ‘just died’ Here’s more from the BBC’s Laura Kuenssberg:  4. Feels like any chance of a deal this month just died— Laura Kuenssberg (@bbclaurak) October 8, 2019  There may be reason to be sceptical of the claims, however. The Telegraph’s James Crisp tweets: This would be very significant. But it is very unMerkelesque to close down talks in this way w/ bald bold ultimatums. So not convinced this source telling whole truth tbh. Thoughts @justinhuggler? https://t.co/U2kQhy10CG— James Crisp (@JamesCrisp6) October 8, 2019 10:10AM BBC: Merkel tells Johnson Brexit deal ‘overwhelmingly unlikely’ if Northern Ireland is not in Customs Union The pound has dropped sharply following this tweet by BBC Politics Editor Laura Kuenssberg: 2. No 10 says PM stressed to Merkel UK believes they had put forward a reasonable new deal, but with no desire to engage on EU side + this demand on NI staying in Customs Union a deal is 'essentially impossible'— Laura Kuenssberg (@bbclaurak) October 8, 2019 Sterling is about 0.6pc off against the dollar compared to yesterday’s close.  10:03AM Figures highlight UK’s productivity ‘puzzle’ UK productivity fell at its fastest rate since 2014 Credit: DANIEL SORABJI/AFP Reflecting on those downbeat productivity figures, the ONS’s statisticians write: This sustained period of declining labour productivity represents a continuation of the UK’s “productivity puzzle”, with productivity since the economic downturn in 2008 growing more slowly than during the long period prior to downturn. Despite occasional periods of growth, this sustained general pattern of stagnation contrasts with patterns following previous UK economic downturns, when productivity initially fell, but subsequently recovered in a relatively sustained fashion whilst returning to the previous trend rate of growth.  A breakdown of which sectors contributed to the decline shows non-manufacturing and construction couldn’t offset a wider slip: Credit: ONS 9:52AM Productivity drop is worst in five years Reuters’ Andy Bruce tweets: UK Q2 productivity performance revised up slightly vs the flash reading... ...but still the biggest drop in annual terms in 5 years. ?? Poor ???? productivity record continues ?? pic.twitter.com/qpp5guJVZ1— Andy Bruce (@BruceReuters) October 8, 2019 9:49AM UK productivity slipped during quarter of contraction Labour productivity in the UK (measured as output per hour) slipped by 0.5pc compared to the same quarter last year, after two consecutive quarters of stagnation.  The Office for National Statistics says: Both services and manufacturing saw a fall in labour productivity growth of 0.8pc and 1.9pc respectively, compared with the same quarter in the previous year. UK productivity (output per hour) fell -0.5%y/y in Q2. Professional services, manufacturing, transport services & financial services contributed most to the fall, though there was also a contribution from labour moving from more to less productive sectors ("allocation effect"). pic.twitter.com/V8qOsDPZZV— Rupert Seggins (@Rupert_Seggins) October 8, 2019 9:42AM LSE: We remain committed to Refinitiv tie-up London Stock Exchange Group has responded to HKEX’s decision to pull its takeover bid — confirming its intention to push ahead towards a tie-up with data giant Refinitiv, that would position the company as a major player in the financial data sector. LSE said: LSEG remains committed to and continues to make good progress on its proposed acquisition of Refinitiv. Regulatory approval processes are underway and shareholder approval for the transaction is expected to be sought at an Extraordinary General Meeting in November 2019. The transaction remains on track to close in H2 2020. 9:34AM China: ‘Stay tuned’ for US tech blacklist response A  spokesperson for China’s foreign ministry has told reporters to “stay tuned” for the country’s response after Donald Trump’s administration placed eight Chinese tech giants on a blacklist. AI startups and security firms were placed on the list, which was unveiled shortly ahead of trade talks between the two countries. The impact of the US-China trade war on global GDP by 2021-2022 9:14AM What will ‘Red October’ means for stock markets? Logo: The Think Tank  Are you ready for a tough October’s trading? The tenth month of the year is often to deadliest for financial markets, reports Tom Rees for today’s Think Tank. He writes: Market volatility in October is on average 25pc higher than other months, according to Goldman Sachs, meaning sharp swings are more likely than usual. Furthermore, six of the top 10 biggest historical drops in US stocks have occurred this month, including the Wall Street Crash in 1929 and Black Monday in 1987.  Goldman analyst John Marshall argues that high October volatility “is more than just a coincidence” and in fact reflects that this month marks a “critical period” for investors and companies just before the end of the year. Read more here: Could Red October torpedo your stocks again? The Think Tank | Read more 9:05AM EasyJet shares fall, analysts highlight lack of forward guidance Shares in EasyJet have fallen about 5.5pc so far today, despite the company unveiling ‘solid’ profit figures in a confident-sounding update to the City this morning. Bloomberg notes that the update was light on guidance for 2020, which appears to have left some analysts feeling let down. Goodbody writes: Combining with the company’s decision not to hold a meeting or hosting a conference call, this could be seen a disappointing. 8:56AM FT: Odey fund lost 12.7pc last month Crispin Odey’s fund is shorting several British firms Credit: REX Crispin Odey’s European hedge fund lost 12.7pc amid last month’s market turbulence as bets against the pound and financial firms came back to bite, the Financial Times reports. The paper says: Mr Odey, founder of London-based Odey Asset Management, lost 12.7 per cent in September in his European hedge fund, according to numbers sent to investors and reviewed by the Financial Times. That left his fund down 18.1 per cent for the year. September proved a major challenge for hedge funds, many of which have been riding rising stock and bond markets this year. The Brexit-backer’s losses were offset somewhat by the payoff from a bet against Metro Bank. Read more here: FT: Crispin Odey hit in volatile September for hedge funds (£) That make deal some damage to a popular conspiracy theory that has been doing the round on Twitter: Brexit conspiracies and crackpot blogs are taking us all for mugs 8:44AM Sterling weakens as euro strengthens The pound has weakened slightly this morning, as the euro strengthens following better-than-expected industrial data from Germany. Seasonally-adjusted German industrial production increased by 0.3pc month-on-month in August, against estimates of a flat figure. That is one of the first glimmers of positive industry news to emerge from Europe’s largest economy in a while — and investors have the added positive motivation that they know stimulus is coming from the European Central Bank. Germany's industrial production was up 0.3% in August, better than expected, but the YoY number at -4.0% remains pretty weak. pic.twitter.com/AbhvGx176p— jeroen blokland (@jsblokland) October 8, 2019 8:29AM PageGroup plummets after profit warning Recruitment slowed down in several of PageGroup’s key markets Credit: ANDY RAIN/EPA-EFE/REX Shares in PageGroup have dropped by around 15pc this morning, after it downgraded its profit expectations in the face of political and economic uncertainty. The FTSE 250 recruitment firm said slowing growth in the US and Germany, Brexit uncertainty and ongoing disruption in Hong Kong has reduced its growth during the third quarter, as companies delayed permanant hiring decisions. It said: Given the heightened political and macro-economic challenges seen in the quarter, together with our limited forward visibility, we currently expect 2019 operating profit to be in the range of £140m to £150m Its chief executive, Steve Ingham, said: Looking ahead, the deterioration in trading conditions seen during Q3 across the majority of our regions is anticipated to continue. 8:22AM LSE Group drops nearly 7pc after Hong Kong exchange pulls bid The withdrawal of HKEX’s interest in LSE has brought the latter’s shares down a peg, as hopes of a buyout fade. It fell nearly 7pc at the open, but has pared back those losses a little: Read more here: Hong Kong bourse scraps $39bn bid for London Stock Exchange 8:19AM EasyJet hails ‘solid’ performance as rivals suffer from strikes Easyjet planes at Geneva airport Credit:  FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP EasyJet has said it expects profit before tax to land in the upper half of its estimates, after strike disruption placed pressure on industry rivals during the summer. My colleague Michael O’Dwyer reports:   The budget airline boosted passenger numbers by 8.6pc to 96 million after increasing its capacity by 10.3pc to 105 million seats. However load factor — the proportion of available seats sold — will fall 1.4pc to 91.5pc for the full year, easyJet said.  EasyJey’s chief executive Jonah Lundgren said: As a result of our self-help initiatives and the increased demand due to disruption at British Airways and Ryanair, we anticipate achieving headline profit before tax for the full year 2019 of between £420m and £430m, in the upper half of our previous guidance range. Read more here: Upbeat EasyJet enjoys profit boost as rivals are hit by strikes 7:39AM Hong Kong/LSE: The numbers behind the failed deal HKEX chief executive Charles Li Credit: Anthony Kwan/Bloomberg Hong Kong's stock exchange has been forced to scrap its £32bn bid for the London Stock Exchange.  The proposed deal was met with scepticism by investors and suspicion among politicians.Even if the deal's economics had been made to work, there would have been plenty of regulatory hurdles to jump, as we have explained previously on Telegraph Business.  Here are some of the key numbers behind the two companies: HKEX v LSE - A tale of two stock exchanges  The failed bid may yet have a legacy in shaping the UKs approach to regulating foreign takeovers in the future. Our Mergers and Acquisitions reporter Vinjeru Mkandawire took a look previously at how the Hong Kong bid had sparked debate on the rules regarding foreign takeovers:  Hong Kong’s bid for London Stock Exchange stirs debate on foreign buyers 7:21AM Agenda: Hong Kong abandons bid for London Stock Exchange The LSE has been the subject of frequent M&A; interest over the past two decades Credit: Chris J. Ratcliffe/Bloomberg Good morning. The Hong Kong Stock Exchange has dropped its multibillion-dollar bid for the prized London Stock Exchange Group, which would have created a global markets titan. We'll be bringing you all the latest news on that story which broke overnight.  Elsewhere, official German data yesterday showed a drop in industrial orders in August but the news failed to shake European stocks, which pushed higher to close in positive territory. US stocks however fluctuated throughout the day ahead of a meeting between the US and China later this week. 5 things to start your day 1) The Conservatives risk trashing their reputation for sound financial management after experts warned that day-to-day spending is set to surge to levels promised by Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour party. Boris Johnson’s new Government is “now adrift without any effective fiscal anchor” and will break its budget rules in its first full year, the Institute for Fiscal Studies said. 2) Could Red October torpedo your stocks again? While traders will be praying to escape unscathed, doomsayers (and admittedly some financial journalists) are rubbing their hands with glee. The previous years when October proved brutal stand long in the memory. 1929, 1987, 2008, 2018 - and now 2019?  3) Walmart plays nice: How retail giant is battling its image problem. The retail behemoth, which started life as Sam Walton’s Five and Dime store in Bentonville, Arkansas in 1950, has not always enjoyed the best of reputations. 4) The Turkish lira slumped to its lowest level against the dollar in more than a month following Donald Trump’s threats to “totally destroy and obliterate” Turkey’s economy. The currency fell as much as 2.1pc to 5.8178 (81p) against the dollar yesterday, its lowest level since September 3. ....the captured ISIS fighters and families. The U.S. has done far more than anyone could have ever expected, including the capture of 100% of the ISIS Caliphate. It is time now for others in the region, some of great wealth, to protect their own territory. THE USA IS GREAT!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 7, 2019 5) A Hong Kong raider targeting the London Stock Exchange may be forced to rack up massive debts as it scrambles to sweeten its £32bn bid in the face of sceptical investors. Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing has only won the backing of one shareholder among the top 10 since making its audacious offer for the London market (LSE) last month, sources said. What happened overnight Hong Kong’s bourse on Tuesday dropped its unsolicited $39 billion bid for London Stock Exchange Group (LSE), conceding it hadn’t won over LSE management for a move that could have transformed both global financial services businesses. The surprise approach, made last month, had threatened to upend the LSE's own $27 billion plan to buy data and analytics company Refinitiv. The Hong Kong exchange had said the LSE would have to ditch the Refinitiv purchase for its offer to go ahead. In a statement on Tuesday, Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing Ltd (HKEX), said it still believed the combination of the two exchanges would be "strategically compelling". In the markets, meanwhile, Asian shares inched up, with Chinese shares making modest gains after a week-long holiday, though investors remained cautious over US-China trade talks after President Donald Trump said a quick trade deal was unlikely. Japan's Nikkei climbed 1pc while MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan rose 0.7pc, led by gains in tech shares in South Korea and Taiwan. South Korea's Samsung Electronics rose 1.2pc after its profit guidance. The semiconductor firm said its third-quarter operating profit likely fell 56pc on a downturn in global memory chip prices, but that was better than what analysts had anticipated. Taiwan's stock index gained 0.7pc to hit five-month highs while Hong Kong shares extended gains after the territory's leader said she had no plans to use the emergency regulation ordinance to introduce other laws. Shanghai shares rose 0.3pc after the week-long break though gains were led mainly by defensive shares ahead of the crucial trade talks. Coming up today Turbulence puns are well-worn when it comes to the performance of Britain’s airlines, but easyJet truly has been flying through a storm in recent months: a sharp oil price spike following the attack on Saudi oil facilities, offset by a wider fall; the collapse of rival Thomas Cook; major rivals hit by strike action; and difficulties faced by several of its sector rivals. After a record loss in the first half of the year, it could be on course for a record profit in the second, says Hargreaves Lansdown’s Nicholas Hyett. “Take fuel out of the equation, and other operating costs are one of the important areas in which airlines can influence their own destiny,” says Hyett. “The focus on reducing non-fuel costs looks set to deliver better results in the second half, having fallen 4pc in the third quarter. That’s despite an improved pay deal for staff, and sustainable progress here would set easyJet up well for next year.” Preliminary results: YouGov Trading update: EasyJet, Electrocomponents, Ferrexpo Economics: PPI (US)


