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News Slideshows (10/10/2019 15 hours)


  • 1/79   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


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    Press Review


    Peter Handke   51% of Americans   Errol Spence Jr.   Happy Friday Eve   Hurricane Michael   Moraga   John Edwards   All Dat   The House Can Play Hardball   Rondo and KCP   2 ISIS   myles powell   Taurean Prince   Día Mundial de la Salud Mental   Caris LeVert   Goffin   For His   Sanders Ranch   
  • 2/79   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


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  • 3/79   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


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  • 4/79   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


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  • 5/79   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


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  • 6/79   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


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  • 7/79   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


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  • 8/79   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


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  • 9/79   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


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  • 10/79   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


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  • 11/79   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


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  • 12/79   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


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  • 13/79   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


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  • 14/79   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named.  Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does.  At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


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  • 15/79   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


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  • 16/79   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


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  • 17/79   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


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  • 18/79   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


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  • 19/79   U.S. Consumer Prices Trail Forecasts as Used-Car Costs Drop
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- A key measure of U.S. consumer prices rose by less than expected in September as used-car costs fell by the most in a year, potentially bolstering the case for the Federal Reserve to cut interest rates for the third time in three months.The core consumer price index, which excludes food and energy, increased 0.1% from the prior month, a Labor Department report showed Thursday, below the median estimate of economists. The annual gain of 2.4% matched projections as well as the August increase. The broader CPI was unchanged on the month and up 1.7% annually, trailing projections.The subdued monthly reading could reinforce investor bets that the Fed will ease policy later in October as the global picture darkens and the trade war worsens. Officials favoring a reduction may see little risk that inflation will jump above the central bank’s price goal and a danger that trade tensions will persist for some time.Even so, additional tariffs could still pass through to prices paid by consumers. On Sept. 1 President Donald Trump initiated fees on about $112 billion in Chinese products and the Asian nation immediately retaliated. Chinese and American negotiators are holding face-to-face talks in Washington this week, with levies set to rise further barring any truce.A separate Labor Department report Thursday showed filings for unemployment benefits fell to a three-week low of 210,000, indicating that while job gains are slowing, layoffs and firings remain limited.Ten-year Treasury yields climbed to the day’s highs after the data, and as traders prepared for a 30-year bond auction later Thursday.Vehicle PricesThe weaker-than-expected CPI figures reflected a 1.6% monthly drop in used-car prices, while new vehicle costs fell 0.1% for the third straight decline. Apparel prices decreased 0.4%, the first drop since April.Other categories were firmer. Shelter, which makes up about a third of total CPI, rose 0.3% in September following a 0.2% gain. Owners-equivalent rent, one of the categories that tracks rental prices, increased 0.3%.The Labor Department’s CPI gauge tends to run faster than the Commerce Department’s personal consumption expenditures price index, the measure officially targeted by the Fed for 2% inflation. Policy makers look to the core PCE index for a better read on underlying price trends. That measure has shown signs of firming, increasing 1.8% annually in August, the most since January.On the CPI, energy prices fell 1.4% in September, the fourth drop in five months, as gasoline declined 2.4%. Food was up 0.1%, the first increase in four months.Prices for medical care rose 0.2%, the least since February, though components were mixed: physicians’ services costs increased, hospital services were unchanged and prescription drugs fell 0.5%.Health insurance prices rose 1.4% in September. In the prior month, the index for such costs surged by a record 1.9%, though it’s not directly based on prices paid by consumers; instead, it’s an indirect measure based on retained earnings, or what insurers have after paying out claims.Get MoreA separate Labor Department report Thursday showed average hourly earnings, adjusted for price changes, rose 1.2% in September from a year earlier, following 1.4% in August, as nominal wage gains cooled.An unofficial Social Security cost-of-living adjustment, based on Labor Department data, was 1.6%. That’s based on the annual change in a third-quarter measure of consumer prices.Economists surveyed by Bloomberg had forecast the core gauge would rise 0.2% from the prior month and 2.4% from a year earlier, with the broader index seen rising 0.1% monthly and 1.8% on a yearly basis. (Adds chart, market reaction.)\--With assistance from Jordan Yadoo, Sophie Caronello and Edward Bolingbroke.To contact the reporter on this story: Reade Pickert in Washington at epickert@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Scott Lanman at slanman@bloomberg.net, Vince GolleFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- A key measure of U.S. consumer prices rose by less than expected in September as used-car costs fell by the most in a year, potentially bolstering the case for the Federal Reserve to cut interest rates for the third time in three months.The core consumer price index, which excludes food and energy, increased 0.1% from the prior month, a Labor Department report showed Thursday, below the median estimate of economists. The annual gain of 2.4% matched projections as well as the August increase. The broader CPI was unchanged on the month and up 1.7% annually, trailing projections.The subdued monthly reading could reinforce investor bets that the Fed will ease policy later in October as the global picture darkens and the trade war worsens. Officials favoring a reduction may see little risk that inflation will jump above the central bank’s price goal and a danger that trade tensions will persist for some time.Even so, additional tariffs could still pass through to prices paid by consumers. On Sept. 1 President Donald Trump initiated fees on about $112 billion in Chinese products and the Asian nation immediately retaliated. Chinese and American negotiators are holding face-to-face talks in Washington this week, with levies set to rise further barring any truce.A separate Labor Department report Thursday showed filings for unemployment benefits fell to a three-week low of 210,000, indicating that while job gains are slowing, layoffs and firings remain limited.Ten-year Treasury yields climbed to the day’s highs after the data, and as traders prepared for a 30-year bond auction later Thursday.Vehicle PricesThe weaker-than-expected CPI figures reflected a 1.6% monthly drop in used-car prices, while new vehicle costs fell 0.1% for the third straight decline. Apparel prices decreased 0.4%, the first drop since April.Other categories were firmer. Shelter, which makes up about a third of total CPI, rose 0.3% in September following a 0.2% gain. Owners-equivalent rent, one of the categories that tracks rental prices, increased 0.3%.The Labor Department’s CPI gauge tends to run faster than the Commerce Department’s personal consumption expenditures price index, the measure officially targeted by the Fed for 2% inflation. Policy makers look to the core PCE index for a better read on underlying price trends. That measure has shown signs of firming, increasing 1.8% annually in August, the most since January.On the CPI, energy prices fell 1.4% in September, the fourth drop in five months, as gasoline declined 2.4%. Food was up 0.1%, the first increase in four months.Prices for medical care rose 0.2%, the least since February, though components were mixed: physicians’ services costs increased, hospital services were unchanged and prescription drugs fell 0.5%.Health insurance prices rose 1.4% in September. In the prior month, the index for such costs surged by a record 1.9%, though it’s not directly based on prices paid by consumers; instead, it’s an indirect measure based on retained earnings, or what insurers have after paying out claims.Get MoreA separate Labor Department report Thursday showed average hourly earnings, adjusted for price changes, rose 1.2% in September from a year earlier, following 1.4% in August, as nominal wage gains cooled.An unofficial Social Security cost-of-living adjustment, based on Labor Department data, was 1.6%. That’s based on the annual change in a third-quarter measure of consumer prices.Economists surveyed by Bloomberg had forecast the core gauge would rise 0.2% from the prior month and 2.4% from a year earlier, with the broader index seen rising 0.1% monthly and 1.8% on a yearly basis. (Adds chart, market reaction.)\--With assistance from Jordan Yadoo, Sophie Caronello and Edward Bolingbroke.To contact the reporter on this story: Reade Pickert in Washington at epickert@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Scott Lanman at slanman@bloomberg.net, Vince GolleFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 20/79   Some of 2019’s Wackiest Investment Predictions Are Coming True
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- When December arrives and trading is quiet, market strategists come up with their wildest predictions for the year ahead. Disclaimer: they don’t actually expect all of them to be right.But 2019 is proving to be bizarre for traders and some of those calls are actually coming true. Of the eight “financial-market surprises” published by Standard Chartered Plc, two have effectively materialized, while three more still remain possible.Coming True:The Federal Reserve cutting interest rates (Done so twice, with another one priced in)The European Central Bank restarting quantitative easing (By 20 billion euros per month from November)Still in Play:The U.S. and China reach an agreement to weaken the dollar (Officials looking at rolling out currency pact)The U.S. Treasury tries to sell 50-year bonds (May do so next year if there is appetite)The U.K. faces a hard Brexit and the pound falls to parity with the dollar (Talks still currently taking place, though optimism is sparse)Looking Unlikely:Hong Kong abandons its dollar currency peg (Traders including Hayman Capital Management’s Kyle Bass are betting unrest will spur capital flight, but it hasn’t happened)OPEC breaks up and Brent crude falls to $25 a barrel (Supply deficit is at its widest level in years)Japan monetizes the national debt, the yen climbs to 80 per dollar (JPMorgan sees the yen as the “only cheap recessionary hedge” remaining)Standard Chartered aren’t the only ones who had a punt. Saxo Bank A/S published their “10 Outrageous Predictions” for 2019 in December, including one that called a German recession. By most accounts, Europe’s largest economy may be in one already. There is no sign of some of the others -- including a solar flare creating chaos and a global transportation tax.Neither bank predicted a $17 trillion pile of negative-yielding debt -- bonds guaranteed to lose investors’ money if held to maturity -- a meltdown in the U.S. repo market, or a drone attack on a Saudi oil facility. But hey, you can’t get everything right.(Updates with latest on each of Standard Chartered’s scenarios.)To contact the reporter on this story: John Ainger in London at jainger@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Paul Dobson at pdobson2@bloomberg.net, Neil Chatterjee, Michael HunterFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- When December arrives and trading is quiet, market strategists come up with their wildest predictions for the year ahead. Disclaimer: they don’t actually expect all of them to be right.But 2019 is proving to be bizarre for traders and some of those calls are actually coming true. Of the eight “financial-market surprises” published by Standard Chartered Plc, two have effectively materialized, while three more still remain possible.Coming True:The Federal Reserve cutting interest rates (Done so twice, with another one priced in)The European Central Bank restarting quantitative easing (By 20 billion euros per month from November)Still in Play:The U.S. and China reach an agreement to weaken the dollar (Officials looking at rolling out currency pact)The U.S. Treasury tries to sell 50-year bonds (May do so next year if there is appetite)The U.K. faces a hard Brexit and the pound falls to parity with the dollar (Talks still currently taking place, though optimism is sparse)Looking Unlikely:Hong Kong abandons its dollar currency peg (Traders including Hayman Capital Management’s Kyle Bass are betting unrest will spur capital flight, but it hasn’t happened)OPEC breaks up and Brent crude falls to $25 a barrel (Supply deficit is at its widest level in years)Japan monetizes the national debt, the yen climbs to 80 per dollar (JPMorgan sees the yen as the “only cheap recessionary hedge” remaining)Standard Chartered aren’t the only ones who had a punt. Saxo Bank A/S published their “10 Outrageous Predictions” for 2019 in December, including one that called a German recession. By most accounts, Europe’s largest economy may be in one already. There is no sign of some of the others -- including a solar flare creating chaos and a global transportation tax.Neither bank predicted a $17 trillion pile of negative-yielding debt -- bonds guaranteed to lose investors’ money if held to maturity -- a meltdown in the U.S. repo market, or a drone attack on a Saudi oil facility. But hey, you can’t get everything right.(Updates with latest on each of Standard Chartered’s scenarios.)To contact the reporter on this story: John Ainger in London at jainger@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Paul Dobson at pdobson2@bloomberg.net, Neil Chatterjee, Michael HunterFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 21/79   Biden Campaign Sends Letter Scolding The NYTimes Over Coverage of Ukrainian Corruption Allegations
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Joe Biden's campaign sent a letter to the New York Times on Thursday criticizing the paper's coverage of corruption allegations against the former vice president and his son Hunter.On Wednesday the Times ran an op-ed by Peter Schweizer asserting that Biden's actions as vice president regarding Ukraine were legal, but should probably be outlawed in the future.Biden campaign spokeswoman Kate Bedingfield addressed Times executive editor Dean Baquet in the letter, "are you deliberately continuing policies that distort reality for the sake of controversy and the clicks that accompany it?""Despite voluminous work done by the independent press and fact-checkers…to refute the heinous conspiracy theory that Donald Trump attempted to bully Ukraine into propping-up for him, the paper ran an op-ed by…Peter Schweizer, making more malicious claims about the Biden family," Bedingfield continued.A Times spokesperson hit back at the Biden campaign, saying "Our coverage of the Biden campaign and Hunter Biden has been fair and accurate."Hunter Biden sat on the board of a Ukrainian natural gas company from 2014 to 2019 that had previously been under investigation by Ukraine's then-prosecutor general Victor Shokin, who had himself been accused of corruption. In 2016 Joe Biden pressured Ukraine to fire Shokin at the behest of U.S. and European Union officials, an action President Trump and his private lawyer Rudy Giuliani have condemned as a conflict of interest.Joe Biden has strenuously denied allegations of any wrongdoing.

    Joe Biden's campaign sent a letter to the New York Times on Thursday criticizing the paper's coverage of corruption allegations against the former vice president and his son Hunter.On Wednesday the Times ran an op-ed by Peter Schweizer asserting that Biden's actions as vice president regarding Ukraine were legal, but should probably be outlawed in the future.Biden campaign spokeswoman Kate Bedingfield addressed Times executive editor Dean Baquet in the letter, "are you deliberately continuing policies that distort reality for the sake of controversy and the clicks that accompany it?""Despite voluminous work done by the independent press and fact-checkers…to refute the heinous conspiracy theory that Donald Trump attempted to bully Ukraine into propping-up for him, the paper ran an op-ed by…Peter Schweizer, making more malicious claims about the Biden family," Bedingfield continued.A Times spokesperson hit back at the Biden campaign, saying "Our coverage of the Biden campaign and Hunter Biden has been fair and accurate."Hunter Biden sat on the board of a Ukrainian natural gas company from 2014 to 2019 that had previously been under investigation by Ukraine's then-prosecutor general Victor Shokin, who had himself been accused of corruption. In 2016 Joe Biden pressured Ukraine to fire Shokin at the behest of U.S. and European Union officials, an action President Trump and his private lawyer Rudy Giuliani have condemned as a conflict of interest.Joe Biden has strenuously denied allegations of any wrongdoing.


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  • 22/79   The Latest: French nominee for EU Commission is rejected
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    France's nominee for the next European Commission has been rejected by EU lawmakers assessing whether she was fit for the job.  Sylvie Goulard, a close ally of French president Emmanuel Macron, had been nominated by incoming European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen to a job overseeing Europe's internal market, industry and defense.

    France's nominee for the next European Commission has been rejected by EU lawmakers assessing whether she was fit for the job. Sylvie Goulard, a close ally of French president Emmanuel Macron, had been nominated by incoming European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen to a job overseeing Europe's internal market, industry and defense.


