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News Slideshows (10/10/2019 03 hours)


  • 1/79   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


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    Press Review


    Braves   Private Party   Chris Jericho   Normandy   Lio Rush   Darby Allin   Rhea Ripley   The Cardinals   Mark Ruffalo   Coby White   Tillerson   Jack Eichel   EMTs   Folty   Breezango   Feby   Brandon Ingram   Karishma   Let's Go Dodgers   Sammy Guevara   Atlanta United   fox news poll   Supa   Cameron Grimes   Drew Gulak   
  • 2/79   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


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  • 3/79   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


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  • 4/79   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


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  • 5/79   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


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  • 6/79   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


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  • 7/79   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


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  • 8/79   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


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  • 9/79   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


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  • 10/79   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


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  • 11/79   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


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  • 12/79   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


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  • 13/79   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


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  • 14/79   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named.  Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does.  At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


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  • 15/79   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


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  • 16/79   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


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  • 17/79   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


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  • 18/79   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


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  • 19/79   Here is What Hedge Funds Really Think About Phillips 66 (PSX)
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Hedge funds and other investment firms run by legendary investors like Israel Englander, Jeffrey Talpins and Ray Dalio are entrusted to manage billions of dollars of accredited investors' money because they are without peer in the resources they use to identify the best investments for their chosen investment horizon. Moreover, they are more willing to […]

    Hedge funds and other investment firms run by legendary investors like Israel Englander, Jeffrey Talpins and Ray Dalio are entrusted to manage billions of dollars of accredited investors' money because they are without peer in the resources they use to identify the best investments for their chosen investment horizon. Moreover, they are more willing to […]


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  • 20/79   Hedge Funds Sold Public Storage (PSA) A Little Bit Too Early
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Does Public Storage (NYSE:PSA) represent a good buying opportunity at the moment? Let’s quickly check the hedge fund interest towards the company. Hedge fund firms constantly search out bright intellectuals and highly-experienced employees and throw away millions of dollars on satellite photos and other research activities, so it is no wonder why they tend to […]

    Does Public Storage (NYSE:PSA) represent a good buying opportunity at the moment? Let’s quickly check the hedge fund interest towards the company. Hedge fund firms constantly search out bright intellectuals and highly-experienced employees and throw away millions of dollars on satellite photos and other research activities, so it is no wonder why they tend to […]


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  • 21/79   Hedge Funds Have Never Been This Bullish On Infosys Limited (INFY)
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Does Infosys Limited (NYSE:INFY) represent a good buying opportunity at the moment? Let’s quickly check the hedge fund interest towards the company. Hedge fund firms constantly search out bright intellectuals and highly-experienced employees and throw away millions of dollars on satellite photos and other research activities, so it is no wonder why they tend to […]

    Does Infosys Limited (NYSE:INFY) represent a good buying opportunity at the moment? Let’s quickly check the hedge fund interest towards the company. Hedge fund firms constantly search out bright intellectuals and highly-experienced employees and throw away millions of dollars on satellite photos and other research activities, so it is no wonder why they tend to […]


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  • 22/79   Here is What Hedge Funds Think About Prudential Financial Inc (PRU)
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The latest 13F reporting period has come and gone, and Insider Monkey is again at the forefront when it comes to making use of this gold mine of data. Insider Monkey finished processing more than 730 13F filings submitted by hedge funds and prominent investors. These filings show these funds' portfolio positions as of June […]

    The latest 13F reporting period has come and gone, and Insider Monkey is again at the forefront when it comes to making use of this gold mine of data. Insider Monkey finished processing more than 730 13F filings submitted by hedge funds and prominent investors. These filings show these funds' portfolio positions as of June […]


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  • 23/79   With EPS Growth And More, Garden Reach Shipbuilders & Engineers (NSE:GRSE) Is Interesting
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Some have more dollars than sense, they say, so even companies that have no revenue, no profit, and a record of...

    Some have more dollars than sense, they say, so even companies that have no revenue, no profit, and a record of...


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  • 24/79   Ecuador oil output hit as protests worsen
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Protesters in Ecuador fought a running battle with security forces Wednesday in a second day of violent protests over a fuel price hike that forced the government to suspend most of the country's deliveries of crude.  The violence broke out as thousands of people representing indigenous groups, farmers, students and labor unions marched on a square in Quito's historic center near the government headquarters.  Masked demonstrators threw Molotov cocktails and paving stones.

    Protesters in Ecuador fought a running battle with security forces Wednesday in a second day of violent protests over a fuel price hike that forced the government to suspend most of the country's deliveries of crude. The violence broke out as thousands of people representing indigenous groups, farmers, students and labor unions marched on a square in Quito's historic center near the government headquarters. Masked demonstrators threw Molotov cocktails and paving stones.


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  • 25/79   China-U.S. Set to Talk With Global Economy Facing Trade Crucible
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Chinese and American negotiators are set to start meeting again in Washington on Thursday in the latest round of their so-far fruitless talks to strike a trade deal. If no agreement is reached, the already slowing global economy will face another hurdle, with the U.S. set to raise tariffs on China on Oct. 15 and then on the European Union on Oct. 18.Both China and the U.S. have scheduled further tariff increases for December, and Europe is considering retaliation against any U.S. action. With close to $2 trillion in global trade flows at risk from greater protectionism, according to a Bloomberg analysis, those protectionist actions would depress trade, make businesses more cautious and further damage global demand.Investors are underlining what’s at stake: U.S. stock futures slid after a report in the South China Morning Post suggested Chinese negotiators led by Liu He could cut short their stay -- a report refuted by the White House.“We are not aware of a change in the Vice Premier’s travel plans at this time,” White House spokesman Judd Deere said late on Wednesday in Washington, referring to Liu.Chinese state-media had said Wednesday night that the schedule was still on track.ChinaChina’s economy would be slowing with or without the trade war. But that conflict, which over the last 18 months has broadened to other contentious areas such as technology, state subsidies, human rights, Taiwan and the Hong Kong protests, is also damaging to the economy, as it cuts demand for Chinese exports, damages business confidence and undermines investment.The tit-for-tat tariffs have driven down commerce, with Chinese exports down 9% in the first eight months of this year, and imports from the U.S. falling almost 28% for the same period. China’s total exports over the same timeframe have been basically unchanged, meaning it’s been able to find other countries to sell to, but its imports dropped 5%, with that fall in demand weighing on other nation’s economies.And the uncertainty is hitting Chinese companies, with manufacturers seeing their business contracting for the past five months, and new export orders contracting for 16 months.EuropeThe China-U.S. dispute is just one of the risks facing the global economy, with Brexit and the ongoing dispute between the U.S. and Europe over cars and industrial subsidies also posing a threat to trade flows. The U.S. will put tariffs on as much as $7.5 billion of Scotch whisky, French wine, cheese, planes and other European exports from next week. EU officials hope that won’t happen, but have also drafted retaliatory measures just in case.That threat and the possibility of a no-deal Brexit are some of the factors dragging down European growth, with a sharp slowdown in German services suggesting the pain from its industrial crisis is spreading, and manufacturing contracting across the Eurozone. That German outlook went from bad to worse in September, an unpleasant surprise that marks the latest dismal reading on Bloomberg’s Trade Tracker.The U.SThe global economic slowdown and trade policy are working against the world’s largest economy as well. Manufacturing has slipped into a recession, with factory output declining in the first two quarters of the year, and data last week indicate a further softening as companies tighten up capital spending budgets. At the same time, U.S. economic growth is above trend thanks to steady household spending and the lowest jobless rate in five decades.Meanwhile, supply-chain complications have emerged from the trade war, prompting companies to adapt and avoid tariffs. In the year through August, U.S. imports from China have declined 12.5%, or more than $43 billion, while purchases from Mexico -- the second-biggest supplier of goods to America -- posted the largest increase.(Updates with stock futures in 3rd paragraph)To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: James Mayger in Beijing at jmayger@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jeffrey Black at jblack25@bloomberg.net, Vince Golle, Sarah McGregorFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Chinese and American negotiators are set to start meeting again in Washington on Thursday in the latest round of their so-far fruitless talks to strike a trade deal. If no agreement is reached, the already slowing global economy will face another hurdle, with the U.S. set to raise tariffs on China on Oct. 15 and then on the European Union on Oct. 18.Both China and the U.S. have scheduled further tariff increases for December, and Europe is considering retaliation against any U.S. action. With close to $2 trillion in global trade flows at risk from greater protectionism, according to a Bloomberg analysis, those protectionist actions would depress trade, make businesses more cautious and further damage global demand.Investors are underlining what’s at stake: U.S. stock futures slid after a report in the South China Morning Post suggested Chinese negotiators led by Liu He could cut short their stay -- a report refuted by the White House.“We are not aware of a change in the Vice Premier’s travel plans at this time,” White House spokesman Judd Deere said late on Wednesday in Washington, referring to Liu.Chinese state-media had said Wednesday night that the schedule was still on track.ChinaChina’s economy would be slowing with or without the trade war. But that conflict, which over the last 18 months has broadened to other contentious areas such as technology, state subsidies, human rights, Taiwan and the Hong Kong protests, is also damaging to the economy, as it cuts demand for Chinese exports, damages business confidence and undermines investment.The tit-for-tat tariffs have driven down commerce, with Chinese exports down 9% in the first eight months of this year, and imports from the U.S. falling almost 28% for the same period. China’s total exports over the same timeframe have been basically unchanged, meaning it’s been able to find other countries to sell to, but its imports dropped 5%, with that fall in demand weighing on other nation’s economies.And the uncertainty is hitting Chinese companies, with manufacturers seeing their business contracting for the past five months, and new export orders contracting for 16 months.EuropeThe China-U.S. dispute is just one of the risks facing the global economy, with Brexit and the ongoing dispute between the U.S. and Europe over cars and industrial subsidies also posing a threat to trade flows. The U.S. will put tariffs on as much as $7.5 billion of Scotch whisky, French wine, cheese, planes and other European exports from next week. EU officials hope that won’t happen, but have also drafted retaliatory measures just in case.That threat and the possibility of a no-deal Brexit are some of the factors dragging down European growth, with a sharp slowdown in German services suggesting the pain from its industrial crisis is spreading, and manufacturing contracting across the Eurozone. That German outlook went from bad to worse in September, an unpleasant surprise that marks the latest dismal reading on Bloomberg’s Trade Tracker.The U.SThe global economic slowdown and trade policy are working against the world’s largest economy as well. Manufacturing has slipped into a recession, with factory output declining in the first two quarters of the year, and data last week indicate a further softening as companies tighten up capital spending budgets. At the same time, U.S. economic growth is above trend thanks to steady household spending and the lowest jobless rate in five decades.Meanwhile, supply-chain complications have emerged from the trade war, prompting companies to adapt and avoid tariffs. In the year through August, U.S. imports from China have declined 12.5%, or more than $43 billion, while purchases from Mexico -- the second-biggest supplier of goods to America -- posted the largest increase.(Updates with stock futures in 3rd paragraph)To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: James Mayger in Beijing at jmayger@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jeffrey Black at jblack25@bloomberg.net, Vince Golle, Sarah McGregorFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 26/79   Boustead Projects (SGX:AVM) Seems To Use Debt Quite Sensibly
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Legendary fund manager Li Lu (who Charlie Munger backed) once said, 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility...