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  • 23/79   Johnson Tells Merkel Deal ‘Essentially Impossible’: Brexit Update
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Follow @Brexit and sign up to our Brexit Bulletin. Boris Johnson told German Chancellor Angela Merkel a Brexit deal is essentially impossible if the EU demands Northern Ireland should stay in the bloc’s customs union. The call between the leaders, at 8 a.m. Tuesday, came after a text message from one of the prime minister’s officials, reported by the Spectator magazine, said his government is preparing for talks to collapse.Ministers published updated no-deal Brexit planning documents in London as negotiations between the U.K. and EU continue in Brussels.Key DevelopmentsEU Council President Donald Tusk accuses Johnson of playing Brexit “blame game”Ireland sets aside $1.3 billion for no-deal divorceScottish Court to rule Wednesday on enforcing anti no-deal lawJohnson Warned Against Big Tax Cuts as U.K. Faces No-Deal ShockPound slips 0.5% against the dollarFruit and Veg Supply Could be Hit by No-Deal (1:30 p.m.)A no-deal split from the EU could cause shortages of some fresh fruits and vegetables because of possible threats to time-sensitive supply chains, the U.K. government warned in Tuesday no-deal planning document.The “just-in-time” nature of grocery logistics in the U.K., which imports half the food it eats, means even short delays at the border could reduce the availability of a “limited number of short shelf-life” goods, according to the report.Ireland Sets Aside $1.3 Billion for No Deal (1.20 p.m.)The Irish government will make 1.2 billion euros ($1.3 billion) available to support the economy if the U.K. leaves without a deal, Finance Minister Paschal Donohoe said in his budget speech in Dublin.About 200 million euros will be made available next year, while the government will borrow to intervene further in a hard Brexit, including 650 million euros for agriculture, enterprise and tourism sectors.“A No Deal is unpredictable and different sectors could be impacted in different ways,” Donohoe said.OK For Johnson to Commit to Oct. 31, Court Told (1:15 p.m.)At the latest Brexit case in Scotland, the court heard that there’s nothing wrong with the government continuing to oppose an extension while saying Britain will leave on Oct. 31. That doesn’t mean it will break the law if it takes that negotiating position with the EU, the government’s lawyer said.It also means there’s no need for judges to act on Boris Johnson’s behalf to ensure a law is upheld, in this case sending the letter requesting a Brexit extension if there’s no agreement by Oct. 19 (see 11:15 a.m.).Keeping confidential how leaving at the end of the month might be achieved lawfully is the right of the government, lawyer Andrew Webster told the Court of Session. “These are delicate times and the court should be very slow to enter the negotiating field,” he said.Lord Carloway, one of the three judges on the panel at the Court of Session in Edinburgh, asked if the court should determine matters now and then see what happens after Oct. 19. The court will give its ruling on Wednesday.U.K. Says EU Needs to Compromise (12:55 p.m.)Johnson’s spokesman, James Slack, has briefed reporters in London and reiterated the government line that the European Union now needs to compromise if there’s to be a Brexit deal.It’s “not acceptable” for Northern Ireland to be kept in the customs union after Britain leaves the bloc – one of the main issues blocking agreement, he said.While Johnson wants a deal, “we are only going to be able to achieve that if the EU works with us and compromises," Slack said. "The prime minister’s position is a clear one: the U.K. needs to leave the EU in its entirety and it’s not acceptable for Northern Ireland to be left behind in the customs union.”Slack said Johnson’s call with German Chancellor Angela Merkel lasted about 30 minutes and was a “frank exchange” (See 10:30 a.m.), and pushed back against European Council President Donald Tusk’s claim that the U.K. is playing a “blame game” over Brexit.r4today https://t.co/vGzsEmOXhf pic.twitter.com/7B5vNTDfIH— BBC Radio 4 Today (@BBCr4today) October 8, 2019 Oil Supply ‘Secure’ if No-Deal, U.K. Says (12:45 p.m.)The supply of crude and refined fuels will be secure in the event of a no-deal Brexit, the U.K. government said.“The U.K. can draw on both substantial domestic production and oil imports from diverse international sources, including Europe, meaning that supply is secure," according to a no-deal planning document released on Tuesday.If the risk to U.K. fuel supplies became material, the government would be able to activate the Downstream Oil Protocol, making a reserve fleet of 80 road tankers available to the industry, it said.Financial Services Risks Remain in No-Deal (12:15 p.m.)Customers of U.K. financial services companies that use passporting to trade in the European Economic Area cannot be fully protected from risks, according to the U.K.’s document on planning for a no-deal Brexit published Tuesday.“The EU authorities and some individual Member States have taken legislative steps to prepare for leaving without a deal, which the government welcomes, but in the absence of further actions by EU authorities residual risks remain,” the document said.Contract continuity is a key issue. About 16 trillion pounds ($19.3 trillion) of swaps contracts between U.K. and EU traders mature after October. While the contracts will remain valid, the Bank of England and industry lobby groups have warned so-called life cycle events in the contracts -- such as extending the maturity of a trade -- could face hurdles.Smith Rejects Threat to Security Cooperation (12:10 p.m.)Northern Ireland Secretary Julian Smith attacked the overnight briefing from Johnson’s office that Britain could stop cooperating on security issues if the EU doesn’t give way.“I am clear that any threat on withdrawing security cooperation with Ireland is unacceptable,” Smith wrote in a Twitter post after Tuesday’s cabinet meeting. “This is not in the interest of Northern Ireland or the Union.”For a minister to use Twitter to attack the policy advocated by the prime minister’s office is a sign of how far, and how fast, relations have deteriorated in Johnson’s government. Were the prime minister to attempt to fight the next election on a no-deal platform, it suggests he’d face losing the support of some of his most senior ministers.Negotiations Resume In Brussels (12 p.m.)Talks between U.K. officials, led by Johnson’s envoy David Frost, and the European Commission are resuming in Brussels, despite the prime minister saying a deal is essentially impossible as things stand.Frost and his team will be continuing to discuss the U.K.’s proposals with the EU side and give clarifications, a U.K. official said.U.K. Commits to No Infrastructure on Border (11:50 a.m.)The U.K. Vowed not to build any infrastructure on the Irish border in the event of a no-deal split, but acknowledged U.K. exports would face tariffs and checks as they pass into Ireland.It said in a no-deal Brexit planning document published Tuesday morning that it would not introduce new checks on goods moving into Northern Ireland and would try to maintain the status quo "as far as possible."But it said the policy might not be sustainable and would seek a permanent solution in talks with the bloc.“Significant risks remain as this policy is temporary in nature and unilateral,” the document said. “The U.K. Government will look to engage with the Irish Government and the EU as soon as possible following Brexit.”Reserved response from Berlin After Call (11:45 a.m.)The response from the German Chancellery was very reserved in response to reports in London about the Tuesday morning call between Angela Merkel and Boris Johnson (see 10:35 a.m.).A government spokesman confirmed the call had taken place but declined to comment on the content of the conversation.The Chancellor is well aware of the blame game which Downing Street has started, but does not intend to enter it, a German official said under the condition of anonymity.Tusk Says Brexit Not ‘Stupid Blame Game’ (11:40 a.m.)EU Council President Donald Tusk held no punches in the ever escalating war of words between Brussels and London, accusing Boris Johnson of playing a ‘stupid blame game’ in his dealings with the bloc.“What’s at stake is not winning some stupid blame game. At stake is the future of Europe and the U.K. as well as the security and interests of our people,” Tusk wrote on Twitter. “You don’t want a deal, you don’t want an extension, you don’t want to revoke,” the Council President added, before asking "quo vadis?” the Latin for "where are you going?”DUP’s Foster Assails ‘Crazy’ Merkel Demand (11.30 a.m.)DUP leader Arlene Foster assailed German chancellor Angela Merkel’s reported comments that Northern Ireland must remain in the EU customs union (see 10:35 a.m.), describing the idea as a “surrender.”“For the U.K. to be asked to leave a part of its sovereign territory in a foreign organisation of which the U.K. would no longer be a part and over which we would have no say whatsoever is beyond crazy,” Foster said in a statement.Johnson Can’t Be Trusted, Scottish Court Told (11:15 a.m.)Brexit is back in Scotland’s highest court as a group of petitioners argue it should write the letter to the EU requesting more time, as required by an Act of Parliament last month. The letter would then be sent in the event of Boris Johnson failing to comply with the law.Aidan O’Neill, the lawyer representing the group, told the panel of three judges at the Court of Session in Edinburgh that Johnson just can’t be trusted, a line that’s underpinned a series of legal challenges.“What happens if he leads some sort of conscientious objection?” O’Neill asked. “We have a prime minister who apparently thinks he can continue his practice as a journalist by making things up and telling lies.”The judges asked why the case on appointing someone to write the extension letter had come to them. The arguments will continue through the day.Starmer Says Johnson Wants No-Deal Split (10:45 a.m.)Keir Starmer, Brexit spokesman for the opposition Labour Party, accused Johnson of following a “cynical” strategy to intentionally “sabotage” the talks with the EU.“Boris Johnson will never take responsibility for his own failure to put forward a credible deal. His strategy from day one has been for a no-deal Brexit,” Starmer said in a statement. “It is now more important than ever that Parliament unites to prevent this reckless Government crashing us out of the EU at the end of the month.”Johnson to Merkel: Deal Essentially Impossible (10:35 a.m.)Boris Johnson held what seems to have been a very difficult phone call with German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Tuesday morning.According to a British official, Merkel told the premier Northern Ireland must remain part of the EU’s customs union if he wants to secure a divorce agreement with the bloc. Johnson told the German chancellor that this demand, along with the EU’s unwillingness to engage with his new proposals, makes a deal essentially impossible.With little progress made in recent days, U.K. officials now believe Brexit talks are close to collapse. The BBC, which first reported details of the conversation, said Johnson’s office regarded the call as a clarifying moment.Brexit Deal Looks ‘Difficult,’ DUP Says (10 a.m.)DUP Deputy Leader Nigel Dodds said it looks unlikely a deal to break the impasse over Brexit will be reached this week, as the U.K. and EU remain divided over a plan which would effectively offer his party a veto over measures to avoid a hard border in Ireland.In an interview with Bloomberg TV, he said he doesn’t see Boris Johnson watering down the consent principle and accused Dublin of wanting to have “its cake and eat it” on the issue.Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar appears to be “desperate” to avoid the blame for a no-deal Brexit, Dodds said.Shapps Denies U.K. Planning to Punish EU States (Earlier)Transport Secretary Grant Shapps denied the U.K. Government is drawing up plans to punish EU member states that agree to a delay to the Oct. 31 Brexit deadline. The threat was in a text message from one of Boris Johnson’s advisers published by the Spectator magazine.The note, attributed to a “contact in Number 10”, said that any EU member state that agrees to delay Brexit would go to the back of the line for cooperation on defense and security.“I don’t think that’s the case at all,” Shapps told BBC Radio. He said it isn’t clear who wrote the text and insisted the government is in serious talks with the EU to get a deal.Rudd Accepts Case For Second Referendum (Earlier)Amber Rudd, who quit Boris Johnson’s cabinet last month in protest at his Brexit policy, said she now accepts the case for a confirmatory vote on any deal agreed with the EU.“We need to look much more carefully about how to find a compromise,” she told BBC Radio, accusing Johnson of giving up on reaching agreement with the bloc.“I still believe that we could find a deal that gets through the House of Commons,” she said. “But we need to make sure that the Number 10 machine works with MPs, stops expelling MPs -- perhaps from its own party, works cross-party with Labour, and yes, may indeed have to have a confirmatory referendum on a deal at some stage to get it through.”U.K. Tweaks No-Deal Brexit Tariffs (Earlier)The U.K. revamped the tariffs it will levy after a no-deal Brexit following warnings from industry that its earlier plans risked making domestic producers uncompetitive.Import duties for heavy goods vehicles will be reduced to 10%, in a boost to the road haulage industry, while levies for bio-ethanol will be raised and new tariffs for clothing introduced, the Department for International Trade said on Tuesday.Earlier:Boris Johnson Preparing for Brexit Talks to Collapse: SpectatorU.K. Tweaks No-Deal Brexit Tariffs for Trucks, Fuel and ClothingJohnson Warned Against Big Tax Cuts as U.K. Faces No-Deal Shock\--With assistance from Anna Edwards, Nikos Chrysoloras, Emma Ross-Thomas, Dara Doyle, Arne Delfs, Ian Wishart, Tim Ross, Robert Hutton, Jessica Shankleman, Helen Robertson and Greg Ritchie.To contact the reporters on this story: Alex Morales in London at amorales2@bloomberg.net;Rodney Jefferson in Edinburgh at r.jefferson@bloomberg.net;Peter Flanagan in Dublin at pflanagan23@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Thomas PennyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Follow @Brexit and sign up to our Brexit Bulletin. Boris Johnson told German Chancellor Angela Merkel a Brexit deal is essentially impossible if the EU demands Northern Ireland should stay in the bloc’s customs union. The call between the leaders, at 8 a.m. Tuesday, came after a text message from one of the prime minister’s officials, reported by the Spectator magazine, said his government is preparing for talks to collapse.Ministers published updated no-deal Brexit planning documents in London as negotiations between the U.K. and EU continue in Brussels.Key DevelopmentsEU Council President Donald Tusk accuses Johnson of playing Brexit “blame game”Ireland sets aside $1.3 billion for no-deal divorceScottish Court to rule Wednesday on enforcing anti no-deal lawJohnson Warned Against Big Tax Cuts as U.K. Faces No-Deal ShockPound slips 0.5% against the dollarFruit and Veg Supply Could be Hit by No-Deal (1:30 p.m.)A no-deal split from the EU could cause shortages of some fresh fruits and vegetables because of possible threats to time-sensitive supply chains, the U.K. government warned in Tuesday no-deal planning document.The “just-in-time” nature of grocery logistics in the U.K., which imports half the food it eats, means even short delays at the border could reduce the availability of a “limited number of short shelf-life” goods, according to the report.Ireland Sets Aside $1.3 Billion for No Deal (1.20 p.m.)The Irish government will make 1.2 billion euros ($1.3 billion) available to support the economy if the U.K. leaves without a deal, Finance Minister Paschal Donohoe said in his budget speech in Dublin.About 200 million euros will be made available next year, while the government will borrow to intervene further in a hard Brexit, including 650 million euros for agriculture, enterprise and tourism sectors.“A No Deal is unpredictable and different sectors could be impacted in different ways,” Donohoe said.OK For Johnson to Commit to Oct. 31, Court Told (1:15 p.m.)At the latest Brexit case in Scotland, the court heard that there’s nothing wrong with the government continuing to oppose an extension while saying Britain will leave on Oct. 31. That doesn’t mean it will break the law if it takes that negotiating position with the EU, the government’s lawyer said.It also means there’s no need for judges to act on Boris Johnson’s behalf to ensure a law is upheld, in this case sending the letter requesting a Brexit extension if there’s no agreement by Oct. 19 (see 11:15 a.m.).Keeping confidential how leaving at the end of the month might be achieved lawfully is the right of the government, lawyer Andrew Webster told the Court of Session. “These are delicate times and the court should be very slow to enter the negotiating field,” he said.Lord Carloway, one of the three judges on the panel at the Court of Session in Edinburgh, asked if the court should determine matters now and then see what happens after Oct. 19. The court will give its ruling on Wednesday.U.K. Says EU Needs to Compromise (12:55 p.m.)Johnson’s spokesman, James Slack, has briefed reporters in London and reiterated the government line that the European Union now needs to compromise if there’s to be a Brexit deal.It’s “not acceptable” for Northern Ireland to be kept in the customs union after Britain leaves the bloc – one of the main issues blocking agreement, he said.While Johnson wants a deal, “we are only going to be able to achieve that if the EU works with us and compromises," Slack said. "The prime minister’s position is a clear one: the U.K. needs to leave the EU in its entirety and it’s not acceptable for Northern Ireland to be left behind in the customs union.”Slack said Johnson’s call with German Chancellor Angela Merkel lasted about 30 minutes and was a “frank exchange” (See 10:30 a.m.), and pushed back against European Council President Donald Tusk’s claim that the U.K. is playing a “blame game” over Brexit.r4today https://t.co/vGzsEmOXhf pic.twitter.com/7B5vNTDfIH— BBC Radio 4 Today (@BBCr4today) October 8, 2019 Oil Supply ‘Secure’ if No-Deal, U.K. Says (12:45 p.m.)The supply of crude and refined fuels will be secure in the event of a no-deal Brexit, the U.K. government said.“The U.K. can draw on both substantial domestic production and oil imports from diverse international sources, including Europe, meaning that supply is secure," according to a no-deal planning document released on Tuesday.If the risk to U.K. fuel supplies became material, the government would be able to activate the Downstream Oil Protocol, making a reserve fleet of 80 road tankers available to the industry, it said.Financial Services Risks Remain in No-Deal (12:15 p.m.)Customers of U.K. financial services companies that use passporting to trade in the European Economic Area cannot be fully protected from risks, according to the U.K.’s document on planning for a no-deal Brexit published Tuesday.“The EU authorities and some individual Member States have taken legislative steps to prepare for leaving without a deal, which the government welcomes, but in the absence of further actions by EU authorities residual risks remain,” the document said.Contract continuity is a key issue. About 16 trillion pounds ($19.3 trillion) of swaps contracts between U.K. and EU traders mature after October. While the contracts will remain valid, the Bank of England and industry lobby groups have warned so-called life cycle events in the contracts -- such as extending the maturity of a trade -- could face hurdles.Smith Rejects Threat to Security Cooperation (12:10 p.m.)Northern Ireland Secretary Julian Smith attacked the overnight briefing from Johnson’s office that Britain could stop cooperating on security issues if the EU doesn’t give way.“I am clear that any threat on withdrawing security cooperation with Ireland is unacceptable,” Smith wrote in a Twitter post after Tuesday’s cabinet meeting. “This is not in the interest of Northern Ireland or the Union.”For a minister to use Twitter to attack the policy advocated by the prime minister’s office is a sign of how far, and how fast, relations have deteriorated in Johnson’s government. Were the prime minister to attempt to fight the next election on a no-deal platform, it suggests he’d face losing the support of some of his most senior ministers.Negotiations Resume In Brussels (12 p.m.)Talks between U.K. officials, led by Johnson’s envoy David Frost, and the European Commission are resuming in Brussels, despite the prime minister saying a deal is essentially impossible as things stand.Frost and his team will be continuing to discuss the U.K.’s proposals with the EU side and give clarifications, a U.K. official said.U.K. Commits to No Infrastructure on Border (11:50 a.m.)The U.K. Vowed not to build any infrastructure on the Irish border in the event of a no-deal split, but acknowledged U.K. exports would face tariffs and checks as they pass into Ireland.It said in a no-deal Brexit planning document published Tuesday morning that it would not introduce new checks on goods moving into Northern Ireland and would try to maintain the status quo "as far as possible."But it said the policy might not be sustainable and would seek a permanent solution in talks with the bloc.“Significant risks remain as this policy is temporary in nature and unilateral,” the document said. “The U.K. Government will look to engage with the Irish Government and the EU as soon as possible following Brexit.”Reserved response from Berlin After Call (11:45 a.m.)The response from the German Chancellery was very reserved in response to reports in London about the Tuesday morning call between Angela Merkel and Boris Johnson (see 10:35 a.m.).A government spokesman confirmed the call had taken place but declined to comment on the content of the conversation.The Chancellor is well aware of the blame game which Downing Street has started, but does not intend to enter it, a German official said under the condition of anonymity.Tusk Says Brexit Not ‘Stupid Blame Game’ (11:40 a.m.)EU Council President Donald Tusk held no punches in the ever escalating war of words between Brussels and London, accusing Boris Johnson of playing a ‘stupid blame game’ in his dealings with the bloc.“What’s at stake is not winning some stupid blame game. At stake is the future of Europe and the U.K. as well as the security and interests of our people,” Tusk wrote on Twitter. “You don’t want a deal, you don’t want an extension, you don’t want to revoke,” the Council President added, before asking "quo vadis?” the Latin for "where are you going?”DUP’s Foster Assails ‘Crazy’ Merkel Demand (11.30 a.m.)DUP leader Arlene Foster assailed German chancellor Angela Merkel’s reported comments that Northern Ireland must remain in the EU customs union (see 10:35 a.m.), describing the idea as a “surrender.”“For the U.K. to be asked to leave a part of its sovereign territory in a foreign organisation of which the U.K. would no longer be a part and over which we would have no say whatsoever is beyond crazy,” Foster said in a statement.Johnson Can’t Be Trusted, Scottish Court Told (11:15 a.m.)Brexit is back in Scotland’s highest court as a group of petitioners argue it should write the letter to the EU requesting more time, as required by an Act of Parliament last month. The letter would then be sent in the event of Boris Johnson failing to comply with the law.Aidan O’Neill, the lawyer representing the group, told the panel of three judges at the Court of Session in Edinburgh that Johnson just can’t be trusted, a line that’s underpinned a series of legal challenges.“What happens if he leads some sort of conscientious objection?” O’Neill asked. “We have a prime minister who apparently thinks he can continue his practice as a journalist by making things up and telling lies.”The judges asked why the case on appointing someone to write the extension letter had come to them. The arguments will continue through the day.Starmer Says Johnson Wants No-Deal Split (10:45 a.m.)Keir Starmer, Brexit spokesman for the opposition Labour Party, accused Johnson of following a “cynical” strategy to intentionally “sabotage” the talks with the EU.“Boris Johnson will never take responsibility for his own failure to put forward a credible deal. His strategy from day one has been for a no-deal Brexit,” Starmer said in a statement. “It is now more important than ever that Parliament unites to prevent this reckless Government crashing us out of the EU at the end of the month.”Johnson to Merkel: Deal Essentially Impossible (10:35 a.m.)Boris Johnson held what seems to have been a very difficult phone call with German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Tuesday morning.According to a British official, Merkel told the premier Northern Ireland must remain part of the EU’s customs union if he wants to secure a divorce agreement with the bloc. Johnson told the German chancellor that this demand, along with the EU’s unwillingness to engage with his new proposals, makes a deal essentially impossible.With little progress made in recent days, U.K. officials now believe Brexit talks are close to collapse. The BBC, which first reported details of the conversation, said Johnson’s office regarded the call as a clarifying moment.Brexit Deal Looks ‘Difficult,’ DUP Says (10 a.m.)DUP Deputy Leader Nigel Dodds said it looks unlikely a deal to break the impasse over Brexit will be reached this week, as the U.K. and EU remain divided over a plan which would effectively offer his party a veto over measures to avoid a hard border in Ireland.In an interview with Bloomberg TV, he said he doesn’t see Boris Johnson watering down the consent principle and accused Dublin of wanting to have “its cake and eat it” on the issue.Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar appears to be “desperate” to avoid the blame for a no-deal Brexit, Dodds said.Shapps Denies U.K. Planning to Punish EU States (Earlier)Transport Secretary Grant Shapps denied the U.K. Government is drawing up plans to punish EU member states that agree to a delay to the Oct. 31 Brexit deadline. The threat was in a text message from one of Boris Johnson’s advisers published by the Spectator magazine.The note, attributed to a “contact in Number 10”, said that any EU member state that agrees to delay Brexit would go to the back of the line for cooperation on defense and security.“I don’t think that’s the case at all,” Shapps told BBC Radio. He said it isn’t clear who wrote the text and insisted the government is in serious talks with the EU to get a deal.Rudd Accepts Case For Second Referendum (Earlier)Amber Rudd, who quit Boris Johnson’s cabinet last month in protest at his Brexit policy, said she now accepts the case for a confirmatory vote on any deal agreed with the EU.“We need to look much more carefully about how to find a compromise,” she told BBC Radio, accusing Johnson of giving up on reaching agreement with the bloc.“I still believe that we could find a deal that gets through the House of Commons,” she said. “But we need to make sure that the Number 10 machine works with MPs, stops expelling MPs -- perhaps from its own party, works cross-party with Labour, and yes, may indeed have to have a confirmatory referendum on a deal at some stage to get it through.”U.K. Tweaks No-Deal Brexit Tariffs (Earlier)The U.K. revamped the tariffs it will levy after a no-deal Brexit following warnings from industry that its earlier plans risked making domestic producers uncompetitive.Import duties for heavy goods vehicles will be reduced to 10%, in a boost to the road haulage industry, while levies for bio-ethanol will be raised and new tariffs for clothing introduced, the Department for International Trade said on Tuesday.Earlier:Boris Johnson Preparing for Brexit Talks to Collapse: SpectatorU.K. Tweaks No-Deal Brexit Tariffs for Trucks, Fuel and ClothingJohnson Warned Against Big Tax Cuts as U.K. Faces No-Deal Shock\--With assistance from Anna Edwards, Nikos Chrysoloras, Emma Ross-Thomas, Dara Doyle, Arne Delfs, Ian Wishart, Tim Ross, Robert Hutton, Jessica Shankleman, Helen Robertson and Greg Ritchie.To contact the reporters on this story: Alex Morales in London at amorales2@bloomberg.net;Rodney Jefferson in Edinburgh at r.jefferson@bloomberg.net;Peter Flanagan in Dublin at pflanagan23@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Thomas PennyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 24/79   Can Lamar Advertising Company (REIT)'s (NASDAQ:LAMR) ROE Continue To Surpass The Industry Average?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    While some investors are already well versed in financial metrics (hat tip), this article is for those who would like...