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  • 23/79   Nissan to start building new Juke car at UK plant as Brexit looms
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Nissan said it will begin making the next-generation Juke vehicle at Britain’s biggest car plant on Monday, just over two weeks before a possible no-deal Brexit which the industry has warned could bring production to a halt.  Nissan decided in 2015, before the 2016 referendum was even held, to make the latest version of the sport utility vehicle at its northern English Sunderland factory, reflecting how major decisions are made years in advance.  The Japanese company, which was encouraged by Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher in the 1980s to use Britain as a gateway to the Continent, has spent 100 million pounds on the latest investment in Juke with 70% of the output for EU markets.

    Nissan said it will begin making the next-generation Juke vehicle at Britain’s biggest car plant on Monday, just over two weeks before a possible no-deal Brexit which the industry has warned could bring production to a halt. Nissan decided in 2015, before the 2016 referendum was even held, to make the latest version of the sport utility vehicle at its northern English Sunderland factory, reflecting how major decisions are made years in advance. The Japanese company, which was encouraged by Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher in the 1980s to use Britain as a gateway to the Continent, has spent 100 million pounds on the latest investment in Juke with 70% of the output for EU markets.


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  • 24/79   Do Directors Own Value Management & Research AG (FRA:VMR1) Shares?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Every investor in Value Management & Research AG (FRA:VMR1) should be aware of the most powerful shareholder groups...

    Every investor in Value Management & Research AG (FRA:VMR1) should be aware of the most powerful shareholder groups...


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  • 25/79   Public to get access to Nuremberg trials digital recordings
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Audio recordings from the historic Nuremberg trials of Nazi leaders will be made available to the public for the first time in digital form after nearly two years of work conducted in secret.  The Memorial of the Shoah in Paris will officially accept the recordings at a ceremony Thursday evening.  The files capture several hundred hours of the first, high-profile trial of top Nazi leaders in Nuremberg, Germany, after World War II. Since 1950, they have existed only on 2,000 large discs housed in wooden boxes in the International Court of Justice library in the Hague, Netherlands.

    Audio recordings from the historic Nuremberg trials of Nazi leaders will be made available to the public for the first time in digital form after nearly two years of work conducted in secret. The Memorial of the Shoah in Paris will officially accept the recordings at a ceremony Thursday evening. The files capture several hundred hours of the first, high-profile trial of top Nazi leaders in Nuremberg, Germany, after World War II. Since 1950, they have existed only on 2,000 large discs housed in wooden boxes in the International Court of Justice library in the Hague, Netherlands.


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  • 26/79   Stocks Whipsawed Before Trade Talks; Dollar Drops: Markets Wrap
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- U.S. equity futures and European stocks fluctuated as a long-anticipated meeting on trade between America and China approached, and after contrasting reports on the talks spurred volatile trading in Asia. Treasuries were steady, while the dollar weakened.Contracts on the S&P 500 Index turned lower as traders grappled with a slew of headlines including news that the gathering scheduled to start Thursday in Washington might be cut short. Futures were particularly choppy early in Asian trading. European stocks drifted lower while Asian shares ended the session mixed, with Japanese equities recouping their declines by the close, South Korea down and Hong Kong and Shanghai notching modest gains. The yuan reversed a decline on news that the White House was considering a currency pact with Beijing.A gauge of the dollar stayed lower as a key measure of U.S. consumer prices rose by less than expected in September and applications for unemployment benefits unexpectedly declined to a three-week low. Crude oil steadied after gyrating during Asia hours. Markets have grown jittery against a backdrop of deteriorating economic data and fresh tensions between the U.S. and China in recent days, as they prepare for the first face-to-face talks between senior officials since July. Investor nerves were on full display in Asia as a series of headlines roiled markets, with traders attempting to digest reports on everything from the duration of the talks to the potential currency pact.“The market is bracing for more headlines -- which can be confusing -- in the next two days; investors may want to keep their position light,” said Frances Cheung, head of Asia macro strategy at Westpac Banking Corp. “A partial deal is the key, as a ‘great deal’ is very unlikely to be reached at this stage, with China reluctant to touch on some structural issues,” she said.Here are some key events coming up this week:Chinese President Xi Jinping is scheduled to meet Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Friday and Saturday for an informal summit.The U.S. releases a key measure of inflation on Thursday.Here are the main moves in markets:StocksFutures on the S&P 500 Index decreased 0.2% as of 8:32 a.m. New York time.The Stoxx Europe 600 Index declined 0.2%.The Shanghai Composite Index climbed 0.8%.The MSCI Emerging Market Index increased 0.2%.CurrenciesThe Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index sank 0.3%.The euro gained 0.5% to $1.103.The British pound advanced 0.3% to $1.2237.The onshore yuan increased 0.1% to 7.125 per dollar.The Japanese yen was little changed at 107.44 per dollar.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries dipped one basis point to 1.58%.The yield on two-year Treasuries fell two basis points to 1.44%.Germany’s 10-year yield gained two basis points to -0.52%.Britain’s 10-year yield jumped three basis points to 0.493%.Japan’s 10-year yield decreased less than one basis point to -0.203%.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude gained 0.9% to $53.05 a barrel.Iron ore climbed 3.5% to $89.25 per metric ton.Gold climbed 0.3% to $1,509.44 an ounce.\--With assistance from Sybilla Gross and Christopher Anstey.To contact the reporter on this story: Yakob Peterseil in London at ypeterseil@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Christopher Anstey at canstey@bloomberg.net, Todd WhiteFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- U.S. equity futures and European stocks fluctuated as a long-anticipated meeting on trade between America and China approached, and after contrasting reports on the talks spurred volatile trading in Asia. Treasuries were steady, while the dollar weakened.Contracts on the S&P 500 Index turned lower as traders grappled with a slew of headlines including news that the gathering scheduled to start Thursday in Washington might be cut short. Futures were particularly choppy early in Asian trading. European stocks drifted lower while Asian shares ended the session mixed, with Japanese equities recouping their declines by the close, South Korea down and Hong Kong and Shanghai notching modest gains. The yuan reversed a decline on news that the White House was considering a currency pact with Beijing.A gauge of the dollar stayed lower as a key measure of U.S. consumer prices rose by less than expected in September and applications for unemployment benefits unexpectedly declined to a three-week low. Crude oil steadied after gyrating during Asia hours. Markets have grown jittery against a backdrop of deteriorating economic data and fresh tensions between the U.S. and China in recent days, as they prepare for the first face-to-face talks between senior officials since July. Investor nerves were on full display in Asia as a series of headlines roiled markets, with traders attempting to digest reports on everything from the duration of the talks to the potential currency pact.“The market is bracing for more headlines -- which can be confusing -- in the next two days; investors may want to keep their position light,” said Frances Cheung, head of Asia macro strategy at Westpac Banking Corp. “A partial deal is the key, as a ‘great deal’ is very unlikely to be reached at this stage, with China reluctant to touch on some structural issues,” she said.Here are some key events coming up this week:Chinese President Xi Jinping is scheduled to meet Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Friday and Saturday for an informal summit.The U.S. releases a key measure of inflation on Thursday.Here are the main moves in markets:StocksFutures on the S&P 500 Index decreased 0.2% as of 8:32 a.m. New York time.The Stoxx Europe 600 Index declined 0.2%.The Shanghai Composite Index climbed 0.8%.The MSCI Emerging Market Index increased 0.2%.CurrenciesThe Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index sank 0.3%.The euro gained 0.5% to $1.103.The British pound advanced 0.3% to $1.2237.The onshore yuan increased 0.1% to 7.125 per dollar.The Japanese yen was little changed at 107.44 per dollar.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries dipped one basis point to 1.58%.The yield on two-year Treasuries fell two basis points to 1.44%.Germany’s 10-year yield gained two basis points to -0.52%.Britain’s 10-year yield jumped three basis points to 0.493%.Japan’s 10-year yield decreased less than one basis point to -0.203%.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude gained 0.9% to $53.05 a barrel.Iron ore climbed 3.5% to $89.25 per metric ton.Gold climbed 0.3% to $1,509.44 an ounce.\--With assistance from Sybilla Gross and Christopher Anstey.To contact the reporter on this story: Yakob Peterseil in London at ypeterseil@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Christopher Anstey at canstey@bloomberg.net, Todd WhiteFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 27/79   If You Had Bought A/S Latvijas Juras medicinas centrs (MUN:UOM) Shares Three Years Ago You'd Have Made 107%
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    It might seem bad, but the worst that can happen when you buy a stock (without leverage) is that its share price goes...

    It might seem bad, but the worst that can happen when you buy a stock (without leverage) is that its share price goes...


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  • 28/79   Have Insiders Been Buying First United Corporation (NASDAQ:FUNC) Shares?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    We often see insiders buying up shares in companies that perform well over the long term. Unfortunately, there are...

    We often see insiders buying up shares in companies that perform well over the long term. Unfortunately, there are...


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  • 29/79   Erdogan Threatens To ‘Open the Doors’ to Europe for Refugees if Criticisms Continue
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan issued a warning to the European Union during a speech to his party on Thursday, threatening to flood the continent with millions of refugees in response to international criticism of Turkey’s recent military offensive in northern Syria.“Hey EU, wake up. I say it again: if you try to frame our operation there as an invasion, our task is simple: we will open the doors and send 3.6 million migrants to you,” Erdogan said in the speech. The public opinion over Erdogan’s actions has largely been negative.On Thursday, France’s foreign ministry requested the Turkish ambassador, Ismail Hakki Musa, speak in Paris about the recent attacks, according to sources. Italian Foreign Minister Luigi Di Maio also called for an immediate end to the fighting.“As a government we think that the Turkish offensive initiative is unacceptable. We condemn it … because military action in the past has always led to more terrorism,” he said. “We call for an immediate end to this offensive which is absolutely not acceptable given that the use of force continues to endanger the life of the Syrian people, who have already experienced tragedy in recent years.”Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu released a statement Thursday joining his European counterparts in calling for Turkey to end its attacks against the Kurds. “Israel strongly condemns the Turkish invasion of the Kurdish areas in Syria and warns against the ethnic cleansing of the Kurds by Turkey and its proxies. Israel is prepared to extend humanitarian assistance to the gallant Kurdish people,” he said.Iran, a close ally of the Syrian government, called for the Turks to halt their advance, while Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said Russia would push for the necessity of dialogue between Turkey and Syria.”During the Thursday rally, an inflammatory Erdogan defended his government’s decision-making and accused other countries of being dishonest in their criticisms.“They are not honest, they just make up words,” he said. “We, however, create action and that is our difference.”

    Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan issued a warning to the European Union during a speech to his party on Thursday, threatening to flood the continent with millions of refugees in response to international criticism of Turkey’s recent military offensive in northern Syria.“Hey EU, wake up. I say it again: if you try to frame our operation there as an invasion, our task is simple: we will open the doors and send 3.6 million migrants to you,” Erdogan said in the speech. The public opinion over Erdogan’s actions has largely been negative.On Thursday, France’s foreign ministry requested the Turkish ambassador, Ismail Hakki Musa, speak in Paris about the recent attacks, according to sources. Italian Foreign Minister Luigi Di Maio also called for an immediate end to the fighting.“As a government we think that the Turkish offensive initiative is unacceptable. We condemn it … because military action in the past has always led to more terrorism,” he said. “We call for an immediate end to this offensive which is absolutely not acceptable given that the use of force continues to endanger the life of the Syrian people, who have already experienced tragedy in recent years.”Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu released a statement Thursday joining his European counterparts in calling for Turkey to end its attacks against the Kurds. “Israel strongly condemns the Turkish invasion of the Kurdish areas in Syria and warns against the ethnic cleansing of the Kurds by Turkey and its proxies. Israel is prepared to extend humanitarian assistance to the gallant Kurdish people,” he said.Iran, a close ally of the Syrian government, called for the Turks to halt their advance, while Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said Russia would push for the necessity of dialogue between Turkey and Syria.”During the Thursday rally, an inflammatory Erdogan defended his government’s decision-making and accused other countries of being dishonest in their criticisms.“They are not honest, they just make up words,” he said. “We, however, create action and that is our difference.”


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  • 30/79   The First Merchants (NASDAQ:FRME) Share Price Is Up 77% And Shareholders Are Holding On
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Generally speaking the aim of active stock picking is to find companies that provide returns that are superior to the...

    Generally speaking the aim of active stock picking is to find companies that provide returns that are superior to the...


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  • 31/79   Estimating The Fair Value Of Morguard Corporation (TSE:MRC)
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    How far off is Morguard Corporation (TSE:MRC) from its intrinsic value? Using the most recent financial data, we'll...

    How far off is Morguard Corporation (TSE:MRC) from its intrinsic value? Using the most recent financial data, we'll...