    Legendary fund manager Li Lu (who Charlie Munger backed) once said, 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility...


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  • 27/79   California bans pesticide linked to brain damage in children
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    A widely used agricultural pesticide that California environmental officials have said has been linked to brain damage in children will be banned after next year under an agreement reached with the manufacturer, state officials announced Wednesday.  Under the deal, all California sales of chlorpyrifos will end on Feb. 6, 2020, and farmers will have until the end of 2020 to exhaust their supplies.  State regulators have said chlorpyrifos has been linked to health defects in children, including brain impairment, and to illnesses in others with compromised immune systems.

    A widely used agricultural pesticide that California environmental officials have said has been linked to brain damage in children will be banned after next year under an agreement reached with the manufacturer, state officials announced Wednesday. Under the deal, all California sales of chlorpyrifos will end on Feb. 6, 2020, and farmers will have until the end of 2020 to exhaust their supplies. State regulators have said chlorpyrifos has been linked to health defects in children, including brain impairment, and to illnesses in others with compromised immune systems.


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  • 28/79   'A victim of their own failure': Why PG&E's massive power shutdown in California was inevitable
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Months after declaring bankruptcy, California's primary public utility, PG&E;, has once again raised the ire of residents and politicians alike.

    Months after declaring bankruptcy, California's primary public utility, PG&E;, has once again raised the ire of residents and politicians alike.


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  • 29/79   Did Sonic Healthcare Limited (ASX:SHL) Use Debt To Deliver Its ROE Of 10%?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Many investors are still learning about the various metrics that can be useful when analysing a stock. This article is...

    Many investors are still learning about the various metrics that can be useful when analysing a stock. This article is...


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  • 30/79   Cincinnati outlaws discrimination based on natural hairstyles associated with race
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Cincinnati is the second city in the country, after New York City, to pass a law making it illegal to discriminate against natural hair.

    Cincinnati is the second city in the country, after New York City, to pass a law making it illegal to discriminate against natural hair.


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  • 31/79   Grob Tea (NSE:GROBTEA) Has A Pretty Healthy Balance Sheet
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Legendary fund manager Li Lu (who Charlie Munger backed) once said, 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility...

    Legendary fund manager Li Lu (who Charlie Munger backed) once said, 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility...


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  • 32/79   The Latest: Officials: Be kind to PG&E workers amid shut-off
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Authorities are asking the public to be kind to frontline utility workers in California as anger mounts against Pacific Gas and Electric over a power shutdown.  PG&E is cutting power to customers in 34 counties as dry, gusty winds create dangerous wildfires conditions.  The utility's faulty equipment was to blame for a deadly fire a year ago that killed 85 people and nearly wiped out the town of Paradise.

    Authorities are asking the public to be kind to frontline utility workers in California as anger mounts against Pacific Gas and Electric over a power shutdown. PG&E is cutting power to customers in 34 counties as dry, gusty winds create dangerous wildfires conditions. The utility's faulty equipment was to blame for a deadly fire a year ago that killed 85 people and nearly wiped out the town of Paradise.


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  • 33/79   PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. (PNC): Hedge Funds In Wait-and-See Mode
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    There are several ways to beat the market, and investing in small cap stocks has historically been one of them. We like to improve the odds of beating the market further by examining what famous hedge fund operators such as Jeff Ubben, George Soros and Carl Icahn think. Those hedge fund operators make billions of […]

    There are several ways to beat the market, and investing in small cap stocks has historically been one of them. We like to improve the odds of beating the market further by examining what famous hedge fund operators such as Jeff Ubben, George Soros and Carl Icahn think. Those hedge fund operators make billions of […]


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  • 34/79   What Kind Of Investor Owns Most Of Fountain Set (Holdings) Limited (HKG:420)?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The big shareholder groups in Fountain Set (Holdings) Limited (HKG:420) have power over the company. Generally...

    The big shareholder groups in Fountain Set (Holdings) Limited (HKG:420) have power over the company. Generally...


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  • 35/79   Here is What Hedge Funds Really Think About Prologis Inc (PLD)
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Billionaire hedge fund managers such as David Abrams, Steve Cohen and Stan Druckenmiller can generate millions or even billions of dollars every year by pinning down high-potential small-cap stocks and pouring cash into these candidates. Small-cap stocks are overlooked by most investors, brokerage houses, and financial services hubs, while the nearly unlimited research abilities of […]

    Billionaire hedge fund managers such as David Abrams, Steve Cohen and Stan Druckenmiller can generate millions or even billions of dollars every year by pinning down high-potential small-cap stocks and pouring cash into these candidates. Small-cap stocks are overlooked by most investors, brokerage houses, and financial services hubs, while the nearly unlimited research abilities of […]


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  • 36/79   These Fundamentals Make Reliance Worldwide Corporation Limited (ASX:RWC) Truly Worth Looking At
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    I've been keeping an eye on Reliance Worldwide Corporation Limited (ASX:RWC) because I'm attracted to its...

    I've been keeping an eye on Reliance Worldwide Corporation Limited (ASX:RWC) because I'm attracted to its...


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  • 37/79   Donald Trump retains Benghazi investigator Trey Gowdy for impeachment team
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Former Republican congressman Trey Gowdy will assist the White House in its impeachment defense, one of Donald Trump's attorneys said Wednesday.

    Former Republican congressman Trey Gowdy will assist the White House in its impeachment defense, one of Donald Trump's attorneys said Wednesday.


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  • 38/79   A Rising Share Price Has Us Looking Closely At JBM Auto Limited's (NSE:JBMA) P/E Ratio
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    JBM Auto (NSE:JBMA) shares have had a really impressive month, gaining 46%, after some slippage. But shareholders may...

    JBM Auto (NSE:JBMA) shares have had a really impressive month, gaining 46%, after some slippage. But shareholders may...


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  • 39/79   US takes custody of two 'high-value' jihadists from Syria Kurds
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Turkey has launched an assault on the Syrian Kurdish forces -- with which the US partnered to combat the Islamic State group -- sparking fears that the offensive could lead to captured fighters they held escaping and reconstituting the group.  'I can confirm that we've taken custody of two high-value ISIS individuals from the SDF,' the defense official said on condition of anonymity, referring to the Islamic State group and the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces that held the captured jihadists.

    Turkey has launched an assault on the Syrian Kurdish forces -- with which the US partnered to combat the Islamic State group -- sparking fears that the offensive could lead to captured fighters they held escaping and reconstituting the group. 'I can confirm that we've taken custody of two high-value ISIS individuals from the SDF,' the defense official said on condition of anonymity, referring to the Islamic State group and the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces that held the captured jihadists.


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  • 40/79   Hillary Clinton to Trump on a 2020 rerun: 'Don't tempt me. Do your job.'
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Responding to President Trump’s sarcastic suggestion that Hillary Clinton should run for president again in 2020, Clinton tweeted back: "Don’t tempt me. Do your job.”

    Responding to President Trump’s sarcastic suggestion that Hillary Clinton should run for president again in 2020, Clinton tweeted back: "Don’t tempt me. Do your job.”


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  • 41/79   A family found more than half a million dollars in cocaine on the beach during their vacation
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A man and his family discovered 20 bricks of cocaine while on vacation in South Carolina, estimated to be worth $600,000.

    A man and his family discovered 20 bricks of cocaine while on vacation in South Carolina, estimated to be worth $600,000.


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  • 42/79   Florida man accused of giving beer to an alligator
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Timothy Kepke and Noah Osborne were arrested Oct. 3. Each was charged with unlawfully taking an alligator, a felony.