    While some investors are already well versed in financial metrics (hat tip), this article is for those who would like...


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  • 25/79   Trump bars Gordon Sondland, key player in Ukraine controversy, from testifying in impeachment investigation
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Gordon Sondland, President Trump's ambassador to the European Union, was scheduled to appear before a trio of committees Tuesday morning.

    Gordon Sondland, President Trump's ambassador to the European Union, was scheduled to appear before a trio of committees Tuesday morning.


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  • 26/79   Despite Its High P/E Ratio, Is WASGAU Produktions & Handels AG (FRA:MSH) Still Undervalued?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today, we'll introduce the concept of the P/E ratio for those who are learning about investing. We'll show how you can...

    Today, we'll introduce the concept of the P/E ratio for those who are learning about investing. We'll show how you can...


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  • 27/79   Core U.S. Producer Prices Fall Most in More Than Four Years
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Explore what’s moving the global economy in the new season of the Stephanomics podcast. Subscribe via Pocket Cast or iTunes.A measure of underlying U.S. producer prices posted the biggest monthly drop in more than four years, adding to signs of tame inflation pressures that potentially offer Federal Reserve policy makers more leeway to lower interest rates. The dollar fell.Excluding food and energy, producer prices decreased 0.3% in September from the prior month, compared with forecasts for a 0.2% increase, a Labor Department report showed Tuesday. The gauge was up 2% from a year earlier, the smallest gain in two years. The overall producer-price index also dropped 0.3% from August and was up 1.4% from a year earlier, the least since November 2016.Key Insights The biggest monthly drop in the core PPI since February 2015 suggests weaker demand is forcing companies to lower prices and preventing them from passing along any higher costs resulting from tariffs. Subdued inflation, at the producer and consumer levels, provides space for the Fed to lower borrowing costs with little concern that price gains will surpass the central bank’s goal. Policy makers next meet Oct. 29-30.The report, which measures wholesale and other business selling costs, reflected monthly declines in indexes for machinery and vehicle wholesaling, as well as fuels and apparel retailing. Transportation and warehousing prices also dropped, while the index for hospital outpatient care increased.The U.S.-China trade war intensified in September when a new 15% tariff on about $112 billion of Chinese products took effect. This tranche, along with the batch that will impact about $160 billion worth of goods in December, more directly targets American consumers.Analysts monitor this report to assess potential price pressures set to show up at the consumer level. A more closely-watched measure of inflation, the core consumer price index, is estimated to have risen 2.4% from a year earlier in data released Thursday, which would equal the August reading.Get More Producer prices excluding food, energy, and trade services -- a measure preferred by some economists because it strips out the most volatile components -- were unchanged from the prior month, and rose 1.7% from a year earlier. The cost of goods fell 0.4% after dropping 0.5% the previous month. Services prices decreased 0.2% after a 0.3% gain in August.Energy prices fell 2.5% from the prior month, dragging down the overall gauge, and food costs rose 0.3%.(Adds market reaction, chart.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Explore what’s moving the global economy in the new season of the Stephanomics podcast. Subscribe via Pocket Cast or iTunes.A measure of underlying U.S. producer prices posted the biggest monthly drop in more than four years, adding to signs of tame inflation pressures that potentially offer Federal Reserve policy makers more leeway to lower interest rates. The dollar fell.Excluding food and energy, producer prices decreased 0.3% in September from the prior month, compared with forecasts for a 0.2% increase, a Labor Department report showed Tuesday. The gauge was up 2% from a year earlier, the smallest gain in two years. The overall producer-price index also dropped 0.3% from August and was up 1.4% from a year earlier, the least since November 2016.Key Insights The biggest monthly drop in the core PPI since February 2015 suggests weaker demand is forcing companies to lower prices and preventing them from passing along any higher costs resulting from tariffs. Subdued inflation, at the producer and consumer levels, provides space for the Fed to lower borrowing costs with little concern that price gains will surpass the central bank’s goal. Policy makers next meet Oct. 29-30.The report, which measures wholesale and other business selling costs, reflected monthly declines in indexes for machinery and vehicle wholesaling, as well as fuels and apparel retailing. Transportation and warehousing prices also dropped, while the index for hospital outpatient care increased.The U.S.-China trade war intensified in September when a new 15% tariff on about $112 billion of Chinese products took effect. This tranche, along with the batch that will impact about $160 billion worth of goods in December, more directly targets American consumers.Analysts monitor this report to assess potential price pressures set to show up at the consumer level. A more closely-watched measure of inflation, the core consumer price index, is estimated to have risen 2.4% from a year earlier in data released Thursday, which would equal the August reading.Get More Producer prices excluding food, energy, and trade services -- a measure preferred by some economists because it strips out the most volatile components -- were unchanged from the prior month, and rose 1.7% from a year earlier. The cost of goods fell 0.4% after dropping 0.5% the previous month. Services prices decreased 0.2% after a 0.3% gain in August.Energy prices fell 2.5% from the prior month, dragging down the overall gauge, and food costs rose 0.3%.(Adds market reaction, chart.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 28/79   Introducing Glanbia (ISE:GL9), The Stock That Dropped 29% In The Last Three Years
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    As an investor its worth striving to ensure your overall portfolio beats the market average. But its virtually certain...

    As an investor its worth striving to ensure your overall portfolio beats the market average. But its virtually certain...


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  • 29/79   U.S. Futures, Stocks Slide as Trade Tensions Flare: Markets Wrap
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- U.S. equity-index futures extended a retreat alongside European stocks on Tuesday as investor optimism over looming trade talks was undercut by news the White House is moving toward possible restrictions on investments into China. Treasuries and gold advanced.Contracts for the three major U.S. gauges had gained earlier, but they reversed after China said it strongly opposed an American decision to blacklist some of its technology firms over involvement in alleged human-rights abuses. Losses deepened when Bloomberg reported the Trump administration is moving ahead with discussions around possible restrictions on capital flows, with a particular focus on investments made by U.S. government pension funds. Chinese tech companies that trade in America fell in the premarket. The dollar edged lower after a measure of underlying U.S. producer prices posted the biggest monthly drop in more than four years.The Stoxx Europe 600 Index fell after two days of advancing. The euro climbed as a jump in manufacturing fueled a surprise improvement in German industrial production, while most European bonds tracked Treasuries higher. The pound extended its decline after Boris Johnson told German Chancellor Angela Merkel a Brexit deal is essentially impossible if the EU demands Northern Ireland stay in the bloc’s customs union.The abrupt escalation in tension between the U.S. and China comes just days before senior representatives resume their effort to resolve a protectionist dispute that has roiled trade and markets for more than a year. Earlier in the day investors were more optimistic following official confirmation People’s Bank of China Governor Yi Gang will join Chinese Vice Premier Liu He at the talks in Washington.Asian equity benchmarks had jumped from Tokyo and Seoul to Shanghai and Hong Kong, where trading showed little concern about ongoing unrest. The tech-heavy South Korean index led the regional advance after Samsung Electronics Co. earnings beat analyst estimates.Elsewhere, Turkey’s lira stabilized after tumbling Monday in wake of U.S. President Donald Trump threatening to “destroy” the country’s economy if it acts in excess in a military operation targeting Kurdish forces in Syria. West Texas crude fell to about $52 per barrel.Here are some key events coming up this week:Fed Chairman Jerome Powell speaks Tuesday on the final day of NABE’s annual conference in Denver; on the following day, minutes are released on the last policy meeting of the Fed’s rate-setting committee.The account of the ECB’s last gathering is due Thursday.Chinese President Xi Jinping and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi reportedly will meet at an unofficial summit.The U.S. releases a key measure of inflation on Thursday.Here are the main moves in markets:StocksFutures on the S&P 500 Index fell 0.6% as of 8:32 a.m. New York time.The Stoxx Europe 600 Index sank 0.9%.The U.K.’s FTSE 100 Index declined 0.3%.The MSCI Asia Pacific Index increased 0.7%.The MSCI Emerging Market Index increased 0.2%.CurrenciesThe Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index declined 0.1%.The euro gained 0.2% to $1.0991.The British pound declined 0.5% to $1.2226.The Japanese yen strengthened 0.4% to 106.86 per dollar.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries decreased five basis points to 1.51%.Germany’s 10-year yield dipped two basis points to -0.59%.Britain’s 10-year yield declined four basis points to 0.416%.CommoditiesGold increased 0.8% to $1,505.91 an ounce.West Texas Intermediate crude declined 1.6% to $51.92 a barrel.\--With assistance from Sybilla Gross, Andreea Papuc and Vassilis Karamanis.To contact the reporter on this story: Samuel Potter in London at spotter33@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Samuel Potter at spotter33@bloomberg.net, Todd WhiteFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- U.S. equity-index futures extended a retreat alongside European stocks on Tuesday as investor optimism over looming trade talks was undercut by news the White House is moving toward possible restrictions on investments into China. Treasuries and gold advanced.Contracts for the three major U.S. gauges had gained earlier, but they reversed after China said it strongly opposed an American decision to blacklist some of its technology firms over involvement in alleged human-rights abuses. Losses deepened when Bloomberg reported the Trump administration is moving ahead with discussions around possible restrictions on capital flows, with a particular focus on investments made by U.S. government pension funds. Chinese tech companies that trade in America fell in the premarket. The dollar edged lower after a measure of underlying U.S. producer prices posted the biggest monthly drop in more than four years.The Stoxx Europe 600 Index fell after two days of advancing. The euro climbed as a jump in manufacturing fueled a surprise improvement in German industrial production, while most European bonds tracked Treasuries higher. The pound extended its decline after Boris Johnson told German Chancellor Angela Merkel a Brexit deal is essentially impossible if the EU demands Northern Ireland stay in the bloc’s customs union.The abrupt escalation in tension between the U.S. and China comes just days before senior representatives resume their effort to resolve a protectionist dispute that has roiled trade and markets for more than a year. Earlier in the day investors were more optimistic following official confirmation People’s Bank of China Governor Yi Gang will join Chinese Vice Premier Liu He at the talks in Washington.Asian equity benchmarks had jumped from Tokyo and Seoul to Shanghai and Hong Kong, where trading showed little concern about ongoing unrest. The tech-heavy South Korean index led the regional advance after Samsung Electronics Co. earnings beat analyst estimates.Elsewhere, Turkey’s lira stabilized after tumbling Monday in wake of U.S. President Donald Trump threatening to “destroy” the country’s economy if it acts in excess in a military operation targeting Kurdish forces in Syria. West Texas crude fell to about $52 per barrel.Here are some key events coming up this week:Fed Chairman Jerome Powell speaks Tuesday on the final day of NABE’s annual conference in Denver; on the following day, minutes are released on the last policy meeting of the Fed’s rate-setting committee.The account of the ECB’s last gathering is due Thursday.Chinese President Xi Jinping and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi reportedly will meet at an unofficial summit.The U.S. releases a key measure of inflation on Thursday.Here are the main moves in markets:StocksFutures on the S&P 500 Index fell 0.6% as of 8:32 a.m. New York time.The Stoxx Europe 600 Index sank 0.9%.The U.K.’s FTSE 100 Index declined 0.3%.The MSCI Asia Pacific Index increased 0.7%.The MSCI Emerging Market Index increased 0.2%.CurrenciesThe Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index declined 0.1%.The euro gained 0.2% to $1.0991.The British pound declined 0.5% to $1.2226.The Japanese yen strengthened 0.4% to 106.86 per dollar.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries decreased five basis points to 1.51%.Germany’s 10-year yield dipped two basis points to -0.59%.Britain’s 10-year yield declined four basis points to 0.416%.CommoditiesGold increased 0.8% to $1,505.91 an ounce.West Texas Intermediate crude declined 1.6% to $51.92 a barrel.\--With assistance from Sybilla Gross, Andreea Papuc and Vassilis Karamanis.To contact the reporter on this story: Samuel Potter in London at spotter33@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Samuel Potter at spotter33@bloomberg.net, Todd WhiteFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 30/79   Read This Before Buying Lakeland Industries, Inc. (NASDAQ:LAKE) Shares
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    We've lost count of how many times insiders have accumulated shares in a company that goes on to improve markedly...

