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News Slideshows (11/07/2019 03 hours)


  • 1/79   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


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    Press Review


    Cole Anthony   Bill Gates   T.I.   Colin Firth   Sessions   Santana Garrett   Noura   Ashlee Simpson   Wanda Sykes   Kelly Osbourne   Tony Snell   Tar Heels   Pete Dunne   She's 18   Kyle Young   Bacot   Matthew Macfadyen   Dakota Kai   Jake Allen   Papa Johns   Cole World   
  • 2/79   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


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  • 3/79   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


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  • 4/79   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


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  • 5/79   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


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  • 6/79   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


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  • 7/79   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


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  • 8/79   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


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  • 9/79   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


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  • 10/79   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


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  • 11/79   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


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  • 12/79   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


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  • 13/79   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


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  • 14/79   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named.  Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does.  At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


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  • 15/79   PHOTOS: Fluorescent turtle embryo wins forty-fifth annual Nikon Small World Competition

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.


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  • 16/79   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


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  • 17/79   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


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  • 18/79   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


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  • 19/79   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


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  • 20/79   Donald Trump continues campaign rally tour for Louisiana GOP candidate Eddie Rispone
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Trump's Wednesday night rally is his third in a solidly Republican Southern state in less than a week.

    Trump's Wednesday night rally is his third in a solidly Republican Southern state in less than a week.


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  • 21/79   Europeans look to China as global partner, shun Trump's US
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    When France's president wants to carry European concerns to the world stage to find solutions for climate change, trade tensions or Iran's nuclear ambitions, he no longer calls Washington.  President Emmanuel Macron's visit to China this week suggests that the United States risks being sidelined on the global stage under President Donald Trump.  One moment spoke volumes: Chinese President Xi Jinping sampling French wines, which Trump's administration recently slapped with heavy new tariffs.

    When France's president wants to carry European concerns to the world stage to find solutions for climate change, trade tensions or Iran's nuclear ambitions, he no longer calls Washington. President Emmanuel Macron's visit to China this week suggests that the United States risks being sidelined on the global stage under President Donald Trump. One moment spoke volumes: Chinese President Xi Jinping sampling French wines, which Trump's administration recently slapped with heavy new tariffs.


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  • 22/79   Should You Be Excited About Johnson Controls-Hitachi Air Conditioning India Limited's (NSE:JCHAC) 15% Return On Equity?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    One of the best investments we can make is in our own knowledge and skill set. With that in mind, this article will...

    One of the best investments we can make is in our own knowledge and skill set. With that in mind, this article will...


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  • 23/79   How to live off the land... in a major US city
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Rob Greenfield needs a lift.  Ride sharing is one of the many ways in which he tries to reduce his carbon footprint -- but the other is more extreme.  Yes, roadkill is an option for the 33-year-old Greenfield.

    Rob Greenfield needs a lift. Ride sharing is one of the many ways in which he tries to reduce his carbon footprint -- but the other is more extreme. Yes, roadkill is an option for the 33-year-old Greenfield.


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  • 24/79   Could Fairwood Holdings Limited (HKG:52) Have The Makings Of Another Dividend Aristocrat?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Could Fairwood Holdings Limited (HKG:52) be an attractive dividend share to own for the long haul? Investors are often...

    Could Fairwood Holdings Limited (HKG:52) be an attractive dividend share to own for the long haul? Investors are often...


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  • 25/79   Did You Manage To Avoid Huayi Tencent Entertainment's (HKG:419) Devastating 88% Share Price Drop?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Long term investing works well, but it doesn't always work for each individual stock. We really hate to see fellow...

    Long term investing works well, but it doesn't always work for each individual stock. We really hate to see fellow...


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  • 26/79   Stocks Mixed as Interim Trade Deal Hits Roadblock: Markets Wrap
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Stocks in Asia were mixed Thursday after reports that the signing of a partial U.S.-China trade deal may be delayed until next month. Treasuries extended Wednesday’s gains.Equities in Japan edged up, while Hong Kong and China opened flat and South Korean stocks slipped. The S&P 500 Index closed little changed Wednesday. The latest news suggested that the signing of a preliminary trade agreement may not happen this month as originally planned as the two sides wrangle over a location. West Texas oil remained near $53 a barrel.Mounting hopes of a U.S.-China trade deal has buoyed confidence in markets this month just as key economic indicators show signs of stabilization. While the latest data from Europe suggest a robust recovery may not be on the cards, a relative improvement eased fears that the global economy was hurtling toward a recession.“We’re still waiting to see what sticks” on any deal, Patrick Chovanec, chief strategist at Silvercrest Asset Management, told Bloomberg TV. “Investors should be patient and not leap to any conclusions based on today’s headlines or yesterday’s headlines.”Elsewhere, oil steadied after slumping in wake of a report that the biggest producers in OPEC+ aren’t pushing for deeper oil-supply cuts at meetings next month.Here are some key events coming up this week:Earnings are due this week from companies including: Walt Disney, Toyota, Deutsche Telekom.A Bank of England monetary decision is due Thursday.The USDA World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates Report for November comes out Friday.These are the main moves in markets:StocksJapan’s Topix index added 0.2% of as 10:30 a.m. in Tokyo.The Shanghai Composite Index was flat.Hong Kong’s Hang Seng Index was flat.South Korea’s Kospi index dropped 0.2%.Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 Index rose 0.7%.Futures on the S&P 500 were flat. The gauge added 0.1% on Wednesday.CurrenciesThe yen was little changed at 108.87 per dollar.The offshore yuan was steady at 7.0118 per dollar.The Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index was little changed.The euro bought $1.1067.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries decreased two basis points to 1.81%.Australia’s 10-year yield fell five basis points to 1.22%.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude was flat at $56.34 a barrel.Gold was little changed at $1,490.85 an ounce.To contact the reporters on this story: Andreea Papuc in Sydney at apapuc1@bloomberg.net;Adam Haigh in Sydney at ahaigh1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Christopher Anstey at canstey@bloomberg.net, Andreea PapucFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Stocks in Asia were mixed Thursday after reports that the signing of a partial U.S.-China trade deal may be delayed until next month. Treasuries extended Wednesday’s gains.Equities in Japan edged up, while Hong Kong and China opened flat and South Korean stocks slipped. The S&P 500 Index closed little changed Wednesday. The latest news suggested that the signing of a preliminary trade agreement may not happen this month as originally planned as the two sides wrangle over a location. West Texas oil remained near $53 a barrel.Mounting hopes of a U.S.-China trade deal has buoyed confidence in markets this month just as key economic indicators show signs of stabilization. While the latest data from Europe suggest a robust recovery may not be on the cards, a relative improvement eased fears that the global economy was hurtling toward a recession.“We’re still waiting to see what sticks” on any deal, Patrick Chovanec, chief strategist at Silvercrest Asset Management, told Bloomberg TV. “Investors should be patient and not leap to any conclusions based on today’s headlines or yesterday’s headlines.”Elsewhere, oil steadied after slumping in wake of a report that the biggest producers in OPEC+ aren’t pushing for deeper oil-supply cuts at meetings next month.Here are some key events coming up this week:Earnings are due this week from companies including: Walt Disney, Toyota, Deutsche Telekom.A Bank of England monetary decision is due Thursday.The USDA World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates Report for November comes out Friday.These are the main moves in markets:StocksJapan’s Topix index added 0.2% of as 10:30 a.m. in Tokyo.The Shanghai Composite Index was flat.Hong Kong’s Hang Seng Index was flat.South Korea’s Kospi index dropped 0.2%.Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 Index rose 0.7%.Futures on the S&P 500 were flat. The gauge added 0.1% on Wednesday.CurrenciesThe yen was little changed at 108.87 per dollar.The offshore yuan was steady at 7.0118 per dollar.The Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index was little changed.The euro bought $1.1067.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries decreased two basis points to 1.81%.Australia’s 10-year yield fell five basis points to 1.22%.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude was flat at $56.34 a barrel.Gold was little changed at $1,490.85 an ounce.To contact the reporters on this story: Andreea Papuc in Sydney at apapuc1@bloomberg.net;Adam Haigh in Sydney at ahaigh1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Christopher Anstey at canstey@bloomberg.net, Andreea PapucFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 27/79   Could Ellex Medical Lasers Limited's (ASX:ELX) Investor Composition Influence The Stock Price?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    A look at the shareholders of Ellex Medical Lasers Limited (ASX:ELX) can tell us which group is most powerful. Large...

    A look at the shareholders of Ellex Medical Lasers Limited (ASX:ELX) can tell us which group is most powerful. Large...


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  • 28/79   Here's Why We're Watching Dimerix's (ASX:DXB) Cash Burn Situation
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    There's no doubt that money can be made by owning shares of unprofitable businesses. For example, biotech and mining...

    There's no doubt that money can be made by owning shares of unprofitable businesses. For example, biotech and mining...


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  • 29/79   Efficient Frontier: Definition, Benefits, and Uses
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    As an investor, wouldn’t it be nice to know that your portfolio both limits your risk and maximizes return? Ideally, it will do just that.  The efficient frontier is a set of investment portfolios that maximizes returns while minimizing risk. … Continue reading ->The post Efficient Frontier: Definition, Benefits, and Uses  appeared first on SmartAsset Blog.

    As an investor, wouldn’t it be nice to know that your portfolio both limits your risk and maximizes return? Ideally, it will do just that.  The efficient frontier is a set of investment portfolios that maximizes returns while minimizing risk. … Continue reading ->The post Efficient Frontier: Definition, Benefits, and Uses  appeared first on SmartAsset Blog.


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  • 30/79   Is There An Opportunity With Hatsun Agro Product Limited's (NSE:HATSUNE1) 20% Undervaluation?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    How far off is Hatsun Agro Product Limited (NSE:HATSUNE1) from its intrinsic value? Using the most recent financial...

    How far off is Hatsun Agro Product Limited (NSE:HATSUNE1) from its intrinsic value? Using the most recent financial...


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  • 31/79   What Is Sarda Energy & Minerals's (NSE:SARDAEN) P/E Ratio After Its Share Price Rocketed?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Sarda Energy & Minerals (NSE:SARDAEN) shareholders are no doubt pleased to see that the share price has had a great...

    Sarda Energy & Minerals (NSE:SARDAEN) shareholders are no doubt pleased to see that the share price has had a great...