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  • 32/79   Deal ‘Not Impossible’ as Leaders Prepare to Meet: Brexit Update
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Boris Johnson is meeting his Irish counterpart Leo Varadkar for crucial talks over lunch as the U.K. and European Union seek a way through the Brexit impasse with time running out to reach a deal. While neither side is brimming with optimism, Ireland’s government said an agreement is “not impossible,” though wide gaps remain.Read more: Johnson and Varadkar to Meet in Last Ditch Bid for Brexit DealKey Developments:Johnson and Varadkar meet in over lunch in northwestern England British security minister warns EU citizens about status in U.K.Irish health minister says deal “not impossible”Top medical officer says no-deal Brexit could cause deathsVaradkar Promises ‘Detailed Discussion (1 p.m.)Leo Varadkar tweeted after the start of the meeting in northwest England, saying he and Boris Johnson would have “detailed discussion to see if we can make any progress.”Johnson and Varadkar Arrive for Crunch Meeting (12:15 p.m.)Boris Johnson and Leo Varadkar arrived at the country house in North West England where they’re due to have lunch and hold their talks.Thornton House was built in the 19th Century and now serves as a venue for weddings and corporate events. Johnson arrived about 20 minutes before Varadkar.Minister: Stop Negotiating By Twitter (12 p.m.)Business minister Nadhim Zahawi said the U.K. government will focus until “the 11th hour on Oct. 31” on getting a deal. “It requires cool heads and real effort, real discipline, real focus,” he said in a Bloomberg interview.“I’d like to see less of this emotional negotiation by Twitter,” he said. “That I think is unwise.”His comments came after European Council President Donald Tusk, accused Johnson of playing a “stupid blame game” in a Twitter post earlier this week.Deal ‘Not Impossible,’ Irish Minister Says (8.45 a.m.)Leo Varadkar and Boris Johnson will “check in” on where Brexit talks stand, Ireland’s Health Minister Simon Harris said, adding that getting a deal is “extremely difficult but not impossible.”Asked in an RTE radio interview if his government trusts Johnson, Harris responded that he is the elected prime minister and “we trust the U.K. political system in that regard.”Earlier, U.K. Business Minister Kwasi Kwarteng said there’s still a “good chance” of a deal. The meeting between the two prime ministers “is not to have a social conversation,” he told BBC Radio. “They’re seriously focused on trying to resolve this issue and trying to get a deal.”Hammond: Election Won’t Solve Impasse (8 a.m.)Former Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond, who was expelled from the Parliamentary Conservative Party for opposing Boris Johnson’s Brexit strategy, warned that an election will not solve the impasse over leaving the EU.“I don’t think an election solves our problem, I would not support an election at the moment,” Hammond told BBC Radio. “A few weeks ago we were being asked to give assurances that we wouldn’t vote against the Government in a vote of no confidence and now we’re being asked to vote to turn the Government out.”He said both the economy and the reputation of the Conservative Party for fiscal prudence are being put at risk by spending commitments announced by his successor Sajid Javid.“I do worry about a strategy which is reckless about our economic future in terms of advocating no-deal Brexit and reckless about our public finances in terms of spending money that, frankly, at this point in the Brexit negotiation, we cannot be sure we have available,” Hammond said.Medical Officer Warns of No-Deal Deaths (7:30 a.m.)Sally Davies, chief medical officer for England, repeated her warning that there may be deaths caused by shortages of drugs and medical equipment if there’s a no-deal Brexit.“The health service and everyone has worked very hard to prepare,” she told BBC Radio. “But I say what I’ve said before, that we cannot guarantee that there will not be shortages, not only in medicines but technology and gadgets and things,” she said. “And there may be deaths, we can’t guarantee there won’t.” The lives of patients “are at risk.”Lewis Warns EU Citizens Over Registration (Earlier)Security Minister Brandon Lewis warned EU citizens they must apply for settled status or risk being expelled from the U.K., the German newspaper Die Welt reported, citing an interview.Only a third of Germans in the U.K. have so far applied to be registered and Lewis said “theoretically, yes,” when asked if they could be removed from the country if there’s a no-deal split from the bloc.\--With assistance from Patrick Donahue, Peter Flanagan, Alex Morales and Robert Hutton.To contact the reporters on this story: Tim Ross in London at tross54@bloomberg.net;Thomas Penny in London at tpenny@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Caroline AlexanderFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Boris Johnson is meeting his Irish counterpart Leo Varadkar for crucial talks over lunch as the U.K. and European Union seek a way through the Brexit impasse with time running out to reach a deal. While neither side is brimming with optimism, Ireland’s government said an agreement is “not impossible,” though wide gaps remain.Read more: Johnson and Varadkar to Meet in Last Ditch Bid for Brexit DealKey Developments:Johnson and Varadkar meet in over lunch in northwestern England British security minister warns EU citizens about status in U.K.Irish health minister says deal “not impossible”Top medical officer says no-deal Brexit could cause deathsVaradkar Promises ‘Detailed Discussion (1 p.m.)Leo Varadkar tweeted after the start of the meeting in northwest England, saying he and Boris Johnson would have “detailed discussion to see if we can make any progress.”Johnson and Varadkar Arrive for Crunch Meeting (12:15 p.m.)Boris Johnson and Leo Varadkar arrived at the country house in North West England where they’re due to have lunch and hold their talks.Thornton House was built in the 19th Century and now serves as a venue for weddings and corporate events. Johnson arrived about 20 minutes before Varadkar.Minister: Stop Negotiating By Twitter (12 p.m.)Business minister Nadhim Zahawi said the U.K. government will focus until “the 11th hour on Oct. 31” on getting a deal. “It requires cool heads and real effort, real discipline, real focus,” he said in a Bloomberg interview.“I’d like to see less of this emotional negotiation by Twitter,” he said. “That I think is unwise.”His comments came after European Council President Donald Tusk, accused Johnson of playing a “stupid blame game” in a Twitter post earlier this week.Deal ‘Not Impossible,’ Irish Minister Says (8.45 a.m.)Leo Varadkar and Boris Johnson will “check in” on where Brexit talks stand, Ireland’s Health Minister Simon Harris said, adding that getting a deal is “extremely difficult but not impossible.”Asked in an RTE radio interview if his government trusts Johnson, Harris responded that he is the elected prime minister and “we trust the U.K. political system in that regard.”Earlier, U.K. Business Minister Kwasi Kwarteng said there’s still a “good chance” of a deal. The meeting between the two prime ministers “is not to have a social conversation,” he told BBC Radio. “They’re seriously focused on trying to resolve this issue and trying to get a deal.”Hammond: Election Won’t Solve Impasse (8 a.m.)Former Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond, who was expelled from the Parliamentary Conservative Party for opposing Boris Johnson’s Brexit strategy, warned that an election will not solve the impasse over leaving the EU.“I don’t think an election solves our problem, I would not support an election at the moment,” Hammond told BBC Radio. “A few weeks ago we were being asked to give assurances that we wouldn’t vote against the Government in a vote of no confidence and now we’re being asked to vote to turn the Government out.”He said both the economy and the reputation of the Conservative Party for fiscal prudence are being put at risk by spending commitments announced by his successor Sajid Javid.“I do worry about a strategy which is reckless about our economic future in terms of advocating no-deal Brexit and reckless about our public finances in terms of spending money that, frankly, at this point in the Brexit negotiation, we cannot be sure we have available,” Hammond said.Medical Officer Warns of No-Deal Deaths (7:30 a.m.)Sally Davies, chief medical officer for England, repeated her warning that there may be deaths caused by shortages of drugs and medical equipment if there’s a no-deal Brexit.“The health service and everyone has worked very hard to prepare,” she told BBC Radio. “But I say what I’ve said before, that we cannot guarantee that there will not be shortages, not only in medicines but technology and gadgets and things,” she said. “And there may be deaths, we can’t guarantee there won’t.” The lives of patients “are at risk.”Lewis Warns EU Citizens Over Registration (Earlier)Security Minister Brandon Lewis warned EU citizens they must apply for settled status or risk being expelled from the U.K., the German newspaper Die Welt reported, citing an interview.Only a third of Germans in the U.K. have so far applied to be registered and Lewis said “theoretically, yes,” when asked if they could be removed from the country if there’s a no-deal split from the bloc.\--With assistance from Patrick Donahue, Peter Flanagan, Alex Morales and Robert Hutton.To contact the reporters on this story: Tim Ross in London at tross54@bloomberg.net;Thomas Penny in London at tpenny@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Caroline AlexanderFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 33/79   Recession Angst Ramps Up Premium for Calm Stocks to 41-Year High
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Wall Street banks have labeled them expensive, crowded and dangerous. Yet the boom in low-volatility stocks is intensifying.Globally the investing style has now clawed back virtually all the losses it notched in the late-September rout for defensive quant trades. Calmer American shares have reached the priciest in 41 years compared with capricious counterparts, according to a Citigroup Inc. study into the low-beta factor.Citi is among those firms warning that stocks offering muted price swings look too hot for comfort. Undeterred, traders are cramming into assets bearing defensive hallmarks to buffer everything from an economic downturn and trade tensions to White House dramas.“Without a catalyst, we think the reversal for valuations will have to be the next upswing in the next business cycle,” said Alessio de Longis, a New York-based multi-asset fund manager at Invesco. Elevated premiums can continue until there’s a material shift in the economy that favors bullish bets, he said.As global growth falters, his peers are also betting relentless demand for shares in sectors such as utilities and real estate -- which typically boast sturdy, bond-like companies -- will keep the strategy on an even keel.Low-volatility exchange-traded funds in the U.S. look set to post their seventh straight week of inflows, while a Dow Jones index based on a low-beta strategy is poised for its fourth week of gains.All that means the low-vol playbook is now the most exposed to macro risks like shocks in the dollar or oil markets since at least 1999, Citi analysts led by Hong Li wrote in a note this week. After ranking stocks by their sensitivity to broader market moves by the lowest quintile to the highest, the price-to-earnings premium for the investing style is at a four-decade high, they said.Whether the steady cohort is becoming too popular for its own good is a point of debate within the industry. In an August paper, a team led by David Blitz at Robeco pointed to evidence of a continued structural bias for rockier shares among hedge funds and mutual funds -- part of the famous low-vol anomaly uncovered by quants.Still if risk appetite improves, or bond proxies get lashed by higher yields, it could inflict pain on investors who have loaded up on tranquil equities.“It’s a crowded trade and low volatility is not riskless,” said Tina Byles Williams, chief executive officer at FIS Group. “If you have a normal cyclical downturn, then a low volatility strategy is appropriate but low volatility tends to be high duration.”Higher interest rates means the trade could go “horribly wrong,” the Philadelphia-based manager said.To contact the reporter on this story: Justina Lee in London at jlee1489@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Samuel Potter at spotter33@bloomberg.net, Sid VermaFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Wall Street banks have labeled them expensive, crowded and dangerous. Yet the boom in low-volatility stocks is intensifying.Globally the investing style has now clawed back virtually all the losses it notched in the late-September rout for defensive quant trades. Calmer American shares have reached the priciest in 41 years compared with capricious counterparts, according to a Citigroup Inc. study into the low-beta factor.Citi is among those firms warning that stocks offering muted price swings look too hot for comfort. Undeterred, traders are cramming into assets bearing defensive hallmarks to buffer everything from an economic downturn and trade tensions to White House dramas.“Without a catalyst, we think the reversal for valuations will have to be the next upswing in the next business cycle,” said Alessio de Longis, a New York-based multi-asset fund manager at Invesco. Elevated premiums can continue until there’s a material shift in the economy that favors bullish bets, he said.As global growth falters, his peers are also betting relentless demand for shares in sectors such as utilities and real estate -- which typically boast sturdy, bond-like companies -- will keep the strategy on an even keel.Low-volatility exchange-traded funds in the U.S. look set to post their seventh straight week of inflows, while a Dow Jones index based on a low-beta strategy is poised for its fourth week of gains.All that means the low-vol playbook is now the most exposed to macro risks like shocks in the dollar or oil markets since at least 1999, Citi analysts led by Hong Li wrote in a note this week. After ranking stocks by their sensitivity to broader market moves by the lowest quintile to the highest, the price-to-earnings premium for the investing style is at a four-decade high, they said.Whether the steady cohort is becoming too popular for its own good is a point of debate within the industry. In an August paper, a team led by David Blitz at Robeco pointed to evidence of a continued structural bias for rockier shares among hedge funds and mutual funds -- part of the famous low-vol anomaly uncovered by quants.Still if risk appetite improves, or bond proxies get lashed by higher yields, it could inflict pain on investors who have loaded up on tranquil equities.“It’s a crowded trade and low volatility is not riskless,” said Tina Byles Williams, chief executive officer at FIS Group. “If you have a normal cyclical downturn, then a low volatility strategy is appropriate but low volatility tends to be high duration.”Higher interest rates means the trade could go “horribly wrong,” the Philadelphia-based manager said.To contact the reporter on this story: Justina Lee in London at jlee1489@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Samuel Potter at spotter33@bloomberg.net, Sid VermaFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 34/79   How Great-West Lifeco Inc.'s (TSE:GWO) Earnings Growth Stacks Up Against The Industry
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Measuring Great-West Lifeco Inc.'s (TSX:GWO) track record of past performance is an insightful exercise for investors...

    Measuring Great-West Lifeco Inc.'s (TSX:GWO) track record of past performance is an insightful exercise for investors...


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  • 35/79   Futures edge lower ahead of top-level U.S.-China trade talks
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Wall Street had a roller-coaster week so far, with developments in the trade war stealing the spotlight.  All three major indexes ended the previous session almost 1% higher on optimism that the two sides could agree to a partial trade deal.

    Wall Street had a roller-coaster week so far, with developments in the trade war stealing the spotlight. All three major indexes ended the previous session almost 1% higher on optimism that the two sides could agree to a partial trade deal.


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  • 36/79   How Much Are First Republic Bank (NYSE:FRC) Insiders Taking Off The Table?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    It is not uncommon to see companies perform well in the years after insiders buy shares. The flip side of that is that...

    It is not uncommon to see companies perform well in the years after insiders buy shares. The flip side of that is that...


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  • 37/79   Intel Officials Warn of Possible ISIS Resurgence After U.S. Withdrawal
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Current and former U.S. intelligence officials warned that ISIS could regroup following the American withdrawal from northeast Syria, according to a report from NBC.Kurdish organizations are currently holding 12,000 ISIS fighters in prison, said the officials, and it is unclear what will happen to them after Turkey's invasion of Syria. If the fighters are set free, the officials fear that ISIS terrorists will regroup similar to how ISIS was formed during the years 2010 to 2013, when the group's founders were released or escaped from jail as American forces left Iraq.President Trump told reporters on Wednesday that if ISIS fighters manage to break free, they "are going to be escaping to Europe, that's where they want to go. They want to go back to their homes."The officials interviewed by NBC agreed with an assessment that ISIS is still a dangerous threat.The bipartisan Syria Study Group, a panel appointed by Congress to assess the situation in the country, released a report days before the Turkish invasion indicating that ISIS would seize an opportunity to regroup."There's ample evidence ISIS is still very much active, it has access to tremendous resources, its brand still has international appeal," said report co-author and senior fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy Dana Stroul.

    Current and former U.S. intelligence officials warned that ISIS could regroup following the American withdrawal from northeast Syria, according to a report from NBC.Kurdish organizations are currently holding 12,000 ISIS fighters in prison, said the officials, and it is unclear what will happen to them after Turkey's invasion of Syria. If the fighters are set free, the officials fear that ISIS terrorists will regroup similar to how ISIS was formed during the years 2010 to 2013, when the group's founders were released or escaped from jail as American forces left Iraq.President Trump told reporters on Wednesday that if ISIS fighters manage to break free, they "are going to be escaping to Europe, that's where they want to go. They want to go back to their homes."The officials interviewed by NBC agreed with an assessment that ISIS is still a dangerous threat.The bipartisan Syria Study Group, a panel appointed by Congress to assess the situation in the country, released a report days before the Turkish invasion indicating that ISIS would seize an opportunity to regroup."There's ample evidence ISIS is still very much active, it has access to tremendous resources, its brand still has international appeal," said report co-author and senior fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy Dana Stroul.


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  • 38/79   One Thing To Remember About The Keane Group, Inc. (NYSE:FRAC) Share Price
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    If you're interested in Keane Group, Inc. (NYSE:FRAC), then you might want to consider its beta (a measure of share...

    If you're interested in Keane Group, Inc. (NYSE:FRAC), then you might want to consider its beta (a measure of share...


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  • 39/79   European Central Bank minority opposed bond-buying stimulus
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Top European Central Bank officials were united over the need for more stimulus at their last meeting but a number of them objected to the decision to launch bond purchases involving the injection of newly printed money into the economy.  The written account of the meeting released Thursday says that 'all members' agreed on the need for some kind of additional stimulus.

    Top European Central Bank officials were united over the need for more stimulus at their last meeting but a number of them objected to the decision to launch bond purchases involving the injection of newly printed money into the economy. The written account of the meeting released Thursday says that 'all members' agreed on the need for some kind of additional stimulus.


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  • 40/79   Minneapolis mayor responds to Trump: I don't have time to be 'tweeting garbage out'
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey hit back at President Trump regarding the use of the Target Center for a Thursday campaign rally.

    Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey hit back at President Trump regarding the use of the Target Center for a Thursday campaign rally.


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  • 41/79   Driven from Central America by gangs and finding refuge in Kentucky: One woman's story
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    However, the whole group did not stay under Monteith’s roof for long. Unbeknownst to them, Mirna and her family were among the last wave of asylum seekers to reach the U.S.-Mexico border before this policy went into effect.