    We've lost count of how many times insiders have accumulated shares in a company that goes on to improve markedly...


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  • 31/79   Should You Like Crown Point Energy Inc.’s (CVE:CWV) High Return On Capital Employed?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today we'll evaluate Crown Point Energy Inc. (CVE:CWV) to determine whether it could have potential as an investment...

    Today we'll evaluate Crown Point Energy Inc. (CVE:CWV) to determine whether it could have potential as an investment...


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  • 32/79   Is Koppers Holdings Inc. (NYSE:KOP) A Volatile Stock?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    If you're interested in Koppers Holdings Inc. (NYSE:KOP), then you might want to consider its beta (a measure of share...

    If you're interested in Koppers Holdings Inc. (NYSE:KOP), then you might want to consider its beta (a measure of share...


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  • 33/79   Kingstone Companies, Inc. (NASDAQ:KINS) Insiders Increased Their Holdings
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    It is not uncommon to see companies perform well in the years after insiders buy shares. Unfortunately, there are also...

    It is not uncommon to see companies perform well in the years after insiders buy shares. Unfortunately, there are also...


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  • 34/79   US blacklists 28 Chinese tech firms over repression of Uighur Muslims
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The United States on Monday blacklisted 28 Chinese companies that develop facial recognition and other artificial intelligence technology, saying they were implicated in the repression of China’s Muslim minority.  The Commerce Department put the companies on a so-called Entity List for acting contrary to American foreign policy interests.  The blacklist effectively bars US firms from selling technology to the Chinese companies without government approval. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said in a written statement Monday that the U.S. government "will not tolerate the brutal suppression of ethnic minorities within China." The blacklisted companies include Hikvision and Dahua, both of which are global providers of video surveillance technology. Hikvision said in a statement Monday that it respects human rights and strongly opposes the Trump administration's decision.  Prominent Chinese AI firms such as Sense Time, Megvii and iFlytek are also on the list. Sense Time and Megvii are known for the development of computer vision technology that underpins facial recognition products, while iFlytek is known for its voice recognition and translation services. Along with the tech companies, the Commerce Department's filing targets local government agencies in China's northwestern Xinjiang region. The filing said the listed groups have been implicated in "China's campaign of repression, mass arbitrary detention, and high-technology surveillance" against Uighurs, Kazakhs and other predominantly Muslim minority groups. Geng Shuang, a Chinese foreign ministry spokesman, said the U.S. has no right to interfere in Xinjiang's internal affairs and denied there are human rights issues in the region. "This kind of behavior seriously violates the basic norms of international relations, interferes in China's internal affairs, and harms China's interests," he said. "The Chinese side strongly deplores and opposes it." Megvii said Tuesday there are "no grounds" for including the company in the blacklist. Megvii said it received no revenue from projects in Xinjiang in the six months through June 30. "We believe our inclusion on the list reflects a misunderstanding of our company," said a Megvii statement. The Trump administration earlier this year used the same blacklisting process to punish Huawei, the Chinese telecom giant targeted by the US over national security concerns. China is estimated to have detained up to 1 million Muslims in prison-like detention centers in the region. The detentions come on top of harsh travel restrictions and a massive surveillance network equipped with facial recognition technology. China has denied committing abuses in the centers and has described them as schools aimed at providing employable skills and combating extremism.

    The United States on Monday blacklisted 28 Chinese companies that develop facial recognition and other artificial intelligence technology, saying they were implicated in the repression of China’s Muslim minority.  The Commerce Department put the companies on a so-called Entity List for acting contrary to American foreign policy interests.  The blacklist effectively bars US firms from selling technology to the Chinese companies without government approval. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said in a written statement Monday that the U.S. government "will not tolerate the brutal suppression of ethnic minorities within China." The blacklisted companies include Hikvision and Dahua, both of which are global providers of video surveillance technology. Hikvision said in a statement Monday that it respects human rights and strongly opposes the Trump administration's decision.  Prominent Chinese AI firms such as Sense Time, Megvii and iFlytek are also on the list. Sense Time and Megvii are known for the development of computer vision technology that underpins facial recognition products, while iFlytek is known for its voice recognition and translation services. Along with the tech companies, the Commerce Department's filing targets local government agencies in China's northwestern Xinjiang region. The filing said the listed groups have been implicated in "China's campaign of repression, mass arbitrary detention, and high-technology surveillance" against Uighurs, Kazakhs and other predominantly Muslim minority groups. Geng Shuang, a Chinese foreign ministry spokesman, said the U.S. has no right to interfere in Xinjiang's internal affairs and denied there are human rights issues in the region. "This kind of behavior seriously violates the basic norms of international relations, interferes in China's internal affairs, and harms China's interests," he said. "The Chinese side strongly deplores and opposes it." Megvii said Tuesday there are "no grounds" for including the company in the blacklist. Megvii said it received no revenue from projects in Xinjiang in the six months through June 30. "We believe our inclusion on the list reflects a misunderstanding of our company," said a Megvii statement. The Trump administration earlier this year used the same blacklisting process to punish Huawei, the Chinese telecom giant targeted by the US over national security concerns. China is estimated to have detained up to 1 million Muslims in prison-like detention centers in the region. The detentions come on top of harsh travel restrictions and a massive surveillance network equipped with facial recognition technology. China has denied committing abuses in the centers and has described them as schools aimed at providing employable skills and combating extremism.


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  • 35/79   Calculating The Intrinsic Value Of Keysight Technologies, Inc. (NYSE:KEYS)
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today we will run through one way of estimating the intrinsic value of Keysight Technologies, Inc. (NYSE:KEYS) by...

    Today we will run through one way of estimating the intrinsic value of Keysight Technologies, Inc. (NYSE:KEYS) by...


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  • 36/79   Nissan names head of China business to be new CEO
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Nissan tapped the head of its China business, Makoto Uchida, as its new president and chief executive, replacing Hiroto Saikawa, who resigned after acknowledging receiving dubious income.  Nissan Motor Co. has been reeling in a leadership crisis amid sinking profitability since the arrest last year of former Chairman Carlos Ghosn over financial misconduct allegations.  Uchida's appointment was announced by the Japanese automaker late Tuesday in a hastily called half-hour news conference by board members Yasushi Kimura and Masakazu Toyoda.

    Nissan tapped the head of its China business, Makoto Uchida, as its new president and chief executive, replacing Hiroto Saikawa, who resigned after acknowledging receiving dubious income. Nissan Motor Co. has been reeling in a leadership crisis amid sinking profitability since the arrest last year of former Chairman Carlos Ghosn over financial misconduct allegations. Uchida's appointment was announced by the Japanese automaker late Tuesday in a hastily called half-hour news conference by board members Yasushi Kimura and Masakazu Toyoda.


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  • 37/79   Should You Be Worried About Envipco Holding N.V.'s (AMS:ENVI) 1.0% Return On Equity?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    One of the best investments we can make is in our own knowledge and skill set. With that in mind, this article will...

    One of the best investments we can make is in our own knowledge and skill set. With that in mind, this article will...


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  • 38/79   Calculating The Intrinsic Value Of Tesmec S.p.A. (BIT:TES)
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Does the October share price for Tesmec S.p.A. (BIT:TES) reflect what it's really worth? Today, we will estimate the...

    Does the October share price for Tesmec S.p.A. (BIT:TES) reflect what it's really worth? Today, we will estimate the...


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  • 39/79   Read This Before You Buy International Paper Company (NYSE:IP) Because Of Its P/E Ratio
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today, we'll introduce the concept of the P/E ratio for those who are learning about investing. To keep it practical...

    Today, we'll introduce the concept of the P/E ratio for those who are learning about investing. To keep it practical...


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  • 40/79   Taliban commanders released as hopes rise for resumption of US peace negotiations
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Hopes are rising for the resumption of the abandoned Taliban and US peace talks after eleven senior Taliban members were freed from prison in an exchange with three kidnapped Indian engineers. Among those freed are two former provincial governors of the Taliban and Abdul Rashid Baluch, a notorious regional leader sentenced to 18 years imprisonment for trafficking opium. The men were being held near Bagram air base outside Kabul.  It is believed American authorities must have given permission for the swap as Baluch was previously on their ‘Specially Designated Global Terrorist’ list. Last month, Donald Trump cancelled over a year’s worth of on-going peace negotiations with the Taliban after the group claimed a Kabul bomb attack that killed 11 people, including an American soldier. However, relations appear to be thawing again after Zalmay Khalilzad, the Special Representative for Afghanistan Reconciliation at the State Department, met senior Taliban leaders on Friday for clandestine talks in Islamabad. It is unclear whether the exchange of the Taliban leaders was discussed during the meeting. While the Afghan authorities do intermittently release prisoners early as gestures of goodwill it is rare to see such high-profile members of the Taliban freed. Abdul Rashid Baluch was a regional official for the group in the southwestern province of Nimroz when he was apprehended while personally escorting an almost one-tonne consignment of opium in 2014. Baluch’s arrest was trumpeted by the U.S-Afghan authorities as proof of Taliban involvement in the international drug trade. Officials said Sheikh Abdur Rahim and Mawlawi Abdur Rashid – provincial governors in the Taliban administration when it was defeated by U.S-led forces in 2001 – were also released. The three Indians set free were working as engineers in the northern Afghan province of Baghlan when they were kidnapped in May 2018, along with four other colleagues. One man was released in March but the whereabouts of the three remaining Indians is unknown.

    Hopes are rising for the resumption of the abandoned Taliban and US peace talks after eleven senior Taliban members were freed from prison in an exchange with three kidnapped Indian engineers. Among those freed are two former provincial governors of the Taliban and Abdul Rashid Baluch, a notorious regional leader sentenced to 18 years imprisonment for trafficking opium. The men were being held near Bagram air base outside Kabul.  It is believed American authorities must have given permission for the swap as Baluch was previously on their ‘Specially Designated Global Terrorist’ list. Last month, Donald Trump cancelled over a year’s worth of on-going peace negotiations with the Taliban after the group claimed a Kabul bomb attack that killed 11 people, including an American soldier. However, relations appear to be thawing again after Zalmay Khalilzad, the Special Representative for Afghanistan Reconciliation at the State Department, met senior Taliban leaders on Friday for clandestine talks in Islamabad. It is unclear whether the exchange of the Taliban leaders was discussed during the meeting. While the Afghan authorities do intermittently release prisoners early as gestures of goodwill it is rare to see such high-profile members of the Taliban freed. Abdul Rashid Baluch was a regional official for the group in the southwestern province of Nimroz when he was apprehended while personally escorting an almost one-tonne consignment of opium in 2014. Baluch’s arrest was trumpeted by the U.S-Afghan authorities as proof of Taliban involvement in the international drug trade. Officials said Sheikh Abdur Rahim and Mawlawi Abdur Rashid – provincial governors in the Taliban administration when it was defeated by U.S-led forces in 2001 – were also released. The three Indians set free were working as engineers in the northern Afghan province of Baghlan when they were kidnapped in May 2018, along with four other colleagues. One man was released in March but the whereabouts of the three remaining Indians is unknown.


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  • 41/79   Everything we know about Hunter Biden's business connections in China
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    President Donald Trump has made multiple allegations about the global business dealings of former Vice President Joe Biden's son.

    President Donald Trump has made multiple allegations about the global business dealings of former Vice President Joe Biden's son.


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  • 42/79   Diplomat's Wife Suspected in Fatal U.K. Car Crash Returned to the U.S. After Telling Authorities She Would Stay. Here's What to Know
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    U.K. officials are asking that diplomatic immunity be waived

    U.K. officials are asking that diplomatic immunity be waived


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  • 43/79   One suspect nabbed, one sought in shooting rampage that killed 4, wounded 5 in Kansas bar
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    One suspect in the shooting rampage that left four dead and five wounded at a Kansas bar was in custody while a second accused remained at large.

    One suspect in the shooting rampage that left four dead and five wounded at a Kansas bar was in custody while a second accused remained at large.


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  • 44/79   'Zombie deer' may be spreading deadly disease to humans — but officials say there’s no way of knowing yet
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Scientists have warned that "zombie deer" are spreading across America and there is nothing that can be done to stop them.Officials monitoring chronic wasting disease, a deadly and severely contagious neurological disorder, in nationwide deer populations, said the illness has now spread to at least 26 states.

    Scientists have warned that "zombie deer" are spreading across America and there is nothing that can be done to stop them.Officials monitoring chronic wasting disease, a deadly and severely contagious neurological disorder, in nationwide deer populations, said the illness has now spread to at least 26 states.


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  • 45/79   EU tells British PM Johnson to stop playing 'stupid' Brexit blame game
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    LONDON/BRUSSELS (Reuters) - The European Union accused Britain of playing a 'stupid blame game' over Brexit on Tuesday after a Downing Street source said a deal was essentially impossible because German Chancellor Angela Merkel had made unacceptable demands.  With just 23 days before the United Kingdom is due to leave the bloc, the future of Brexit remains deeply uncertain and both London and Brussels are positioning themselves to avoid blame for a delay or a disorderly no-deal Brexit.  In a sign that Johnson's last-ditch proposals to bridge the impasse have failed, a Downing Street source said Merkel and Johnson spoke on Tuesday morning and she made clear that a deal was 'overwhelmingly unlikely'.