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  • 32/79   Does Grasim Industries Limited's (NSE:GRASIM) CEO Salary Compare Well With Others?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    In 2016 Dilip Gaur was appointed CEO of Grasim Industries Limited (NSE:GRASIM). First, this article will compare CEO...

    In 2016 Dilip Gaur was appointed CEO of Grasim Industries Limited (NSE:GRASIM). First, this article will compare CEO...


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  • 33/79   Amazon Spending to Take Seattle Council Not Working So Far
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Amazon.com Inc.’s attempt to overhaul the Seattle City Council through political donations may have fallen short, initial election returns suggest.While only some ballots have been counted, early results from Tuesday’s election indicate that Amazon-backed candidates won’t win a majority of the nine seat council. Only four of Amazon’s choices were ahead in the early count and one of those by a slim margin.Amazon, the biggest employer in Seattle, contributed $1.45 million to a business-backed political-action committee to help elect council members the company viewed as more favorable to its interests and those of the business community.The group, called the Civic Alliance for a Sound Economy, backed six new candidates for seven open council seats. Three of them trail, according to the early results. It also backed one incumbent, who leads her race. Two positions weren’t up for election this year.But the retail giant may still attain its biggest local election prize -- the defeat of local socialist and chief Amazon antagonist Kshama Sawant, who trails rival Egan Orion, a candidate who garnered personal donations from at least 18 Amazon executives.Yet even that victory is far from assured as Sawant made a late come back in a previous election six years ago. Washington State votes by mail-in ballot so close races can often take days to count.Amazon said Wednesday it was pleased with the outcome so far.“We’re looking forward to working with the new city council, which we believe will be considerably more open to constructive dialogue and making the decisions that need to be made in order for Seattle to be world-class city to live and do business,” Amazon spokesman Drew Herdener said in a statement.The election and a bitter primary this August have divided Seattle, a city facing rapid expansion in the technology sector along with crippling traffic and worries about high housing costs and persistent homelessness.The spending on the local races reflect a potential pushback from business as progressive politicians gain prominence nationally. It also framed the election as a test of whether money from deep-pocketed companies would be effective on a public wary of corporate influence in politics.U.S. Senators Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren criticized Amazon’s spending on the Seattle races as they vie for the Democratic presidential nomination.Seattle’s business revolt ignited last year as the city considered a tax on large employers to fund homeless services. After the measure passed in May 2018, Amazon helped lead a resistance that ultimately ended in the measure’s repeal a month later. Since then, the company has made several announcements about its intentions to expand in Bellevue, just east of Seattle.(Updates with comment from Amazon in the seventh paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Dina Bass in Seattle at dbass2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Andrew Pollack, Alistair BarrFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Amazon.com Inc.’s attempt to overhaul the Seattle City Council through political donations may have fallen short, initial election returns suggest.While only some ballots have been counted, early results from Tuesday’s election indicate that Amazon-backed candidates won’t win a majority of the nine seat council. Only four of Amazon’s choices were ahead in the early count and one of those by a slim margin.Amazon, the biggest employer in Seattle, contributed $1.45 million to a business-backed political-action committee to help elect council members the company viewed as more favorable to its interests and those of the business community.The group, called the Civic Alliance for a Sound Economy, backed six new candidates for seven open council seats. Three of them trail, according to the early results. It also backed one incumbent, who leads her race. Two positions weren’t up for election this year.But the retail giant may still attain its biggest local election prize -- the defeat of local socialist and chief Amazon antagonist Kshama Sawant, who trails rival Egan Orion, a candidate who garnered personal donations from at least 18 Amazon executives.Yet even that victory is far from assured as Sawant made a late come back in a previous election six years ago. Washington State votes by mail-in ballot so close races can often take days to count.Amazon said Wednesday it was pleased with the outcome so far.“We’re looking forward to working with the new city council, which we believe will be considerably more open to constructive dialogue and making the decisions that need to be made in order for Seattle to be world-class city to live and do business,” Amazon spokesman Drew Herdener said in a statement.The election and a bitter primary this August have divided Seattle, a city facing rapid expansion in the technology sector along with crippling traffic and worries about high housing costs and persistent homelessness.The spending on the local races reflect a potential pushback from business as progressive politicians gain prominence nationally. It also framed the election as a test of whether money from deep-pocketed companies would be effective on a public wary of corporate influence in politics.U.S. Senators Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren criticized Amazon’s spending on the Seattle races as they vie for the Democratic presidential nomination.Seattle’s business revolt ignited last year as the city considered a tax on large employers to fund homeless services. After the measure passed in May 2018, Amazon helped lead a resistance that ultimately ended in the measure’s repeal a month later. Since then, the company has made several announcements about its intentions to expand in Bellevue, just east of Seattle.(Updates with comment from Amazon in the seventh paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Dina Bass in Seattle at dbass2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Andrew Pollack, Alistair BarrFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 34/79   Do Institutions Own Frencken Group Limited (SGX:E28) Shares?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Every investor in Frencken Group Limited (SGX:E28) should be aware of the most powerful shareholder groups. Generally...

    Every investor in Frencken Group Limited (SGX:E28) should be aware of the most powerful shareholder groups. Generally...


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  • 35/79   Should You Be Concerned About Tse Sui Luen Jewellery (International) Limited's (HKG:417) Historical Volatility?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Anyone researching Tse Sui Luen Jewellery (International) Limited (HKG:417) might want to consider the historical...

    Anyone researching Tse Sui Luen Jewellery (International) Limited (HKG:417) might want to consider the historical...


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  • 36/79   New Mountain Finance (NMFC) Lags Q3 Earnings Estimates
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    New Mountain (NMFC) delivered earnings and revenue surprises of -2.86% and 4.20%, respectively, for the quarter ended September 2019. Do the numbers hold clues to what lies ahead for the stock?

    New Mountain (NMFC) delivered earnings and revenue surprises of -2.86% and 4.20%, respectively, for the quarter ended September 2019. Do the numbers hold clues to what lies ahead for the stock?


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  • 37/79   Keane Group, Inc. (NEX) Q3 Earnings and Revenues Surpass Estimates
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Keane Group, Inc. (NEX) delivered earnings and revenue surprises of 100.00% and 0.14%, respectively, for the quarter ended September 2019. Do the numbers hold clues to what lies ahead for the stock?

    Keane Group, Inc. (NEX) delivered earnings and revenue surprises of 100.00% and 0.14%, respectively, for the quarter ended September 2019. Do the numbers hold clues to what lies ahead for the stock?


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  • 38/79   Gladstone Land (LAND) Surpasses Q3 FFO and Revenue Estimates
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Gladstone (LAND) delivered FFO and revenue surprises of 41.00% and 19.40%, respectively, for the quarter ended September 2019. Do the numbers hold clues to what lies ahead for the stock?

    Gladstone (LAND) delivered FFO and revenue surprises of 41.00% and 19.40%, respectively, for the quarter ended September 2019. Do the numbers hold clues to what lies ahead for the stock?


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  • 39/79   OraSure Technologies (OSUR) Q3 Earnings Surpass Estimates
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    OraSure (OSUR) delivered earnings and revenue surprises of 66.67% and -5.13%, respectively, for the quarter ended September 2019. Do the numbers hold clues to what lies ahead for the stock?

    OraSure (OSUR) delivered earnings and revenue surprises of 66.67% and -5.13%, respectively, for the quarter ended September 2019. Do the numbers hold clues to what lies ahead for the stock?


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  • 40/79   Trump Jr. tweets name of alleged whistleblower
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    For weeks, President Trump and his supporters have demanded the identity of the whistleblower who triggered the impeachment inquiry be exposed. On Wednesday, Trump’s eldest son revealed the name of the alleged whistleblower in a tweet.

    For weeks, President Trump and his supporters have demanded the identity of the whistleblower who triggered the impeachment inquiry be exposed. On Wednesday, Trump’s eldest son revealed the name of the alleged whistleblower in a tweet.


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  • 41/79   Anchor says Buckingham Palace pressure killed ABC's story on Epstein
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    In a leaked video released Tuesday, ABC News anchor Amy Robach said the network killed her story on wealthy pedophile Jeffrey Epstein under pressure from the British royal family.

    In a leaked video released Tuesday, ABC News anchor Amy Robach said the network killed her story on wealthy pedophile Jeffrey Epstein under pressure from the British royal family.


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  • 42/79   The Latest: Acid attack victim glad for hate crime charge
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The Hispanic man who had acid thrown on his face says he's pleased Milwaukee prosecutors charged the white man suspected of the attack with a hate crime.  Mahud Villalaz said Wednesday he was thankful for 'the people that have worried about me' and that he's feeling better.  Villalaz made the comments just as 61-year-old Clinton Blackwell appeared in court for the first time to be advised of the first-degree reckless injury charge he faces.

    The Hispanic man who had acid thrown on his face says he's pleased Milwaukee prosecutors charged the white man suspected of the attack with a hate crime. Mahud Villalaz said Wednesday he was thankful for 'the people that have worried about me' and that he's feeling better. Villalaz made the comments just as 61-year-old Clinton Blackwell appeared in court for the first time to be advised of the first-degree reckless injury charge he faces.