    Timothy Kepke and Noah Osborne were arrested Oct. 3. Each was charged with unlawfully taking an alligator, a felony.


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  • 43/79   Humans will not 'migrate' to other planets, Nobel winner says
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Humans will never migrate to a planet outside of Earth's solar system because it would take far too long to get there, Swiss Nobel laureate Michel Mayor said Wednesday.  Mayor and his colleague Didier Queloz were on Tuesday awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics for their research refining techniques to detect so-called exoplanets.  'If we are talking about exoplanets, things should be clear: we will not migrate there,' Mayor told AFP near Madrid on the sidelines of a conference when asked about the possibility of humans moving to other planets.

    Humans will never migrate to a planet outside of Earth's solar system because it would take far too long to get there, Swiss Nobel laureate Michel Mayor said Wednesday. Mayor and his colleague Didier Queloz were on Tuesday awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics for their research refining techniques to detect so-called exoplanets. 'If we are talking about exoplanets, things should be clear: we will not migrate there,' Mayor told AFP near Madrid on the sidelines of a conference when asked about the possibility of humans moving to other planets.


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  • 44/79   Hong Kong 'won't rule out' Chinese help over protests: leader
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Hong Kong's under-fire leader Carrie Lam on Tuesday said China intervening to end months of pro-democracy protests is an option following a particularly violent week of unrest that paralysed the city. Hong Kong was virtually locked down over the three-day holiday weekend, with the majority of subway stops closed. It is also the position of the central government (in Beijing) that Hong Kong should tackle the problem on her own.

    Hong Kong's under-fire leader Carrie Lam on Tuesday said China intervening to end months of pro-democracy protests is an option following a particularly violent week of unrest that paralysed the city. Hong Kong was virtually locked down over the three-day holiday weekend, with the majority of subway stops closed. It is also the position of the central government (in Beijing) that Hong Kong should tackle the problem on her own.


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  • 45/79   Why Do the Yemeni Houthi Rebels Have North Korean Missiles?
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A strange tale.

    A strange tale.


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  • 46/79   Minneapolis mayor responds to Trump: I don't have time to be 'tweeting garbage out'
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey hit back at President Trump regarding the use of the Target Center for a Thursday campaign rally.

    Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey hit back at President Trump regarding the use of the Target Center for a Thursday campaign rally.


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  • 47/79   'We good now, China? South Park 'apologises' after being banned by Communist Party
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The creators of South Park have issued an irreverent mock apology to the Chinese government after reports that the show has been censored on Chinese streaming services and social media. The statement from Trey Parker and Matt Stone made fun of censorship of comparisons of Xi Jinping, the Chinese President, with Winnie the Pooh, and called out the National Basketball Association (NBA) for apologising over the support expressed by one of its officials for the Hong Kong protest movement.   “Like the NBA, we welcome the Chinese censors into our homes and into our hearts. We too love money more than freedom and democracy. Xi doesn’t look just like Winnie the Pooh at all,” read a statement issued by the South Park Twitter account. “Tune into our 300th episode this Wednesday at 10! Long live the Great Communist Party of China! May this autumn’s sorghum harvest be bountiful! We good now China?” The American satirical animation series, famed for taking swipes at global events and society without fear or favour, reportedly incurred the wrath of China’s fierce censors over a recent episode “Band in China” which critiques the way Hollywood allegedly tries to mould its content to avoid offending Beijing. The NBA backs "freedom of expression," its commissioner Adam Silver insisted earlier this week Credit: GLYN KIRK/AFP The plot of the episode sees three of the characters forming a metal band which is so popular that a film is made about it. However, the script keeps changing so that it can be safely distributed in China. “Now I know how Hollywood writers feel,” says Stan, a band member, as he rejigs his work under the careful eye of a Chinese guard. The episode also features a story line where South Park dad, Randy Marsh, gets caught trying to sell weed in China and is sent to a work camp, similar to the mass internment camps in Xinjiang, where an estimated one million people, including Uighur Muslims, are being held. The South Park row comes as China’s state broadcaster said on Tuesday that it would stop showing NBA games as a backlash intensified against the league over a tweet that expressed support for Hong Kong’s pro-democracy protesters. Houston Rockets' manager Daryl Morey ignited controversy on Friday by re-tweeting an image which was captioned: “Fight for Freedom. Stand with Hong Kong,” in reference to the pro-democracy protests that have rocked the global financial hub for four months. Basketball is hugely popular in China, and Mr Morey’s tweet caused outrage on Chinese social media even after he deleted it. The Chinese Basketball Association said it was suspending cooperation with the team, and the Chinese consulate in Houston issued a statement expressing anger. The Chinese market is highly profitable for the NBA, the sport’s governing body, and on Sunday night, the NBA described Mr Morey’s statement as “regrettable” in having “deeply offended many of our friends and fans in China.” Adam Silver, the NBA's commissioner, said on Monday that the league backs "freedom of expression". "There is no doubt, the economic impact is already clear," Mr Silver told Japan's Kyodo News agency ahead of an NBA London Game 2019 basketball match between Washington Wizards and New York Knicks at the O2 Arena in London.

    The creators of South Park have issued an irreverent mock apology to the Chinese government after reports that the show has been censored on Chinese streaming services and social media. The statement from Trey Parker and Matt Stone made fun of censorship of comparisons of Xi Jinping, the Chinese President, with Winnie the Pooh, and called out the National Basketball Association (NBA) for apologising over the support expressed by one of its officials for the Hong Kong protest movement.   “Like the NBA, we welcome the Chinese censors into our homes and into our hearts. We too love money more than freedom and democracy. Xi doesn’t look just like Winnie the Pooh at all,” read a statement issued by the South Park Twitter account. “Tune into our 300th episode this Wednesday at 10! Long live the Great Communist Party of China! May this autumn’s sorghum harvest be bountiful! We good now China?” The American satirical animation series, famed for taking swipes at global events and society without fear or favour, reportedly incurred the wrath of China’s fierce censors over a recent episode “Band in China” which critiques the way Hollywood allegedly tries to mould its content to avoid offending Beijing. The NBA backs "freedom of expression," its commissioner Adam Silver insisted earlier this week Credit: GLYN KIRK/AFP The plot of the episode sees three of the characters forming a metal band which is so popular that a film is made about it. However, the script keeps changing so that it can be safely distributed in China. “Now I know how Hollywood writers feel,” says Stan, a band member, as he rejigs his work under the careful eye of a Chinese guard. The episode also features a story line where South Park dad, Randy Marsh, gets caught trying to sell weed in China and is sent to a work camp, similar to the mass internment camps in Xinjiang, where an estimated one million people, including Uighur Muslims, are being held. The South Park row comes as China’s state broadcaster said on Tuesday that it would stop showing NBA games as a backlash intensified against the league over a tweet that expressed support for Hong Kong’s pro-democracy protesters. Houston Rockets' manager Daryl Morey ignited controversy on Friday by re-tweeting an image which was captioned: “Fight for Freedom. Stand with Hong Kong,” in reference to the pro-democracy protests that have rocked the global financial hub for four months. Basketball is hugely popular in China, and Mr Morey’s tweet caused outrage on Chinese social media even after he deleted it. The Chinese Basketball Association said it was suspending cooperation with the team, and the Chinese consulate in Houston issued a statement expressing anger. The Chinese market is highly profitable for the NBA, the sport’s governing body, and on Sunday night, the NBA described Mr Morey’s statement as “regrettable” in having “deeply offended many of our friends and fans in China.” Adam Silver, the NBA's commissioner, said on Monday that the league backs "freedom of expression". "There is no doubt, the economic impact is already clear," Mr Silver told Japan's Kyodo News agency ahead of an NBA London Game 2019 basketball match between Washington Wizards and New York Knicks at the O2 Arena in London.


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  • 48/79   No, Betsy DeVos is not going to jail
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A judge said to Betsy DeVos' department: "I am not sending anyone to jail yet, but it’s good to know that I have that ability.” The internet exploded.

    A judge said to Betsy DeVos' department: "I am not sending anyone to jail yet, but it’s good to know that I have that ability.” The internet exploded.


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  • 49/79   We worked for the UAW. Amid corruption allegations, the union needs a fresh start.
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    With nearly 50,000 UAW members out on the GM picket lines, this may not seem a good time to speak up. But this is the moment UAW can start over.

    With nearly 50,000 UAW members out on the GM picket lines, this may not seem a good time to speak up. But this is the moment UAW can start over.


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  • 50/79   Back from the dead: Some corals regrow after 'fatal' warming
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    For the first time ever, scientists have found corals that were thought to have been killed by heat stress have recovered, a glimmer of hope for the world's climate change-threatened reefs.  The chance discovery, made by Diego K. Kersting from the Freie University of Berlin and the University of Barcelona during diving expeditions in the Spanish Mediterranean, was reported in the journal Science Advances on Wednesday.  Kersting and co-author Cristina Linares have been carrying out long-term monitoring of 243 colonies of the endangered reef-builder coral Cladocora caespitosa since 2002, allowing them to describe in previous papers recurring warming-related mass mortalities.

    For the first time ever, scientists have found corals that were thought to have been killed by heat stress have recovered, a glimmer of hope for the world's climate change-threatened reefs. The chance discovery, made by Diego K. Kersting from the Freie University of Berlin and the University of Barcelona during diving expeditions in the Spanish Mediterranean, was reported in the journal Science Advances on Wednesday. Kersting and co-author Cristina Linares have been carrying out long-term monitoring of 243 colonies of the endangered reef-builder coral Cladocora caespitosa since 2002, allowing them to describe in previous papers recurring warming-related mass mortalities.