    However, the whole group did not stay under Monteith’s roof for long. Unbeknownst to them, Mirna and her family were among the last wave of asylum seekers to reach the U.S.-Mexico border before this policy went into effect.


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  • 42/79   New book says Homeland Security acting head McAleenan pushed family separation policy for migrants
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan was one of the drivers of the Trump administration’s now abandoned policy of separating migrant families at the southern border — a position he has since disavowed as “not worth” the ensuing public relations disaster.

    Acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan was one of the drivers of the Trump administration’s now abandoned policy of separating migrant families at the southern border — a position he has since disavowed as “not worth” the ensuing public relations disaster.


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  • 43/79   9-year-old charged with murder in 5 Illinois fire deaths
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A 9-year-old child accused of causing a mobile home fire that killed three children and two adults in central Illinois has been charged with five counts of first-degree murder. The juvenile also was charged with two counts of arson and one count of aggravated arson, the (Peoria) Journal Star reported. It tracks all U.S. homicides since then in which four or more people were killed (not including the offender) over a short period of time (24 hours), regardless of weapon, location, victim-offender relationship or motive.

    A 9-year-old child accused of causing a mobile home fire that killed three children and two adults in central Illinois has been charged with five counts of first-degree murder. The juvenile also was charged with two counts of arson and one count of aggravated arson, the (Peoria) Journal Star reported. It tracks all U.S. homicides since then in which four or more people were killed (not including the offender) over a short period of time (24 hours), regardless of weapon, location, victim-offender relationship or motive.


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  • 44/79   Protests over Bangladesh student death as PM vows to punish killers
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Bangladesh's prime minister on Wednesday vowed to mete out the 'highest punishment to the killers' of a university student who died after he criticised a deal the leader made with India.  The killing of 21-year-old Abrar Fahad on Monday, allegedly by members of a student branch of the country's ruling Awami League party, has sparked two days of protests in Dhaka and other cities.  Some 13 students, including 10 from the Awami League branch, have been detained by police over his death.

    Bangladesh's prime minister on Wednesday vowed to mete out the 'highest punishment to the killers' of a university student who died after he criticised a deal the leader made with India. The killing of 21-year-old Abrar Fahad on Monday, allegedly by members of a student branch of the country's ruling Awami League party, has sparked two days of protests in Dhaka and other cities. Some 13 students, including 10 from the Awami League branch, have been detained by police over his death.


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  • 45/79   Ready for War: Iran Is Bristling with Missiles
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A real threat.

    A real threat.


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  • 46/79   Israel unveils the remains of 5,000-year-old city
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Israeli archaeologists on Sunday unveiled the remains of a 5,000-year-old city they said was one of the biggest from its era in the region, including fortifications, a ritual temple and a cemetery.

    Israeli archaeologists on Sunday unveiled the remains of a 5,000-year-old city they said was one of the biggest from its era in the region, including fortifications, a ritual temple and a cemetery.


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  • 47/79   Donald Trump to Hillary Clinton: Run for president again! Clinton to Trump: Do your job!
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Trump loves to taunt Hillary Clinton and the 2020 Democratic presidential candidates; now he's doing both at the same time.

    Trump loves to taunt Hillary Clinton and the 2020 Democratic presidential candidates; now he's doing both at the same time.


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  • 48/79   Off the rails: Hanoi closes trackside cafes thronged by selfie-seeking tourists
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    It's the kind of shot every Instagram connoisseur yearns for: century-old railway tracks cutting through dusty backstreets, flanked by tourists drinking beer or iced tea mere inches from the slow-moving trains.  The sight has become such a draw in the Vietnamese capital of Hanoi that authorities have set a weekend deadline for the removal of dozens of cafes that have cropped up, citing safety concerns.  It's crazy, and completely different to anywhere I've been before,' said Australian tourist Laura Metze, after a train rumbled by.

    It's the kind of shot every Instagram connoisseur yearns for: century-old railway tracks cutting through dusty backstreets, flanked by tourists drinking beer or iced tea mere inches from the slow-moving trains. The sight has become such a draw in the Vietnamese capital of Hanoi that authorities have set a weekend deadline for the removal of dozens of cafes that have cropped up, citing safety concerns. It's crazy, and completely different to anywhere I've been before,' said Australian tourist Laura Metze, after a train rumbled by.


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  • 49/79   US meth lab strikes in Afghanistan killed at least 30 civilians says UN
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    An American blitz on dozens of Taliban drug factories in Western Afghanistan killed at least 30 civilians and may have left dozens more dead, a United Nations report has found. United States aircraft struck more than 60 methamphetamine labs earlier this year during a one-day onslaught to deny Taliban insurgents income from the lucrative drug trade. The raids killed at least 30 civilians according to a UN investigation and may have killed a further 30. The UN also said the raids broke international law because drugs workers are not considered a legitimate military target. American forces in Afghanistan immediately disputed the reports findings, saying they disagreed with the UN's methods, analysis and “narrow definition” of legitimate targets. A spokesman said the labs had been under lengthy surveillance before they were struck and “extraordinary measures” had been taken to avoid killing civilians. Col Sonny Leggett said he was “deeply concerned” by the UN's methods and findings. Taliban insurgents have long been accused of obtaining huge sums from the country's extensive opium trade, as militants tax production and levy protection money. Methamphetamine production has recently been added to the country's drugs business, with UN officials earlier this year warning seizures were growing exponentially. The May 5 raids in Farah and Nimroz province were carried out after “comprehensive intelligence confirmed that all personnel inside of the laboratories were Taliban combatants”, the US told investigators. Investigators verified 30 civilians killed and nine injured, including 14 children, but said they were investigating “reliable and credible information” another 30 civilians were also killed, the UN said. The UN in its report contended the drug facilities were owned and operated by criminal groups, so "did not meet the definition of legitimate military objectives under international law." The factories and workers inside “may not be lawfully made the target of attack based on their possible economic or financial contribution to the war effort of a party to a conflict,” it concluded. The US, however, insisted the labs were run and owned by the Taliban, who used revenue to "fund ongoing indiscriminate violence against innocent Afghans".

    An American blitz on dozens of Taliban drug factories in Western Afghanistan killed at least 30 civilians and may have left dozens more dead, a United Nations report has found. United States aircraft struck more than 60 methamphetamine labs earlier this year during a one-day onslaught to deny Taliban insurgents income from the lucrative drug trade. The raids killed at least 30 civilians according to a UN investigation and may have killed a further 30. The UN also said the raids broke international law because drugs workers are not considered a legitimate military target. American forces in Afghanistan immediately disputed the reports findings, saying they disagreed with the UN's methods, analysis and “narrow definition” of legitimate targets. A spokesman said the labs had been under lengthy surveillance before they were struck and “extraordinary measures” had been taken to avoid killing civilians. Col Sonny Leggett said he was “deeply concerned” by the UN's methods and findings. Taliban insurgents have long been accused of obtaining huge sums from the country's extensive opium trade, as militants tax production and levy protection money. Methamphetamine production has recently been added to the country's drugs business, with UN officials earlier this year warning seizures were growing exponentially. The May 5 raids in Farah and Nimroz province were carried out after “comprehensive intelligence confirmed that all personnel inside of the laboratories were Taliban combatants”, the US told investigators. Investigators verified 30 civilians killed and nine injured, including 14 children, but said they were investigating “reliable and credible information” another 30 civilians were also killed, the UN said. The UN in its report contended the drug facilities were owned and operated by criminal groups, so "did not meet the definition of legitimate military objectives under international law." The factories and workers inside “may not be lawfully made the target of attack based on their possible economic or financial contribution to the war effort of a party to a conflict,” it concluded. The US, however, insisted the labs were run and owned by the Taliban, who used revenue to "fund ongoing indiscriminate violence against innocent Afghans".


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  • 50/79   A winner of this year's Nobel prize in physics is convinced we'll detect alien life in 100 years. Here are 13 reasons why we haven't made contact yet.
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    A Nobel prize-winner thinks we'll detect aliens within 100 years, possibly sooner. Other scientists think we might never make contact.

    A Nobel prize-winner thinks we'll detect aliens within 100 years, possibly sooner. Other scientists think we might never make contact.


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  • 51/79   Back from the dead: Some corals regrow after 'fatal' warming
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    For the first time ever, scientists have found corals that were thought to have been killed by heat stress have recovered, a glimmer of hope for the world's climate change-threatened reefs.  The chance discovery, made by Diego K. Kersting from the Freie University of Berlin and the University of Barcelona during diving expeditions in the Spanish Mediterranean, was reported in the journal Science Advances on Wednesday.  Kersting and co-author Cristina Linares have been carrying out long-term monitoring of 243 colonies of the endangered reef-builder coral Cladocora caespitosa since 2002, allowing them to describe in previous papers recurring warming-related mass mortalities.

    For the first time ever, scientists have found corals that were thought to have been killed by heat stress have recovered, a glimmer of hope for the world's climate change-threatened reefs. The chance discovery, made by Diego K. Kersting from the Freie University of Berlin and the University of Barcelona during diving expeditions in the Spanish Mediterranean, was reported in the journal Science Advances on Wednesday. Kersting and co-author Cristina Linares have been carrying out long-term monitoring of 243 colonies of the endangered reef-builder coral Cladocora caespitosa since 2002, allowing them to describe in previous papers recurring warming-related mass mortalities.


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  • 52/79   20 new moons were discovered around Saturn
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The new discovery increases the moons orbiting the "jewel of our solar system" to 82, surpassing Jupiter

    The new discovery increases the moons orbiting the "jewel of our solar system" to 82, surpassing Jupiter


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  • 53/79   As Sea Levels Rise, So Do Ghost Forests
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Up and down the mid-Atlantic coast, sea levels are rising rapidly, creating stands of dead trees -- often bleached, sometimes blackened -- known as ghost forests.The water is gaining as much as 5 millimeters per year in some places, well above the global average of 3.1 millimeters, driven by profound environmental shifts that include climate change.Increasingly powerful storms, a consequence of a warming world, push seawater inland. More intense dry spells reduce freshwater flowing outward. Adding to the peril, in some places the land is naturally sinking.All of this allows seawater to claim new territory, killing trees from the roots up.Rising seas often conjure the threat to faraway, low-lying nations or island-states. But to understand the immediate consequences of some of the most rapid sea-level rise anywhere in the world, stand among the scraggly, dying pines of Dorchester County along the Maryland coast.Chesapeake Bay's Migrating MarshesPeople living on the eastern shore of Chesapeake Bay, the country's largest estuary system, have a front-row view of the sea's rapid advance, said Keryn Gedan, a wetland ecologist at George Washington University.Part of the reason for the quickly rising waters may be that the Gulf Stream, which flows northward up the coast, is slowing down as meltwater from Greenland inhibits its flow. That is causing what some scientists describe as a pileup of water along the East Coast, elevating sea levels locally.The effects of climate change are also exacerbated by land that is sinking as a result of geological processes triggered by the end of the last ice age.Because of the extraordinary speed at which the water is rising here, Gedan said, "I think of this area as a window into the future for the rest of the world."In Dorchester County, where dead and dying loblolly pines stand forlornly, Gedan has learned to "read" these forests from the mix of species present.As saltwater moves into the ground, oak and other sensitive hardwoods die first. Loblolly pine, the most salt-tolerant, is often the last tree standing until it, too, is overwhelmed.Then the saltwater marsh plants move in. If you're lucky, velvety tufts of cordgrass sprout. If not, impenetrable stands of cane-like Phragmites, an invasive species, take over.One reason the effects of rising seas are so noticeable here is that the land has very little slope. Those 5 millimeters of sea level, a rise that's only slightly more than two half-dollar coins stacked, can translate into saltwater pushing 15 feet inland per year, according to Gedan.Shoots of sweet gum, a tree with star-shaped leaves and bark like alligator skin, have more tolerance for salt than other hardwoods, such as oak. They can endure for a time as groundwater becomes more saline.But eventually, the sweet gum dies as well.The Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, where Gedan does research, lost 3,000 acres of forest and agricultural land between 1938 and 2006. More than 5,000 acres of marsh became open water.At first, this trend depressed Matt Whitbeck, a biologist with the Fish and Wildlife Service who works at the refuge. Saltwater marshes are important nurseries for the fish and crabs people like to eat.But in 2012, he realized the marsh wasn't entirely disappearing; it was migrating. Some of the 3,000 acres of forest that the refuge had lost had transformed into saltwater marsh.His outlook changed. "We need to think about where the marsh is moving, not where it is," he said.But in nearby Smithville, a historically African American town, this movement poses an existential threat. Backyards have been gobbled up by advancing marsh, basketball courts overgrown. What were once thick stands of pine near the water's edge have greatly thinned. The marsh now menaces a graveyard.Residents have battled the advancing wetlands for years, said Roslyn Watts, 60, who grew up here. All that time, she and her neighbors thought the inexorable advance was simply the price of living near water's edge.But in 2010, she learned about global warming and sea level rise, she said. She understood that what was happening wasn't entirely natural."I was angry," she said, and particularly incensed by the idea that retreat was the only workable strategy. The Dutch didn't retreat, she said. They built dikes. Why couldn't Smithville?"These families have been here since at least the late 19th century," she said. "There's a connection to the land."But Smithville, small and with few resources, has little money to adapt.Further south in Somerset County, numerous "for sale" signs stand in front of houses along the back roads. Some are abandoned, their yards overgrown by Phragmites. On Deal Island, ditches once dug to drain the land for farming and to help manage flooding from high tides now stand full of stagnant water.Today, in fact, these ditches are part of the threat: Instead of draining water out to sea, they can accelerate the movement of saltwater inland, said Kate Tully, an agroecologist at the University of Maryland.In general, saltwater can seep into the soil before sea level rise becomes obvious in other ways, killing sensitive plants far from the shore. "We call it the invisible flood, because you can't really see it," she said.Elizabeth van Dolah, an anthropologist at the University of Maryland who works with rural communities along the eastern shore, noted that residents here are accustomed to marsh migration and flooding. "But they're probably seeing it happening at a much quicker pace than in the past," she said. "Many of them recognize that, yes, they eventually have to leave. But for the time being, they intend to stay in place."Bob Fitzgerald, 80, has farmed near the town Princess Anne his whole life. Driving the back roads in his four-seater pickup, he pointed out fields that, just five years ago, grew corn but have since become too salty for crops."You can't give property away down here," he said.The asphalt roads are occasionally tinted red along the edges. That, too, is an effect of the floodwater "overtopping" the roads, Fitzgerald said."People who have built their homes here are damn fools," he said, speaking near a place where pine trees appear to be dying around a house. "It should have been abandoned."As the years pass, he said, it will be.'Cedar Cemeteries' in New JerseyFor 33 years, Ken Able has walked the same causeway almost daily at the Rutgers University Marine Field Station in Tuckerton, New Jersey. In that time he has seen marsh become open water, and the fish population transform as cooler-water species decline and those that thrive in warmer waters move in.Blue crab and summer flounder, both saltwater species, have pushed into freshwater rivers. Their arrival suggests the waterways are becoming saltier further inland.All these signs of change come from the ocean, a fluid and often fickle environment. Which is why Able, a professor emeritus of marine and coastal sciences, so appreciates the ghost forests. They're a signal of change from a stationary source: the trees themselves."A ghost forest is a way to capture geological history," he said. "There's not always a way to do that."The Atlantic white cedar, abundant around the Mullica River Estuary in stands such as this one, is an unusually durable parchment on which to capture that history.Long prized for lumber, its wood is highly resistant to rot. But the tree is also very sensitive to salt. It can tolerate maybe three salty high tides before succumbing.So when the trees begin dying, it's a trustworthy indicator that conditions are becoming more saline. It is an age-old phenomenon, now happening faster.Erosion of marshes and riverbanks has also accelerated, revealing buried cedar stumps from prehistoric ghost forests. Jennifer Walker, a frequent collaborator with Able who recently earned her Ph.D. in oceanography at Rutgers, dated one stump here to the fifth century. "Cedar cemeteries," she calls these places.As elsewhere, ghost forest formation seems to have sped up recently, particularly after Hurricane Sandy hit the region in 2012. "It's a good example of a slowly encroaching process -- and then storms making it worse," Walker said.She is studying sediment cores from salt marshes and dating ancient, dead cedars in order to reconstruct sea level rise and ghost forest formation through time.The pace of sea level rise first quickened in the late 19th century after the Industrial Revolution, Walker said, and then sped up again in recent decades. It's now rising faster than at any point in the past several thousand years.Much of the Mullica River Estuary is a nature preserve, its many tributaries remote and undeveloped. But since 2015, Able and Walker have taken a series of helicopter rides over the area. "It's not one giant ghost forest," Walker said. "But the more you look, the more you find them."From above, they've seen swaths of dead trees along riverbanks many miles from the open ocean, suggesting that Sandy pushed seawater far up the river system."You get a slug of saltwater," Able said, "and things die."On the North Carolina Coast, Fires and SaltPaul Taillie, a Ph.D. student at North Carolina State University, encountered a mystery: He wanted to know how quickly ghost forests form. So he repeated a study originally done 15 years earlier to see how plant life had changed over time.As expected, saltwater marsh had advanced. Pond pine and other salt-sensitive trees were dying. Salt-tolerant plants, including saw grass and black needle rush, were moving in.But unexpectedly, the change wasn't occurring evenly across the landscape. Trees were dying faster in some places than others.What could explain this uneven emergence of ghost forests?The study area had almost no slope -- much of it was just inches above sea level -- and the minor differences in elevation couldn't explain the variation.But a clue came from the soil. It tended to be saltier where trees were dying fastest.The explanation Taillie, who's now a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Florida, landed on had to do with drought. When droughts hit, the amount of freshwater emptying into the ocean from nearby rivers declines, making nearshore waters saltier in some places.That saltier water then pushes inland unevenly, killing trees in an irregular pattern across an otherwise mostly uniform landscape. "It's not just rising sea level" that creates ghost forests, Tallie said, but periods of dryness."It's more during times of drought, when you have less freshwater, that the saltwater creeps in," he said. "Salinity goes up."Wildfires are another accelerant.Wetlands burn naturally here during dry years. Fires often travel on top of standing water, consuming grass and trees that rise above the muck.In the past, young trees quickly sprouted after fires. But recently, some forests have failed to recover."There's almost no regeneration," Chris Moorman, a disturbance ecologist at North Carolina State University, said as we surveyed an expanse of dead, mostly branchless trees. He and Taillie said they think that wetlands like these have become too salty for young pond pines, which are more sensitive to salt than mature ones. They can't gain a foothold in marshes their own forebears could tolerate.Drought is predicted to become more frequent as the climate warms, Taillie said. That means wildfires, combined with intensified dry spells and amplified saltwater intrusion may, together, accelerate the formation of ghost forests independently of sea level rise.The synergy of fire and salt produces particularly dramatic ghost forests. Along the Chesapeake Bay, stands of trees might gradually thin near open water, until just a few scraggly pines remain. But in some places here, acre upon acre of dead trees, sun-bleached and occasionally fire-blackened, stand sentinel over bubbling marshes.Yet while the ghost forests may evoke graveyards, the salt marsh plants that advance into dead and dying stands of trees are themselves valuable. Marshes provide homes for birds; they serve as nurseries for young fish and other sea creatures.And as the sea advances, the new marshes also provide a momentary buffer against the rising tide -- protecting the forests whose time has not yet come.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company