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  • 43/79   Sea levels set to keep rising for centuries even if emissions targets met
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Generations yet unborn will face rising oceans and coastal inundations into the 2300s even if governments meet climate commitments, researchers findA potential scenario of future sea level rise in South Beach, Miami, Florida, with a global temperature rise of 2C. Photograph: Nickolay Lamm/Courtesy Climate CentralSea level rise is set to challenge human civilization for centuries to come, even if internationally agreed climate goals are met and planet-warming emissions are then immediately eliminated, researchers have found.The lag time between rising global temperatures and the knock-on impact of coastal inundation means that the world will be dealing with ever-rising sea levels into the 2300s, regardless of prompt action to address the climate crisis, according to the new study.Even if governments meet their commitments from the landmark 2015 Paris climate agreement, the first 15-year period of the deal will still result in enough emissions that would cause sea levels to increase by around 20cm by the year 2300.This scenario, modeled by researchers, assumes that all countries make their promised emissions reductions by 2030 and then abruptly eliminate all planet-warming gases from that point onwards. In reality, only a small number of countries are on track to meet the Paris target of limiting global heating to 2C above the pre-industrial era.“Even with the Paris pledges there will be a large amount of sea level rise,” said Peter Clark, an Oregon State University climate scientist and co-author of the study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.“Sea level rise is going to be an ongoing problem for centuries to come, we will have to keep on adapting over and over again. It’s going to be a whole new expensive lifestyle, costing trillions of dollars.“Sea level has a very long memory, so even if we start cooling temperatures the seas will continue to rise. It’s a bit like trying to turn the Titanic around, rather than a speedboat.”Researchers used a computer model that simulates sea level rise in response to various emissions levels, looking both at historical emissions since 1750 and also what the emissions scenario would be from 2015 to 2030 if countries met their Paris agreement obligations.About half of the 20cm sea level rise can be attributed to the world’s top five greenhouse gas polluters – the US, China, India, Russia and the European Union – according to the researchers. The US was a key architect of the Paris deal but this week Donald Trump formally triggered its exit from the agreement.“Our results show that what we do today will have a huge effect in 2300. Twenty centimetres is very significant; it is basically as much sea-level rise as we’ve observed over the entire 20th century,” said Climate Analytics’ Alexander Nauels, lead author of the study. “To cause that with only 15 years of emissions is quite staggering.”The results reveal the daunting prospect of a near-endless advance of the seas, forcing countries to invest huge resources in defending key infrastructure or ceding certain areas to the tides. Many coastal cities around the world are already facing this challenge, with recent research finding that land currently home to 300 million people will flood at least once a year by 2050 unless carbon emissions are drastically slashed.As the world heats up, ocean water is expanding while land-based glaciers and the two great polar ice caps are melting away, causing the oceans to swell.According to the UN’s climate science panel, the global sea level rise could reach as much as 1.1 metres by the end of the century if emissions aren’t curbed. Clark pointed out the real situation could be even worse if the melting of the Antarctic turns out to be on the dire end of the spectrum of uncertainty.“People are going to become less inclined to live by the coast and there are going to be sea level rise refugees,” Clark said. “More severe cuts in emissions are certainly going to be required but the current Paris pledges aren’t enough to prevent the seas from rising for a long, long time.”

    Generations yet unborn will face rising oceans and coastal inundations into the 2300s even if governments meet climate commitments, researchers findA potential scenario of future sea level rise in South Beach, Miami, Florida, with a global temperature rise of 2C. Photograph: Nickolay Lamm/Courtesy Climate CentralSea level rise is set to challenge human civilization for centuries to come, even if internationally agreed climate goals are met and planet-warming emissions are then immediately eliminated, researchers have found.The lag time between rising global temperatures and the knock-on impact of coastal inundation means that the world will be dealing with ever-rising sea levels into the 2300s, regardless of prompt action to address the climate crisis, according to the new study.Even if governments meet their commitments from the landmark 2015 Paris climate agreement, the first 15-year period of the deal will still result in enough emissions that would cause sea levels to increase by around 20cm by the year 2300.This scenario, modeled by researchers, assumes that all countries make their promised emissions reductions by 2030 and then abruptly eliminate all planet-warming gases from that point onwards. In reality, only a small number of countries are on track to meet the Paris target of limiting global heating to 2C above the pre-industrial era.“Even with the Paris pledges there will be a large amount of sea level rise,” said Peter Clark, an Oregon State University climate scientist and co-author of the study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.“Sea level rise is going to be an ongoing problem for centuries to come, we will have to keep on adapting over and over again. It’s going to be a whole new expensive lifestyle, costing trillions of dollars.“Sea level has a very long memory, so even if we start cooling temperatures the seas will continue to rise. It’s a bit like trying to turn the Titanic around, rather than a speedboat.”Researchers used a computer model that simulates sea level rise in response to various emissions levels, looking both at historical emissions since 1750 and also what the emissions scenario would be from 2015 to 2030 if countries met their Paris agreement obligations.About half of the 20cm sea level rise can be attributed to the world’s top five greenhouse gas polluters – the US, China, India, Russia and the European Union – according to the researchers. The US was a key architect of the Paris deal but this week Donald Trump formally triggered its exit from the agreement.“Our results show that what we do today will have a huge effect in 2300. Twenty centimetres is very significant; it is basically as much sea-level rise as we’ve observed over the entire 20th century,” said Climate Analytics’ Alexander Nauels, lead author of the study. “To cause that with only 15 years of emissions is quite staggering.”The results reveal the daunting prospect of a near-endless advance of the seas, forcing countries to invest huge resources in defending key infrastructure or ceding certain areas to the tides. Many coastal cities around the world are already facing this challenge, with recent research finding that land currently home to 300 million people will flood at least once a year by 2050 unless carbon emissions are drastically slashed.As the world heats up, ocean water is expanding while land-based glaciers and the two great polar ice caps are melting away, causing the oceans to swell.According to the UN’s climate science panel, the global sea level rise could reach as much as 1.1 metres by the end of the century if emissions aren’t curbed. Clark pointed out the real situation could be even worse if the melting of the Antarctic turns out to be on the dire end of the spectrum of uncertainty.“People are going to become less inclined to live by the coast and there are going to be sea level rise refugees,” Clark said. “More severe cuts in emissions are certainly going to be required but the current Paris pledges aren’t enough to prevent the seas from rising for a long, long time.”


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  • 44/79   How the Taliban Won America's Nineteen-Year War
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    It is likely that more and more Afghans will start either associating themselves with—or relating to—the Taliban insurgency.

    It is likely that more and more Afghans will start either associating themselves with—or relating to—the Taliban insurgency.


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  • 45/79   Republicans break with Trump and Rand on whistleblower unmasking
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Standing next to President Trump on Monday night, Sen. Rand Paul called for the media to unmask the Ukraine whistleblower and was cheered by rallygoers in Kentucky.

    Standing next to President Trump on Monday night, Sen. Rand Paul called for the media to unmask the Ukraine whistleblower and was cheered by rallygoers in Kentucky.


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  • 46/79   U.S. border patrol officer kills suspected undocumented immigrant
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The Customs and Border Protection officers were investigating in an area close to the border between the United States and Mexico, which is when they encountered the suspect and chased him on foot, the New Mexican state police said in a statement posted online. "At some point during the chase, the suspect fired a weapon at the two border patrol agents," officials said. New Mexico State Police are investigating the case.

    The Customs and Border Protection officers were investigating in an area close to the border between the United States and Mexico, which is when they encountered the suspect and chased him on foot, the New Mexican state police said in a statement posted online. "At some point during the chase, the suspect fired a weapon at the two border patrol agents," officials said. New Mexico State Police are investigating the case.


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  • 47/79   The Trump impeachment is all about an allegation of quid pro quo. But what does that mean?
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Quid pro quo. It's hard to say and a bit confusing to understand, but it's the phrase at the center of a contentious impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump.

    Quid pro quo. It's hard to say and a bit confusing to understand, but it's the phrase at the center of a contentious impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump.


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  • 48/79   Macron warns of 'profound shift' in Iran deal as new report finds Tehran is dominant power in Middle East
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Iran’s breach of the 2015 nuclear agreement by enriching uranium at an underground facility “marks a profound shift” which could signal the ultimate collapse of the deal, Emmanuel Macron said Wednesday.  The French president, who has worked vigorously to save the nuclear deal since Donald Trump withdrew the US last year, said he was deeply alarmed Iran’s decision to resume enrichment at Fordow, a nuclear facility carved into a mountain. “I think that for the first time, Iran has decided in an explicit and blunt manner to leave the JCPOA agreement, which marks a profound shift,” Mr Macron said during a visit to China.  His comments mark the gloomiest public assessment yet by a European leader about the chances of salvaging the agreement after the US withdrawal and as Iran continues to escalate its breaches of the deal.  Meanwhile, a new report claims Iran has become the dominant power when it comes to fighting wars in the Middle East as a result of the “networks of influence” it has built throughout the region. Mr Macron spoke shortly after Iran began injecting uranium gas into 1,044 centrifuges at Fordow, a facility that Iran hid from the world until 2009 and which Western and Israeli officials have long feared could be used for developing a nuclear weapon.  Iran tensions | Read more The 2015 nuclear agreement forbids any uranium enrichment at Fordow and Hassan Rouhani, Iran’s president acknowledged the sensitivity of the site when he announced the move earlier this week.  Mr Rouhani insisted that the move was reversible and said Iran would return to full compliance with the agreement if European countries found a way around US sanctions to deliver the economic benefits Iran was promised in 2015.    The reopening of Fordow comes days after Iran announced it was deploying advanced new centrifuges that can enrich uranium faster. But neither move brings Iran significantly closer to obtaining a nuclear weapon. A weapon would require uranium enriched at 90 per cent, whereas Iran is currently enriching at around 5 per cent.  Iran insists it has no intention of developing a nuclear weapon. The latest breaches have nonetheless alarmed European states and Israel. Benjamin Netanyahu, Israel’s prime minister, repeated his warning this week it would take military action to stop Iran getting a bomb.  “This is not only for our security and our future; it’s for the future of the Middle East and the world,” he said.  Amid the growing tensions, it emerged that Iran briefly detained an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspector last week and seized her travel documents, the first such encounter since the nuclear deal.  Q&A; | The 2015 Iran nuclear deal Iran confirmed it had stopped the inspector from entering its Natanz nuclear site out of suspicion she was carrying “suspicious material”.   Iran is believed to have begun secretly constructing the Fordow facility in the early 2000s but it was only known to the world when Barack Obama exposed it in 2009 and accused Iran of covertly working on a weapons programme.  The base is around 80 metres underground, making it difficult to destroy with an airstrike, and is protected by anti-aircraft batteries. Israel came close to bombing the site in 2011 but ultimately decided not to move ahead.  The network of alliances Iran has built with terror groups such as Hizbollah in Lebanon, as well a pro-Iranian Shia militias in Iraq, mean the balance of power in the Middle East is now in Iran’s favour, according to the London-based International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) think tank. At a glance | Key players in Tehran Iran’s ability, moreover, to fight and win wars in the Middle East without resorting to conventional military forces has been allowed to develop because there has been no effective international response to Iran’s activities in the region. According to the IISS’s latest report, “Iran’s Networks of Influence in the Middle East” which is published on Thursday, while the US and its allies still retain military superiority over Iran in terms of conventional forces, Tehran has proved to be more effective in waging war in what it calls the “Grey Zone” of conflict. This means Iran is able to avoid risking a traditional “state-on-state” confrontations, which it would be likely to lose. Instead, by building what the report calls “networks of influence” with proxies throughout the region, Tehran has succeeded in gaining a distinct advantage over rivals in the region, such as Saudi Arabia. “Iran is fighting and winning wars ‘fought amongst the people’, not wars between states,” the report concludes.