    LONDON/BRUSSELS (Reuters) - The European Union accused Britain of playing a 'stupid blame game' over Brexit on Tuesday after a Downing Street source said a deal was essentially impossible because German Chancellor Angela Merkel had made unacceptable demands. With just 23 days before the United Kingdom is due to leave the bloc, the future of Brexit remains deeply uncertain and both London and Brussels are positioning themselves to avoid blame for a delay or a disorderly no-deal Brexit. In a sign that Johnson's last-ditch proposals to bridge the impasse have failed, a Downing Street source said Merkel and Johnson spoke on Tuesday morning and she made clear that a deal was 'overwhelmingly unlikely'.


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  • 46/79   UN may run out of money by end of the month: Guterres
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The United Nations is running a deficit of $230 million, Secretary General Antonio Guterres said on Monday, and may run out of money by the end of October.  In a letter intended for the 37,000 employees at the UN secretariat and obtained by AFP, Guterres said unspecified 'additional stop-gap measures' would have to be taken to ensure salaries and entitlements are paid.  'Member States have paid only 70 per cent of the total amount needed for our regular budget operations in 2019.

    The United Nations is running a deficit of $230 million, Secretary General Antonio Guterres said on Monday, and may run out of money by the end of October. In a letter intended for the 37,000 employees at the UN secretariat and obtained by AFP, Guterres said unspecified 'additional stop-gap measures' would have to be taken to ensure salaries and entitlements are paid. 'Member States have paid only 70 per cent of the total amount needed for our regular budget operations in 2019.


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  • 47/79   Iran's Missiles Would Be a Real Problem During a War
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Bad for U.S. bases and aircraft carriers.

    Bad for U.S. bases and aircraft carriers.


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  • 48/79   Here Are All the 2019 Nobel Prize Winners (So Far)
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The first award went to a trio for their research into cellular oxygen use

    The first award went to a trio for their research into cellular oxygen use


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  • 49/79   Judge Tammy Kemp: 'I could not refuse' ex-Dallas cop Amber Guyger a hug after sentencing
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Judge Tammy Kemp, who hugged and gave Amber Guyger a Bible after she was sentenced to prison, said her actions were appropriate.

    Judge Tammy Kemp, who hugged and gave Amber Guyger a Bible after she was sentenced to prison, said her actions were appropriate.


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  • 50/79   3 win Nobel Prize in Physics for work to understand cosmos
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    A Canadian-American cosmologist and two Swiss scientists won this year's Nobel Prize in Physics on Tuesday for their work in understanding how the universe has evolved from the Big Bang and the blockbuster discovery of the first known planet outside our solar system.  Canadian-born James Peebles, 84, of Princeton University, was credited for 'theoretical discoveries in physical cosmology' and Switzerland's Michel Mayor, 77, and Didier Queloz, 53, each from the University of Geneva, were honored for discovering 'an exoplanet orbiting a solar-type star,' said Prof. Goran Hansson, secretary general of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.

    A Canadian-American cosmologist and two Swiss scientists won this year's Nobel Prize in Physics on Tuesday for their work in understanding how the universe has evolved from the Big Bang and the blockbuster discovery of the first known planet outside our solar system. Canadian-born James Peebles, 84, of Princeton University, was credited for 'theoretical discoveries in physical cosmology' and Switzerland's Michel Mayor, 77, and Didier Queloz, 53, each from the University of Geneva, were honored for discovering 'an exoplanet orbiting a solar-type star,' said Prof. Goran Hansson, secretary general of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.


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  • 51/79   Nobel Prize for Medicine awarded to trio who discovered how cells sense and adapt to oxygen
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Three scientists have been announced as the winners of the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for discovering how cells “sense and adapt to oxygen availability,” the Nobel Committee announced Monday.  William G. Kaelin, Jr, Peter J. Ratcliffe and Gregg L. Semenza will equally share the 9 million kronor ($918,000) cash award.

    Three scientists have been announced as the winners of the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for discovering how cells “sense and adapt to oxygen availability,” the Nobel Committee announced Monday. William G. Kaelin, Jr, Peter J. Ratcliffe and Gregg L. Semenza will equally share the 9 million kronor ($918,000) cash award.


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  • 52/79   Diseases like West Nile, EEE and flesh-eating bacteria are flourishing due to climate change
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Climate change is altering the nation's environment and the microbes, viruses and insects that inhabit it, potentially increasing where diseases are.

    Climate change is altering the nation's environment and the microbes, viruses and insects that inhabit it, potentially increasing where diseases are.


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  • 53/79   First female spacewalk is set, again. NASA says it sent the correct size spacesuit this time
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    With two medium-size spacesuits now available, Christina Koch and Jessica Meir are scheduled to embark on their spacewalk Oct. 21, NASA said.

    With two medium-size spacesuits now available, Christina Koch and Jessica Meir are scheduled to embark on their spacewalk Oct. 21, NASA said.


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  • 54/79   We Now Have a Good Idea When Martian Oceans Started Dying
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Curiosity discovered salty deposits that point to a time when the atmosphere was in decline—and it was taking the seas along with it.

    Curiosity discovered salty deposits that point to a time when the atmosphere was in decline—and it was taking the seas along with it.


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  • 55/79   Could Nazi Germany Have Gotten the Atomic Bomb First?
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    A dangerous alternate history.

    A dangerous alternate history.


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  • 56/79   Chicago teens stage 'die-in' to demand action on climate change; one man arrested
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Dozens of Chicago teens gathered across from Trump International Hotel and marched to City Hall Monday to demand action on climate change.

    Dozens of Chicago teens gathered across from Trump International Hotel and marched to City Hall Monday to demand action on climate change.


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  • 57/79   Biotech experts gather at the White House for ‘Summit on America’s Bioeconomy’
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    More than 100 biotech researchers, industry executives and government officials met at the White House today for a summit focusing on America's bioeconomy — the range of products, services and data derived from biological processes and bioscience research. "The bioeconomy is already an integral part of the general economy," White House chief technology officer Michael Kratsios told the attendees. "In 2017, revenues from engineered biological systems reached nearly $400 billion." He cited figures from SynBioBeta suggesting that the private sector alone invested more than $3.7 billion in early-stage biological engineering and manufacturing tech companies during 2018. "But we are not… Read More

    More than 100 biotech researchers, industry executives and government officials met at the White House today for a summit focusing on America's bioeconomy — the range of products, services and data derived from biological processes and bioscience research. "The bioeconomy is already an integral part of the general economy," White House chief technology officer Michael Kratsios told the attendees. "In 2017, revenues from engineered biological systems reached nearly $400 billion." He cited figures from SynBioBeta suggesting that the private sector alone invested more than $3.7 billion in early-stage biological engineering and manufacturing tech companies during 2018. "But we are not… Read More


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  • 58/79   Astronomers spot 20 more moons of Saturn — and want you to help name them
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Saturn has pulled ahead of Jupiter again in the moon discovery race, thanks to a batch of 20 outer moons that bring the ringed planet's total tally to 82. The newly reported satellites, confirmed by the International Astronomical Union's Minor Planet Center, were found by the same team that reported spotting 12 new moons of Jupiter last year. As was the case with those moons of Jupiter, the discovery team at the Carnegie Institution for Science is soliciting suggestions for naming the newly reported moons of Jupiter. Right now, they're known only by their numerical designations, such as S/2004 S29… Read More

    Saturn has pulled ahead of Jupiter again in the moon discovery race, thanks to a batch of 20 outer moons that bring the ringed planet's total tally to 82. The newly reported satellites, confirmed by the International Astronomical Union's Minor Planet Center, were found by the same team that reported spotting 12 new moons of Jupiter last year. As was the case with those moons of Jupiter, the discovery team at the Carnegie Institution for Science is soliciting suggestions for naming the newly reported moons of Jupiter. Right now, they're known only by their numerical designations, such as S/2004 S29… Read More


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  • 59/79   These are the deepest and largest man-made holes in the world
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Humans might not have ever reached the Earth's mantle, but they've gone deep. Here are some of the deepest man-made holes in the world.

    Humans might not have ever reached the Earth's mantle, but they've gone deep. Here are some of the deepest man-made holes in the world.


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  • 60/79   Turkey says it won't bow to US threat over its Syria plans
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Turkey will not bow to threats over its Syria plans, the Turkish vice president said Tuesday in an apparent response to President Donald Trump's warning to Ankara the previous day about the scope of its planned military incursion into northeastern Syria.  Trump said earlier this week the United States would step aside for an expected Turkish attack on Syrian Kurdish fighters, who have fought alongside Americans for years, but he then threatened to destroy the Turks' economy if they went too far.  The U.S. president later cast his decision to abandon the Kurdish fighters in Syria as fulfilling a campaign promise to withdraw from 'endless war' in the Middle East, even as Republican critics and others said he was sacrificing a U.S. ally and undermining American credibility.

    Turkey will not bow to threats over its Syria plans, the Turkish vice president said Tuesday in an apparent response to President Donald Trump's warning to Ankara the previous day about the scope of its planned military incursion into northeastern Syria. Trump said earlier this week the United States would step aside for an expected Turkish attack on Syrian Kurdish fighters, who have fought alongside Americans for years, but he then threatened to destroy the Turks' economy if they went too far. The U.S. president later cast his decision to abandon the Kurdish fighters in Syria as fulfilling a campaign promise to withdraw from 'endless war' in the Middle East, even as Republican critics and others said he was sacrificing a U.S. ally and undermining American credibility.


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  • 61/79   When 'Get Out' Is a President's National Security Strategy
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    WASHINGTON -- President Donald Trump is once again pursuing a national security strategy at odds with the official position of his government, ordering a pullback of U.S. forces just inside the Syrian border. It is a move that his own senior advisers have warned would risk new chaos throughout the region.He is demonstrating that in his pursuit of ending America's "endless wars," no U.S. troop presence abroad is too small to escape his desire to terminate it. In this case, the mission has been to prevent Islamic State forces from reconstituting, and to keep another conflict at bay -- a Turkish attack on Kurdish forces, including on those that have been America's staunchest allies in the fight against the Islamic State.To the Pentagon and the State Department, that is a traditional role for U.S. troops, honed over 75 years of global leadership. But if there is a Trump doctrine around the world after 32 months of chaotic policymaking, it may have been expressed in its purest form when the president vented on Twitter on Monday morning: "Time for us to get out."Just this summer, the State Department's special envoy for Syrian affairs, James F. Jeffrey, one of America's most experienced Middle East hands, told a public forum not to worry about a precipitous withdrawal. "We plan on having a small residual force to remain on for an indefinite time," he said. The president, he added, "is much seized with this." But perhaps not seized the way Jeffrey imagined.Long before he was elected, Trump had sounded a recurrent theme about Syria -- as well as about the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, the U.S. presence in Japan and South Korea, and other global deployments. Acting as the world's policeman was too expensive, he complained. Allies played us for "suckers." Both in the campaign and today, Trump sensed that many Americans share his view -- and polls show he is right, even among some who loathe Trump himself.So when President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey spoke by telephone with Trump on Sunday, the Turkish leader likely knew exactly what he was doing: circumventing the U.S. generals and diplomats who sing the praises of maintaining the traditional American forward presence around the world. The Turkish leader could appeal to Trump's instincts, and clear a path for his forces to fight those he calls "terrorists" over his border, even though they are the same Kurdish troops who have long been allies of the United States.Trump's sudden abandonment of the Kurds was another example of the independent, parallel foreign policy he has run from the White House, which has largely abandoned the elaborate systems created since President Harry Truman's day to think ahead about the potential costs and benefits of presidential decisions. That system is badly broken today. Trump is so suspicious of the professional staff -- many drawn from the State Department and the CIA -- and so dismissive of the "deep state" foreign policy establishment, that he usually announces decisions first, and forces the staff to deal with them later.It has happened time and time again on Syria. When he announced a unilateral withdrawal late last year, it was the final straw for Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, whose resignation letter was a searing indictment of Trump's disregard for allies and alliances.By Monday morning, both traditional U.S. allies and Trump's staunchest Republican defenders, the ones standing up for him in the impeachment battle, argued that the decision was a victory for authoritarian leaders across the geopolitical spectrum.Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., the majority leader, said Trump had rewarded America's adversaries. "A precipitous withdrawal of U.S. forces from Syria would only benefit Russia, Iran and the Assad regime," McConnell said in a statement, a reference to Bashar Assad, the Syrian dictator. "And it would increase the risk that ISIS and other terrorist groups regroup," using a common abbreviation for the Islamic State.In the most biting line, he urged Trump "to exercise American leadership."McConnell was among the Trump allies who cheered the president when, not even three months after his inauguration, he ordered the first military strike of his presidency, a missile attack against Syrian air bases in response to evidence that Assad had, once again, gassed his own people. Trump said he reacted to pictures of Syrian children suffering in the gas attack. But he also ordered the action while Xi Jinping, the Chinese leader, was at his dinner table at Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort, eating what the president called "the most beautiful piece of chocolate cake that you have ever seen." It was clearly meant as a message: There was a new sheriff in town.Xi may have a different view now. Trump's calls for restraint have often followed his threats of fire and fury. Xi and the North Koreans may both have reason to believe that Trump may pull back from the Pacific -- their fondest wish -- in return for few concessions. It is a possibility Trump himself has periodically talked raised with aides while complaining about trade deficits.After Trump mysteriously suspended military aid to Ukraine in July -- now the subject of an impeachment inquiry into whether he was holding the aid hostage in return for politically damaging information on former Vice President Joe Biden -- his stated argument was that the United States paid too much, and Europeans too little.If there was any discussion in the White House about how slowing the military aid might damage efforts to contain Russia's power in the region, it has not surfaced.When he pulled out of the nuclear deal with Iran, it was over the objections of a secretary of state, a national security adviser and a secretary of defense -- all since departed -- who urged him to build on the past agreement. Sixteen months later, he fired his next national security adviser, the hawkish John R. Bolton, for fear that Bolton would send him down the road to another "forever war."In that regard, Trump has correctly read the American people who, after Iraq and Afghanistan, also have a deep distaste for forever wars. It is the one issue on which Trump and former President Barack Obama agree, and a reason for Obama's decision not to make good on his promise of bombing Assad for crossing the "red line" of using poison gas.But Trump's objections go beyond Obama's. "Like some of those who are running to replace him, President Trump has conflated 'forever wars' with an open-ended presence," said Richard N. Haass, the president of the Council on Foreign Relations and a senior George W. Bush administration official as America went into two wars between 2001 and 2003."We've had 70 years of open-ended presence in Germany, Japan, South Korea," he noted. "It's part of an alliance. And it keeps countries from doing things you don't want them to do," like building their own nuclear weapons.The Syria presence, Mattis had argued, was in that vein -- low risk, low casualty, high returns for America's security. It was a tripwire to keep the Islamic State from rising again, and Turkey from starting a war. Trump's Sunday night tweet, saying everyone in the region was going to have to work things out themselves, announced an abdication of that role.Trump may well pull back in coming days; in fact, by lunchtime Monday he already appeared to be pivoting, declaring on Twitter that "if Turkey does anything that I, in my great and unmatched wisdom, consider to be off limits, I will totally destroy and obliterate the Economy of Turkey."It was a strange threat to utter to a NATO ally. It did not specify what was out of bounds. And most of all, it did not describe how the United States would exercise that kind of power in a world in which America is viewed in many capitals as already getting out.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company