    Up and down the mid-Atlantic coast, sea levels are rising rapidly, creating stands of dead trees -- often bleached, sometimes blackened -- known as ghost forests.The water is gaining as much as 5 millimeters per year in some places, well above the global average of 3.1 millimeters, driven by profound environmental shifts that include climate change.Increasingly powerful storms, a consequence of a warming world, push seawater inland. More intense dry spells reduce freshwater flowing outward. Adding to the peril, in some places the land is naturally sinking.All of this allows seawater to claim new territory, killing trees from the roots up.Rising seas often conjure the threat to faraway, low-lying nations or island-states. But to understand the immediate consequences of some of the most rapid sea-level rise anywhere in the world, stand among the scraggly, dying pines of Dorchester County along the Maryland coast.Chesapeake Bay's Migrating MarshesPeople living on the eastern shore of Chesapeake Bay, the country's largest estuary system, have a front-row view of the sea's rapid advance, said Keryn Gedan, a wetland ecologist at George Washington University.Part of the reason for the quickly rising waters may be that the Gulf Stream, which flows northward up the coast, is slowing down as meltwater from Greenland inhibits its flow. That is causing what some scientists describe as a pileup of water along the East Coast, elevating sea levels locally.The effects of climate change are also exacerbated by land that is sinking as a result of geological processes triggered by the end of the last ice age.Because of the extraordinary speed at which the water is rising here, Gedan said, "I think of this area as a window into the future for the rest of the world."In Dorchester County, where dead and dying loblolly pines stand forlornly, Gedan has learned to "read" these forests from the mix of species present.As saltwater moves into the ground, oak and other sensitive hardwoods die first. Loblolly pine, the most salt-tolerant, is often the last tree standing until it, too, is overwhelmed.Then the saltwater marsh plants move in. If you're lucky, velvety tufts of cordgrass sprout. If not, impenetrable stands of cane-like Phragmites, an invasive species, take over.One reason the effects of rising seas are so noticeable here is that the land has very little slope. Those 5 millimeters of sea level, a rise that's only slightly more than two half-dollar coins stacked, can translate into saltwater pushing 15 feet inland per year, according to Gedan.Shoots of sweet gum, a tree with star-shaped leaves and bark like alligator skin, have more tolerance for salt than other hardwoods, such as oak. They can endure for a time as groundwater becomes more saline.But eventually, the sweet gum dies as well.The Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, where Gedan does research, lost 3,000 acres of forest and agricultural land between 1938 and 2006. More than 5,000 acres of marsh became open water.At first, this trend depressed Matt Whitbeck, a biologist with the Fish and Wildlife Service who works at the refuge. Saltwater marshes are important nurseries for the fish and crabs people like to eat.But in 2012, he realized the marsh wasn't entirely disappearing; it was migrating. Some of the 3,000 acres of forest that the refuge had lost had transformed into saltwater marsh.His outlook changed. "We need to think about where the marsh is moving, not where it is," he said.But in nearby Smithville, a historically African American town, this movement poses an existential threat. Backyards have been gobbled up by advancing marsh, basketball courts overgrown. What were once thick stands of pine near the water's edge have greatly thinned. The marsh now menaces a graveyard.Residents have battled the advancing wetlands for years, said Roslyn Watts, 60, who grew up here. All that time, she and her neighbors thought the inexorable advance was simply the price of living near water's edge.But in 2010, she learned about global warming and sea level rise, she said. She understood that what was happening wasn't entirely natural."I was angry," she said, and particularly incensed by the idea that retreat was the only workable strategy. The Dutch didn't retreat, she said. They built dikes. Why couldn't Smithville?"These families have been here since at least the late 19th century," she said. "There's a connection to the land."But Smithville, small and with few resources, has little money to adapt.Further south in Somerset County, numerous "for sale" signs stand in front of houses along the back roads. Some are abandoned, their yards overgrown by Phragmites. On Deal Island, ditches once dug to drain the land for farming and to help manage flooding from high tides now stand full of stagnant water.Today, in fact, these ditches are part of the threat: Instead of draining water out to sea, they can accelerate the movement of saltwater inland, said Kate Tully, an agroecologist at the University of Maryland.In general, saltwater can seep into the soil before sea level rise becomes obvious in other ways, killing sensitive plants far from the shore. "We call it the invisible flood, because you can't really see it," she said.Elizabeth van Dolah, an anthropologist at the University of Maryland who works with rural communities along the eastern shore, noted that residents here are accustomed to marsh migration and flooding. "But they're probably seeing it happening at a much quicker pace than in the past," she said. "Many of them recognize that, yes, they eventually have to leave. But for the time being, they intend to stay in place."Bob Fitzgerald, 80, has farmed near the town Princess Anne his whole life. Driving the back roads in his four-seater pickup, he pointed out fields that, just five years ago, grew corn but have since become too salty for crops."You can't give property away down here," he said.The asphalt roads are occasionally tinted red along the edges. That, too, is an effect of the floodwater "overtopping" the roads, Fitzgerald said."People who have built their homes here are damn fools," he said, speaking near a place where pine trees appear to be dying around a house. "It should have been abandoned."As the years pass, he said, it will be.'Cedar Cemeteries' in New JerseyFor 33 years, Ken Able has walked the same causeway almost daily at the Rutgers University Marine Field Station in Tuckerton, New Jersey. In that time he has seen marsh become open water, and the fish population transform as cooler-water species decline and those that thrive in warmer waters move in.Blue crab and summer flounder, both saltwater species, have pushed into freshwater rivers. Their arrival suggests the waterways are becoming saltier further inland.All these signs of change come from the ocean, a fluid and often fickle environment. Which is why Able, a professor emeritus of marine and coastal sciences, so appreciates the ghost forests. They're a signal of change from a stationary source: the trees themselves."A ghost forest is a way to capture geological history," he said. "There's not always a way to do that."The Atlantic white cedar, abundant around the Mullica River Estuary in stands such as this one, is an unusually durable parchment on which to capture that history.Long prized for lumber, its wood is highly resistant to rot. But the tree is also very sensitive to salt. It can tolerate maybe three salty high tides before succumbing.So when the trees begin dying, it's a trustworthy indicator that conditions are becoming more saline. It is an age-old phenomenon, now happening faster.Erosion of marshes and riverbanks has also accelerated, revealing buried cedar stumps from prehistoric ghost forests. Jennifer Walker, a frequent collaborator with Able who recently earned her Ph.D. in oceanography at Rutgers, dated one stump here to the fifth century. "Cedar cemeteries," she calls these places.As elsewhere, ghost forest formation seems to have sped up recently, particularly after Hurricane Sandy hit the region in 2012. "It's a good example of a slowly encroaching process -- and then storms making it worse," Walker said.She is studying sediment cores from salt marshes and dating ancient, dead cedars in order to reconstruct sea level rise and ghost forest formation through time.The pace of sea level rise first quickened in the late 19th century after the Industrial Revolution, Walker said, and then sped up again in recent decades. It's now rising faster than at any point in the past several thousand years.Much of the Mullica River Estuary is a nature preserve, its many tributaries remote and undeveloped. But since 2015, Able and Walker have taken a series of helicopter rides over the area. "It's not one giant ghost forest," Walker said. "But the more you look, the more you find them."From above, they've seen swaths of dead trees along riverbanks many miles from the open ocean, suggesting that Sandy pushed seawater far up the river system."You get a slug of saltwater," Able said, "and things die."On the North Carolina Coast, Fires and SaltPaul Taillie, a Ph.D. student at North Carolina State University, encountered a mystery: He wanted to know how quickly ghost forests form. So he repeated a study originally done 15 years earlier to see how plant life had changed over time.As expected, saltwater marsh had advanced. Pond pine and other salt-sensitive trees were dying. Salt-tolerant plants, including saw grass and black needle rush, were moving in.But unexpectedly, the change wasn't occurring evenly across the landscape. Trees were dying faster in some places than others.What could explain this uneven emergence of ghost forests?The study area had almost no slope -- much of it was just inches above sea level -- and the minor differences in elevation couldn't explain the variation.But a clue came from the soil. It tended to be saltier where trees were dying fastest.The explanation Taillie, who's now a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Florida, landed on had to do with drought. When droughts hit, the amount of freshwater emptying into the ocean from nearby rivers declines, making nearshore waters saltier in some places.That saltier water then pushes inland unevenly, killing trees in an irregular pattern across an otherwise mostly uniform landscape. "It's not just rising sea level" that creates ghost forests, Tallie said, but periods of dryness."It's more during times of drought, when you have less freshwater, that the saltwater creeps in," he said. "Salinity goes up."Wildfires are another accelerant.Wetlands burn naturally here during dry years. Fires often travel on top of standing water, consuming grass and trees that rise above the muck.In the past, young trees quickly sprouted after fires. But recently, some forests have failed to recover."There's almost no regeneration," Chris Moorman, a disturbance ecologist at North Carolina State University, said as we surveyed an expanse of dead, mostly branchless trees. He and Taillie said they think that wetlands like these have become too salty for young pond pines, which are more sensitive to salt than mature ones. They can't gain a foothold in marshes their own forebears could tolerate.Drought is predicted to become more frequent as the climate warms, Taillie said. That means wildfires, combined with intensified dry spells and amplified saltwater intrusion may, together, accelerate the formation of ghost forests independently of sea level rise.The synergy of fire and salt produces particularly dramatic ghost forests. Along the Chesapeake Bay, stands of trees might gradually thin near open water, until just a few scraggly pines remain. But in some places here, acre upon acre of dead trees, sun-bleached and occasionally fire-blackened, stand sentinel over bubbling marshes.Yet while the ghost forests may evoke graveyards, the salt marsh plants that advance into dead and dying stands of trees are themselves valuable. Marshes provide homes for birds; they serve as nurseries for young fish and other sea creatures.And as the sea advances, the new marshes also provide a momentary buffer against the rising tide -- protecting the forests whose time has not yet come.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company


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  • 54/79   Humans will not 'migrate' to other planets, Nobel winner says
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Humans will never migrate to a planet outside of Earth's solar system because it would take far too long to get there, Swiss Nobel laureate Michel Mayor said Wednesday.  Mayor and his colleague Didier Queloz were on Tuesday awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics for their research refining techniques to detect so-called exoplanets.  'If we are talking about exoplanets, things should be clear: we will not migrate there,' Mayor told AFP near Madrid on the sidelines of a conference when asked about the possibility of humans moving to other planets.

    Humans will never migrate to a planet outside of Earth's solar system because it would take far too long to get there, Swiss Nobel laureate Michel Mayor said Wednesday. Mayor and his colleague Didier Queloz were on Tuesday awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics for their research refining techniques to detect so-called exoplanets. 'If we are talking about exoplanets, things should be clear: we will not migrate there,' Mayor told AFP near Madrid on the sidelines of a conference when asked about the possibility of humans moving to other planets.