    Iran’s breach of the 2015 nuclear agreement by enriching uranium at an underground facility “marks a profound shift” which could signal the ultimate collapse of the deal, Emmanuel Macron said Wednesday.  The French president, who has worked vigorously to save the nuclear deal since Donald Trump withdrew the US last year, said he was deeply alarmed Iran’s decision to resume enrichment at Fordow, a nuclear facility carved into a mountain. “I think that for the first time, Iran has decided in an explicit and blunt manner to leave the JCPOA agreement, which marks a profound shift,” Mr Macron said during a visit to China.  His comments mark the gloomiest public assessment yet by a European leader about the chances of salvaging the agreement after the US withdrawal and as Iran continues to escalate its breaches of the deal.  Meanwhile, a new report claims Iran has become the dominant power when it comes to fighting wars in the Middle East as a result of the “networks of influence” it has built throughout the region. Mr Macron spoke shortly after Iran began injecting uranium gas into 1,044 centrifuges at Fordow, a facility that Iran hid from the world until 2009 and which Western and Israeli officials have long feared could be used for developing a nuclear weapon.  Iran tensions | Read more The 2015 nuclear agreement forbids any uranium enrichment at Fordow and Hassan Rouhani, Iran’s president acknowledged the sensitivity of the site when he announced the move earlier this week.  Mr Rouhani insisted that the move was reversible and said Iran would return to full compliance with the agreement if European countries found a way around US sanctions to deliver the economic benefits Iran was promised in 2015.    The reopening of Fordow comes days after Iran announced it was deploying advanced new centrifuges that can enrich uranium faster. But neither move brings Iran significantly closer to obtaining a nuclear weapon. A weapon would require uranium enriched at 90 per cent, whereas Iran is currently enriching at around 5 per cent.  Iran insists it has no intention of developing a nuclear weapon. The latest breaches have nonetheless alarmed European states and Israel. Benjamin Netanyahu, Israel’s prime minister, repeated his warning this week it would take military action to stop Iran getting a bomb.  “This is not only for our security and our future; it’s for the future of the Middle East and the world,” he said.  Amid the growing tensions, it emerged that Iran briefly detained an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspector last week and seized her travel documents, the first such encounter since the nuclear deal.  Q&A; | The 2015 Iran nuclear deal Iran confirmed it had stopped the inspector from entering its Natanz nuclear site out of suspicion she was carrying “suspicious material”.   Iran is believed to have begun secretly constructing the Fordow facility in the early 2000s but it was only known to the world when Barack Obama exposed it in 2009 and accused Iran of covertly working on a weapons programme.  The base is around 80 metres underground, making it difficult to destroy with an airstrike, and is protected by anti-aircraft batteries. Israel came close to bombing the site in 2011 but ultimately decided not to move ahead.  The network of alliances Iran has built with terror groups such as Hizbollah in Lebanon, as well a pro-Iranian Shia militias in Iraq, mean the balance of power in the Middle East is now in Iran’s favour, according to the London-based International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) think tank. At a glance | Key players in Tehran Iran’s ability, moreover, to fight and win wars in the Middle East without resorting to conventional military forces has been allowed to develop because there has been no effective international response to Iran’s activities in the region. According to the IISS’s latest report, “Iran’s Networks of Influence in the Middle East” which is published on Thursday, while the US and its allies still retain military superiority over Iran in terms of conventional forces, Tehran has proved to be more effective in waging war in what it calls the “Grey Zone” of conflict. This means Iran is able to avoid risking a traditional “state-on-state” confrontations, which it would be likely to lose. Instead, by building what the report calls “networks of influence” with proxies throughout the region, Tehran has succeeded in gaining a distinct advantage over rivals in the region, such as Saudi Arabia. “Iran is fighting and winning wars ‘fought amongst the people’, not wars between states,” the report concludes.


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  • 49/79   In last days, al-Baghdadi sought safety in shrinking domain
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    In his last months on the run, Islamic State group leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi was agitated, fearful of traitors, sometimes disguised as a shepherd, sometimes hiding underground, always dependent on a shrinking circle of confidants.  Associates paint a picture of a man obsessed with his security and well-being and trying to find safety in towns and deserts in eastern Syria near the Iraqi border as the extremists' domains crumbled.  In the end, the brutal leader once hailed as 'caliph' left former IS areas completely, slipping into hostile territory in Syria's northwestern Idlib province run by the radical group's al-Qaida-linked rivals.

    In his last months on the run, Islamic State group leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi was agitated, fearful of traitors, sometimes disguised as a shepherd, sometimes hiding underground, always dependent on a shrinking circle of confidants. Associates paint a picture of a man obsessed with his security and well-being and trying to find safety in towns and deserts in eastern Syria near the Iraqi border as the extremists' domains crumbled. In the end, the brutal leader once hailed as 'caliph' left former IS areas completely, slipping into hostile territory in Syria's northwestern Idlib province run by the radical group's al-Qaida-linked rivals.


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  • 50/79   Standing tall: Scientists find oldest example of upright ape
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    An international team of researchers says the fossilized partial skeleton of a male ape that lived almost 12 million years ago in the humid forests of what is now southern Germany bears a striking resemblance to modern human bones.  The findings 'raise fundamental questions about our previous understanding of the evolution of the great apes and humans,' said Madelaine Boehme of the University of Tuebingen, Germany, who led the research.  Boehme, along with researchers from Bulgaria, Germany, Canada and the United States, examined more than 15,000 bones recovered from a trove of archaeological remains known as the Hammerschmiede, or Hammer Smithy, about 70 kilometers (44 miles) west of the Germany city of Munich.

    An international team of researchers says the fossilized partial skeleton of a male ape that lived almost 12 million years ago in the humid forests of what is now southern Germany bears a striking resemblance to modern human bones. The findings 'raise fundamental questions about our previous understanding of the evolution of the great apes and humans,' said Madelaine Boehme of the University of Tuebingen, Germany, who led the research. Boehme, along with researchers from Bulgaria, Germany, Canada and the United States, examined more than 15,000 bones recovered from a trove of archaeological remains known as the Hammerschmiede, or Hammer Smithy, about 70 kilometers (44 miles) west of the Germany city of Munich.


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  • 51/79   Why Didn't She Get Alzheimer's? The Answer Could Hold a Key to Fighting the Disease
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The woman's genetic profile showed she would develop Alzheimer's by the time she turned 50.A member of the world's largest family to suffer from Alzheimer's, she, like generations of her relatives, was born with a gene mutation that causes people to begin having memory and thinking problems in their 40s and deteriorate rapidly toward death around age 60.But remarkably, she experienced no cognitive decline at all until her 70s, nearly three decades later than expected.How did that happen? New research provides an answer, one that experts say could change the scientific understanding of Alzheimer's disease and inspire new ideas about how to prevent and treat it.In a study published Monday in the journal Nature Medicine, researchers say the woman, whose name they withheld to protect her privacy, has another mutation that has protected her from dementia even though her brain has developed a major neurological feature of Alzheimer's disease.This ultra rare mutation appears to help stave off the disease by minimizing the binding of a particular sugar compound to an important gene. That finding suggests that treatments could be developed to give other people that same protective mechanism."I'm very excited to see this new study come out -- the impact is dramatic," said Dr. Yadong Huang, a senior investigator at Gladstone Institutes, who was not involved in the research. "For both research and therapeutic development, this new finding is very important."A drug or gene therapy would not be available any time soon because scientists first need to replicate the protective mechanism found in this one patient by testing it in laboratory animals and human brain cells.Still, this case comes at a time when the Alzheimer's field is craving new approaches after billions of dollars have been spent on developing and testing treatments and some 200 drug trials have failed. It has been more than 15 years since the last treatment for dementia was approved, and the few drugs available do not work very well for very long.The woman is entering her late 70s now and lives in Medellin, the epicenter for an extended Colombian family of about 6,000 people whose members have been plagued with dementia for centuries, a condition they called "La Bobera" -- "the foolishness" -- and attributed to superstitious causes.Decades ago, a Colombian neurologist, Dr. Francisco Lopera, began painstakingly collecting the family's birth and death records in Medellin and remote Andes mountain villages. He documented the sprawling family tree and took dangerous risks in guerrilla and drug-trafficking territory to cajole relatives of people who died with dementia into giving him their brains for analysis.Through this work, Lopera, whose brain bank at the University of Antioquia now contains 300 brains, helped discover that their Alzheimer's was caused by a mutation on a gene called Presenilin 1.While this type of hereditary early-onset dementia accounts for only a small proportion of the roughly 30 million people worldwide with Alzheimer's, it is important because unlike most forms of Alzheimer's, the Colombian version has been traced to a specific cause and a consistent pattern. So Lopera and a team of American scientists have spent years studying the family, searching for answers both to help the Colombians and to address the mounting epidemic of the more typical old-age Alzheimer's disease.When they found that the woman had the Presenilin 1 mutation, but had not yet even developed a pre-Alzheimer's condition called mild cognitive impairment, the scientists were mystified."We have a single person who is resilient to Alzheimer's disease when she should be at high risk," said Dr. Eric Reiman, executive director of the Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix and a leader of the research team.The woman was flown to Boston, where some of the researchers are based, for brain scans and other tests. Those results were puzzling, said Yakeel Quiroz, a Colombian neuropsychologist who directs the familial dementia neuroimaging lab at Massachusetts General Hospital.The woman's brain was laden with the foremost hallmark of Alzheimer's: plaques of amyloid protein."The highest levels of amyloid that we have seen so far," said Quiroz, adding that the excessive amyloid probably accumulated because the woman has lived much longer than other family members with the Alzheimer's-causing mutation.But the woman had few other neurological signs of the disease -- not much of a protein called tau, which forms tangles in Alzheimer's brains, and little neurodegeneration or brain atrophy."Her brain was functioning really well," said Quiroz, who, like Reiman, is a senior author of the study. "Compared to people who are 45 or 50, she's actually better."She said the woman, who raised four children, had only one year of formal education and could barely read or write, so it was unlikely her cognitive protection came from educational stimulation."She has a secret in her biology," Lopera said. "This case is a big window to discover new approaches."Quiroz consulted Dr. Joseph Arboleda-Velasquez, who, like her, is an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School (he is also Quiroz's husband). Arboleda-Velasquez, a cell biologist at Massachusetts Eye and Ear, conducted extensive genetic testing and sequencing, determining that the woman has an extremely rare mutation on a gene called APOE.APOE is important in general-population Alzheimer's. One variant, APOE4, present in about 14% of people, greatly increases risk and is present in 40% of people with Alzheimer's. People with another variant, APOE2, occurring in about 7% of the population, are less likely to develop Alzheimer's, while those with the most common variant, APOE3, are in the middle.The Colombian woman has two copies of APOE3, but both copies have a mutation called Christchurch (for the New Zealand city where it was discovered). The Christchurch mutation is extremely rare, but several years ago, Reiman's daughter Rebecca, a technologist, helped determine that a handful of Colombian family members have that mutation on one of their APOE genes. They developed Alzheimer's as early as their relatives, though -- unlike the woman with mutations on both APOE genes."The fact that she had two copies, not just one, really kind of sealed the deal," Arboleda-Velasquez said.The woman's mutation is in an area of the APOE gene that binds with a sugar-protein compound called heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), which is involved in spreading tau in Alzheimer's disease.In laboratory experiments, the researchers found that the less a variant of APOE binds to HSPG, the less it is linked to Alzheimer's. With the Christchurch mutation, there was barely any binding.That, said Arboleda-Velasquez, "was the piece that completed the puzzle because, 'Oh, this is how the mutation has such a strong effect.'"Researchers were also able to develop a compound that, in laboratory dish experiments, mimicked the action of the mutation, suggesting it's possible to make drugs that prevent APOE from binding to HSPG.Dr. Guojun Bu, who studies APOE, said that while the findings involved a single case and more research is needed, the implications could be profound."When you have delayed onset of Alzheimer's by three decades, you say wow," said Bu, chairman of the neuroscience department at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, who was not involved in the study.He said the research suggests that instead of drugs attacking amyloid or tau, which have failed in many clinical trials, a medication or gene therapy targeting APOE could be promising.Reiman, who led another newly published study showing that APOE has a bigger impact on a person's risk of getting Alzheimer's than previously thought, said potential treatments could try to reduce or even silence APOE activity in the brain. People born without APOE appear to have no cognitive problems, but they do have very high cholesterol that requires treatment.Huang, who wrote a commentary about the study and is affiliated with two companies focusing on potential APOE-related treatments, said the findings also challenge a leading Alzheimer's theory about the role of amyloid.Since the woman had huge amounts of amyloid but few other Alzheimer's indicators, "it actually illustrates, to my knowledge for the first time, a very clear dissociation of amyloid accumulation from tau pathology, neurodegeneration and even cognitive decline," he said.Lopera said the woman is just beginning to develop dementia, and he recently disclosed her genetic profile to her four adult children, who each have only one copy of the Christchurch mutation.The researchers are also evaluating a few other members of the Colombian family, who appear to also have some resistance to Alzheimer's. They are not as old as the woman, and they do not have the Christchurch mutation, but the team hopes to find other genetic factors from studying them and examine whether those factors operate along the same or different biological pathways, Reiman said."We've learned that at least one individual can live for very long having the cause of Alzheimer's, and she's resistant to it," Arboleda-Velasquez said. "What this patient is teaching is there could be a pathway for correcting the disease."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company