    WASHINGTON -- President Donald Trump is once again pursuing a national security strategy at odds with the official position of his government, ordering a pullback of U.S. forces just inside the Syrian border. It is a move that his own senior advisers have warned would risk new chaos throughout the region.He is demonstrating that in his pursuit of ending America's "endless wars," no U.S. troop presence abroad is too small to escape his desire to terminate it. In this case, the mission has been to prevent Islamic State forces from reconstituting, and to keep another conflict at bay -- a Turkish attack on Kurdish forces, including on those that have been America's staunchest allies in the fight against the Islamic State.To the Pentagon and the State Department, that is a traditional role for U.S. troops, honed over 75 years of global leadership. But if there is a Trump doctrine around the world after 32 months of chaotic policymaking, it may have been expressed in its purest form when the president vented on Twitter on Monday morning: "Time for us to get out."Just this summer, the State Department's special envoy for Syrian affairs, James F. Jeffrey, one of America's most experienced Middle East hands, told a public forum not to worry about a precipitous withdrawal. "We plan on having a small residual force to remain on for an indefinite time," he said. The president, he added, "is much seized with this." But perhaps not seized the way Jeffrey imagined.Long before he was elected, Trump had sounded a recurrent theme about Syria -- as well as about the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, the U.S. presence in Japan and South Korea, and other global deployments. Acting as the world's policeman was too expensive, he complained. Allies played us for "suckers." Both in the campaign and today, Trump sensed that many Americans share his view -- and polls show he is right, even among some who loathe Trump himself.So when President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey spoke by telephone with Trump on Sunday, the Turkish leader likely knew exactly what he was doing: circumventing the U.S. generals and diplomats who sing the praises of maintaining the traditional American forward presence around the world. The Turkish leader could appeal to Trump's instincts, and clear a path for his forces to fight those he calls "terrorists" over his border, even though they are the same Kurdish troops who have long been allies of the United States.Trump's sudden abandonment of the Kurds was another example of the independent, parallel foreign policy he has run from the White House, which has largely abandoned the elaborate systems created since President Harry Truman's day to think ahead about the potential costs and benefits of presidential decisions. That system is badly broken today. Trump is so suspicious of the professional staff -- many drawn from the State Department and the CIA -- and so dismissive of the "deep state" foreign policy establishment, that he usually announces decisions first, and forces the staff to deal with them later.It has happened time and time again on Syria. When he announced a unilateral withdrawal late last year, it was the final straw for Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, whose resignation letter was a searing indictment of Trump's disregard for allies and alliances.By Monday morning, both traditional U.S. allies and Trump's staunchest Republican defenders, the ones standing up for him in the impeachment battle, argued that the decision was a victory for authoritarian leaders across the geopolitical spectrum.Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., the majority leader, said Trump had rewarded America's adversaries. "A precipitous withdrawal of U.S. forces from Syria would only benefit Russia, Iran and the Assad regime," McConnell said in a statement, a reference to Bashar Assad, the Syrian dictator. "And it would increase the risk that ISIS and other terrorist groups regroup," using a common abbreviation for the Islamic State.In the most biting line, he urged Trump "to exercise American leadership."McConnell was among the Trump allies who cheered the president when, not even three months after his inauguration, he ordered the first military strike of his presidency, a missile attack against Syrian air bases in response to evidence that Assad had, once again, gassed his own people. Trump said he reacted to pictures of Syrian children suffering in the gas attack. But he also ordered the action while Xi Jinping, the Chinese leader, was at his dinner table at Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort, eating what the president called "the most beautiful piece of chocolate cake that you have ever seen." It was clearly meant as a message: There was a new sheriff in town.Xi may have a different view now. Trump's calls for restraint have often followed his threats of fire and fury. Xi and the North Koreans may both have reason to believe that Trump may pull back from the Pacific -- their fondest wish -- in return for few concessions. It is a possibility Trump himself has periodically talked raised with aides while complaining about trade deficits.After Trump mysteriously suspended military aid to Ukraine in July -- now the subject of an impeachment inquiry into whether he was holding the aid hostage in return for politically damaging information on former Vice President Joe Biden -- his stated argument was that the United States paid too much, and Europeans too little.If there was any discussion in the White House about how slowing the military aid might damage efforts to contain Russia's power in the region, it has not surfaced.When he pulled out of the nuclear deal with Iran, it was over the objections of a secretary of state, a national security adviser and a secretary of defense -- all since departed -- who urged him to build on the past agreement. Sixteen months later, he fired his next national security adviser, the hawkish John R. Bolton, for fear that Bolton would send him down the road to another "forever war."In that regard, Trump has correctly read the American people who, after Iraq and Afghanistan, also have a deep distaste for forever wars. It is the one issue on which Trump and former President Barack Obama agree, and a reason for Obama's decision not to make good on his promise of bombing Assad for crossing the "red line" of using poison gas.But Trump's objections go beyond Obama's. "Like some of those who are running to replace him, President Trump has conflated 'forever wars' with an open-ended presence," said Richard N. Haass, the president of the Council on Foreign Relations and a senior George W. Bush administration official as America went into two wars between 2001 and 2003."We've had 70 years of open-ended presence in Germany, Japan, South Korea," he noted. "It's part of an alliance. And it keeps countries from doing things you don't want them to do," like building their own nuclear weapons.The Syria presence, Mattis had argued, was in that vein -- low risk, low casualty, high returns for America's security. It was a tripwire to keep the Islamic State from rising again, and Turkey from starting a war. Trump's Sunday night tweet, saying everyone in the region was going to have to work things out themselves, announced an abdication of that role.Trump may well pull back in coming days; in fact, by lunchtime Monday he already appeared to be pivoting, declaring on Twitter that "if Turkey does anything that I, in my great and unmatched wisdom, consider to be off limits, I will totally destroy and obliterate the Economy of Turkey."It was a strange threat to utter to a NATO ally. It did not specify what was out of bounds. And most of all, it did not describe how the United States would exercise that kind of power in a world in which America is viewed in many capitals as already getting out.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company


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  • 62/79   Trump says he's a master dealmaker, but his record of dancing to the tune of foreign leaders says otherwise
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Trump has a long history of caving to foreign leaders when he's backed into a corner. Turkey, China, Russia, and North Korea are just a few examples.

    Trump has a long history of caving to foreign leaders when he's backed into a corner. Turkey, China, Russia, and North Korea are just a few examples.


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  • 63/79   Britain's Brexit talks with EU appear on verge of collapse
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Brexit talks between Britain and the European Union appeared to be on the verge of collapse on Tuesday, with Brussels accusing London of intransigence and threatening the bloc's future.  Prime Minister Boris Johnson spoke to German Chancellor Angela Merkel, who said a deal was 'overwhelmingly unlikely' without compromise by the UK, according to a Downing Street source.

    Brexit talks between Britain and the European Union appeared to be on the verge of collapse on Tuesday, with Brussels accusing London of intransigence and threatening the bloc's future. Prime Minister Boris Johnson spoke to German Chancellor Angela Merkel, who said a deal was 'overwhelmingly unlikely' without compromise by the UK, according to a Downing Street source.


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  • 64/79   The Latest: Iran criticizes expected Turkish push into Syria
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Iran's foreign ministry says a Turkish incursion into northern Syria would not address Turkey's security concerns and would also cause 'extensive' damage and humanitarian problems.  The ministry said in a statement issued on Tuesday that it was closely watching Turkey's actions in Syria.  It added, however, that the U.S. presence in Syria was 'illegitimate' and that its forces should have withdrawn from the country sooner.

    Iran's foreign ministry says a Turkish incursion into northern Syria would not address Turkey's security concerns and would also cause 'extensive' damage and humanitarian problems. The ministry said in a statement issued on Tuesday that it was closely watching Turkey's actions in Syria. It added, however, that the U.S. presence in Syria was 'illegitimate' and that its forces should have withdrawn from the country sooner.


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  • 65/79   Donald Trump isolated as Republican allies revolt over US withdrawal from Syria
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Lindsey Graham and Mitch McConnell lead condemnation of foreign policy move that could prove ‘disaster in the making’Donald Trump with Mark Milley, the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, in the Cabinet Room on Monday. Lindsey Graham said abandoning the Kurds would be ‘a stain on America’s honour’. Photograph: Carolyn Kaster/APDonald Trump was dangerously isolated on Monday as, in a rare rebuke, some of his most loyal allies revolted against his decision to withdraw US troops from north-eastern Syria.Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell led a chorus of Republicans who, having defended the president on almost every other issue – including over impeachment – decided to draw a line in the sand.“A precipitous withdrawal of US forces from Syria would only benefit Russia, Iran, and the Assad regime,” McConnell said. “And it would increase the risk that Isis and other terrorist groups regroup.”He added: “As we learned the hard way during the Obama administration, American interests are best served by American leadership, not by retreat or withdrawal.”The criticism was significant because McConnell is usually at pains not to cross Trump even at his most capricious. Last week the Kentucky senator released a Facebook video promising to stop Democratic-led impeachment in its tracks.Article 1 of the United States constitution gives the House of Representatives the sole power to initiate impeachment and the Senate the sole power to try impeachments of the president. A president can be impeached if they are judged to have committed "treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors" – although the constitution does not specify what “high crimes and misdemeanors” are.The process starts with the House of Representatives passing articles of impeachment. A simple majority of members need to vote in favour of impeachment for it to pass to the next stage. Democrats currently control the house, with 235 representatives.The chief justice of the US supreme court then presides over the proceedings in the Senate, where the president is tried, with senators acting as the jury. For the president to be found guilty two-thirds of senators must vote to convict. Republicans currently control the Senate, with 53 of the 100 senators.Two presidents have previously been impeached, Bill Clinton in 1998, and Andrew Johnson in 1868, though neither was removed from office as a result. Richard Nixon resigned in 1974 before there was a formal vote to impeach him.Martin BelamThe unusual fracture emerged on Sunday night when, shortly after a phone conversation between Trump and Turkey’s president Recep Tayyip Erdo?an, the White House announced removal of US troops from the Syria-Turkey border area. “Turkey will soon be moving forward with its long-planned operation into Northern Syria,” it added.Critics of all political stripes have long feared that the move could open the way for a Turkish strike on Kurdish-led fighters in the area. Kurdish groups have fought alongside a small US presence in Syria to drive Islamic State militants from the region.The Republican backlash was rapid and potentially unnerving for a president whose fate is tethered to the party and the assumption that it will acquit him in the Senate if, as widely expected, the Democratic-led House of Representatives votes for impeachment.Lindsey Graham, chairman of the Senate judiciary committee, who has become an outspoken defender (and frequent golf partner) of Trump, did not acquiesce this time. Abandonment of the Kurds would be “a disaster in the making”, he said, and “a stain on America’s honour”.Graham told Fox News: “I hope I’m making myself clear how short-sighted and irresponsible this decision is. I like President Trump. I’ve tried to help him. This, to me, is just unnerving to its core.”Graham wrote on Twitter that if the plan goes ahead, he will introduce a Senate resolution opposing it and seeking reversal of the decision. He added: “We will introduce bipartisan sanctions against Turkey if they invade Syria and will call for their suspension from NATO if they attack Kurdish forces who assisted the US in the destruction of the ISIS Caliphate.”Kevin McCarthy, the top Republican in the House, whose attempts to defend Trump’s phone call with Ukraine’s president have provoked mockery, said: “If you make a commitment and somebody is fighting with you, America should keep their word.”Michael McCaul of Texas, the lead Republican on the House foreign affairs committee, also urged the president to reconsider. “The United States should not step aside and allow a Turkish military operation in north-east Syria,” he said. “This move will undermine our ongoing campaign to prevent an Isis resurgence and will ultimately threaten our homeland.“Additionally, the United States needs to stay engaged to prevent further destructive involvement in the region from our adversaries like the Assad regime, Putin and Iran.”Notably, senator Marco Rubio of Florida, reluctant to criticise Trump even when the president suggested that China investigate former vice president and 2020 election rival Joe Biden, was clear , describing the retreat as “a grave mistake that will have implications far beyond Syria”And Nikki Haley, Trump’s former UN ambassador, admonished Trump without mentioning his name. “We must always have the backs of our allies, if we expect them to have our back,” she tweeted. “The Kurds were instrumental in our successful fight against ISIS in Syria. Leaving them to die is a big mistake. TurkeyIsNotOurFriend”Ominously for Trump, even conservative Fox News aired dissent. Host Brian Kilmeade described the pullout as “a disaster”, telling viewers of Fox & Friends: “Abandon our allies? That’s a campaign promise? Abandon the people that got the caliphate destroyed?”Republicans who have contradicted Trump before did so forcefully again. Utah senator Mitt Romney described Trump’s announcement as “a betrayal”, adding: “It says that America is an unreliable ally; it facilitates ISIS resurgence; and it presages another humanitarian disaster.”Romney and Democratic senator Chris Murphy issued a joint statement insisting Trump’s administration “explain to the American people how betraying an ally and ceding influence to terrorists and adversaries is not disastrous for our national security interests”.Democrats also piled in but there was a lone voice of support for the president on Capitol Hill. Republican senator Rand Paul, long a critic of foreign intervention, said: “So many neocons want us to stay in wars all over the Middle East forever. [Trump] is absolutely right to end those wars and bring the troops home.”Trump himself was undeterred by the blowback. Speaking at the White House on Monday, he said he has “great respect” for the prominent Republican critics. And added: “People are extremely thrilled because they say it’s time to bring our people back home. We’re not a police force. They’re policing the area. We’re not a police force. The UK was very thrilled at this decision … many people agree with it very strongly.”?

    Lindsey Graham and Mitch McConnell lead condemnation of foreign policy move that could prove ‘disaster in the making’Donald Trump with Mark Milley, the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, in the Cabinet Room on Monday. Lindsey Graham said abandoning the Kurds would be ‘a stain on America’s honour’. Photograph: Carolyn Kaster/APDonald Trump was dangerously isolated on Monday as, in a rare rebuke, some of his most loyal allies revolted against his decision to withdraw US troops from north-eastern Syria.Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell led a chorus of Republicans who, having defended the president on almost every other issue – including over impeachment – decided to draw a line in the sand.“A precipitous withdrawal of US forces from Syria would only benefit Russia, Iran, and the Assad regime,” McConnell said. “And it would increase the risk that Isis and other terrorist groups regroup.”He added: “As we learned the hard way during the Obama administration, American interests are best served by American leadership, not by retreat or withdrawal.”The criticism was significant because McConnell is usually at pains not to cross Trump even at his most capricious. Last week the Kentucky senator released a Facebook video promising to stop Democratic-led impeachment in its tracks.Article 1 of the United States constitution gives the House of Representatives the sole power to initiate impeachment and the Senate the sole power to try impeachments of the president. A president can be impeached if they are judged to have committed "treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors" – although the constitution does not specify what “high crimes and misdemeanors” are.The process starts with the House of Representatives passing articles of impeachment. A simple majority of members need to vote in favour of impeachment for it to pass to the next stage. Democrats currently control the house, with 235 representatives.The chief justice of the US supreme court then presides over the proceedings in the Senate, where the president is tried, with senators acting as the jury. For the president to be found guilty two-thirds of senators must vote to convict. Republicans currently control the Senate, with 53 of the 100 senators.Two presidents have previously been impeached, Bill Clinton in 1998, and Andrew Johnson in 1868, though neither was removed from office as a result. Richard Nixon resigned in 1974 before there was a formal vote to impeach him.Martin BelamThe unusual fracture emerged on Sunday night when, shortly after a phone conversation between Trump and Turkey’s president Recep Tayyip Erdo?an, the White House announced removal of US troops from the Syria-Turkey border area. “Turkey will soon be moving forward with its long-planned operation into Northern Syria,” it added.Critics of all political stripes have long feared that the move could open the way for a Turkish strike on Kurdish-led fighters in the area. Kurdish groups have fought alongside a small US presence in Syria to drive Islamic State militants from the region.The Republican backlash was rapid and potentially unnerving for a president whose fate is tethered to the party and the assumption that it will acquit him in the Senate if, as widely expected, the Democratic-led House of Representatives votes for impeachment.Lindsey Graham, chairman of the Senate judiciary committee, who has become an outspoken defender (and frequent golf partner) of Trump, did not acquiesce this time. Abandonment of the Kurds would be “a disaster in the making”, he said, and “a stain on America’s honour”.Graham told Fox News: “I hope I’m making myself clear how short-sighted and irresponsible this decision is. I like President Trump. I’ve tried to help him. This, to me, is just unnerving to its core.”Graham wrote on Twitter that if the plan goes ahead, he will introduce a Senate resolution opposing it and seeking reversal of the decision. He added: “We will introduce bipartisan sanctions against Turkey if they invade Syria and will call for their suspension from NATO if they attack Kurdish forces who assisted the US in the destruction of the ISIS Caliphate.”Kevin McCarthy, the top Republican in the House, whose attempts to defend Trump’s phone call with Ukraine’s president have provoked mockery, said: “If you make a commitment and somebody is fighting with you, America should keep their word.”Michael McCaul of Texas, the lead Republican on the House foreign affairs committee, also urged the president to reconsider. “The United States should not step aside and allow a Turkish military operation in north-east Syria,” he said. “This move will undermine our ongoing campaign to prevent an Isis resurgence and will ultimately threaten our homeland.“Additionally, the United States needs to stay engaged to prevent further destructive involvement in the region from our adversaries like the Assad regime, Putin and Iran.”Notably, senator Marco Rubio of Florida, reluctant to criticise Trump even when the president suggested that China investigate former vice president and 2020 election rival Joe Biden, was clear , describing the retreat as “a grave mistake that will have implications far beyond Syria”And Nikki Haley, Trump’s former UN ambassador, admonished Trump without mentioning his name. “We must always have the backs of our allies, if we expect them to have our back,” she tweeted. “The Kurds were instrumental in our successful fight against ISIS in Syria. Leaving them to die is a big mistake. TurkeyIsNotOurFriend”Ominously for Trump, even conservative Fox News aired dissent. Host Brian Kilmeade described the pullout as “a disaster”, telling viewers of Fox & Friends: “Abandon our allies? That’s a campaign promise? Abandon the people that got the caliphate destroyed?”Republicans who have contradicted Trump before did so forcefully again. Utah senator Mitt Romney described Trump’s announcement as “a betrayal”, adding: “It says that America is an unreliable ally; it facilitates ISIS resurgence; and it presages another humanitarian disaster.”Romney and Democratic senator Chris Murphy issued a joint statement insisting Trump’s administration “explain to the American people how betraying an ally and ceding influence to terrorists and adversaries is not disastrous for our national security interests”.Democrats also piled in but there was a lone voice of support for the president on Capitol Hill. Republican senator Rand Paul, long a critic of foreign intervention, said: “So many neocons want us to stay in wars all over the Middle East forever. [Trump] is absolutely right to end those wars and bring the troops home.”Trump himself was undeterred by the blowback. Speaking at the White House on Monday, he said he has “great respect” for the prominent Republican critics. And added: “People are extremely thrilled because they say it’s time to bring our people back home. We’re not a police force. They’re policing the area. We’re not a police force. The UK was very thrilled at this decision … many people agree with it very strongly.”?