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  • 51/79   20 new moons were discovered around Saturn
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The new discovery increases the moons orbiting the "jewel of our solar system" to 82, surpassing Jupiter

    The new discovery increases the moons orbiting the "jewel of our solar system" to 82, surpassing Jupiter


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  • 52/79   As Sea Levels Rise, So Do Ghost Forests
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Up and down the mid-Atlantic coast, sea levels are rising rapidly, creating stands of dead trees -- often bleached, sometimes blackened -- known as ghost forests.The water is gaining as much as 5 millimeters per year in some places, well above the global average of 3.1 millimeters, driven by profound environmental shifts that include climate change.Increasingly powerful storms, a consequence of a warming world, push seawater inland. More intense dry spells reduce freshwater flowing outward. Adding to the peril, in some places the land is naturally sinking.All of this allows seawater to claim new territory, killing trees from the roots up.Rising seas often conjure the threat to faraway, low-lying nations or island-states. But to understand the immediate consequences of some of the most rapid sea-level rise anywhere in the world, stand among the scraggly, dying pines of Dorchester County along the Maryland coast.Chesapeake Bay's Migrating MarshesPeople living on the eastern shore of Chesapeake Bay, the country's largest estuary system, have a front-row view of the sea's rapid advance, said Keryn Gedan, a wetland ecologist at George Washington University.Part of the reason for the quickly rising waters may be that the Gulf Stream, which flows northward up the coast, is slowing down as meltwater from Greenland inhibits its flow. That is causing what some scientists describe as a pileup of water along the East Coast, elevating sea levels locally.The effects of climate change are also exacerbated by land that is sinking as a result of geological processes triggered by the end of the last ice age.Because of the extraordinary speed at which the water is rising here, Gedan said, "I think of this area as a window into the future for the rest of the world."In Dorchester County, where dead and dying loblolly pines stand forlornly, Gedan has learned to "read" these forests from the mix of species present.As saltwater moves into the ground, oak and other sensitive hardwoods die first. Loblolly pine, the most salt-tolerant, is often the last tree standing until it, too, is overwhelmed.Then the saltwater marsh plants move in. If you're lucky, velvety tufts of cordgrass sprout. If not, impenetrable stands of cane-like Phragmites, an invasive species, take over.One reason the effects of rising seas are so noticeable here is that the land has very little slope. Those 5 millimeters of sea level, a rise that's only slightly more than two half-dollar coins stacked, can translate into saltwater pushing 15 feet inland per year, according to Gedan.Shoots of sweet gum, a tree with star-shaped leaves and bark like alligator skin, have more tolerance for salt than other hardwoods, such as oak. They can endure for a time as groundwater becomes more saline.But eventually, the sweet gum dies as well.The Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, where Gedan does research, lost 3,000 acres of forest and agricultural land between 1938 and 2006. More than 5,000 acres of marsh became open water.At first, this trend depressed Matt Whitbeck, a biologist with the Fish and Wildlife Service who works at the refuge. Saltwater marshes are important nurseries for the fish and crabs people like to eat.But in 2012, he realized the marsh wasn't entirely disappearing; it was migrating. Some of the 3,000 acres of forest that the refuge had lost had transformed into saltwater marsh.His outlook changed. "We need to think about where the marsh is moving, not where it is," he said.But in nearby Smithville, a historically African American town, this movement poses an existential threat. Backyards have been gobbled up by advancing marsh, basketball courts overgrown. What were once thick stands of pine near the water's edge have greatly thinned. The marsh now menaces a graveyard.Residents have battled the advancing wetlands for years, said Roslyn Watts, 60, who grew up here. All that time, she and her neighbors thought the inexorable advance was simply the price of living near water's edge.But in 2010, she learned about global warming and sea level rise, she said. She understood that what was happening wasn't entirely natural."I was angry," she said, and particularly incensed by the idea that retreat was the only workable strategy. The Dutch didn't retreat, she said. They built dikes. Why couldn't Smithville?"These families have been here since at least the late 19th century," she said. "There's a connection to the land."But Smithville, small and with few resources, has little money to adapt.Further south in Somerset County, numerous "for sale" signs stand in front of houses along the back roads. Some are abandoned, their yards overgrown by Phragmites. On Deal Island, ditches once dug to drain the land for farming and to help manage flooding from high tides now stand full of stagnant water.Today, in fact, these ditches are part of the threat: Instead of draining water out to sea, they can accelerate the movement of saltwater inland, said Kate Tully, an agroecologist at the University of Maryland.In general, saltwater can seep into the soil before sea level rise becomes obvious in other ways, killing sensitive plants far from the shore. "We call it the invisible flood, because you can't really see it," she said.Elizabeth van Dolah, an anthropologist at the University of Maryland who works with rural communities along the eastern shore, noted that residents here are accustomed to marsh migration and flooding. "But they're probably seeing it happening at a much quicker pace than in the past," she said. "Many of them recognize that, yes, they eventually have to leave. But for the time being, they intend to stay in place."Bob Fitzgerald, 80, has farmed near the town Princess Anne his whole life. Driving the back roads in his four-seater pickup, he pointed out fields that, just five years ago, grew corn but have since become too salty for crops."You can't give property away down here," he said.The asphalt roads are occasionally tinted red along the edges. That, too, is an effect of the floodwater "overtopping" the roads, Fitzgerald said."People who have built their homes here are damn fools," he said, speaking near a place where pine trees appear to be dying around a house. "It should have been abandoned."As the years pass, he said, it will be.'Cedar Cemeteries' in New JerseyFor 33 years, Ken Able has walked the same causeway almost daily at the Rutgers University Marine Field Station in Tuckerton, New Jersey. In that time he has seen marsh become open water, and the fish population transform as cooler-water species decline and those that thrive in warmer waters move in.Blue crab and summer flounder, both saltwater species, have pushed into freshwater rivers. Their arrival suggests the waterways are becoming saltier further inland.All these signs of change come from the ocean, a fluid and often fickle environment. Which is why Able, a professor emeritus of marine and coastal sciences, so appreciates the ghost forests. They're a signal of change from a stationary source: the trees themselves."A ghost forest is a way to capture geological history," he said. "There's not always a way to do that."The Atlantic white cedar, abundant around the Mullica River Estuary in stands such as this one, is an unusually durable parchment on which to capture that history.Long prized for lumber, its wood is highly resistant to rot. But the tree is also very sensitive to salt. It can tolerate maybe three salty high tides before succumbing.So when the trees begin dying, it's a trustworthy indicator that conditions are becoming more saline. It is an age-old phenomenon, now happening faster.Erosion of marshes and riverbanks has also accelerated, revealing buried cedar stumps from prehistoric ghost forests. Jennifer Walker, a frequent collaborator with Able who recently earned her Ph.D. in oceanography at Rutgers, dated one stump here to the fifth century. "Cedar cemeteries," she calls these places.As elsewhere, ghost forest formation seems to have sped up recently, particularly after Hurricane Sandy hit the region in 2012. "It's a good example of a slowly encroaching process -- and then storms making it worse," Walker said.She is studying sediment cores from salt marshes and dating ancient, dead cedars in order to reconstruct sea level rise and ghost forest formation through time.The pace of sea level rise first quickened in the late 19th century after the Industrial Revolution, Walker said, and then sped up again in recent decades. It's now rising faster than at any point in the past several thousand years.Much of the Mullica River Estuary is a nature preserve, its many tributaries remote and undeveloped. But since 2015, Able and Walker have taken a series of helicopter rides over the area. "It's not one giant ghost forest," Walker said. "But the more you look, the more you find them."From above, they've seen swaths of dead trees along riverbanks many miles from the open ocean, suggesting that Sandy pushed seawater far up the river system."You get a slug of saltwater," Able said, "and things die."On the North Carolina Coast, Fires and SaltPaul Taillie, a Ph.D. student at North Carolina State University, encountered a mystery: He wanted to know how quickly ghost forests form. So he repeated a study originally done 15 years earlier to see how plant life had changed over time.As expected, saltwater marsh had advanced. Pond pine and other salt-sensitive trees were dying. Salt-tolerant plants, including saw grass and black needle rush, were moving in.But unexpectedly, the change wasn't occurring evenly across the landscape. Trees were dying faster in some places than others.What could explain this uneven emergence of ghost forests?The study area had almost no slope -- much of it was just inches above sea level -- and the minor differences in elevation couldn't explain the variation.But a clue came from the soil. It tended to be saltier where trees were dying fastest.The explanation Taillie, who's now a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Florida, landed on had to do with drought. When droughts hit, the amount of freshwater emptying into the ocean from nearby rivers declines, making nearshore waters saltier in some places.That saltier water then pushes inland unevenly, killing trees in an irregular pattern across an otherwise mostly uniform landscape. "It's not just rising sea level" that creates ghost forests, Tallie said, but periods of dryness."It's more during times of drought, when you have less freshwater, that the saltwater creeps in," he said. "Salinity goes up."Wildfires are another accelerant.Wetlands burn naturally here during dry years. Fires often travel on top of standing water, consuming grass and trees that rise above the muck.In the past, young trees quickly sprouted after fires. But recently, some forests have failed to recover."There's almost no regeneration," Chris Moorman, a disturbance ecologist at North Carolina State University, said as we surveyed an expanse of dead, mostly branchless trees. He and Taillie said they think that wetlands like these have become too salty for young pond pines, which are more sensitive to salt than mature ones. They can't gain a foothold in marshes their own forebears could tolerate.Drought is predicted to become more frequent as the climate warms, Taillie said. That means wildfires, combined with intensified dry spells and amplified saltwater intrusion may, together, accelerate the formation of ghost forests independently of sea level rise.The synergy of fire and salt produces particularly dramatic ghost forests. Along the Chesapeake Bay, stands of trees might gradually thin near open water, until just a few scraggly pines remain. But in some places here, acre upon acre of dead trees, sun-bleached and occasionally fire-blackened, stand sentinel over bubbling marshes.Yet while the ghost forests may evoke graveyards, the salt marsh plants that advance into dead and dying stands of trees are themselves valuable. Marshes provide homes for birds; they serve as nurseries for young fish and other sea creatures.And as the sea advances, the new marshes also provide a momentary buffer against the rising tide -- protecting the forests whose time has not yet come.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company