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  • 55/79   Nobel prize honors breakthroughs on lithium-ion batteries
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    If you're reading this on a cellphone or laptop computer, you might thank the three winners of this year's Nobel Prize in chemistry for their work on lithium-ion batteries.  Batteries that economically store energy from renewable sources like the wind and sun open up new possibilities to curb global warming.  'This is a highly charged story of tremendous potential,' quipped Olof Ramstrom of the Nobel committee for chemistry.

    If you're reading this on a cellphone or laptop computer, you might thank the three winners of this year's Nobel Prize in chemistry for their work on lithium-ion batteries. Batteries that economically store energy from renewable sources like the wind and sun open up new possibilities to curb global warming. 'This is a highly charged story of tremendous potential,' quipped Olof Ramstrom of the Nobel committee for chemistry.


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  • 56/79   NASA's first female launch director to lead countdowns during Artemis missions to the moon
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    NASA's Artemis program aims to send two American astronauts — a man and a woman — to the moon's south pole by 2024.

    NASA's Artemis program aims to send two American astronauts — a man and a woman — to the moon's south pole by 2024.


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  • 57/79   Scientists Designed a Drug for Just One Patient. Her Name Is Mila
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    A new drug, created to treat just one patient, has pushed the bounds of personalized medicine and has raised unexplored regulatory and ethical questions, scientists reported Wednesday.The drug, described in the New England Journal of Medicine, is believed to be the first "custom" treatment for a genetic disease. It is called milasen, named after the only patient who will ever take it: Mila (mee-lah) Makovec, who lives with her mother, Julia Vitarello, in Longmont, Colorado.Mila, 8, has a rapidly progressing neurological disorder that is fatal. Her symptoms started at age 3. Within a few years, she had gone from an agile, talkative child to one who was blind and unable to stand or hold up her head. She needed a feeding tube and experienced up to 30 seizures a day, each lasting one or two minutes.Vitarello learned in December 2016 that Mila had Batten's disease. But the girl's case was puzzling, doctors said. Batten's disease is recessive -- a patient must inherit two mutated versions of a gene, MFSD8, to develop the disease.Mila had just one mutated gene, and the other copy seemed normal. That should have been sufficient to prevent the disease.In March 2017, Dr. Timothy Yu and his colleagues at Boston Children's Hospital discovered that the problem with the intact gene lay in an extraneous bit of DNA that had scrambled the manufacturing of an important protein.That gave Yu an idea: Why not make a custom piece of RNA to block the effects of the extraneous DNA? Developing such a drug would be expensive, but there were no other options.Vitarello already had set up Mila's Miracle Foundation and was appealing for donations on GoFundMe. So, she began fundraising in earnest, eventually raising $3 million for a variety of research efforts.Yu's team oversaw development of the drug, tested it in rodents, and consulted with the Food and Drug Administration. In January 2018, the agency granted permission to give the drug to Mila. She got her first dose on Jan. 31, 2018.The drug was delivered through a spinal tap, so it could reach her brain. Within a month, Vitarello noticed a difference. Mila was having fewer seizures, and they were not lasting as long.With continued treatments, the number of seizures has diminished so much that the girl has between zero and six a day, and they last less than a minute.Mila rarely needs the feeding tube now, and is able once again to eat pureed foods. She cannot stand unassisted, but when she is held upright, her neck and back are straight, no longer slumped.Still, Mila has lost the last few words of her vocabulary and remains severely disabled."She is starting not to respond to things that made her laugh or smile," Vitarello said.Milasen is believed to be the first drug developed for a single patient (CAR-T cancer therapies, while individualized, are not drugs). But the path forward is not clear, Yu and his colleagues acknowledged.There are more than 7,000 rare diseases, and more than 90% have no FDA-approved treatment, according to Rachel Sher, vice president of regulatory and government affairs at the National Organization for Rare Disorders.Tens of thousands of patients could be in Mila's situation in the United States alone. But there are nowhere near enough researchers to make custom drugs for all who might want them.And even if there were, who would pay? Not the federal government, not drug companies and not insurers, said Dr. Steven Joffe, professor of medical ethics and health policy at the University of Pennsylvania."Unfortunately, that leaves it to families," he added. "It feels awfully uncomfortable, but that is the reality."That means custom drugs would be an option only for the very wealthy, those with the skills to raise large sums of money, or those who gain the support of foundations.Mila's drug development was mostly paid for by the foundation run by her mother, but she and Yu declined to say how much was spent.The idea of custom drugs also leads the FDA into uncharted territory. In an editorial published with Yu's paper, Dr. Janet Woodcock, director of the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, raised tough questions:What type of evidence is needed before exposing a human to a new drug? Even in rapidly progressing, fatal illnesses, precipitating severe complications or death is not acceptable, so what is the minimum assurance of safety that is needed?She also asked how a custom drug's efficacy might be evaluated, and how regulators should weigh the urgency of the patient's situation and the number of patients who could ultimately be treated. None of those questions have an easy answer.Brad Margus, founder of the A-T Children's Project, said he was hoping Yu would develop another custom drug for a 2-year-old girl with A-T, or ataxia telangiectasia, an extremely rare genetic disorder that causes a variety of symptoms, including problems moving, a weakened immune system and slowed mental development. Margus' two sons have A-T.His foundation would pay for the work, although the drug would be suitable for only one child. But Margus wondered how generalizable the custom-drug approach would be for "patients whose parents or disease advocates haven't been lucky enough to capture a slice of Tim Yu's time."Milasen will not cure Mila, Vitarello acknowledged. But Mila was 7 when she got her first dose."What if the next Mila is treated when she is 4 or 5?" she asked. The development of milasen "is opening up an entirely new treatment path.""As a mom, I still feel hopeful," Vitarello added. "But I have one foot in hope and one foot in reality."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company

    A new drug, created to treat just one patient, has pushed the bounds of personalized medicine and has raised unexplored regulatory and ethical questions, scientists reported Wednesday.The drug, described in the New England Journal of Medicine, is believed to be the first "custom" treatment for a genetic disease. It is called milasen, named after the only patient who will ever take it: Mila (mee-lah) Makovec, who lives with her mother, Julia Vitarello, in Longmont, Colorado.Mila, 8, has a rapidly progressing neurological disorder that is fatal. Her symptoms started at age 3. Within a few years, she had gone from an agile, talkative child to one who was blind and unable to stand or hold up her head. She needed a feeding tube and experienced up to 30 seizures a day, each lasting one or two minutes.Vitarello learned in December 2016 that Mila had Batten's disease. But the girl's case was puzzling, doctors said. Batten's disease is recessive -- a patient must inherit two mutated versions of a gene, MFSD8, to develop the disease.Mila had just one mutated gene, and the other copy seemed normal. That should have been sufficient to prevent the disease.In March 2017, Dr. Timothy Yu and his colleagues at Boston Children's Hospital discovered that the problem with the intact gene lay in an extraneous bit of DNA that had scrambled the manufacturing of an important protein.That gave Yu an idea: Why not make a custom piece of RNA to block the effects of the extraneous DNA? Developing such a drug would be expensive, but there were no other options.Vitarello already had set up Mila's Miracle Foundation and was appealing for donations on GoFundMe. So, she began fundraising in earnest, eventually raising $3 million for a variety of research efforts.Yu's team oversaw development of the drug, tested it in rodents, and consulted with the Food and Drug Administration. In January 2018, the agency granted permission to give the drug to Mila. She got her first dose on Jan. 31, 2018.The drug was delivered through a spinal tap, so it could reach her brain. Within a month, Vitarello noticed a difference. Mila was having fewer seizures, and they were not lasting as long.With continued treatments, the number of seizures has diminished so much that the girl has between zero and six a day, and they last less than a minute.Mila rarely needs the feeding tube now, and is able once again to eat pureed foods. She cannot stand unassisted, but when she is held upright, her neck and back are straight, no longer slumped.Still, Mila has lost the last few words of her vocabulary and remains severely disabled."She is starting not to respond to things that made her laugh or smile," Vitarello said.Milasen is believed to be the first drug developed for a single patient (CAR-T cancer therapies, while individualized, are not drugs). But the path forward is not clear, Yu and his colleagues acknowledged.There are more than 7,000 rare diseases, and more than 90% have no FDA-approved treatment, according to Rachel Sher, vice president of regulatory and government affairs at the National Organization for Rare Disorders.Tens of thousands of patients could be in Mila's situation in the United States alone. But there are nowhere near enough researchers to make custom drugs for all who might want them.And even if there were, who would pay? Not the federal government, not drug companies and not insurers, said Dr. Steven Joffe, professor of medical ethics and health policy at the University of Pennsylvania."Unfortunately, that leaves it to families," he added. "It feels awfully uncomfortable, but that is the reality."That means custom drugs would be an option only for the very wealthy, those with the skills to raise large sums of money, or those who gain the support of foundations.Mila's drug development was mostly paid for by the foundation run by her mother, but she and Yu declined to say how much was spent.The idea of custom drugs also leads the FDA into uncharted territory. In an editorial published with Yu's paper, Dr. Janet Woodcock, director of the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, raised tough questions:What type of evidence is needed before exposing a human to a new drug? Even in rapidly progressing, fatal illnesses, precipitating severe complications or death is not acceptable, so what is the minimum assurance of safety that is needed?She also asked how a custom drug's efficacy might be evaluated, and how regulators should weigh the urgency of the patient's situation and the number of patients who could ultimately be treated. None of those questions have an easy answer.Brad Margus, founder of the A-T Children's Project, said he was hoping Yu would develop another custom drug for a 2-year-old girl with A-T, or ataxia telangiectasia, an extremely rare genetic disorder that causes a variety of symptoms, including problems moving, a weakened immune system and slowed mental development. Margus' two sons have A-T.His foundation would pay for the work, although the drug would be suitable for only one child. But Margus wondered how generalizable the custom-drug approach would be for "patients whose parents or disease advocates haven't been lucky enough to capture a slice of Tim Yu's time."Milasen will not cure Mila, Vitarello acknowledged. But Mila was 7 when she got her first dose."What if the next Mila is treated when she is 4 or 5?" she asked. The development of milasen "is opening up an entirely new treatment path.""As a mom, I still feel hopeful," Vitarello added. "But I have one foot in hope and one foot in reality."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company


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  • 58/79   Even light smoking can still cause long-term lung damage, new study finds
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    New US research has found that smoking even just five cigarettes a day or less is enough to cause long-term damage to lungs.  Led by researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons, the new study looked at 25,352 participants age 17 to 93 years who were a mix of smokers, ex-smokers and never-smokers.  Thanks to using such a large study sample, the researchers were able to see differences in lung function among light smokers (defined as 5 or less cigarettes per day) and heavy smokers (30 or more cigarettes per day) which other studies have been unable to detect.

    New US research has found that smoking even just five cigarettes a day or less is enough to cause long-term damage to lungs. Led by researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons, the new study looked at 25,352 participants age 17 to 93 years who were a mix of smokers, ex-smokers and never-smokers. Thanks to using such a large study sample, the researchers were able to see differences in lung function among light smokers (defined as 5 or less cigarettes per day) and heavy smokers (30 or more cigarettes per day) which other studies have been unable to detect.


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  • 59/79   Is vaping safer than smoking? Depends who you ask, and what scientific study they point to
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The claim is central to electronic cigarettes' future, and is under scrutiny as cases of vaping-related lung injuries rise with at least 18 dead.

    The claim is central to electronic cigarettes' future, and is under scrutiny as cases of vaping-related lung injuries rise with at least 18 dead.


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  • 60/79   Family says Egyptian pro-democracy activist beaten in jail
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The family of a leading Egyptian pro-democracy activist, who was arrested amid a recent clampdown following anti-government protests, said on Thursday that he was beaten, threatened and stripped to his underwear while in custody.  There was no immediate comment from Egyptian authorities to the allegations.  Alaa Abdel-Fattah rose to prominence with the 2011 uprisings that swept the Middle East and in Egypt toppled longtime President Hosni Mubarak.

    The family of a leading Egyptian pro-democracy activist, who was arrested amid a recent clampdown following anti-government protests, said on Thursday that he was beaten, threatened and stripped to his underwear while in custody. There was no immediate comment from Egyptian authorities to the allegations. Alaa Abdel-Fattah rose to prominence with the 2011 uprisings that swept the Middle East and in Egypt toppled longtime President Hosni Mubarak.


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  • 61/79   Turkey makes small advances in 2nd day of Syria invasion
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Turkish ground forces seized at least one village from Kurdish fighters in northern Syria as they pressed ahead with their assault for a second day Thursday, pounding towns and villages along with border with airstrikes and artillery.  Residents of border areas within Syria scrambled in panic as they tried to get out on foot and in cars, pick-up trucks and motorcycle rickshaws piled with mattresses and belongings.  It was wrenchingly familiar for the many who only a few years ago, had fled the advances on their towns and villages by the Islamic State group.

    Turkish ground forces seized at least one village from Kurdish fighters in northern Syria as they pressed ahead with their assault for a second day Thursday, pounding towns and villages along with border with airstrikes and artillery. Residents of border areas within Syria scrambled in panic as they tried to get out on foot and in cars, pick-up trucks and motorcycle rickshaws piled with mattresses and belongings. It was wrenchingly familiar for the many who only a few years ago, had fled the advances on their towns and villages by the Islamic State group.