    The woman's genetic profile showed she would develop Alzheimer's by the time she turned 50.A member of the world's largest family to suffer from Alzheimer's, she, like generations of her relatives, was born with a gene mutation that causes people to begin having memory and thinking problems in their 40s and deteriorate rapidly toward death around age 60.But remarkably, she experienced no cognitive decline at all until her 70s, nearly three decades later than expected.How did that happen? New research provides an answer, one that experts say could change the scientific understanding of Alzheimer's disease and inspire new ideas about how to prevent and treat it.In a study published Monday in the journal Nature Medicine, researchers say the woman, whose name they withheld to protect her privacy, has another mutation that has protected her from dementia even though her brain has developed a major neurological feature of Alzheimer's disease.This ultra rare mutation appears to help stave off the disease by minimizing the binding of a particular sugar compound to an important gene. That finding suggests that treatments could be developed to give other people that same protective mechanism."I'm very excited to see this new study come out -- the impact is dramatic," said Dr. Yadong Huang, a senior investigator at Gladstone Institutes, who was not involved in the research. "For both research and therapeutic development, this new finding is very important."A drug or gene therapy would not be available any time soon because scientists first need to replicate the protective mechanism found in this one patient by testing it in laboratory animals and human brain cells.Still, this case comes at a time when the Alzheimer's field is craving new approaches after billions of dollars have been spent on developing and testing treatments and some 200 drug trials have failed. It has been more than 15 years since the last treatment for dementia was approved, and the few drugs available do not work very well for very long.The woman is entering her late 70s now and lives in Medellin, the epicenter for an extended Colombian family of about 6,000 people whose members have been plagued with dementia for centuries, a condition they called "La Bobera" -- "the foolishness" -- and attributed to superstitious causes.Decades ago, a Colombian neurologist, Dr. Francisco Lopera, began painstakingly collecting the family's birth and death records in Medellin and remote Andes mountain villages. He documented the sprawling family tree and took dangerous risks in guerrilla and drug-trafficking territory to cajole relatives of people who died with dementia into giving him their brains for analysis.Through this work, Lopera, whose brain bank at the University of Antioquia now contains 300 brains, helped discover that their Alzheimer's was caused by a mutation on a gene called Presenilin 1.While this type of hereditary early-onset dementia accounts for only a small proportion of the roughly 30 million people worldwide with Alzheimer's, it is important because unlike most forms of Alzheimer's, the Colombian version has been traced to a specific cause and a consistent pattern. So Lopera and a team of American scientists have spent years studying the family, searching for answers both to help the Colombians and to address the mounting epidemic of the more typical old-age Alzheimer's disease.When they found that the woman had the Presenilin 1 mutation, but had not yet even developed a pre-Alzheimer's condition called mild cognitive impairment, the scientists were mystified."We have a single person who is resilient to Alzheimer's disease when she should be at high risk," said Dr. Eric Reiman, executive director of the Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix and a leader of the research team.The woman was flown to Boston, where some of the researchers are based, for brain scans and other tests. Those results were puzzling, said Yakeel Quiroz, a Colombian neuropsychologist who directs the familial dementia neuroimaging lab at Massachusetts General Hospital.The woman's brain was laden with the foremost hallmark of Alzheimer's: plaques of amyloid protein."The highest levels of amyloid that we have seen so far," said Quiroz, adding that the excessive amyloid probably accumulated because the woman has lived much longer than other family members with the Alzheimer's-causing mutation.But the woman had few other neurological signs of the disease -- not much of a protein called tau, which forms tangles in Alzheimer's brains, and little neurodegeneration or brain atrophy."Her brain was functioning really well," said Quiroz, who, like Reiman, is a senior author of the study. "Compared to people who are 45 or 50, she's actually better."She said the woman, who raised four children, had only one year of formal education and could barely read or write, so it was unlikely her cognitive protection came from educational stimulation."She has a secret in her biology," Lopera said. "This case is a big window to discover new approaches."Quiroz consulted Dr. Joseph Arboleda-Velasquez, who, like her, is an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School (he is also Quiroz's husband). Arboleda-Velasquez, a cell biologist at Massachusetts Eye and Ear, conducted extensive genetic testing and sequencing, determining that the woman has an extremely rare mutation on a gene called APOE.APOE is important in general-population Alzheimer's. One variant, APOE4, present in about 14% of people, greatly increases risk and is present in 40% of people with Alzheimer's. People with another variant, APOE2, occurring in about 7% of the population, are less likely to develop Alzheimer's, while those with the most common variant, APOE3, are in the middle.The Colombian woman has two copies of APOE3, but both copies have a mutation called Christchurch (for the New Zealand city where it was discovered). The Christchurch mutation is extremely rare, but several years ago, Reiman's daughter Rebecca, a technologist, helped determine that a handful of Colombian family members have that mutation on one of their APOE genes. They developed Alzheimer's as early as their relatives, though -- unlike the woman with mutations on both APOE genes."The fact that she had two copies, not just one, really kind of sealed the deal," Arboleda-Velasquez said.The woman's mutation is in an area of the APOE gene that binds with a sugar-protein compound called heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), which is involved in spreading tau in Alzheimer's disease.In laboratory experiments, the researchers found that the less a variant of APOE binds to HSPG, the less it is linked to Alzheimer's. With the Christchurch mutation, there was barely any binding.That, said Arboleda-Velasquez, "was the piece that completed the puzzle because, 'Oh, this is how the mutation has such a strong effect.'"Researchers were also able to develop a compound that, in laboratory dish experiments, mimicked the action of the mutation, suggesting it's possible to make drugs that prevent APOE from binding to HSPG.Dr. Guojun Bu, who studies APOE, said that while the findings involved a single case and more research is needed, the implications could be profound."When you have delayed onset of Alzheimer's by three decades, you say wow," said Bu, chairman of the neuroscience department at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, who was not involved in the study.He said the research suggests that instead of drugs attacking amyloid or tau, which have failed in many clinical trials, a medication or gene therapy targeting APOE could be promising.Reiman, who led another newly published study showing that APOE has a bigger impact on a person's risk of getting Alzheimer's than previously thought, said potential treatments could try to reduce or even silence APOE activity in the brain. People born without APOE appear to have no cognitive problems, but they do have very high cholesterol that requires treatment.Huang, who wrote a commentary about the study and is affiliated with two companies focusing on potential APOE-related treatments, said the findings also challenge a leading Alzheimer's theory about the role of amyloid.Since the woman had huge amounts of amyloid but few other Alzheimer's indicators, "it actually illustrates, to my knowledge for the first time, a very clear dissociation of amyloid accumulation from tau pathology, neurodegeneration and even cognitive decline," he said.Lopera said the woman is just beginning to develop dementia, and he recently disclosed her genetic profile to her four adult children, who each have only one copy of the Christchurch mutation.The researchers are also evaluating a few other members of the Colombian family, who appear to also have some resistance to Alzheimer's. They are not as old as the woman, and they do not have the Christchurch mutation, but the team hopes to find other genetic factors from studying them and examine whether those factors operate along the same or different biological pathways, Reiman said."We've learned that at least one individual can live for very long having the cause of Alzheimer's, and she's resistant to it," Arboleda-Velasquez said. "What this patient is teaching is there could be a pathway for correcting the disease."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company


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  • 52/79   Brain-scanning helmet helps track children in motion
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Scientists have used a modified bike helmet to create a device that can monitor brain activity in children in realtime.  The technology may eventually be used on patients with neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and epilepsy, they reported Tuesday in Nature Communications.  Researchers inserted a wearable magnetoencephalography (MEG) device into a standard bike helmet, and successfully recorded the brain's response to maternal touch in children aged two to five.