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  • 66/79   China Signals It Will Hit Back Over U.S. Tech Blacklist
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. China signaled it would hit back after the Trump administration placed eight of the country’s technology giants on a blacklist over alleged human rights violations against Muslim minorities.Asked Tuesday whether China would retaliate over the blacklist, foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang told reporters “stay tuned.” He also denied that the government abused human rights in the far west region of Xinjiang.“We urge the U.S. side to immediately correct its mistake, withdraw the relevant decision and stop interfering in China’s internal affairs,” Geng said in Beijing. “China will continue to take firm and forceful measures to resolutely safeguard national sovereignty, security and development interests.”The Trump administration’s move, which was announced after U.S. markets closed, came on the same day negotiators from the two sides began working-level preparations for high-level talks due to begin Thursday in Washington. A U.S. Commerce Department spokesman said the “action is unrelated to the trade negotiations,” and China confirmed Vice Premier Liu He would lead the delegation as planned.U.S. equity-index futures fell, reversing an earlier gain, while European stocks slipped to snap a two-day advance, ahead of high-level trade talks between America and China this week. U.S. futures fell after China said it strongly opposed the American decision to blacklist some of its technology firms. Equity benchmarks across Asia rose earlier as trading showed little concern about ongoing unrest in Hong Kong.The blacklist, first reported by Reuters, still takes President Donald Trump’s economic war against China in a new direction, marking the first time his administration has cited human rights as a reason for action. Past moves to blacklist companies such as Huawei Technologies Co. have been taken on national security grounds.The companies on the blacklist include two video surveillance companies -- Hangzhou Hikvision Digital Technology Co. and Zhejiang Dahua Technology Co. -- that by some accounts control as much as a third of the global market for video surveillance and have cameras all over the world.Also targeted were SenseTime Group Ltd. -- the world’s most valuable artificial intelligence startup -- and fellow AI giant Megvii Technology Ltd., which is said to be aiming to raise up to $1 billion in a Hong Kong initial public offering. Backed by Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba Group Holding Ltd., the pair are at the forefront of China’s ambition to dominate AI in coming years.Entities on the list are prohibited from doing business with American companies without being granted a U.S. government license, although some have maintained relationships with banned companies through international subsidiaries. Hikvision and Dahua were suspended from trading Tuesday, but iFlytek Co. -- one of the eight singled out -- slid 2.7% in Shenzhen.“Specifically, these entities have been implicated in human rights violations and abuses in the implementation of China’s campaign of repression, mass arbitrary detention, and high-technology surveillance against Uighurs, Kazakhs, and other members of Muslim minority groups” in Xinjiang, the U.S. Commerce Department said in a federal register notice published Monday.The foreign ministry’s Geng accused the U.S. of having “sinister intentions.” “The measures taken by China to eliminate extremism from the roots are fully in line with Chinese law and international practice,” he said.SenseTime and Dahua weren’t immediately available for comment outside of normal business hours.“Hikvision strongly opposes today’s decision by the U.S. government and it will hamper efforts by global companies to improve human rights around the world,” the company said in a statement. “Punishing Hikvision, despite these engagements, will deter global companies from communicating with the U.S. government, hurt Hikvision’s U.S. businesses partners and negatively impact the U.S. economy.”Megvii said the U.S. had “no grounds” to put it on the list, and noted that Human Rights Watch had corrected a report that implicated the company. It added that it hadn’t earned revenue from Xinjiang in the first part of the year, and the impact on its business from the designation was minimal.The blacklist comes as Trump faces growing pressure at home to support pro-democracy protests in the Chinese-controlled territory of Hong Kong. On Monday, Trump said he was hoping for a “humane solution” in a city where protests have grown increasingly violent.What Our Economists Say:“With growth fading, the U.S. and China could both use at least a reprieve from trade tensions. A mini-deal was mooted. It now looks less likely.”\--Bloomberg Economics Chief Economist Tom OrlikRead the full analysis hereThe move targets Chinese surveillance companies involved in the crackdown in Xinjiang, where as many as a million Uighur Muslims have been placed in mass detention camps, prompting criticism from around the world. The White House in May had readied the sanctions package for surveillance technology companies accused of human rights violations, but decided to hold back because of the trade negotiations.In June, the Trump administration again considered the sanctions and had planned to roll them out with a human rights speech by Vice President Mike Pence on the anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre, Bloomberg has reported. The speech was postponed indefinitely, so that Trump could secure a meeting with Chinese leader Xi Jinping in Osaka, Japan.Also to be placed on the Commerce Department’s “entity list” are the Xinjiang region’s public security bureau and 18 other municipal and county public security bureaus as well as the province’s police college.“The U.S. government and Department of Commerce cannot and will not tolerate the brutal suppression of ethnic minorities within China,” Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross said in a statement on Monday. “This action will ensure that our technologies, fostered in an environment of individual liberty and free enterprise, are not used to repress defenseless minority populations.”\--With assistance from Jennifer A. Dlouhy, Justin Sink, Ian King, Candy Cheng, Michael Hytha, Mark Milian, Edwin Chan, James Mayger and Eric Lam.To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Dandan Li in Beijing at dli395@bloomberg.net;Shawn Donnan in Washington at sdonnan@bloomberg.net;Jenny Leonard in Washington at jleonard67@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Margaret Collins at mcollins45@bloomberg.net, ;Daniel Ten Kate at dtenkate@bloomberg.net, Sarah McGregor, Brendan ScottFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. China signaled it would hit back after the Trump administration placed eight of the country’s technology giants on a blacklist over alleged human rights violations against Muslim minorities.Asked Tuesday whether China would retaliate over the blacklist, foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang told reporters “stay tuned.” He also denied that the government abused human rights in the far west region of Xinjiang.“We urge the U.S. side to immediately correct its mistake, withdraw the relevant decision and stop interfering in China’s internal affairs,” Geng said in Beijing. “China will continue to take firm and forceful measures to resolutely safeguard national sovereignty, security and development interests.”The Trump administration’s move, which was announced after U.S. markets closed, came on the same day negotiators from the two sides began working-level preparations for high-level talks due to begin Thursday in Washington. A U.S. Commerce Department spokesman said the “action is unrelated to the trade negotiations,” and China confirmed Vice Premier Liu He would lead the delegation as planned.U.S. equity-index futures fell, reversing an earlier gain, while European stocks slipped to snap a two-day advance, ahead of high-level trade talks between America and China this week. U.S. futures fell after China said it strongly opposed the American decision to blacklist some of its technology firms. Equity benchmarks across Asia rose earlier as trading showed little concern about ongoing unrest in Hong Kong.The blacklist, first reported by Reuters, still takes President Donald Trump’s economic war against China in a new direction, marking the first time his administration has cited human rights as a reason for action. Past moves to blacklist companies such as Huawei Technologies Co. have been taken on national security grounds.The companies on the blacklist include two video surveillance companies -- Hangzhou Hikvision Digital Technology Co. and Zhejiang Dahua Technology Co. -- that by some accounts control as much as a third of the global market for video surveillance and have cameras all over the world.Also targeted were SenseTime Group Ltd. -- the world’s most valuable artificial intelligence startup -- and fellow AI giant Megvii Technology Ltd., which is said to be aiming to raise up to $1 billion in a Hong Kong initial public offering. Backed by Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba Group Holding Ltd., the pair are at the forefront of China’s ambition to dominate AI in coming years.Entities on the list are prohibited from doing business with American companies without being granted a U.S. government license, although some have maintained relationships with banned companies through international subsidiaries. Hikvision and Dahua were suspended from trading Tuesday, but iFlytek Co. -- one of the eight singled out -- slid 2.7% in Shenzhen.“Specifically, these entities have been implicated in human rights violations and abuses in the implementation of China’s campaign of repression, mass arbitrary detention, and high-technology surveillance against Uighurs, Kazakhs, and other members of Muslim minority groups” in Xinjiang, the U.S. Commerce Department said in a federal register notice published Monday.The foreign ministry’s Geng accused the U.S. of having “sinister intentions.” “The measures taken by China to eliminate extremism from the roots are fully in line with Chinese law and international practice,” he said.SenseTime and Dahua weren’t immediately available for comment outside of normal business hours.“Hikvision strongly opposes today’s decision by the U.S. government and it will hamper efforts by global companies to improve human rights around the world,” the company said in a statement. “Punishing Hikvision, despite these engagements, will deter global companies from communicating with the U.S. government, hurt Hikvision’s U.S. businesses partners and negatively impact the U.S. economy.”Megvii said the U.S. had “no grounds” to put it on the list, and noted that Human Rights Watch had corrected a report that implicated the company. It added that it hadn’t earned revenue from Xinjiang in the first part of the year, and the impact on its business from the designation was minimal.The blacklist comes as Trump faces growing pressure at home to support pro-democracy protests in the Chinese-controlled territory of Hong Kong. On Monday, Trump said he was hoping for a “humane solution” in a city where protests have grown increasingly violent.What Our Economists Say:“With growth fading, the U.S. and China could both use at least a reprieve from trade tensions. A mini-deal was mooted. It now looks less likely.”\--Bloomberg Economics Chief Economist Tom OrlikRead the full analysis hereThe move targets Chinese surveillance companies involved in the crackdown in Xinjiang, where as many as a million Uighur Muslims have been placed in mass detention camps, prompting criticism from around the world. The White House in May had readied the sanctions package for surveillance technology companies accused of human rights violations, but decided to hold back because of the trade negotiations.In June, the Trump administration again considered the sanctions and had planned to roll them out with a human rights speech by Vice President Mike Pence on the anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre, Bloomberg has reported. The speech was postponed indefinitely, so that Trump could secure a meeting with Chinese leader Xi Jinping in Osaka, Japan.Also to be placed on the Commerce Department’s “entity list” are the Xinjiang region’s public security bureau and 18 other municipal and county public security bureaus as well as the province’s police college.“The U.S. government and Department of Commerce cannot and will not tolerate the brutal suppression of ethnic minorities within China,” Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross said in a statement on Monday. “This action will ensure that our technologies, fostered in an environment of individual liberty and free enterprise, are not used to repress defenseless minority populations.”\--With assistance from Jennifer A. Dlouhy, Justin Sink, Ian King, Candy Cheng, Michael Hytha, Mark Milian, Edwin Chan, James Mayger and Eric Lam.To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Dandan Li in Beijing at dli395@bloomberg.net;Shawn Donnan in Washington at sdonnan@bloomberg.net;Jenny Leonard in Washington at jleonard67@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Margaret Collins at mcollins45@bloomberg.net, ;Daniel Ten Kate at dtenkate@bloomberg.net, Sarah McGregor, Brendan ScottFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 67/79   Think Twice on a Trump Phone Call
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Want to receive this post in your inbox every day? Sign up for the Balance of Power newsletter, and follow Bloomberg Politics on Twitter and Facebook for more.As Donald Trump’s impeachment inquiry rolls through Congress, leaders around the world must be thinking back to what they’ve said to the U.S. president in what they presumed were private conversations.From Ukraine to Italy to the U.K. and Australia, Trump’s efforts to solicit help in salvaging his presidency are under ever-increasing scrutiny. Our story out today shows how Trump’s ability to sniff out weak spots in others is behind his selective outreach.More broadly, as one diplomat says, any leader must be prepared for strange and unexpected requests when Trump calls. The trick is to stay positive without committing to anything and to speak guardedly, because the transcript might become public.We’re also seeing how Trump’s chats with individual leaders — and his tendency to make policy on the fly — could affect not just the U.S. election. Take Turkey, which may invade Syria after he effectively gave Recep Tayyip Erdogan a green light over the phone.The president’s actions risk sowing policy confusion — read here for Nick Wadhams’ and Glen Carey’s take on that.And they may have unintended consequences. As Marc Champion reports, Trump’s pledged withdrawal of U.S. troops from Syria would leave Moscow dealing with Turkey, a weaker and more compliant player.The president says the move is a “win” for America. But it could be a “win-win” where Russia benefits, too.Global HeadlinesJust in: U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson told German Chancellor Angela Merkel that a Brexit deal is essentially impossible if the European Union demands Northern Ireland stay in the bloc’s customs union, according to a British official. The pound fell to its weakest level against the euro since Sept. 9.Unusually Quiet | Erdogan, who doesn’t usually mince his words when under attack, has been suspiciously quiet since Trump threatened to obliterate Turkey’s economy should its army act in excess in Syria. The Turkish leader kept a low profile when Trump made a similar threat earlier this year. Erdogan appears to be following the same playbook even as his army prepares for an incursion to fight Kurdish militants in the border region with Syria.No regrets | Two weeks after seven first-term House Democrats representing Trump-leaning districts decided to back an impeachment inquiry of the president, he has erased any lingering doubts they may have had about the risks to their own re-election chances in 2020, Erik Wasson and David Welch report.Trump’s impeachment defense strategy will be put to the test today as one of his top diplomats appears before House committees to explain the president’s call for Ukraine to investigate 2020 rival Joe Biden. Biden unveiled an education plan today that focuses on making colleges more affordable and boosting employment opportunities for those without a bachelor’s degree.Talking while fighting | China’s Foreign Ministry warned the U.S. to “stay tuned” for retaliation after it black-listed eight of the country’s technology companies for alleged involvement in human rights violations against Muslim minorities in the far-western region of Xinjiang. The sanctions are among several disputes — including disagreements over China’s handling of unrest in Hong Kong  and its efforts to isolate Taiwan — on the boil just as Chinese negotiators prepare to resume trade talks in the U.S.A unit of Activision Blizzard has banned a player for expressing support for Hong Kong’s protest movement, the latest company attempting to rein in speech that might displease China.Mending fences | President Jair Bolsonaro took office warning Brazil would be more wary of investment from Beijing, but things seem to have found a warmer footing. Samy Adghirni reports exclusively on a recent all-expenses-paid trip that Brazilian lawmakers made to China. It’s not the only place seeking to reset ties: Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan visits China today to rally support for investment after project spending dropped.Tragic rise | The fallout of the 2010 plane crash that killed Poland’s president and dozens of other officials helped transform one of Europe’s great successes into one of its biggest renegades. Marek Strzelecki and Rodney Jefferson explain how Jaroslaw Kaczynski, the late president’s twin brother, and his Law & Justice party used the disaster as a galvanizing force to gain sway over the courts, state companies and the media. Opinion polls suggest Law & Justice will cement its grip on power in an Oct. 13 election.What to WatchCanadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau took fire from all sides in the only English-language leaders debate last night before an Oct. 21 general election that polls suggest is still his to lose. Ecuadorian President Lenin Moreno accused his political opponents of attempting a coup and announced he’s moving the government outside the capital after violence erupted over scrapped fuel subsidies last week.Tell us how we’re doing or what we’re missing at balancepower@bloomberg.net.And finally ... China’s outrage against the National Basketball Association has transformed what was supposed to be a high-profile promotional week into a PR disaster. Celebrities and fans say they’ll skip exhibition games where stars like LeBron James were due to play, and state TV will no longer broadcast matches. The NBA is under pressure after Houston Rockets General Manager Daryl Morey tweeted a slogan supporting Hong Kong’s protesters. China is the NBA’s most important market outside the U.S. \--With assistance from Karl Maier, Kathleen Hunter, Onur Ant and Brendan Scott.To contact the author of this story: Rosalind Mathieson in London at rmathieson3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Winfrey at mwinfrey@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Want to receive this post in your inbox every day? Sign up for the Balance of Power newsletter, and follow Bloomberg Politics on Twitter and Facebook for more.As Donald Trump’s impeachment inquiry rolls through Congress, leaders around the world must be thinking back to what they’ve said to the U.S. president in what they presumed were private conversations.From Ukraine to Italy to the U.K. and Australia, Trump’s efforts to solicit help in salvaging his presidency are under ever-increasing scrutiny. Our story out today shows how Trump’s ability to sniff out weak spots in others is behind his selective outreach.More broadly, as one diplomat says, any leader must be prepared for strange and unexpected requests when Trump calls. The trick is to stay positive without committing to anything and to speak guardedly, because the transcript might become public.We’re also seeing how Trump’s chats with individual leaders — and his tendency to make policy on the fly — could affect not just the U.S. election. Take Turkey, which may invade Syria after he effectively gave Recep Tayyip Erdogan a green light over the phone.The president’s actions risk sowing policy confusion — read here for Nick Wadhams’ and Glen Carey’s take on that.And they may have unintended consequences. As Marc Champion reports, Trump’s pledged withdrawal of U.S. troops from Syria would leave Moscow dealing with Turkey, a weaker and more compliant player.The president says the move is a “win” for America. But it could be a “win-win” where Russia benefits, too.Global HeadlinesJust in: U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson told German Chancellor Angela Merkel that a Brexit deal is essentially impossible if the European Union demands Northern Ireland stay in the bloc’s customs union, according to a British official. The pound fell to its weakest level against the euro since Sept. 9.Unusually Quiet | Erdogan, who doesn’t usually mince his words when under attack, has been suspiciously quiet since Trump threatened to obliterate Turkey’s economy should its army act in excess in Syria. The Turkish leader kept a low profile when Trump made a similar threat earlier this year. Erdogan appears to be following the same playbook even as his army prepares for an incursion to fight Kurdish militants in the border region with Syria.No regrets | Two weeks after seven first-term House Democrats representing Trump-leaning districts decided to back an impeachment inquiry of the president, he has erased any lingering doubts they may have had about the risks to their own re-election chances in 2020, Erik Wasson and David Welch report.Trump’s impeachment defense strategy will be put to the test today as one of his top diplomats appears before House committees to explain the president’s call for Ukraine to investigate 2020 rival Joe Biden. Biden unveiled an education plan today that focuses on making colleges more affordable and boosting employment opportunities for those without a bachelor’s degree.Talking while fighting | China’s Foreign Ministry warned the U.S. to “stay tuned” for retaliation after it black-listed eight of the country’s technology companies for alleged involvement in human rights violations against Muslim minorities in the far-western region of Xinjiang. The sanctions are among several disputes — including disagreements over China’s handling of unrest in Hong Kong  and its efforts to isolate Taiwan — on the boil just as Chinese negotiators prepare to resume trade talks in the U.S.A unit of Activision Blizzard has banned a player for expressing support for Hong Kong’s protest movement, the latest company attempting to rein in speech that might displease China.Mending fences | President Jair Bolsonaro took office warning Brazil would be more wary of investment from Beijing, but things seem to have found a warmer footing. Samy Adghirni reports exclusively on a recent all-expenses-paid trip that Brazilian lawmakers made to China. It’s not the only place seeking to reset ties: Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan visits China today to rally support for investment after project spending dropped.Tragic rise | The fallout of the 2010 plane crash that killed Poland’s president and dozens of other officials helped transform one of Europe’s great successes into one of its biggest renegades. Marek Strzelecki and Rodney Jefferson explain how Jaroslaw Kaczynski, the late president’s twin brother, and his Law & Justice party used the disaster as a galvanizing force to gain sway over the courts, state companies and the media. Opinion polls suggest Law & Justice will cement its grip on power in an Oct. 13 election.What to WatchCanadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau took fire from all sides in the only English-language leaders debate last night before an Oct. 21 general election that polls suggest is still his to lose. Ecuadorian President Lenin Moreno accused his political opponents of attempting a coup and announced he’s moving the government outside the capital after violence erupted over scrapped fuel subsidies last week.Tell us how we’re doing or what we’re missing at balancepower@bloomberg.net.And finally ... China’s outrage against the National Basketball Association has transformed what was supposed to be a high-profile promotional week into a PR disaster. Celebrities and fans say they’ll skip exhibition games where stars like LeBron James were due to play, and state TV will no longer broadcast matches. The NBA is under pressure after Houston Rockets General Manager Daryl Morey tweeted a slogan supporting Hong Kong’s protesters. China is the NBA’s most important market outside the U.S. \--With assistance from Karl Maier, Kathleen Hunter, Onur Ant and Brendan Scott.To contact the author of this story: Rosalind Mathieson in London at rmathieson3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Winfrey at mwinfrey@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 68/79   Trump defends decision to abandon Kurdish allies in Syria
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    President Donald Trump cast his decision to abandon Kurdish fighters in Syria as fulfilling a campaign promise to withdraw from 'endless war' in the Middle East, even as Republican critics and others said he was sacrificing a U.S. ally and undermining American credibility.  Trump declared U.S. troops would step aside for an expected Turkish attack on the Kurds, who have fought alongside Americans for years, but he then threatened to destroy the Turks' economy if they went too far.  It was the latest example of Trump's approach to foreign policy that critics condemn as impulsive, that he sometimes reverses and that frequently is untethered to the advice of his national security aides.