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  • 62/79   Why Is Turkey Fighting the Kurds in Syria?
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Turkish forces began a long-anticipated cross-border assault on Wednesday against the Syrian Democratic Forces, a Kurdish-led militia, in northeastern Syria.The dispute between Turkey and the Kurds has deep roots in regional power dynamics that have created a tangled web of interests. Further complicating the picture is the fact that the United States is an ally of both Turkey and the SDF, as the militia is known.President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey said the goal of the incursion was "to destroy the terror corridor" that he said Kurdish forces were trying to establish on his country's southern border, and to bring peace to the region.Leaders of the SDF and others in the region say the strikes are putting civilians at risk, and warned of an imminent humanitarian crisis. Kurdish groups on the ground shared photographs and videos of people fleeing villages as smoke rose from the site of strikes.To understand the current conflict requires knowing the background of the dispute between Turkey and the Kurds, and how the United States fits into the dynamic.Who are the Kurds?The Kurds are the fourth-largest ethnic group in the Middle East. Despite their numbers, they are a stateless and often marginalized people whose homeland stretches across Turkey, Iraq, Syria, Iran and Armenia.After World War I and the fall of the Ottoman Empire, many Kurds pushed for an independent Kurdish state, and promises were made in early treaties for the creation of a Kurdistan. But when the region was eventually divvied up, the nation never materialized.In the years since, numerous attempts at nationhood have been largely quashed.How does Turkey view the Kurds?Relations between the Turkish nation and the nationless Kurds have long been fraught.Turkey sees the rising power of Kurdish forces along its southern border as a threat, and Erdogan has for years made pronouncements of plans for a military intervention in the northern Syrian enclave.But in fact, the roots of the dispute extend much further back, and they are intrinsically tied to a domestic conflict in Turkey.Turkey has been in conflict with the Kurdistan Workers' Party, known as the PKK, since it launched a violent separatist movement in the country in the early 1980s. Both Turkey and the United States consider the PKK a terrorist organization.Across the border in Syria, an offshoot militia, the Kurdish People's Protection Units, has been active since 2004. The militia, known as the YPG, has long sought to form an autonomous state for the Kurds.The YPG and an associated militia of female fighters have been applauded by some in the West for their anti-Islamist stance. It has attracted a number of American and European volunteers to fight in its ranks during the battle against the Islamic State.But the militia members have deep ties to the PKK, the Kurdish group that Turkey considers a terrorist organization, though its leaders play down the links.Early in Syria's civil war, the militia had early success in establishing a peaceful enclave -- they called it Rojava -- in the north of the country.The militia members eventually joined with other regional groups and grew into the SDF, which was instrumental in wresting large stretches of Syrian territory from the Islamic State, or ISIS, and ousting ISIS from its last foothold in Syria earlier this year.As the SDF wrested back control of towns and cities across northeastern Syria from ISIS, Kurdish power grew. And as it did, Erdogan increasingly voiced concern.How does the U.S. fit in?The Turkish operation against the Kurds in Syria has left Washington stuck between two allies.President Donald Trump's announcement this week that he would be pulling troops from the country effectively greenlighted Turkey's incursion. Erdogan has long advocated a U.S. withdrawal from Syria and has urged Trump to pull his support from the SDF, most recently in a weekend phone call.The United States and Turkey, which are NATO partners, have long been close allies.But the Kurds and the United States also have a long history of cooperation.The U.S.-led coalition began working with the SDF in 2015, saying the Kurdish-led group was the most capable of pushing back the Islamic State militants who had seized large swaths of territory in Iraq and Syria. This proved to be true.Trump further muddied the United States' position when, after first voicing support for Erdogan's plan, he seemed to walk back his statements in the face of objections from political allies and opponents alike.Trump said on Twitter: "We may be in the process of leaving Syria, but in no way have we Abandoned the Kurds, who are special people and wonderful fighters." In a subsequent message he said that the United States was "helping the Kurds financially" and warned Turkey against unnecessary force.Could all this benefit ISIS?Possibly.The SDF proved a vital force in wresting back control of areas seized by ISIS militants. It also captured tens of thousands of Islamic State fighters and their families. Those people are now being held in makeshift prisons in the region being targeted by Turkey, and while Trump said he believes Turkey should be responsible for them, there are no plans for their relocation.While the territory of the Islamic State's self-declared "caliphate" has been wrested from the group, the security situation in much of Syria remains tenuous.Some fear that destabilizing northeastern Syria will create the same power vacuum that existed before the Islamic State's rise to power, and make way for the group to reemerge.Even now, despite their territorial losses, there is evidence that ISIS militants are active in Syria, said Melissa Dalton, director of the Cooperative Defense Project at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.With Turkey's new incursion into the country, she said, the SDF is likely to turn its attention away from its old adversaries."There is a very high risk of the Islamic State taking advantage of the SDF and the American and other coalition members being focused on the implications of the Turkish efforts," she said.Dalton said she was also concerned about increased potential for prison breaks and unrest among detainees."It's really a recipe for disaster," she said.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company

    Turkish forces began a long-anticipated cross-border assault on Wednesday against the Syrian Democratic Forces, a Kurdish-led militia, in northeastern Syria.The dispute between Turkey and the Kurds has deep roots in regional power dynamics that have created a tangled web of interests. Further complicating the picture is the fact that the United States is an ally of both Turkey and the SDF, as the militia is known.President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey said the goal of the incursion was "to destroy the terror corridor" that he said Kurdish forces were trying to establish on his country's southern border, and to bring peace to the region.Leaders of the SDF and others in the region say the strikes are putting civilians at risk, and warned of an imminent humanitarian crisis. Kurdish groups on the ground shared photographs and videos of people fleeing villages as smoke rose from the site of strikes.To understand the current conflict requires knowing the background of the dispute between Turkey and the Kurds, and how the United States fits into the dynamic.Who are the Kurds?The Kurds are the fourth-largest ethnic group in the Middle East. Despite their numbers, they are a stateless and often marginalized people whose homeland stretches across Turkey, Iraq, Syria, Iran and Armenia.After World War I and the fall of the Ottoman Empire, many Kurds pushed for an independent Kurdish state, and promises were made in early treaties for the creation of a Kurdistan. But when the region was eventually divvied up, the nation never materialized.In the years since, numerous attempts at nationhood have been largely quashed.How does Turkey view the Kurds?Relations between the Turkish nation and the nationless Kurds have long been fraught.Turkey sees the rising power of Kurdish forces along its southern border as a threat, and Erdogan has for years made pronouncements of plans for a military intervention in the northern Syrian enclave.But in fact, the roots of the dispute extend much further back, and they are intrinsically tied to a domestic conflict in Turkey.Turkey has been in conflict with the Kurdistan Workers' Party, known as the PKK, since it launched a violent separatist movement in the country in the early 1980s. Both Turkey and the United States consider the PKK a terrorist organization.Across the border in Syria, an offshoot militia, the Kurdish People's Protection Units, has been active since 2004. The militia, known as the YPG, has long sought to form an autonomous state for the Kurds.The YPG and an associated militia of female fighters have been applauded by some in the West for their anti-Islamist stance. It has attracted a number of American and European volunteers to fight in its ranks during the battle against the Islamic State.But the militia members have deep ties to the PKK, the Kurdish group that Turkey considers a terrorist organization, though its leaders play down the links.Early in Syria's civil war, the militia had early success in establishing a peaceful enclave -- they called it Rojava -- in the north of the country.The militia members eventually joined with other regional groups and grew into the SDF, which was instrumental in wresting large stretches of Syrian territory from the Islamic State, or ISIS, and ousting ISIS from its last foothold in Syria earlier this year.As the SDF wrested back control of towns and cities across northeastern Syria from ISIS, Kurdish power grew. And as it did, Erdogan increasingly voiced concern.How does the U.S. fit in?The Turkish operation against the Kurds in Syria has left Washington stuck between two allies.President Donald Trump's announcement this week that he would be pulling troops from the country effectively greenlighted Turkey's incursion. Erdogan has long advocated a U.S. withdrawal from Syria and has urged Trump to pull his support from the SDF, most recently in a weekend phone call.The United States and Turkey, which are NATO partners, have long been close allies.But the Kurds and the United States also have a long history of cooperation.The U.S.-led coalition began working with the SDF in 2015, saying the Kurdish-led group was the most capable of pushing back the Islamic State militants who had seized large swaths of territory in Iraq and Syria. This proved to be true.Trump further muddied the United States' position when, after first voicing support for Erdogan's plan, he seemed to walk back his statements in the face of objections from political allies and opponents alike.Trump said on Twitter: "We may be in the process of leaving Syria, but in no way have we Abandoned the Kurds, who are special people and wonderful fighters." In a subsequent message he said that the United States was "helping the Kurds financially" and warned Turkey against unnecessary force.Could all this benefit ISIS?Possibly.The SDF proved a vital force in wresting back control of areas seized by ISIS militants. It also captured tens of thousands of Islamic State fighters and their families. Those people are now being held in makeshift prisons in the region being targeted by Turkey, and while Trump said he believes Turkey should be responsible for them, there are no plans for their relocation.While the territory of the Islamic State's self-declared "caliphate" has been wrested from the group, the security situation in much of Syria remains tenuous.Some fear that destabilizing northeastern Syria will create the same power vacuum that existed before the Islamic State's rise to power, and make way for the group to reemerge.Even now, despite their territorial losses, there is evidence that ISIS militants are active in Syria, said Melissa Dalton, director of the Cooperative Defense Project at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.With Turkey's new incursion into the country, she said, the SDF is likely to turn its attention away from its old adversaries."There is a very high risk of the Islamic State taking advantage of the SDF and the American and other coalition members being focused on the implications of the Turkish efforts," she said.Dalton said she was also concerned about increased potential for prison breaks and unrest among detainees."It's really a recipe for disaster," she said.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company


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  • 63/79   Nissan to start building new Juke car at UK plant as Brexit looms
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Nissan  said it will begin making the next-generation Juke vehicle at Britain’s biggest car plant on Monday, just over two weeks before a possible no-deal Brexit which the industry has warned could bring production to a halt.  Nissan decided in 2015, before the 2016 referendum was even held, to make the latest version of the sport utility vehicle at its northern English Sunderland factory, reflecting how major decisions are made years in advance.  The Japanese company, which was encouraged by Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher in the 1980s to use Britain as a gateway to the Continent, has spent 100 million pounds on the latest investment in Juke with 70% of the output for EU markets.

    Nissan said it will begin making the next-generation Juke vehicle at Britain’s biggest car plant on Monday, just over two weeks before a possible no-deal Brexit which the industry has warned could bring production to a halt. Nissan decided in 2015, before the 2016 referendum was even held, to make the latest version of the sport utility vehicle at its northern English Sunderland factory, reflecting how major decisions are made years in advance. The Japanese company, which was encouraged by Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher in the 1980s to use Britain as a gateway to the Continent, has spent 100 million pounds on the latest investment in Juke with 70% of the output for EU markets.


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  • 64/79   Nissan Gives Cold Comfort to Brexit-Threatened Auto Plant
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Follow @Brexit and sign up to our Brexit Bulletin. Nissan Motor Co. unveiled a revamped production line in the English town of Sunderland on Thursday. Yet the fanfare around the updated Juke crossover model may prove to be no more than a stay of execution for a factory whose future will be on the line in the event of a no-deal Brexit.The introduction of the face-lift auto at Britain’s biggest car plant will be accompanied by the loss of one of five daily work shifts as staff transfer between the site’s two assembly lines, a move that may be a precursor of further cuts to come.Carmakers have been increasingly vocal in opposing a British split from the European Union without a deal, warning of a potentially devastating impact on the industry. Export tariffs would make locally-built autos uncompetitive when sold in mainland Europe and customs checks and red tape would disrupt ultra-efficient just-in-time supply lines, they say.Nissan, which made Britain its European manufacturing base in 1986, has said it’s “waiting for clarity” on the implications of Brexit. It has already scrapped plans to build its X-Trail sport-utility vehicle at Sunderland, which has a workforce of 6,500 people, and ended production of the luxury Infiniti brand there in July. Production of the larger Qashqai SUV could be moved to Spain.Nissan has invested 100 million pounds ($122 million) in Sunderland to build the revamped Juke, according to a statement Thursday, funding equipment including 27 die sets that cut and mold the car’s steel body and four spray booths to accommodate a choice of 15 different two-tone color combinations.No HybridYet the latest iteration of the 10-year-old design goes on sale without a mention of a hybrid or electric version, in an industry where many new models come to market with options beyond traditional combustion engines.Jobs at the plant appear safe in the short term, with overall headcount set to remain the same despite the lost shift as manufacturing staff are redeployed to the site’s Line Two to support production of Juke, according to an emailed statement from the company late Wednesday.But Nissan could find it relatively easy to shift Juke assembly across the Channel if a hard Brexit was to prove too ruinous. The company and partner Renault SA already build multiple models on identical platforms. The Juke’s Common Module Family B platform is architecture being used by Renault to assemble the latest versions of the Clio supermini and Captur crossover.Priced from 17,395 pounds ($21,274), Nissan will begin delivering the Juke next month, days after the Oct. 31 date for Britain to leave the EU. While Parliament has taken steps to force Boris Johnson to seek an extension to the U.K.’s membership of the block in the absence of a deal, the prime minister has pledged to stick to the deadline.More than 1 million Jukes have been built in Sunderland since the car was launched in 2010. Almost 80,000 were churned out last year, equivalent to almost a fifth of the plant’s total production of 442,000 autos, with about a third sold in the U.K.‘Serious Implications’The facility in northeast England helped propel Britain to record auto output and sales in 2016, before concerns about Brexit and a government campaign against diesel motors began to weigh on demand. The site, which also makes the all-electric Leaf hatchback, supports close to 30,000 supply-chain jobs.Nissan has said friction-less trade is central to Sunderland’s success and that a sudden change from current arrangements will have “serious implications” for the industry. The company’s confidence in the U.K. has wavered since Greg Clark, former business secretary, wrote to it after the 2016 Brexit vote with four key assurances, including a pledge to seek tariff-free access to the EU.The carmaker’s shares rose 0.5% to 656.5 yen in Tokyo trading Thursday. They are down 25% this year.Nissan won a 61 million-pound government regional development grant last year to boost productivity in Sunderland, though its aims included securing new production of the now-canceled X-Trail model. Following the cancellation, Clark told the House of Commons that “Nissan will be invited to resubmit an application in the light of its changed investment.”The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy didn’t have an update on the situation.(Updates with Sunderland investment in fifth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Alex Morales and Ania Nussbaum.To contact the reporter on this story: Siddharth Philip in London at sphilip3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tara Patel at tpatel2@bloomberg.net, Christopher JasperFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Follow @Brexit and sign up to our Brexit Bulletin. Nissan Motor Co. unveiled a revamped production line in the English town of Sunderland on Thursday. Yet the fanfare around the updated Juke crossover model may prove to be no more than a stay of execution for a factory whose future will be on the line in the event of a no-deal Brexit.The introduction of the face-lift auto at Britain’s biggest car plant will be accompanied by the loss of one of five daily work shifts as staff transfer between the site’s two assembly lines, a move that may be a precursor of further cuts to come.Carmakers have been increasingly vocal in opposing a British split from the European Union without a deal, warning of a potentially devastating impact on the industry. Export tariffs would make locally-built autos uncompetitive when sold in mainland Europe and customs checks and red tape would disrupt ultra-efficient just-in-time supply lines, they say.Nissan, which made Britain its European manufacturing base in 1986, has said it’s “waiting for clarity” on the implications of Brexit. It has already scrapped plans to build its X-Trail sport-utility vehicle at Sunderland, which has a workforce of 6,500 people, and ended production of the luxury Infiniti brand there in July. Production of the larger Qashqai SUV could be moved to Spain.Nissan has invested 100 million pounds ($122 million) in Sunderland to build the revamped Juke, according to a statement Thursday, funding equipment including 27 die sets that cut and mold the car’s steel body and four spray booths to accommodate a choice of 15 different two-tone color combinations.No HybridYet the latest iteration of the 10-year-old design goes on sale without a mention of a hybrid or electric version, in an industry where many new models come to market with options beyond traditional combustion engines.Jobs at the plant appear safe in the short term, with overall headcount set to remain the same despite the lost shift as manufacturing staff are redeployed to the site’s Line Two to support production of Juke, according to an emailed statement from the company late Wednesday.But Nissan could find it relatively easy to shift Juke assembly across the Channel if a hard Brexit was to prove too ruinous. The company and partner Renault SA already build multiple models on identical platforms. The Juke’s Common Module Family B platform is architecture being used by Renault to assemble the latest versions of the Clio supermini and Captur crossover.Priced from 17,395 pounds ($21,274), Nissan will begin delivering the Juke next month, days after the Oct. 31 date for Britain to leave the EU. While Parliament has taken steps to force Boris Johnson to seek an extension to the U.K.’s membership of the block in the absence of a deal, the prime minister has pledged to stick to the deadline.More than 1 million Jukes have been built in Sunderland since the car was launched in 2010. Almost 80,000 were churned out last year, equivalent to almost a fifth of the plant’s total production of 442,000 autos, with about a third sold in the U.K.‘Serious Implications’The facility in northeast England helped propel Britain to record auto output and sales in 2016, before concerns about Brexit and a government campaign against diesel motors began to weigh on demand. The site, which also makes the all-electric Leaf hatchback, supports close to 30,000 supply-chain jobs.Nissan has said friction-less trade is central to Sunderland’s success and that a sudden change from current arrangements will have “serious implications” for the industry. The company’s confidence in the U.K. has wavered since Greg Clark, former business secretary, wrote to it after the 2016 Brexit vote with four key assurances, including a pledge to seek tariff-free access to the EU.The carmaker’s shares rose 0.5% to 656.5 yen in Tokyo trading Thursday. They are down 25% this year.Nissan won a 61 million-pound government regional development grant last year to boost productivity in Sunderland, though its aims included securing new production of the now-canceled X-Trail model. Following the cancellation, Clark told the House of Commons that “Nissan will be invited to resubmit an application in the light of its changed investment.”The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy didn’t have an update on the situation.(Updates with Sunderland investment in fifth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Alex Morales and Ania Nussbaum.To contact the reporter on this story: Siddharth Philip in London at sphilip3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tara Patel at tpatel2@bloomberg.net, Christopher JasperFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 65/79   The Latest: EU concerned over Turkey's offensive in Syria
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The European Union says that the Turkish offensive in Kurdish-held areas of Syria is setting back any hope for progress toward ending the conflict.  EU spokeswoman Maja Kocijancic said on Thursday that the offensive will worsen the stream of refugees from Syria, increase violence against innocent civilians and obstruct the fight against the Islamic State group.