    Scientists have used a modified bike helmet to create a device that can monitor brain activity in children in realtime. The technology may eventually be used on patients with neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and epilepsy, they reported Tuesday in Nature Communications. Researchers inserted a wearable magnetoencephalography (MEG) device into a standard bike helmet, and successfully recorded the brain's response to maternal touch in children aged two to five.


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  • 53/79   Scientists warn of 'untold suffering' in climate 'emergency'
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Humanity faces 'untold suffering' if it fails to tackle the 'climate emergency' threatening life on Earth, more than 11,000 scientists warned Tuesday.  In a declaration in the journal BioScience, they noted that 40 years ago, scientists from 50 nations at the first World Climate Change Conference 'agreed that alarming trends... made it urgently necessary to act'.  'An immense increase of scale in endeavours to conserve our biosphere is needed to avoid untold suffering,' the scientists said in BioScience, a peer-reviewed publication of the American Institute of Biological Sciences.

    Humanity faces 'untold suffering' if it fails to tackle the 'climate emergency' threatening life on Earth, more than 11,000 scientists warned Tuesday. In a declaration in the journal BioScience, they noted that 40 years ago, scientists from 50 nations at the first World Climate Change Conference 'agreed that alarming trends... made it urgently necessary to act'. 'An immense increase of scale in endeavours to conserve our biosphere is needed to avoid untold suffering,' the scientists said in BioScience, a peer-reviewed publication of the American Institute of Biological Sciences.


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  • 54/79   More than 11,000 scientists have declared a 'climate emergency.' One of the best things we can do, they say, is have fewer children.
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    After analyzing 40 years' worth of data, thousands of scientists from around the world say our planet is in the midst of a "climate emergency."

    After analyzing 40 years' worth of data, thousands of scientists from around the world say our planet is in the midst of a "climate emergency."


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  • 55/79   Possibility or pipe dream: How close are we to seeing flying cars?
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Drivable aircraft would require batteries that aren't ready. Then there are the legislative and infrastructure hurdles that could take a decade or longer to clear.

    Drivable aircraft would require batteries that aren't ready. Then there are the legislative and infrastructure hurdles that could take a decade or longer to clear.


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  • 56/79   NASA cracks open a sample of moon soil that’s been shut away for four decades
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    For the first time in more than 40 years, NASA has opened up a pristine sample of moon dirt and rocks that was collected during the Apollo missions. Scientists hope that a close analysis of the material from a 2-foot-long, nearly 2-inch-wide core sample will help astronauts get ready for a new series of Artemis moon missions in the 2020s. When Apollo's moonwalkers collected samples of lunar soil and rock, also known as regolith, some of those samples were tucked away at NASA's Johnson Space Center with the expectation that analytical tools would improve over the course of the decades… Read More

    For the first time in more than 40 years, NASA has opened up a pristine sample of moon dirt and rocks that was collected during the Apollo missions. Scientists hope that a close analysis of the material from a 2-foot-long, nearly 2-inch-wide core sample will help astronauts get ready for a new series of Artemis moon missions in the 2020s. When Apollo's moonwalkers collected samples of lunar soil and rock, also known as regolith, some of those samples were tucked away at NASA's Johnson Space Center with the expectation that analytical tools would improve over the course of the decades… Read More


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  • 57/79   New class of Allen Distinguished Investigators will focus on cellular processes
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The Paul G. Allen Frontiers Group, a division of Seattle's Allen Institute, is making a total of $7.5 million in awards to its latest class of five biomedical researchers. The themes for this year's Allen Distinguished Investigators focus on stem cell therapies and single-cell interactions in their native environments. “The field of stem cell biology has the potential to change how we treat diseases by helping precision medicine, and there’s so much we still don’t understand about the interplay between cells in living tissues or organs,” Kathy Richmond, director of the Frontiers Group, said today in a news release. "Our… Read More

    The Paul G. Allen Frontiers Group, a division of Seattle's Allen Institute, is making a total of $7.5 million in awards to its latest class of five biomedical researchers. The themes for this year's Allen Distinguished Investigators focus on stem cell therapies and single-cell interactions in their native environments. “The field of stem cell biology has the potential to change how we treat diseases by helping precision medicine, and there’s so much we still don’t understand about the interplay between cells in living tissues or organs,” Kathy Richmond, director of the Frontiers Group, said today in a news release. "Our… Read More


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  • 58/79   Spaceflight and Rocket Lab will put a Japanese shooting-star satellite into orbit
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Seattle-based Spaceflight says it's handling the pre-launch logistics for a Japanese satellite that's designed to spray artificial shooting stars into the sky. Tokyo-based ALE's spacecraft is just one of seven satellites due to be sent into orbit from New Zealand as early as Nov. 25, aboard a Rocket Lab Electron launch vehicle. It'll be the 10th Electron launch, earning the nickname "Running Out of Fingers." It'll also be the first launch to test the guidance and navigation hardware as well as the sensors that Rocket Lab will eventually use to help make the Electron's first stage recoverable. No recovery will… Read More

    Seattle-based Spaceflight says it's handling the pre-launch logistics for a Japanese satellite that's designed to spray artificial shooting stars into the sky. Tokyo-based ALE's spacecraft is just one of seven satellites due to be sent into orbit from New Zealand as early as Nov. 25, aboard a Rocket Lab Electron launch vehicle. It'll be the 10th Electron launch, earning the nickname "Running Out of Fingers." It'll also be the first launch to test the guidance and navigation hardware as well as the sensors that Rocket Lab will eventually use to help make the Electron's first stage recoverable. No recovery will… Read More


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  • 59/79   Boeing proposes lunar lander for NASA crews, rivaling Blue Origin (and SpaceX?)
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Boeing says it has submitted its proposal for a lunar lander capable of putting astronauts on the moon by as early as 2024, joining a competition that includes Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin space venture and most likely SpaceX as well. Today marked the deadline for submissions. NASA says it's aiming to select at least two proposed landing systems by January for further development. Two separate teams could be selected to build landers for moon missions in 2024 and 2025. NASA envisions a system that includes a transfer vehicle to ferry a lander from a lunar-orbiting Gateway outpost to… Read More

    Boeing says it has submitted its proposal for a lunar lander capable of putting astronauts on the moon by as early as 2024, joining a competition that includes Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin space venture and most likely SpaceX as well. Today marked the deadline for submissions. NASA says it's aiming to select at least two proposed landing systems by January for further development. Two separate teams could be selected to build landers for moon missions in 2024 and 2025. NASA envisions a system that includes a transfer vehicle to ferry a lander from a lunar-orbiting Gateway outpost to… Read More


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  • 60/79   The Longest U.K. Pay Slump in 200 Years Is Coming to an End
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Living standards in the U.K. are on the cusp of returning to their pre-crisis levels in an election boost for Prime Minister Boris Johnson.In an analysis published Thursday, the Resolution Foundation think tank predicted that basic weekly pay will surpass 513 pounds ($661) by the end of the year, a level last seen in August 2007 after adjusting for inflation.The prospect of an end to the longest pay downturn in more than two centuries will almost certainly be seized on by Johnson’s Conservative Party, which is campaigning for the Dec. 12 general election on a slogan of getting Brexit done so that Britain can focus on building on promising economic fundamentals.It marks a sharp contrast to the snap 2017 election, when Theresa May, Johnson’s predecessor, was campaigning against a backdrop of shrinking pay packets and went on to lose her parliamentary majority. Low-paid workers in sectors such as retail and hospitality had benefited from big increases in the minimum wage, the Resolution Foundation said. But a risk for Johnson is that focusing on the metric reminds voters of the Conservatives’ record on pay since they took office in 2010. Overall, Britons would be 138 pounds a week better off had pay continued to grow at its pre-crisis average of 2% of a year.“Returning to pre-crisis levels is very different from making up any of the lost ground in the intervening decade,” the research firm said in its latest quarterly Earnings Outlook.With nominal earnings growing at almost 4% a year, the labor market appears to have returned to full employment but cracks are emerging, it said. Vacancies are falling and the number of people switching jobs remains below pre-crisis levels, while falling productivity threatens to place a limit on pay growth.To contact the reporter on this story: Andrew Atkinson in London at a.atkinson@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Fergal O'Brien at fobrien@bloomberg.net, David GoodmanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Living standards in the U.K. are on the cusp of returning to their pre-crisis levels in an election boost for Prime Minister Boris Johnson.In an analysis published Thursday, the Resolution Foundation think tank predicted that basic weekly pay will surpass 513 pounds ($661) by the end of the year, a level last seen in August 2007 after adjusting for inflation.The prospect of an end to the longest pay downturn in more than two centuries will almost certainly be seized on by Johnson’s Conservative Party, which is campaigning for the Dec. 12 general election on a slogan of getting Brexit done so that Britain can focus on building on promising economic fundamentals.It marks a sharp contrast to the snap 2017 election, when Theresa May, Johnson’s predecessor, was campaigning against a backdrop of shrinking pay packets and went on to lose her parliamentary majority. Low-paid workers in sectors such as retail and hospitality had benefited from big increases in the minimum wage, the Resolution Foundation said. But a risk for Johnson is that focusing on the metric reminds voters of the Conservatives’ record on pay since they took office in 2010. Overall, Britons would be 138 pounds a week better off had pay continued to grow at its pre-crisis average of 2% of a year.“Returning to pre-crisis levels is very different from making up any of the lost ground in the intervening decade,” the research firm said in its latest quarterly Earnings Outlook.With nominal earnings growing at almost 4% a year, the labor market appears to have returned to full employment but cracks are emerging, it said. Vacancies are falling and the number of people switching jobs remains below pre-crisis levels, while falling productivity threatens to place a limit on pay growth.To contact the reporter on this story: Andrew Atkinson in London at a.atkinson@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Fergal O'Brien at fobrien@bloomberg.net, David GoodmanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 61/79   Head of UN Palestinian agency resigns amid ethics probe
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The head of the UN agency for Palestinian refugees has resigned amid an internal probe into alleged mismanagement and ethical abuses at the organization, the United Nations said Wednesday.  'A short while ago, UNRWA's Commissioner-General, Pierre Krahenbuhl, informed the secretary-general that he was resigning, effective immediately,' UN spokesman Stephane Dujarric told a news briefing.