    Up and down the mid-Atlantic coast, sea levels are rising rapidly, creating stands of dead trees -- often bleached, sometimes blackened -- known as ghost forests.The water is gaining as much as 5 millimeters per year in some places, well above the global average of 3.1 millimeters, driven by profound environmental shifts that include climate change.Increasingly powerful storms, a consequence of a warming world, push seawater inland. More intense dry spells reduce freshwater flowing outward. Adding to the peril, in some places the land is naturally sinking.All of this allows seawater to claim new territory, killing trees from the roots up.Rising seas often conjure the threat to faraway, low-lying nations or island-states. But to understand the immediate consequences of some of the most rapid sea-level rise anywhere in the world, stand among the scraggly, dying pines of Dorchester County along the Maryland coast.Chesapeake Bay's Migrating MarshesPeople living on the eastern shore of Chesapeake Bay, the country's largest estuary system, have a front-row view of the sea's rapid advance, said Keryn Gedan, a wetland ecologist at George Washington University.Part of the reason for the quickly rising waters may be that the Gulf Stream, which flows northward up the coast, is slowing down as meltwater from Greenland inhibits its flow. That is causing what some scientists describe as a pileup of water along the East Coast, elevating sea levels locally.The effects of climate change are also exacerbated by land that is sinking as a result of geological processes triggered by the end of the last ice age.Because of the extraordinary speed at which the water is rising here, Gedan said, "I think of this area as a window into the future for the rest of the world."In Dorchester County, where dead and dying loblolly pines stand forlornly, Gedan has learned to "read" these forests from the mix of species present.As saltwater moves into the ground, oak and other sensitive hardwoods die first. Loblolly pine, the most salt-tolerant, is often the last tree standing until it, too, is overwhelmed.Then the saltwater marsh plants move in. If you're lucky, velvety tufts of cordgrass sprout. If not, impenetrable stands of cane-like Phragmites, an invasive species, take over.One reason the effects of rising seas are so noticeable here is that the land has very little slope. Those 5 millimeters of sea level, a rise that's only slightly more than two half-dollar coins stacked, can translate into saltwater pushing 15 feet inland per year, according to Gedan.Shoots of sweet gum, a tree with star-shaped leaves and bark like alligator skin, have more tolerance for salt than other hardwoods, such as oak. They can endure for a time as groundwater becomes more saline.But eventually, the sweet gum dies as well.The Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, where Gedan does research, lost 3,000 acres of forest and agricultural land between 1938 and 2006. More than 5,000 acres of marsh became open water.At first, this trend depressed Matt Whitbeck, a biologist with the Fish and Wildlife Service who works at the refuge. Saltwater marshes are important nurseries for the fish and crabs people like to eat.But in 2012, he realized the marsh wasn't entirely disappearing; it was migrating. Some of the 3,000 acres of forest that the refuge had lost had transformed into saltwater marsh.His outlook changed. "We need to think about where the marsh is moving, not where it is," he said.But in nearby Smithville, a historically African American town, this movement poses an existential threat. Backyards have been gobbled up by advancing marsh, basketball courts overgrown. What were once thick stands of pine near the water's edge have greatly thinned. The marsh now menaces a graveyard.Residents have battled the advancing wetlands for years, said Roslyn Watts, 60, who grew up here. All that time, she and her neighbors thought the inexorable advance was simply the price of living near water's edge.But in 2010, she learned about global warming and sea level rise, she said. She understood that what was happening wasn't entirely natural."I was angry," she said, and particularly incensed by the idea that retreat was the only workable strategy. The Dutch didn't retreat, she said. They built dikes. Why couldn't Smithville?"These families have been here since at least the late 19th century," she said. "There's a connection to the land."But Smithville, small and with few resources, has little money to adapt.Further south in Somerset County, numerous "for sale" signs stand in front of houses along the back roads. Some are abandoned, their yards overgrown by Phragmites. On Deal Island, ditches once dug to drain the land for farming and to help manage flooding from high tides now stand full of stagnant water.Today, in fact, these ditches are part of the threat: Instead of draining water out to sea, they can accelerate the movement of saltwater inland, said Kate Tully, an agroecologist at the University of Maryland.In general, saltwater can seep into the soil before sea level rise becomes obvious in other ways, killing sensitive plants far from the shore. "We call it the invisible flood, because you can't really see it," she said.Elizabeth van Dolah, an anthropologist at the University of Maryland who works with rural communities along the eastern shore, noted that residents here are accustomed to marsh migration and flooding. "But they're probably seeing it happening at a much quicker pace than in the past," she said. "Many of them recognize that, yes, they eventually have to leave. But for the time being, they intend to stay in place."Bob Fitzgerald, 80, has farmed near the town Princess Anne his whole life. Driving the back roads in his four-seater pickup, he pointed out fields that, just five years ago, grew corn but have since become too salty for crops."You can't give property away down here," he said.The asphalt roads are occasionally tinted red along the edges. That, too, is an effect of the floodwater "overtopping" the roads, Fitzgerald said."People who have built their homes here are damn fools," he said, speaking near a place where pine trees appear to be dying around a house. "It should have been abandoned."As the years pass, he said, it will be.'Cedar Cemeteries' in New JerseyFor 33 years, Ken Able has walked the same causeway almost daily at the Rutgers University Marine Field Station in Tuckerton, New Jersey. In that time he has seen marsh become open water, and the fish population transform as cooler-water species decline and those that thrive in warmer waters move in.Blue crab and summer flounder, both saltwater species, have pushed into freshwater rivers. Their arrival suggests the waterways are becoming saltier further inland.All these signs of change come from the ocean, a fluid and often fickle environment. Which is why Able, a professor emeritus of marine and coastal sciences, so appreciates the ghost forests. They're a signal of change from a stationary source: the trees themselves."A ghost forest is a way to capture geological history," he said. "There's not always a way to do that."The Atlantic white cedar, abundant around the Mullica River Estuary in stands such as this one, is an unusually durable parchment on which to capture that history.Long prized for lumber, its wood is highly resistant to rot. But the tree is also very sensitive to salt. It can tolerate maybe three salty high tides before succumbing.So when the trees begin dying, it's a trustworthy indicator that conditions are becoming more saline. It is an age-old phenomenon, now happening faster.Erosion of marshes and riverbanks has also accelerated, revealing buried cedar stumps from prehistoric ghost forests. Jennifer Walker, a frequent collaborator with Able who recently earned her Ph.D. in oceanography at Rutgers, dated one stump here to the fifth century. "Cedar cemeteries," she calls these places.As elsewhere, ghost forest formation seems to have sped up recently, particularly after Hurricane Sandy hit the region in 2012. "It's a good example of a slowly encroaching process -- and then storms making it worse," Walker said.She is studying sediment cores from salt marshes and dating ancient, dead cedars in order to reconstruct sea level rise and ghost forest formation through time.The pace of sea level rise first quickened in the late 19th century after the Industrial Revolution, Walker said, and then sped up again in recent decades. It's now rising faster than at any point in the past several thousand years.Much of the Mullica River Estuary is a nature preserve, its many tributaries remote and undeveloped. But since 2015, Able and Walker have taken a series of helicopter rides over the area. "It's not one giant ghost forest," Walker said. "But the more you look, the more you find them."From above, they've seen swaths of dead trees along riverbanks many miles from the open ocean, suggesting that Sandy pushed seawater far up the river system."You get a slug of saltwater," Able said, "and things die."On the North Carolina Coast, Fires and SaltPaul Taillie, a Ph.D. student at North Carolina State University, encountered a mystery: He wanted to know how quickly ghost forests form. So he repeated a study originally done 15 years earlier to see how plant life had changed over time.As expected, saltwater marsh had advanced. Pond pine and other salt-sensitive trees were dying. Salt-tolerant plants, including saw grass and black needle rush, were moving in.But unexpectedly, the change wasn't occurring evenly across the landscape. Trees were dying faster in some places than others.What could explain this uneven emergence of ghost forests?The study area had almost no slope -- much of it was just inches above sea level -- and the minor differences in elevation couldn't explain the variation.But a clue came from the soil. It tended to be saltier where trees were dying fastest.The explanation Taillie, who's now a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Florida, landed on had to do with drought. When droughts hit, the amount of freshwater emptying into the ocean from nearby rivers declines, making nearshore waters saltier in some places.That saltier water then pushes inland unevenly, killing trees in an irregular pattern across an otherwise mostly uniform landscape. "It's not just rising sea level" that creates ghost forests, Tallie said, but periods of dryness."It's more during times of drought, when you have less freshwater, that the saltwater creeps in," he said. "Salinity goes up."Wildfires are another accelerant.Wetlands burn naturally here during dry years. Fires often travel on top of standing water, consuming grass and trees that rise above the muck.In the past, young trees quickly sprouted after fires. But recently, some forests have failed to recover."There's almost no regeneration," Chris Moorman, a disturbance ecologist at North Carolina State University, said as we surveyed an expanse of dead, mostly branchless trees. He and Taillie said they think that wetlands like these have become too salty for young pond pines, which are more sensitive to salt than mature ones. They can't gain a foothold in marshes their own forebears could tolerate.Drought is predicted to become more frequent as the climate warms, Taillie said. That means wildfires, combined with intensified dry spells and amplified saltwater intrusion may, together, accelerate the formation of ghost forests independently of sea level rise.The synergy of fire and salt produces particularly dramatic ghost forests. Along the Chesapeake Bay, stands of trees might gradually thin near open water, until just a few scraggly pines remain. But in some places here, acre upon acre of dead trees, sun-bleached and occasionally fire-blackened, stand sentinel over bubbling marshes.Yet while the ghost forests may evoke graveyards, the salt marsh plants that advance into dead and dying stands of trees are themselves valuable. Marshes provide homes for birds; they serve as nurseries for young fish and other sea creatures.And as the sea advances, the new marshes also provide a momentary buffer against the rising tide -- protecting the forests whose time has not yet come.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company