    The European Union says that the Turkish offensive in Kurdish-held areas of Syria is setting back any hope for progress toward ending the conflict. EU spokeswoman Maja Kocijancic said on Thursday that the offensive will worsen the stream of refugees from Syria, increase violence against innocent civilians and obstruct the fight against the Islamic State group.


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  • 66/79   Yemen to become world's poorest country if war continues: UN
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    War-ravaged Yemen is on course to become the world's poorest country if the conflict persists, the United Nations said in a report.  'If fighting continues through 2022, Yemen will rank the poorest country in the world, with 79 percent of the population living under the poverty line and 65 percent classified as extremely poor,' according to the United Nations Development Programme report, published Wednesday.  Because of the war, poverty in Yemen has jumped from 47 percent of the population in 2014 to a projected 75 percent by the end of 2019.

    War-ravaged Yemen is on course to become the world's poorest country if the conflict persists, the United Nations said in a report. 'If fighting continues through 2022, Yemen will rank the poorest country in the world, with 79 percent of the population living under the poverty line and 65 percent classified as extremely poor,' according to the United Nations Development Programme report, published Wednesday. Because of the war, poverty in Yemen has jumped from 47 percent of the population in 2014 to a projected 75 percent by the end of 2019.


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  • 67/79   Turkey's Erdogan threatens to send 'millions' of refugees to Europe if EU calls Syria offensive 'invasion'
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Turkey's president Recep Tayyip Erdogan has threatened to send "millions" of Syrian refugees to Europe in response to criticism of his military offensive into Kurdish-controlled northern Syria. Speaking to his party, Mr Erdogan said Turkish forces had killed 109 "militants" since the operation began on Wednesday, and warned he would "open the doors" to spark a new refugee crisis in Europe if the EU called it an "invasion." "Hey EU, wake up. I say it again: if you try to frame our operation there as an invasion, our task is simple: we will open the doors and send 3.6 million migrants to you," he said.  Shelling near Akcakale, Sanliurfa inside Syria, taken from the Turkish side of the border on Thursday morning. Credit:  Lefteris Pitarakis/ AP He added that Islamic State prisoners held by Kurdish forces would be kept in jail or returned to home countries willing to take them.  The comments came as a Syrian human rights group said up to 100,000 civilians have been displaced by fighting since Turkey launched its offensive with shelling and airstrikes against Kurdish strong points and cities on Wednesday afternoon. Large convoys of civilian cars were still heading south towards the cities of Hasekah and Tel Temir in a bid to flee the fighting on Thursday morning.  The Syrian Red Crescent said five civilians had been killed and 25, including six children, injured by 9 pm on Wednesday.  Turkey, which says it wants to create a “safe zone” on the Syrian side of the border, said it had seized all its designated objective for the first day and that the operation continued to go as planned.  "Our heroic commandos taking part in Operation Peace Spring are continuing to advance east of the Euphrates (river)," the Defence Ministry wrote on Twitter. "The designated targets were seized," it said in a later statement. The Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces said they had repulsed a Turkish attack on the city of Tel Abyad and said claims Turkey had made any advance east the the Euphrates were false.  A spokesman for the National Army, a Turkish-backed Syrian rebel group, said its fighters were moving towards both cities in support of the Turkish army, but denied SDF reports of heavy clashes near Tel Abyad.  Recep Tayyip Erdogan said he would "open the door" to Europe for millions of Syrian refugees if the EU called the Turkish operation an "invasion" Credit: REX Witnesses said there was shelling around Ras al Ain, also known as Sani Kani, the border town that appears to be a key Turkish objective for the campaign. The SDF also said they have come under attack by Islamic State sleeper cell taking advantage of the Turkish offensive.  Five Isil fighters were killed in a failed attack on security forces in the village of Tweimiyeh, near the Turkish border, on Thursday morning, the group said.  “Daesh sleep cells this Thursday morning tried to take over al Twimiyah villages to hit security and cause chaos by targeting one of our military points,” the SDF said in a statement. “A number of them were killed and the rest were captured.” The reported attack came as Kurdish authorities accused Turkey of a “clear attempt” to help Isil prisoners escape by shelling a prison holding militants of more than 60 nationalities.  Shelling on Wednesday night targeted part of the Chirkin prison in the city of Qamishli, Kurdish-led authorities said in a statement. No Isil prisoners are known to have escaped.  On Wednesday evening Donald Trump said US forces had taken custody of several foreign Isis prisoners, including notorious British fighters known as the “Beatles” London-born Alexanda Kotey, 35, and El Shafee Elsheikh, a 31-year-old Briton born in Sudan, had been in the custody of the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces since February 2018. They will now face trial in the United States.  Syrian government allies Russia and Iran both called for an end to the offensive. Britain joined other European Union countries in calling on Turkey to cease the operation on Wednesday. On Thursday morning, Italian Foreign Minister Luigi Di Maio called the offensive “unacceptable.”  Meanwhile Iran, a close ally of Syrian president Bashar al-Assad’s regime, called Thursday for “an immediate halt” to the offensive and demanded Turkish forces withdraw. Russia, another Syrian ally, blamed the chaos on American policy making and called for dialogue between Turkey and the Assad government. Bashar Assad does not control the Kurdish-led autonomous region in northern Syria. China said Syria's territorial integrity must be "respected" and called on Turkey to "exercise restraint."

    Turkey's president Recep Tayyip Erdogan has threatened to send "millions" of Syrian refugees to Europe in response to criticism of his military offensive into Kurdish-controlled northern Syria. Speaking to his party, Mr Erdogan said Turkish forces had killed 109 "militants" since the operation began on Wednesday, and warned he would "open the doors" to spark a new refugee crisis in Europe if the EU called it an "invasion." "Hey EU, wake up. I say it again: if you try to frame our operation there as an invasion, our task is simple: we will open the doors and send 3.6 million migrants to you," he said.  Shelling near Akcakale, Sanliurfa inside Syria, taken from the Turkish side of the border on Thursday morning. Credit:  Lefteris Pitarakis/ AP He added that Islamic State prisoners held by Kurdish forces would be kept in jail or returned to home countries willing to take them.  The comments came as a Syrian human rights group said up to 100,000 civilians have been displaced by fighting since Turkey launched its offensive with shelling and airstrikes against Kurdish strong points and cities on Wednesday afternoon. Large convoys of civilian cars were still heading south towards the cities of Hasekah and Tel Temir in a bid to flee the fighting on Thursday morning.  The Syrian Red Crescent said five civilians had been killed and 25, including six children, injured by 9 pm on Wednesday.  Turkey, which says it wants to create a “safe zone” on the Syrian side of the border, said it had seized all its designated objective for the first day and that the operation continued to go as planned.  "Our heroic commandos taking part in Operation Peace Spring are continuing to advance east of the Euphrates (river)," the Defence Ministry wrote on Twitter. "The designated targets were seized," it said in a later statement. The Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces said they had repulsed a Turkish attack on the city of Tel Abyad and said claims Turkey had made any advance east the the Euphrates were false.  A spokesman for the National Army, a Turkish-backed Syrian rebel group, said its fighters were moving towards both cities in support of the Turkish army, but denied SDF reports of heavy clashes near Tel Abyad.  Recep Tayyip Erdogan said he would "open the door" to Europe for millions of Syrian refugees if the EU called the Turkish operation an "invasion" Credit: REX Witnesses said there was shelling around Ras al Ain, also known as Sani Kani, the border town that appears to be a key Turkish objective for the campaign. The SDF also said they have come under attack by Islamic State sleeper cell taking advantage of the Turkish offensive.  Five Isil fighters were killed in a failed attack on security forces in the village of Tweimiyeh, near the Turkish border, on Thursday morning, the group said.  “Daesh sleep cells this Thursday morning tried to take over al Twimiyah villages to hit security and cause chaos by targeting one of our military points,” the SDF said in a statement. “A number of them were killed and the rest were captured.” The reported attack came as Kurdish authorities accused Turkey of a “clear attempt” to help Isil prisoners escape by shelling a prison holding militants of more than 60 nationalities.  Shelling on Wednesday night targeted part of the Chirkin prison in the city of Qamishli, Kurdish-led authorities said in a statement. No Isil prisoners are known to have escaped.  On Wednesday evening Donald Trump said US forces had taken custody of several foreign Isis prisoners, including notorious British fighters known as the “Beatles” London-born Alexanda Kotey, 35, and El Shafee Elsheikh, a 31-year-old Briton born in Sudan, had been in the custody of the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces since February 2018. They will now face trial in the United States.  Syrian government allies Russia and Iran both called for an end to the offensive. Britain joined other European Union countries in calling on Turkey to cease the operation on Wednesday. On Thursday morning, Italian Foreign Minister Luigi Di Maio called the offensive “unacceptable.”  Meanwhile Iran, a close ally of Syrian president Bashar al-Assad’s regime, called Thursday for “an immediate halt” to the offensive and demanded Turkish forces withdraw. Russia, another Syrian ally, blamed the chaos on American policy making and called for dialogue between Turkey and the Assad government. Bashar Assad does not control the Kurdish-led autonomous region in northern Syria. China said Syria's territorial integrity must be "respected" and called on Turkey to "exercise restraint."


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  • 68/79   N. Korea threatens to resume nuke, long-range missile tests
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    North Korea threatened again Thursday to resume nuclear and long-range missile tests, accusing the U.S. of having instigated some members of the U.N. Security Council to condemn its recent weapons tests.  The warning by Pyongyang's Foreign Ministry followed the weekend breakdown of North Korea-U.S. nuclear negotiations in Sweden, the first such talks between the countries in more than seven months.  North Korea said the talks collapsed because the U.S. didn't have any new proposals, and whether it maintains a self-imposed moratorium on major weapons tests was up to Washington.

    North Korea threatened again Thursday to resume nuclear and long-range missile tests, accusing the U.S. of having instigated some members of the U.N. Security Council to condemn its recent weapons tests. The warning by Pyongyang's Foreign Ministry followed the weekend breakdown of North Korea-U.S. nuclear negotiations in Sweden, the first such talks between the countries in more than seven months. North Korea said the talks collapsed because the U.S. didn't have any new proposals, and whether it maintains a self-imposed moratorium on major weapons tests was up to Washington.


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  • 69/79   Q&A: How is China-India summit affecting Asia rivalry
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Chinese President Xi Jinping is coming to India to meet with Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Friday, just weeks after Beijing supported India's rival Pakistan in raising the issue of New Delhi's recent actions in disputed Kashmir at the U.N. General Assembly meeting.  It was just the latest slight to India-China relations, which both leaders project as solid but which are constantly at risk because of the ongoing rivalry for dominance in Asia.

    Chinese President Xi Jinping is coming to India to meet with Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Friday, just weeks after Beijing supported India's rival Pakistan in raising the issue of New Delhi's recent actions in disputed Kashmir at the U.N. General Assembly meeting. It was just the latest slight to India-China relations, which both leaders project as solid but which are constantly at risk because of the ongoing rivalry for dominance in Asia.


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  • 70/79   Brown-Bag Lunches for Kids With Food Allergies
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...


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  • 71/79   What to Feed Your Family When the Power Goes Out
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...


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  • 72/79   Try These Healthy Snack Ideas for Kids
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...

    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...


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  • 73/79   The 9 Best Jobs for Teachers To Make Some Cash During the Summer Break
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.


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  • 74/79   How to Spot and Avoid Algal Blooms
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...


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  • 75/79   Get These 4 Vaccines for College
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If your child is a college student—or soon to be one—making sure he or she is fully vaccinated is critically important, especially for those who will be living in a dorm or other shared space. Th...

    If your child is a college student—or soon to be one—making sure he or she is fully vaccinated is critically important, especially for those who will be living in a dorm or other shared space. Th...


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  • 76/79   DNA detectives: New tech can mean a diagnosis for your child, but not a lot of answers
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Four-year-old Eli Kadkhoda is one of a handful of children with IRF2BPL-related condition, named after the gene to which it is linked. Its patients are all healthy at birth, stumbling and losing speech by kindergarten, wheelchair-dependent soon after.

    Four-year-old Eli Kadkhoda is one of a handful of children with IRF2BPL-related condition, named after the gene to which it is linked. Its patients are all healthy at birth, stumbling and losing speech by kindergarten, wheelchair-dependent soon after.


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  • 77/79   Will Your Health Insurance Cover You Overseas?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you’re traveling abroad this summer, the last thing you probably want to think about is what you’ll do if you get sick or injured. But experts say 15 percent of travelers encounter some kind o...

    If you’re traveling abroad this summer, the last thing you probably want to think about is what you’ll do if you get sick or injured. But experts say 15 percent of travelers encounter some kind o...


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  • 78/79   9 Easy Ways to Make Your Jack-o'-Lanterns Last Longer
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    A little bleach goes a long way.

    A little bleach goes a long way.


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  • 79/79   Don't Forget These Vaccines When You Travel
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you're planning a summer trip overseas, you may be preoccupied with booking airfare and finding lodging, but certain destinations require an extra step of planning: travel vaccines. You might...

    If you're planning a summer trip overseas, you may be preoccupied with booking airfare and finding lodging, but certain destinations require an extra step of planning: travel vaccines. You might...


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