    The head of the UN agency for Palestinian refugees has resigned amid an internal probe into alleged mismanagement and ethical abuses at the organization, the United Nations said Wednesday. 'A short while ago, UNRWA's Commissioner-General, Pierre Krahenbuhl, informed the secretary-general that he was resigning, effective immediately,' UN spokesman Stephane Dujarric told a news briefing.


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  • 62/79   Iraq protesters storm Baghdad bridge, medic killed
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Anti-government protesters in Iraq stormed a bridge Wednesday in central Baghdad, where security forces pushed them back with batons and tear gas, wounding dozens.  A medic was killed while aiding demonstrators.  The military called on the protesters to stop blocking roads and ports, saying they had cost Iraq $6 billion, and it vowed to arrest those responsible.

    Anti-government protesters in Iraq stormed a bridge Wednesday in central Baghdad, where security forces pushed them back with batons and tear gas, wounding dozens. A medic was killed while aiding demonstrators. The military called on the protesters to stop blocking roads and ports, saying they had cost Iraq $6 billion, and it vowed to arrest those responsible.


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  • 63/79   Your Evening Briefing
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Want to receive this post in your inbox every afternoon? Sign up hereThe top U.S. diplomat in Ukraine was deeply concerned about President Donald Trump’s now-famous proposal to his equal in Ukraine—that he investigate former Vice President Joseph Biden and the 2016 presidential campaign in exchange for security aid and a White House meeting. This, the latest from unsealed transcripts of House impeachment testimony, came as Trump moved to bolster his public relations team, and perhaps with good reason: One House Democrat told CNN that quid pro quo is the wrong phrase to describe the transaction at the heart of the impeachment inquiry. He said it’s really about “bribery and extortion.” —Josh PetriHere are today’s top storiesTrump and Chinese President Xi Jinping may not be able to sign a deal to partially resolve the trade war until December.Chinese state-owned entities are in talks about investing as much as $10 billion in Saudi Aramco’s initial public offering. Republicans suffered setbacks in Virginia and Kentucky as part of Tuesday’s elections.More U.S. millennials are suffering from chronic health problems that could limit their lifetime earning potential.K-pop became a global sensation by signaling the virtuousness of its stars. Sex trafficking, date rape, spy-camera recordings and bribery weren’t supposed to be part of the bargain.Consumers are increasingly aware of their food’s carbon footprint. So it shouldn’t come as a surprise that plant-based meat companies are now selling themselves as climate-friendly.What’s Joe Weisenthal thinking about? Profits are suddenly important again, the Bloomberg news director opines. Softbank CEO Masayoshi Son said a lesson of the WeWork debacle is that companies need to have an obvious road to the black. Goldman Sachs CEO David Solomon said the same thing yesterday. Unsurprisingly, there’s recently been a reckoning for companies with uncertain prospects of making money.What you’ll need to know tomorrowThe IMF warns Europe to prepare for the worst.  Elon Musk sets a date to unveil Tesla’s new pickup. New Jersey Transit needs help moving stadium-sized crowds. New York City voted for a better way to vote. Ray Dalio says the “world has gone mad” with so much free money. The Las Vegas nightclub boom may be coming to an end. Vape shops will likely be exempt from coming E-cigarette restrictions.What you’ll want to read in Bloomberg GraphicsThe land of golden dreams isa residential nightmare. The median price for a new home in California now tops $600,000, more than twice the rest of the country. The poverty rate, adjusted for the cost of living, is the worst in the nation. The state is home to 12% of the U.S. population, but a quarter of its homeless population. How did it get so bad? Let us explain.To contact the author of this story: Josh Petri in Portland at jpetri4@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Want to receive this post in your inbox every afternoon? Sign up hereThe top U.S. diplomat in Ukraine was deeply concerned about President Donald Trump’s now-famous proposal to his equal in Ukraine—that he investigate former Vice President Joseph Biden and the 2016 presidential campaign in exchange for security aid and a White House meeting. This, the latest from unsealed transcripts of House impeachment testimony, came as Trump moved to bolster his public relations team, and perhaps with good reason: One House Democrat told CNN that quid pro quo is the wrong phrase to describe the transaction at the heart of the impeachment inquiry. He said it’s really about “bribery and extortion.” —Josh PetriHere are today’s top storiesTrump and Chinese President Xi Jinping may not be able to sign a deal to partially resolve the trade war until December.Chinese state-owned entities are in talks about investing as much as $10 billion in Saudi Aramco’s initial public offering. Republicans suffered setbacks in Virginia and Kentucky as part of Tuesday’s elections.More U.S. millennials are suffering from chronic health problems that could limit their lifetime earning potential.K-pop became a global sensation by signaling the virtuousness of its stars. Sex trafficking, date rape, spy-camera recordings and bribery weren’t supposed to be part of the bargain.Consumers are increasingly aware of their food’s carbon footprint. So it shouldn’t come as a surprise that plant-based meat companies are now selling themselves as climate-friendly.What’s Joe Weisenthal thinking about? Profits are suddenly important again, the Bloomberg news director opines. Softbank CEO Masayoshi Son said a lesson of the WeWork debacle is that companies need to have an obvious road to the black. Goldman Sachs CEO David Solomon said the same thing yesterday. Unsurprisingly, there’s recently been a reckoning for companies with uncertain prospects of making money.What you’ll need to know tomorrowThe IMF warns Europe to prepare for the worst.  Elon Musk sets a date to unveil Tesla’s new pickup. New Jersey Transit needs help moving stadium-sized crowds. New York City voted for a better way to vote. Ray Dalio says the “world has gone mad” with so much free money. The Las Vegas nightclub boom may be coming to an end. Vape shops will likely be exempt from coming E-cigarette restrictions.What you’ll want to read in Bloomberg GraphicsThe land of golden dreams isa residential nightmare. The median price for a new home in California now tops $600,000, more than twice the rest of the country. The poverty rate, adjusted for the cost of living, is the worst in the nation. The state is home to 12% of the U.S. population, but a quarter of its homeless population. How did it get so bad? Let us explain.To contact the author of this story: Josh Petri in Portland at jpetri4@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 64/79   Johnson tries to shake off rocky start as UK election begins
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Prime Minister Boris Johnson told British voters Wednesday that they have to back his Conservatives if they want an end to Brexit delays, as he tried to shake off a rocky start to the governing party's election campaign.  In fact, lawmakers approved Johnson's EU divorce deal in principle last month, but asked for more time to scrutinize it.

    Prime Minister Boris Johnson told British voters Wednesday that they have to back his Conservatives if they want an end to Brexit delays, as he tried to shake off a rocky start to the governing party's election campaign. In fact, lawmakers approved Johnson's EU divorce deal in principle last month, but asked for more time to scrutinize it.


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  • 65/79   Turkey's Erdogan to meet Trump in Washington next week
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's office says Turkey's leader will travel to Washington next week for talks with U.S. President Donald Trump.  Erdogan's planned trip to Washington had been put into doubt following votes in the U.S. House of Representatives aiming to sanction Turkey and to recognize the mass killings of Armenians a century ago as genocide.

    Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's office says Turkey's leader will travel to Washington next week for talks with U.S. President Donald Trump. Erdogan's planned trip to Washington had been put into doubt following votes in the U.S. House of Representatives aiming to sanction Turkey and to recognize the mass killings of Armenians a century ago as genocide.


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  • 66/79   Erdogan: Turkey captured slain IS leader al-Baghdadi's wife
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Turkey has captured a wife of the slain leader of the Islamic State group, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Wednesday.  Erdogan made the announcement while delivering a speech in the capital of Ankara but gave no other details.  A senior Turkish official, however, said the woman was among a group of 11 Islamic State suspects detained in a police operation in Turkey's Hatay province, near the border with Syria, on June 2, 2018.

    Turkey has captured a wife of the slain leader of the Islamic State group, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Wednesday. Erdogan made the announcement while delivering a speech in the capital of Ankara but gave no other details. A senior Turkish official, however, said the woman was among a group of 11 Islamic State suspects detained in a police operation in Turkey's Hatay province, near the border with Syria, on June 2, 2018.


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  • 67/79   Britain's Johnson launches election campaign on opposition turf
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    British Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Wednesday launched the Conservatives' election campaign in  a traditional stronghold of the Labour opposition he hopes to win over by vowing to 'get Brexit done'.  Addressing supporters who were dressed in t-shirts bearing the slogan, he urged voters to give him the majority needed to push his EU divorce deal through parliament and leave the bloc by the latest deadline of January 31.  'We can't go on like this,' Johnson told the crowd in Birmingham, Britain's second biggest city, after decrying the political paralysis that has so far stalled its departure.

    British Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Wednesday launched the Conservatives' election campaign in a traditional stronghold of the Labour opposition he hopes to win over by vowing to 'get Brexit done'. Addressing supporters who were dressed in t-shirts bearing the slogan, he urged voters to give him the majority needed to push his EU divorce deal through parliament and leave the bloc by the latest deadline of January 31. 'We can't go on like this,' Johnson told the crowd in Birmingham, Britain's second biggest city, after decrying the political paralysis that has so far stalled its departure.