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  • 53/79   Nobel prize honors breakthroughs on lithium-ion batteries
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    If you're reading this on a cellphone or laptop computer, you might thank the three winners of this year's Nobel Prize in chemistry for their work on lithium-ion batteries.  Batteries that economically store energy from renewable sources like the wind and sun open up new possibilities to curb global warming.  'This is a highly charged story of tremendous potential,' quipped Olof Ramstrom of the Nobel committee for chemistry.

    If you're reading this on a cellphone or laptop computer, you might thank the three winners of this year's Nobel Prize in chemistry for their work on lithium-ion batteries. Batteries that economically store energy from renewable sources like the wind and sun open up new possibilities to curb global warming. 'This is a highly charged story of tremendous potential,' quipped Olof Ramstrom of the Nobel committee for chemistry.


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  • 54/79   A winner of this year's Nobel prize in physics is convinced we'll detect alien life in 100 years. Here are 13 reasons why we haven't made contact yet.
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    A Nobel prize-winner thinks we'll detect aliens within 100 years, possibly sooner. Other scientists think we might never make contact.

    A Nobel prize-winner thinks we'll detect aliens within 100 years, possibly sooner. Other scientists think we might never make contact.


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  • 55/79   Is vaping safer than smoking? Depends who you ask, and what scientific study they point to
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The claim is central to electronic cigarettes' future, and is under scrutiny as cases of vaping-related lung injuries rise with at least 18 dead.

    The claim is central to electronic cigarettes' future, and is under scrutiny as cases of vaping-related lung injuries rise with at least 18 dead.


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  • 56/79   Top DJ Fatboy Slim pays homage to 'right now' Greta Thunberg
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    British superstar DJ Fatboy Slim paid tribute to teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg by performing a remix of his hit song 'Right Here, Right Now', using samples from her dramatic UN speech.  The 56-year-old artist played the mash-up, made by South African electronic artist David Scott, at a show in Gateshead, northeast England, last Friday, with a video clip of the performance recently going viral on social media.  The remix samples Thunberg's demands for action against climate change in her fiery speech at the United Nations last month to be taken 'right here, right now', using it during each refrain of the song's title.

    British superstar DJ Fatboy Slim paid tribute to teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg by performing a remix of his hit song 'Right Here, Right Now', using samples from her dramatic UN speech. The 56-year-old artist played the mash-up, made by South African electronic artist David Scott, at a show in Gateshead, northeast England, last Friday, with a video clip of the performance recently going viral on social media. The remix samples Thunberg's demands for action against climate change in her fiery speech at the United Nations last month to be taken 'right here, right now', using it during each refrain of the song's title.


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  • 57/79   Before Nobels: Gifts to and From Rich Patrons Were Early Science’s Currency
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Collaborative scientific societies, beginning in the mid-17th century, distanced rewards from the whims and demands of individual patrons.

    Collaborative scientific societies, beginning in the mid-17th century, distanced rewards from the whims and demands of individual patrons.


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  • 58/79   A new study reveals how the last woolly mammoths died out 4,000 years ago. That's after the Egyptians had built the pyramids.
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The last of the woolly mammoths died on an Arctic island 4,000 years ago, meaning these animals went extinct much later than scientists once thought.

    The last of the woolly mammoths died on an Arctic island 4,000 years ago, meaning these animals went extinct much later than scientists once thought.


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  • 59/79   Astronauts just printed meat in space for the first time — and it could change the way we grow food on Earth
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    A spacecraft with vials of cow cells landed at the International Space Station in September. From there, cosmonauts fed the vials into a 3D printer.

    A spacecraft with vials of cow cells landed at the International Space Station in September. From there, cosmonauts fed the vials into a 3D printer.


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  • 60/79   US moves 2 British IS members known as 'Beatles' from Syria
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Two British militants believed to be part of an Islamic State group that beheaded hostages and was known as 'The Beatles' have been moved out of a detention center in Syria and are in American custody, U.S. officials said Wednesday.  President Donald Trump said earlier Wednesday that the U.S. has moved some of the Islamic State prisoners amid fears some could escape custody as Turkey invades northeast Syria.  In 2014 and 2015, the militants held more than 20 Western hostages in Syria and tortured many of them.

    Two British militants believed to be part of an Islamic State group that beheaded hostages and was known as 'The Beatles' have been moved out of a detention center in Syria and are in American custody, U.S. officials said Wednesday. President Donald Trump said earlier Wednesday that the U.S. has moved some of the Islamic State prisoners amid fears some could escape custody as Turkey invades northeast Syria. In 2014 and 2015, the militants held more than 20 Western hostages in Syria and tortured many of them.


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  • 61/79   Turkey begins offensive against Kurdish fighters in Syria
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Turkey launched airstrikes, fired artillery and began a ground offensive against Kurdish fighters in northern Syria on Wednesday after U.S. troops pulled back from the area, paving the way for an assault on forces that have long been allied with the United States.  Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan announced the start of the campaign, which followed the abrupt decision Sunday by U.S. President Donald Trump to essentially abandon the Syrian Kurdish fighters, leaving them vulnerable to a Turkish offensive that was widely condemned around the world.  It also marked a stark change in rhetoric by Trump, who during a press conference in New York last year vowed to stand by the Kurds, who have been America's only allies in Syria fighting the Islamic State group .

    Turkey launched airstrikes, fired artillery and began a ground offensive against Kurdish fighters in northern Syria on Wednesday after U.S. troops pulled back from the area, paving the way for an assault on forces that have long been allied with the United States. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan announced the start of the campaign, which followed the abrupt decision Sunday by U.S. President Donald Trump to essentially abandon the Syrian Kurdish fighters, leaving them vulnerable to a Turkish offensive that was widely condemned around the world. It also marked a stark change in rhetoric by Trump, who during a press conference in New York last year vowed to stand by the Kurds, who have been America's only allies in Syria fighting the Islamic State group .


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  • 62/79   The Latest: US takes 2 militants tied to beheadings in Syria
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    U.S. officials say two captive British militants believed to be part of an Islamic State group that beheaded hostages have been taken into American custody and moved out of Syria.  President Donald Trump said earlier Wednesday that the U.S. had transferred some Islamic State prisoners amid fears they could escape custody as Turkish troops invade northeastern Syria.  Officials say they took El Shafee Elsheikh and Alexanda Amon Kotey out of Syria to an undisclosed location.

    U.S. officials say two captive British militants believed to be part of an Islamic State group that beheaded hostages have been taken into American custody and moved out of Syria. President Donald Trump said earlier Wednesday that the U.S. had transferred some Islamic State prisoners amid fears they could escape custody as Turkish troops invade northeastern Syria. Officials say they took El Shafee Elsheikh and Alexanda Amon Kotey out of Syria to an undisclosed location.


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  • 63/79   Bipartisan Senate bill would halt arms sales to Turkey
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    A bipartisan Senate bill would halt U.S. military assistance to NATO ally Turkey and clamp sanctions on the U.S. assets of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan because of his country's invasion Wednesday of northern Syria.  The measure effectively rebukes President Donald Trump's abrupt decision to pull U.S. troops from the region.  Soon after their withdrawal, Erdogan commenced air and ground assaults on Syrian Kurdish fighters who've been helping the U.S. battle Islamic State extremists there, which numerous lawmakers and others had warned would happen.

    A bipartisan Senate bill would halt U.S. military assistance to NATO ally Turkey and clamp sanctions on the U.S. assets of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan because of his country's invasion Wednesday of northern Syria. The measure effectively rebukes President Donald Trump's abrupt decision to pull U.S. troops from the region. Soon after their withdrawal, Erdogan commenced air and ground assaults on Syrian Kurdish fighters who've been helping the U.S. battle Islamic State extremists there, which numerous lawmakers and others had warned would happen.


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  • 64/79   Analysis: Trump's Syria move gets quick, negative results
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The U.S. must escape the 'Endless Wars' in the Middle East, President Donald Trump repeatedly declares.  When on Wednesday Turkey attacked the Kurds, America's longtime battlefield allies, U.S. troops had evacuated from harm's way.  From Iran to North Korea, China, Iraq, Afghanistan and Venezuela, nearly all of Trump's foreign policy priorities remain works in progress nearly three years into his presidency.