    President Donald Trump cast his decision to abandon Kurdish fighters in Syria as fulfilling a campaign promise to withdraw from 'endless war' in the Middle East, even as Republican critics and others said he was sacrificing a U.S. ally and undermining American credibility. Trump declared U.S. troops would step aside for an expected Turkish attack on the Kurds, who have fought alongside Americans for years, but he then threatened to destroy the Turks' economy if they went too far. It was the latest example of Trump's approach to foreign policy that critics condemn as impulsive, that he sometimes reverses and that frequently is untethered to the advice of his national security aides.


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  • 69/79   Pentagon tries to row back Trump green light of 'destabilising' Turkish assault on Syria
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The Pentagon has attempted to row back on Donald Trump’s green-lighting of a Turkish offensive on Kurdish-held Syria, warning Ankara the US does not support such a "destabilising" move. President Trump made the decision after a phone call with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and apparently without consultation from his own advisers or intelligence services, who warned yesterday that it could prove to be one of the most reckless decisions of his presidency.  "The Department of Defense made clear to Turkey - as did the President - that we do not endorse a Turkish operation in Northern Syria,” Jonathan Hoffan, Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs, said in a statement. “The US Armed Forces will not support, or be involved in any such operation. “We will work with our other Nato allies and Coalition partners to reiterate to Turkey the possible destabilising consequences of potential actions to Turkey, the region, and beyond." A state department official went further, saying it was a “very bad idea”. Accounts of the Sunday night phone call between the two leaders suggest Mr Trump had been pressured by his Turkish counterpart. A female fighter of the US-backed Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) flashes the victory gesture while celebrating after announcing the total elimination of the Islamic State in Syria Credit: AFP The Turkish presidency said that during the call with Mr Trump, Mr Erdogan had expressed his frustration with the failure of US military and security officials to implement the agreement between the two countries on a safe zone. The Nato allies agreed in August to establish a buffer zone in northeast Syria, which involved moving Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG) fighters back from the Turkish border. The YPG had also agreed to allow joint US-Turkey patrols as part of the security mechanism. Mr Erdogan told Mr Trump that the US moved too slowly to set up the zone, expressing his anger that the US security bureaucracy, namely the Pentagon, was seemingly stalling the zone's full implementation. Observers said it may have goaded Mr Trump, who does not like to be thought of as being hamstrung by policymakers. Mr Trump has attempted to mitigate the fallout, tweeting yesterday that Ankara must watch its step. Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Turkey's president, holds up a map of his proposed "safe zone" while speaking during the UN General Assembly meeting in New York Credit: Bloomberg “If Turkey does anything that I, in my great and unmatched wisdom, consider to be off limits, I will totally destroy and obliterate the Economy of Turkey (I’ve done before!),” he wrote in a grandiose tweet. He also claimed to have the support of his coalition allies, saying the UK was among those parties who agreed with the policy shift. “A lot of people have their opinion. I could name many who are extremely thrilled that we’re coming home ,” he said at the White House. “The UK is very thrilled at this decision. As you know, they have soldiers over there also. And others. But many people agree with it very strongly. I understand both sides of it very well.” He has been criticised from all corners, including from Republican allies. Lindsey Graham, chairman of the Senate judiciary committee, an outspoken defender of the president, said abandonment of the Kurds would be “a disaster in the making”, he said, and “a stain on America’s honour”. Nikki Haley, his former ambassador at the United Nations, said: “We must always have the backs of our allies, if we expect them to have our back.  The Kurds were instrumental in our successful fight against ISIS in Syria. Leaving them to die is a big mistake.” However, Turkey said on Tuesday that it is ready at the border for an assault, which Mr Erdogan has been warning could come any day. Sources in Syria have told the Telegraph the Kurds had been acting in good faith complying with the security mechanism, believing if they did so they would have the US’s continued support. “We feel as if the whole time Turkey had another plan of its own, that the patrols were only for reconnaissance, and now we have no defences on the border,” one official said.

    The Pentagon has attempted to row back on Donald Trump’s green-lighting of a Turkish offensive on Kurdish-held Syria, warning Ankara the US does not support such a "destabilising" move. President Trump made the decision after a phone call with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and apparently without consultation from his own advisers or intelligence services, who warned yesterday that it could prove to be one of the most reckless decisions of his presidency.  "The Department of Defense made clear to Turkey - as did the President - that we do not endorse a Turkish operation in Northern Syria,” Jonathan Hoffan, Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs, said in a statement. “The US Armed Forces will not support, or be involved in any such operation. “We will work with our other Nato allies and Coalition partners to reiterate to Turkey the possible destabilising consequences of potential actions to Turkey, the region, and beyond." A state department official went further, saying it was a “very bad idea”. Accounts of the Sunday night phone call between the two leaders suggest Mr Trump had been pressured by his Turkish counterpart. A female fighter of the US-backed Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) flashes the victory gesture while celebrating after announcing the total elimination of the Islamic State in Syria Credit: AFP The Turkish presidency said that during the call with Mr Trump, Mr Erdogan had expressed his frustration with the failure of US military and security officials to implement the agreement between the two countries on a safe zone. The Nato allies agreed in August to establish a buffer zone in northeast Syria, which involved moving Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG) fighters back from the Turkish border. The YPG had also agreed to allow joint US-Turkey patrols as part of the security mechanism. Mr Erdogan told Mr Trump that the US moved too slowly to set up the zone, expressing his anger that the US security bureaucracy, namely the Pentagon, was seemingly stalling the zone's full implementation. Observers said it may have goaded Mr Trump, who does not like to be thought of as being hamstrung by policymakers. Mr Trump has attempted to mitigate the fallout, tweeting yesterday that Ankara must watch its step. Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Turkey's president, holds up a map of his proposed "safe zone" while speaking during the UN General Assembly meeting in New York Credit: Bloomberg “If Turkey does anything that I, in my great and unmatched wisdom, consider to be off limits, I will totally destroy and obliterate the Economy of Turkey (I’ve done before!),” he wrote in a grandiose tweet. He also claimed to have the support of his coalition allies, saying the UK was among those parties who agreed with the policy shift. “A lot of people have their opinion. I could name many who are extremely thrilled that we’re coming home ,” he said at the White House. “The UK is very thrilled at this decision. As you know, they have soldiers over there also. And others. But many people agree with it very strongly. I understand both sides of it very well.” He has been criticised from all corners, including from Republican allies. Lindsey Graham, chairman of the Senate judiciary committee, an outspoken defender of the president, said abandonment of the Kurds would be “a disaster in the making”, he said, and “a stain on America’s honour”. Nikki Haley, his former ambassador at the United Nations, said: “We must always have the backs of our allies, if we expect them to have our back.  The Kurds were instrumental in our successful fight against ISIS in Syria. Leaving them to die is a big mistake.” However, Turkey said on Tuesday that it is ready at the border for an assault, which Mr Erdogan has been warning could come any day. Sources in Syria have told the Telegraph the Kurds had been acting in good faith complying with the security mechanism, believing if they did so they would have the US’s continued support. “We feel as if the whole time Turkey had another plan of its own, that the patrols were only for reconnaissance, and now we have no defences on the border,” one official said.


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  • 70/79   Brown-Bag Lunches for Kids With Food Allergies
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...


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  • 71/79   What to Feed Your Family When the Power Goes Out
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...


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  • 72/79   Try These Healthy Snack Ideas for Kids
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...

    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...


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  • 73/79   The 9 Best Jobs for Teachers To Make Some Cash During the Summer Break
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.


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  • 74/79   How to Spot and Avoid Algal Blooms
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...


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  • 75/79   Get These 4 Vaccines for College
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If your child is a college student—or soon to be one—making sure he or she is fully vaccinated is critically important, especially for those who will be living in a dorm or other shared space. Th...

    If your child is a college student—or soon to be one—making sure he or she is fully vaccinated is critically important, especially for those who will be living in a dorm or other shared space. Th...


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  • 76/79   DNA detectives: New tech can mean a diagnosis for your child, but not a lot of answers
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Four-year-old Eli Kadkhoda is one of a handful of children with IRF2BPL-related condition, named after the gene to which it is linked. Its patients are all healthy at birth, stumbling and losing speech by kindergarten, wheelchair-dependent soon after.

    Four-year-old Eli Kadkhoda is one of a handful of children with IRF2BPL-related condition, named after the gene to which it is linked. Its patients are all healthy at birth, stumbling and losing speech by kindergarten, wheelchair-dependent soon after.


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  • 77/79   Will Your Health Insurance Cover You Overseas?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you’re traveling abroad this summer, the last thing you probably want to think about is what you’ll do if you get sick or injured. But experts say 15 percent of travelers encounter some kind o...

    If you’re traveling abroad this summer, the last thing you probably want to think about is what you’ll do if you get sick or injured. But experts say 15 percent of travelers encounter some kind o...


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  • 78/79   9 Easy Ways to Make Your Jack-o'-Lanterns Last Longer
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    A little bleach goes a long way.

    A little bleach goes a long way.


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  • 79/79   Don't Forget These Vaccines When You Travel
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you're planning a summer trip overseas, you may be preoccupied with booking airfare and finding lodging, but certain destinations require an extra step of planning: travel vaccines. You might...

    If you're planning a summer trip overseas, you may be preoccupied with booking airfare and finding lodging, but certain destinations require an extra step of planning: travel vaccines. You might...


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