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  • 68/79   Johnson’s Election Troubles Grow as U.K. Minister Quits Cabinet
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, follow us @Brexit and subscribe to our podcast.Things keep going wrong for Boris Johnson as he seeks to win a Conservative majority in the U.K.’s Dec. 12 general election.The prime minister’s bid was rocked by a cabinet resignation on Wednesday, just minutes before he launched the campaign. Welsh Secretary Alun Cairns quit after reports he knew about a former aide’s role in the collapse of a rape trial.The U.K.’s main opposition Labour party also suffered a blow when deputy leader Tom Watson announced he would be leaving full-time politics after 35 years. He has clashed in the past with Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn over the direction of the party. But it will be Cairns’s resignation -- the first by a cabinet minister during an election campaign for at least 100 years -- that resonates for Johnson. It is a blow for the Tories at the start of one of the most unpredictable contests in recent history. While they have a double-digit lead over Labour Party in several recent polls, the negatives are already piling up for the premier.Johnson sought to regain the initiative at his first campaign event, a rally in Birmingham, central England on Wednesday evening."Come with us and we will get Brexit done," he told a crowd of hundreds of cheering Conservative politicians and activists, holding up campaign placards.Johnson claimed he was most "proud" of the Brexit deal he negotiated with the European Union, and that it delivered everything he campaigned for in the 2016 referendum. That was aimed at countering the threat from Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage, who claims Johnson’s deal is a betrayal and is urging Tories to abandon it. If Farage wins enough votes, he could seriously damage Johnson’s chances of forming a majority government next month.The main slogan for Johnson’s event, emblazoned on the lectern and on screens around the hall, was: "Get Brexit Done -- Unleash Britain’s potential."Johnson said Corbyn wants more "dither" and delay, with another Brexit referendum in 2020. "This country is aching to move on," the Tory leader said, to cheers and chants of "Boris! Boris!" He added: "Let’s get out of the rut of the last three years."Trial SabotageThe speech followed Cairns’s resignation earlier on Wednesday over allegations he approved the selection of a former aide as a Tory candidate even though he’d been accused by a judge of sabotaging a rape trial. Cairns said in a letter to Johnson that he is “confident I will be cleared of any breach or wrongdoing.”Conservative Party Chairman James Cleverly earlier gave a series of TV and radio interviews in which he tried to contain the fallout from comments by Leader of the House of Commons Jacob Rees-Mogg, who was forced to apologize for suggesting the 72 people killed in the 2017 Grenfell tower-block fire hadn’t shown “common sense.”Those remarks were then compounded by fellow Conservative MP Andrew Bridgen, who suggested Rees-Mogg would have survived the fire because he is more “clever” than the victims. Bridgen also apologized, but opponents said the pair’s comments showed the party is out of touch with ordinary people.‘Poisonous Heart’“What Rees-Mogg and Bridgen said goes to the poisonous heart of the Tories’ attitude towards people in our communities,” Labour’s campaign coordinator, Andrew Gwynne, said in a statement.In another setback for the Conservatives, the country’s most senior civil servant blocked the Treasury from publishing costings for the opposition Labour Party’s policies. According to a Treasury official, the announcement had been ready to go on Tuesday, but after complaints from Labour, Cabinet Secretary Mark Sedwill refused to let it proceed.Also on Tuesday, former Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond said he would be quitting Parliament after his expulsion from the Tory party. He didn’t leave quietly, saying in a letter to constituents that he was “saddened” by the situation after 45 years of party membership.“The Conservative Party that I have served has always had room for a wide range of opinions and has been tolerant of measured dissent,” Hammond wrote. “Many Parliamentary colleagues have defied the party whip on occasions without any action being taken against them,” he added in a swipe at Johnson, who himself twice voted against the Brexit deal secured by his predecessor, Theresa May.Johnson holds a rally on Wednesday evening in the West Midlands, where he will reiterate his core pledges to deliver Brexit and move on to addressing policing, health care and education. But there’s a danger for the prime minister that the drip drip of negative stories may swamp that message.(Updates with Tom Watson resignation.)\--With assistance from Tim Ross.To contact the reporters on this story: Alex Morales in London at amorales2@bloomberg.net;Kitty Donaldson in London at kdonaldson1@bloomberg.net;Robert Hutton in London at rhutton1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Thomas Penny, Stuart BiggsFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, follow us @Brexit and subscribe to our podcast.Things keep going wrong for Boris Johnson as he seeks to win a Conservative majority in the U.K.’s Dec. 12 general election.The prime minister’s bid was rocked by a cabinet resignation on Wednesday, just minutes before he launched the campaign. Welsh Secretary Alun Cairns quit after reports he knew about a former aide’s role in the collapse of a rape trial.The U.K.’s main opposition Labour party also suffered a blow when deputy leader Tom Watson announced he would be leaving full-time politics after 35 years. He has clashed in the past with Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn over the direction of the party. But it will be Cairns’s resignation -- the first by a cabinet minister during an election campaign for at least 100 years -- that resonates for Johnson. It is a blow for the Tories at the start of one of the most unpredictable contests in recent history. While they have a double-digit lead over Labour Party in several recent polls, the negatives are already piling up for the premier.Johnson sought to regain the initiative at his first campaign event, a rally in Birmingham, central England on Wednesday evening."Come with us and we will get Brexit done," he told a crowd of hundreds of cheering Conservative politicians and activists, holding up campaign placards.Johnson claimed he was most "proud" of the Brexit deal he negotiated with the European Union, and that it delivered everything he campaigned for in the 2016 referendum. That was aimed at countering the threat from Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage, who claims Johnson’s deal is a betrayal and is urging Tories to abandon it. If Farage wins enough votes, he could seriously damage Johnson’s chances of forming a majority government next month.The main slogan for Johnson’s event, emblazoned on the lectern and on screens around the hall, was: "Get Brexit Done -- Unleash Britain’s potential."Johnson said Corbyn wants more "dither" and delay, with another Brexit referendum in 2020. "This country is aching to move on," the Tory leader said, to cheers and chants of "Boris! Boris!" He added: "Let’s get out of the rut of the last three years."Trial SabotageThe speech followed Cairns’s resignation earlier on Wednesday over allegations he approved the selection of a former aide as a Tory candidate even though he’d been accused by a judge of sabotaging a rape trial. Cairns said in a letter to Johnson that he is “confident I will be cleared of any breach or wrongdoing.”Conservative Party Chairman James Cleverly earlier gave a series of TV and radio interviews in which he tried to contain the fallout from comments by Leader of the House of Commons Jacob Rees-Mogg, who was forced to apologize for suggesting the 72 people killed in the 2017 Grenfell tower-block fire hadn’t shown “common sense.”Those remarks were then compounded by fellow Conservative MP Andrew Bridgen, who suggested Rees-Mogg would have survived the fire because he is more “clever” than the victims. Bridgen also apologized, but opponents said the pair’s comments showed the party is out of touch with ordinary people.‘Poisonous Heart’“What Rees-Mogg and Bridgen said goes to the poisonous heart of the Tories’ attitude towards people in our communities,” Labour’s campaign coordinator, Andrew Gwynne, said in a statement.In another setback for the Conservatives, the country’s most senior civil servant blocked the Treasury from publishing costings for the opposition Labour Party’s policies. According to a Treasury official, the announcement had been ready to go on Tuesday, but after complaints from Labour, Cabinet Secretary Mark Sedwill refused to let it proceed.Also on Tuesday, former Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond said he would be quitting Parliament after his expulsion from the Tory party. He didn’t leave quietly, saying in a letter to constituents that he was “saddened” by the situation after 45 years of party membership.“The Conservative Party that I have served has always had room for a wide range of opinions and has been tolerant of measured dissent,” Hammond wrote. “Many Parliamentary colleagues have defied the party whip on occasions without any action being taken against them,” he added in a swipe at Johnson, who himself twice voted against the Brexit deal secured by his predecessor, Theresa May.Johnson holds a rally on Wednesday evening in the West Midlands, where he will reiterate his core pledges to deliver Brexit and move on to addressing policing, health care and education. But there’s a danger for the prime minister that the drip drip of negative stories may swamp that message.(Updates with Tom Watson resignation.)\--With assistance from Tim Ross.To contact the reporters on this story: Alex Morales in London at amorales2@bloomberg.net;Kitty Donaldson in London at kdonaldson1@bloomberg.net;Robert Hutton in London at rhutton1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Thomas Penny, Stuart BiggsFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 69/79   Iranians plead guilty after arrest for spying on dissidents
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Two men arrested last year for spying on Iranian dissidents in the United States have pleaded guilty to charges in a Washington court, the Justice Department announced Wednesday.  Iranian-US dual citizen Ahmadreza Mohammadi Doostdar and Majid Ghorbani, an Iranian resident of California, tried to penetrate the Mujahedin-e Khalq (MEK), a group of Iranian dissidents in exile, in New York and Washington from 2017-2018, according to the department.  Doostdar traveled to the United States form Iran on three occasions to recruit Ghorbani and give him instructions and thousands of dollars in payments, according to the charges.

    Two men arrested last year for spying on Iranian dissidents in the United States have pleaded guilty to charges in a Washington court, the Justice Department announced Wednesday. Iranian-US dual citizen Ahmadreza Mohammadi Doostdar and Majid Ghorbani, an Iranian resident of California, tried to penetrate the Mujahedin-e Khalq (MEK), a group of Iranian dissidents in exile, in New York and Washington from 2017-2018, according to the department. Doostdar traveled to the United States form Iran on three occasions to recruit Ghorbani and give him instructions and thousands of dollars in payments, according to the charges.


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  • 70/79   9 Easy Ways to Make Your Jack-o'-Lanterns Last Longer
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    A little bleach goes a long way.

    A little bleach goes a long way.


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  • 71/79   Is It Time for a Medication Reconciliation?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    More than half of adult Americans regularly take at least one prescription drug, according to a recent Consumer Reports nationally representative survey. And for those who take any medication on ...

    More than half of adult Americans regularly take at least one prescription drug, according to a recent Consumer Reports nationally representative survey. And for those who take any medication on ...


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  • 72/79   5 Turkey Cooking Tips Will Guarantee You Have the Perfect Bird This Holidays
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    There's no need to wing it at Thanksgiving this year.

    There's no need to wing it at Thanksgiving this year.


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  • 73/79   Brown-Bag Lunches for Kids With Food Allergies
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...


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  • 74/79   What to Feed Your Family When the Power Goes Out
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...


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  • 75/79   Try These Healthy Snack Ideas for Kids
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...

    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...


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  • 76/79   The 9 Best Jobs for Teachers To Make Some Cash During the Summer Break
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.


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  • 77/79   How to Spot and Avoid Algal Blooms
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...


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  • 78/79   Get These 4 Vaccines for College
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If your child is a college student—or soon to be one—making sure he or she is fully vaccinated is critically important, especially for those who will be living in a dorm or other shared space. Th...

    If your child is a college student—or soon to be one—making sure he or she is fully vaccinated is critically important, especially for those who will be living in a dorm or other shared space. Th...


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  • 79/79   DNA detectives: New tech can mean a diagnosis for your child, but not a lot of answers
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Four-year-old Eli Kadkhoda is one of a handful of children with IRF2BPL-related condition, named after the gene to which it is linked. Its patients are all healthy at birth, stumbling and losing speech by kindergarten, wheelchair-dependent soon after.

    Four-year-old Eli Kadkhoda is one of a handful of children with IRF2BPL-related condition, named after the gene to which it is linked. Its patients are all healthy at birth, stumbling and losing speech by kindergarten, wheelchair-dependent soon after.


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