    The U.S. must escape the 'Endless Wars' in the Middle East, President Donald Trump repeatedly declares. When on Wednesday Turkey attacked the Kurds, America's longtime battlefield allies, U.S. troops had evacuated from harm's way. From Iran to North Korea, China, Iraq, Afghanistan and Venezuela, nearly all of Trump's foreign policy priorities remain works in progress nearly three years into his presidency.


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  • 65/79   Turkey Launches Ground Incursion Into Syria as U.S. Stands Aside
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Turkey launched a military ground incursion into northeastern Syria to force U.S.-backed Kurdish militants controlling the border area away from the region, the Defense Ministry said, after President Donald Trump ordered U.S. forces to stand aside.Turkish armored vehicles and tanks crossed into Syria after Turkish F-16s and artillery units targeted positions of Kurdish YPG militants earlier Wednesday. The Turkish military carried out the incursion together with allied Syrian rebels in an effort to seize areas to the south of the frontier towns.President Recep Tayyip Erdogan earlier announced the start of the operation, code-named “Peace Spring,” on Twitter and said it would also target Islamic State. Russia, Iran and some top European officials urged Turkey to act with restraint. The conflict has sparked concerns that renewed chaos in Syria could lead to a jihadist resurgence and push the Kurds -- America’s allies in the fight against IS -- into the arms of President Bashar al-Assad.Turkey has battled Kurdish separatists for years and had repeatedly warned it would not allow the creation of a Kurdish proto-state on its immediate border. Once it seizes the area, Turkey plans to resettle 2 million Syrian refugees, most of them Arabs, in the border zone, further complicating a combustible situation.A small forward group of Turkish forces first entered Syria early Wednesday at two points close to the towns of Tal Abyad and Ras al-Ayn, according to a Turkish official, who spoke on condition of anonymity. Turkish planes and shells pounded the towns as the incursion began. Residents fled though Kurdish forces had vacated positions before the attack, which is expected to involve tens of thousands of soldiers backed by tanks and armored personnel carriers from NATO’s second-largest army.The Turkish lira weakened as the conflict started.Turkey’s advance followed a dramatic reversal of U.S. policy. Trump told Erdogan in a phone call on Sunday that dozens of American troops who’d been working closely with Kurdish forces in the fight against Islamic State would pull back, effectively clearing the way for a Turkish incursion.Asked by reporters Wednesday at the White House what he’d do if Erdogan wipes out the Kurds, Trump said: “I will wipe out his economy if that happens,” adding that he hopes the Turkish leader “will act rationally.”Trump’s announcement Sunday appeared to surprise allies at home and abroad. Republican Senator Lindsey Graham, normally a staunch Trump ally on Capitol Hill was among several Republicans angered by the move. He tweeted Wednesday: “Pray for our Kurdish allies who have been shamelessly abandoned by the Trump Administration. This move ensures the reemergence of ISIS.”Graham also introduced a bipartisan measure, with Chris Van Hollen, a Maryland Democrat, that would trigger sanctions unless the Trump administration “certifies to Congress -- every 90 days” that Turkey is not operating in Syrian territoryThe Kurdish-led SDF said they would defend their “own people,” potentially relegating the battle against Islamic State.The Kurdish YPG militia that forms the backbone of the SDF has been one of America’s closest partners in the fight against Islamic State and is holding thousands of jihadist fighters and their families in camps and detention centers in northeastern Syria.The head of the SDF, Mazloum Abdi, wrote Trump on Wednesday and implored him to intervene.“We still hope that you will prevent the coming catastrophe against the Kurdish people and other peoples in the region as a result of the Turkish invasion,” Abdi wrote in the letter, which praised earlier cooperation between the SDF and U.S. forces.While Trump said Turkey would become responsible for the detainees, who include foreign fighters from Europe, it was not clear if there was a mechanism in place to transfer them to Turkish custody. Trump was criticized at home for a decision that could see Islamic State fighters escape or regroup.Analysts said a U.S. pullback could ultimately play into the hands of Russia, whose military intervention helped turn the tide of the Syrian civil war in favor of Assad. As the Turkish offensive got underway, the Associated Press reported that the YPG had asked Russia to mediate talks between them and the Assad government.Trump Whipsaws on Turkey as Threat Follows Green Light on SyriaTurkey sees the YPG as a threat due to its link to the separatist PKK, another Kurdish group the Turkish government been battling for decades. It’s considered a terrorist organization by the U.S. and the European Union.Its offensive into northern Syria first aims to surround towns in a strip of border territory, before pushing further south in an effort to dismantle any chance of a Kurdish state emerging on its doorstep, according to two Turkish officials, who requested anonymity to discuss sensitive military planning.Trump’s Confounding Syria Moves Again Spur Policy ConfusionThe first targets will be the Syrian towns of Kobani, Tal Abyad and Ras al-Ayn, all held by the YPG and located along the former Berlin-Baghdad railway that for hundreds of miles forms the frontier with Turkey, according to the officials.The military aims to penetrate at least 30 kilometers (19 miles) deep into Syrian territory and secure the M-4 highway that runs parallel to the frontier all the way to Iraq in the east, they said. Erdogan was keen to act before winter set in and made it difficult for tanks to operate in muddy terrain.“What aggravates the operational risks is the deep-running mistrust between Turkey and the U.S.,” said Nihat Ali Ozcan, a strategist at the Economic Policy Research Foundation in Ankara. “Turkey is very much worried about whether the U.S. will share intelligence with the YPG over Turkish troop positions to help them defend themselves.”Who Are the Syrian Kurds the U.S. Is Abandoning?: QuickTakeTurkish commanders expect to be confronted by a sophisticated foe after the battle-hardened YPG were armed by the U.S. and other Western militaries to help fight Islamic State, they said. Erdogan has chastised Washington for backing the Kurds, but he only pushed ahead with the operation after Trump reversed years of U.S. policy.“YPG militants have two options: They can defect or we will have to stop them from disrupting our counter-ISIS efforts,” Fahrettin Altun, Erdogan’s chief of communications, wrote on Twitter early Wednesday.(Updates with Graham introducing measure, in paragraph.)\--With assistance from Lin Noueihed, Taylan Bilgic, Glen Carey and Tony Capaccio.To contact the reporters on this story: Onur Ant in Istanbul at oant@bloomberg.net;Selcan Hacaoglu in Ankara at shacaoglu@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Onur Ant at oant@bloomberg.net, ;Lin Noueihed at lnoueihed@bloomberg.net, ;Alex Wayne at awayne3@bloomberg.net, Joshua Gallu, Bill FariesFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Turkey launched a military ground incursion into northeastern Syria to force U.S.-backed Kurdish militants controlling the border area away from the region, the Defense Ministry said, after President Donald Trump ordered U.S. forces to stand aside.Turkish armored vehicles and tanks crossed into Syria after Turkish F-16s and artillery units targeted positions of Kurdish YPG militants earlier Wednesday. The Turkish military carried out the incursion together with allied Syrian rebels in an effort to seize areas to the south of the frontier towns.President Recep Tayyip Erdogan earlier announced the start of the operation, code-named “Peace Spring,” on Twitter and said it would also target Islamic State. Russia, Iran and some top European officials urged Turkey to act with restraint. The conflict has sparked concerns that renewed chaos in Syria could lead to a jihadist resurgence and push the Kurds -- America’s allies in the fight against IS -- into the arms of President Bashar al-Assad.Turkey has battled Kurdish separatists for years and had repeatedly warned it would not allow the creation of a Kurdish proto-state on its immediate border. Once it seizes the area, Turkey plans to resettle 2 million Syrian refugees, most of them Arabs, in the border zone, further complicating a combustible situation.A small forward group of Turkish forces first entered Syria early Wednesday at two points close to the towns of Tal Abyad and Ras al-Ayn, according to a Turkish official, who spoke on condition of anonymity. Turkish planes and shells pounded the towns as the incursion began. Residents fled though Kurdish forces had vacated positions before the attack, which is expected to involve tens of thousands of soldiers backed by tanks and armored personnel carriers from NATO’s second-largest army.The Turkish lira weakened as the conflict started.Turkey’s advance followed a dramatic reversal of U.S. policy. Trump told Erdogan in a phone call on Sunday that dozens of American troops who’d been working closely with Kurdish forces in the fight against Islamic State would pull back, effectively clearing the way for a Turkish incursion.Asked by reporters Wednesday at the White House what he’d do if Erdogan wipes out the Kurds, Trump said: “I will wipe out his economy if that happens,” adding that he hopes the Turkish leader “will act rationally.”Trump’s announcement Sunday appeared to surprise allies at home and abroad. Republican Senator Lindsey Graham, normally a staunch Trump ally on Capitol Hill was among several Republicans angered by the move. He tweeted Wednesday: “Pray for our Kurdish allies who have been shamelessly abandoned by the Trump Administration. This move ensures the reemergence of ISIS.”Graham also introduced a bipartisan measure, with Chris Van Hollen, a Maryland Democrat, that would trigger sanctions unless the Trump administration “certifies to Congress -- every 90 days” that Turkey is not operating in Syrian territoryThe Kurdish-led SDF said they would defend their “own people,” potentially relegating the battle against Islamic State.The Kurdish YPG militia that forms the backbone of the SDF has been one of America’s closest partners in the fight against Islamic State and is holding thousands of jihadist fighters and their families in camps and detention centers in northeastern Syria.The head of the SDF, Mazloum Abdi, wrote Trump on Wednesday and implored him to intervene.“We still hope that you will prevent the coming catastrophe against the Kurdish people and other peoples in the region as a result of the Turkish invasion,” Abdi wrote in the letter, which praised earlier cooperation between the SDF and U.S. forces.While Trump said Turkey would become responsible for the detainees, who include foreign fighters from Europe, it was not clear if there was a mechanism in place to transfer them to Turkish custody. Trump was criticized at home for a decision that could see Islamic State fighters escape or regroup.Analysts said a U.S. pullback could ultimately play into the hands of Russia, whose military intervention helped turn the tide of the Syrian civil war in favor of Assad. As the Turkish offensive got underway, the Associated Press reported that the YPG had asked Russia to mediate talks between them and the Assad government.Trump Whipsaws on Turkey as Threat Follows Green Light on SyriaTurkey sees the YPG as a threat due to its link to the separatist PKK, another Kurdish group the Turkish government been battling for decades. It’s considered a terrorist organization by the U.S. and the European Union.Its offensive into northern Syria first aims to surround towns in a strip of border territory, before pushing further south in an effort to dismantle any chance of a Kurdish state emerging on its doorstep, according to two Turkish officials, who requested anonymity to discuss sensitive military planning.Trump’s Confounding Syria Moves Again Spur Policy ConfusionThe first targets will be the Syrian towns of Kobani, Tal Abyad and Ras al-Ayn, all held by the YPG and located along the former Berlin-Baghdad railway that for hundreds of miles forms the frontier with Turkey, according to the officials.The military aims to penetrate at least 30 kilometers (19 miles) deep into Syrian territory and secure the M-4 highway that runs parallel to the frontier all the way to Iraq in the east, they said. Erdogan was keen to act before winter set in and made it difficult for tanks to operate in muddy terrain.“What aggravates the operational risks is the deep-running mistrust between Turkey and the U.S.,” said Nihat Ali Ozcan, a strategist at the Economic Policy Research Foundation in Ankara. “Turkey is very much worried about whether the U.S. will share intelligence with the YPG over Turkish troop positions to help them defend themselves.”Who Are the Syrian Kurds the U.S. Is Abandoning?: QuickTakeTurkish commanders expect to be confronted by a sophisticated foe after the battle-hardened YPG were armed by the U.S. and other Western militaries to help fight Islamic State, they said. Erdogan has chastised Washington for backing the Kurds, but he only pushed ahead with the operation after Trump reversed years of U.S. policy.“YPG militants have two options: They can defect or we will have to stop them from disrupting our counter-ISIS efforts,” Fahrettin Altun, Erdogan’s chief of communications, wrote on Twitter early Wednesday.(Updates with Graham introducing measure, in paragraph.)\--With assistance from Lin Noueihed, Taylan Bilgic, Glen Carey and Tony Capaccio.To contact the reporters on this story: Onur Ant in Istanbul at oant@bloomberg.net;Selcan Hacaoglu in Ankara at shacaoglu@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Onur Ant at oant@bloomberg.net, ;Lin Noueihed at lnoueihed@bloomberg.net, ;Alex Wayne at awayne3@bloomberg.net, Joshua Gallu, Bill FariesFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 66/79   Shooting latest indication of increasing anti-Semitism
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The shooting that left two dead and several injured in Halle, Germany, on Wednesday — when Jews celebrated Yom Kippur, the holiest day of the year for their faith — has shined a spotlight on the worldwide rise of anti-Semitic incidents.  The attack in Germany, where investigators are pursuing anti-Semitic motives after the assailant reportedly shot at the door of a synagogue in an attempt to gain entry, drew swift condemnation from United Nations Secretary General António Guterres and renewed calls from Jewish groups in the U.S. to step up cooperation in combating anti-Semitism.  'We have been saying for several years that anti-Semitism is real, it's resurgent, it's lethal and it's multi-sourced,' American Jewish Committee CEO David Harris said in an interview.

    The shooting that left two dead and several injured in Halle, Germany, on Wednesday — when Jews celebrated Yom Kippur, the holiest day of the year for their faith — has shined a spotlight on the worldwide rise of anti-Semitic incidents. The attack in Germany, where investigators are pursuing anti-Semitic motives after the assailant reportedly shot at the door of a synagogue in an attempt to gain entry, drew swift condemnation from United Nations Secretary General António Guterres and renewed calls from Jewish groups in the U.S. to step up cooperation in combating anti-Semitism. 'We have been saying for several years that anti-Semitism is real, it's resurgent, it's lethal and it's multi-sourced,' American Jewish Committee CEO David Harris said in an interview.


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  • 67/79   Merkel joins solidarity vigil at synagogue after Halle shooting
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Chancellor Angela Merkel joined people gathered at Berlin's main synagogue late Wednesday for a silent vigil, showing solidarity with the victims of a deadly gun attack in Halle and saying 'no to antisemitism'.  Offering words of encouragement for New Synagogue rabbi Gesa Ederberg on a Yom Kippur holiday tainted by violence, Merkel said: 'Unfortunately, on your holy day today, we've witnessed something horrible.

    Chancellor Angela Merkel joined people gathered at Berlin's main synagogue late Wednesday for a silent vigil, showing solidarity with the victims of a deadly gun attack in Halle and saying 'no to antisemitism'. Offering words of encouragement for New Synagogue rabbi Gesa Ederberg on a Yom Kippur holiday tainted by violence, Merkel said: 'Unfortunately, on your holy day today, we've witnessed something horrible.


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  • 68/79   2 dead in attack targeting German synagogue on Yom Kippur
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    A heavily armed assailant ranting about Jews tried to force his way into a synagogue in Germany on Yom Kippur, Judaism's holiest day, then shot two people to death nearby in an attack Wednesday that was livestreamed on a popular gaming site.  The attacker shot at the door of the synagogue in the eastern city of Halle but did not get in as 70 to 80 people inside were observing the holy day.  The gunman shouted that Jews were 'the root' of 'problems' such as feminism and 'mass immigration,' according to a group that tracks online extremism.

    A heavily armed assailant ranting about Jews tried to force his way into a synagogue in Germany on Yom Kippur, Judaism's holiest day, then shot two people to death nearby in an attack Wednesday that was livestreamed on a popular gaming site. The attacker shot at the door of the synagogue in the eastern city of Halle but did not get in as 70 to 80 people inside were observing the holy day. The gunman shouted that Jews were 'the root' of 'problems' such as feminism and 'mass immigration,' according to a group that tracks online extremism.


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  • 69/79   'Mr. Kurd' says Trump has abandoned US allies in Middle East
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Mr. Kurd feels betrayed. A year ago, Kurdish journalist Rahim Rashidi stood up at a news conference and listened to President Donald Trump praise his people. Trump professed respect for the "great" U.S. allies, even inadvertently giving Rashidi the nickname "Mr. Kurd" as he called on him to ask a question.

    Mr. Kurd feels betrayed. A year ago, Kurdish journalist Rahim Rashidi stood up at a news conference and listened to President Donald Trump praise his people. Trump professed respect for the "great" U.S. allies, even inadvertently giving Rashidi the nickname "Mr. Kurd" as he called on him to ask a question.


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  • 70/79   Brown-Bag Lunches for Kids With Food Allergies
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...


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  • 71/79   What to Feed Your Family When the Power Goes Out
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...


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  • 72/79   Try These Healthy Snack Ideas for Kids
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...

    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...


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  • 73/79   The 9 Best Jobs for Teachers To Make Some Cash During the Summer Break
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.


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  • 74/79   How to Spot and Avoid Algal Blooms
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...


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  • 75/79   Get These 4 Vaccines for College
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If your child is a college student—or soon to be one—making sure he or she is fully vaccinated is critically important, especially for those who will be living in a dorm or other shared space. Th...

    If your child is a college student—or soon to be one—making sure he or she is fully vaccinated is critically important, especially for those who will be living in a dorm or other shared space. Th...


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  • 76/79   DNA detectives: New tech can mean a diagnosis for your child, but not a lot of answers
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Four-year-old Eli Kadkhoda is one of a handful of children with IRF2BPL-related condition, named after the gene to which it is linked. Its patients are all healthy at birth, stumbling and losing speech by kindergarten, wheelchair-dependent soon after.

    Four-year-old Eli Kadkhoda is one of a handful of children with IRF2BPL-related condition, named after the gene to which it is linked. Its patients are all healthy at birth, stumbling and losing speech by kindergarten, wheelchair-dependent soon after.


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  • 77/79   Will Your Health Insurance Cover You Overseas?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you’re traveling abroad this summer, the last thing you probably want to think about is what you’ll do if you get sick or injured. But experts say 15 percent of travelers encounter some kind o...

    If you’re traveling abroad this summer, the last thing you probably want to think about is what you’ll do if you get sick or injured. But experts say 15 percent of travelers encounter some kind o...


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  • 78/79   9 Easy Ways to Make Your Jack-o'-Lanterns Last Longer
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    A little bleach goes a long way.

    A little bleach goes a long way.


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  • 79/79   Don't Forget These Vaccines When You Travel
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you're planning a summer trip overseas, you may be preoccupied with booking airfare and finding lodging, but certain destinations require an extra step of planning: travel vaccines. You might...

    If you're planning a summer trip overseas, you may be preoccupied with booking airfare and finding lodging, but certain destinations require an extra step of planning: travel vaccines. You might...


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