News Slideshows (11/07/2019 15 hours) « WhmSoft Services Photo Gallery
 
Local Search - Deals
Addresses - Schedules - Reviews
Weather Information
Hot Products
 
  WhmSoft Services Photo Gallery
News Photos Slideshows, High Tech, vlrPhone, vlrMemos


View the Current Celebrities News Photos Flash Slideshow

View the Current Sports News Photos Flash Slideshow

Install the News Photos PDF eBooks and Flash Slideshows Viewer


Free the Animation VR / AR
Play to reveal 3D images and 3D models!
Demonstration A-Frame / Multiplayer
Android app on Google Play
 
vlrPhone / vlrFilter
Project of very low consumption, radiation and bitrate softphones, with the support of the spatial audio, of the frequency shifts and of the ultrasonic communications / Multifunction Audio Filter with Remote Control!



 

Howto - Illustrated Answers
 

Follow us on Twitter Facebook Page LinkedIn



Click here to buy posters!
Click here to buy posters!
Search Offers on Amazon
Digital Photography
Digital Camera
High Technology
iPhone
iPad
Kindle
Webcam Invitation
Webcam Invitation

Vector Images - 3D Images


News Slideshows (11/07/2019 15 hours)


  • 1/79   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.


    Press Review


    The Apprentice   John Kennedy   Mark Burnett   friday eve   Mary Cain   Takuma Inoue   Happy N7   Until I Joined Nike   Marie Curie   Kappa League   Albert Camus   I-85 SB   That's He-Man   Duck Dynasty   Freedom of the Press   ICE and CBP   
  • 2/79   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 3/79   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 4/79   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 5/79   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 6/79   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 7/79   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 8/79   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 9/79   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 10/79   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 11/79   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 12/79   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 13/79   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 14/79   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named.  Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does.  At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 15/79   PHOTOS: Fluorescent turtle embryo wins forty-fifth annual Nikon Small World Competition

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 16/79   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 17/79   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 18/79   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 19/79   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 20/79   Hundreds protest in Rome against marauding wild boars
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Hundreds of farmers descended on the Italian capital on Thursday to protest against a surge of marauding wild boars they say are ruining their crops and land.  Farmers from various regions of Italy filled a square outside the parliament building.  Coldiretti, Italy's main agricultural lobby, says there are two million wild boars in Italy which have, along with other wild animals, caused the deaths of 13 people in the first nine months of the year.

    Hundreds of farmers descended on the Italian capital on Thursday to protest against a surge of marauding wild boars they say are ruining their crops and land. Farmers from various regions of Italy filled a square outside the parliament building. Coldiretti, Italy's main agricultural lobby, says there are two million wild boars in Italy which have, along with other wild animals, caused the deaths of 13 people in the first nine months of the year.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 21/79   Labour Vies With Tories to Ramp Up Spending Plans: U.K. Votes
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, follow us @Brexit and subscribe to our podcast.Both of the U.K.’s major parties are rolling out big spending plans. Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid said a Conservative government would borrow about 20 billion pounds ($26 billion) extra a year to invest in infrastructure, overhauling fiscal rules after almost a decade of austerity.Labour’s economy spokesman John McDonnell pledged 250 billion pounds ($321 billion) of infrastructure investment over 10 years, and 150 billion pounds over five years on state education, social housing and health care.Read more: Javid Allows Borrowing for Investment in Revamp of U.K. RulesKey Developments:Javid plans to balance current budget while boosting borrowingMcDonnell says finance sector key to Labour’s investment plansBoris Johnson campaigns in Scotland, Northern IrelandLiberal Democrats, Greens and Plaid Cymru reach electoral pact in 60 seats to try to ensure MPs elected from “Remain alliance”Labour hit by resignation of Deputy Leader Tom WatsonBank of England keeps interest rates unchanged, but says easing may be needed due to Brexit uncertainty and global showdownLabour’s Dawn Butler to Stand for Deputy Leader (1:30 p.m.)Dawn Butler, Labour’s equalities spokeswoman, said she will stand to be the party’s deputy leader following Tom Watson’s decision to stand down.“I’ve thought very carefully about who should replace Tom and after giving it some thought I will be throwing my hat in the ring,” Butler told Bloomberg TV after Watson’s announcement on Wednesday evening. Butler highlighted her “track record of being very supportive to our leader Jeremy Corbyn” as a reason party members should vote for her -- a sign of how much power has shifted firmly to Labour’s socialist wing.McDonnell Pledges Spending Boost, Warns Banks (11:45 a.m.)Labour’s economy spokesman John McDonnell announced his party’s own spending pledge: a National Transformation Fund of 250 billion pounds ($320 billion) over a decade for infrastructure, and a Social Transformation Fund of 150 billion pounds over five years to transform state education, health care and social housing.Speaking in Liverpool, northwest England, McDonnell said the money would go to “areas that haven’t had their fair share for years.” He also said banks would be pushed to fund investment.“We can’t do it if the private finance sector isn’t pulling its weight too,” he said. “The days of the City dictating terms to the rest of the country are over.” McDonnell said there will be opportunities for large-scale private investment alongside government investment “because it will marry up.”Javid Revamps Rules to Boost Borrowing (10:55 a.m.)Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid has opened up the U.K.’s spending taps, setting out new fiscal rules he said a Conservative government will follow that reflect a cheaper environment for borrowing. Javid proposed three rules:A balanced current budgetBorrowing for investment won’t exceed 3% of GDPThat ceiling will be re-evaluated if debt servicing costs rise“It’s a responsible time to invest,” Javid said in a speech in Manchester, northwest England.In practical terms, it means around 20 billion pounds ($26 billion) a year extra for investment, something Javid said would deliver a “decade of renewal.” The announcement ends months of speculation over what would replace the current fiscal rules, which require borrowing to be less than 2% of gross domestic product in 2020-21.Javid will almost certainly breach that ceiling after announcing an extra 13.4 billion pounds ($17.2 billion) of spending on public services in September.Long-Bailey: Media Misrepresents Labour on Brexit (9 a.m.)Labour’s business spokeswoman Rebecca Long-Bailey accused the media of misrepresenting the main opposition party’s position on Brexit, and said voters back it once they have it explained to them.“Our position is to ensure we get a credible deal that puts the economy first and protects jobs and living standards and to deliver that to a public vote -- with Remain on the ballot paper,’’ she said in an interview with Bloomberg TV. “It seems to go down well whether you voted to leave or voted Remain, because the final decision will be yours to make.’’Long-Bailey said Tom Watson is “a force of nature’’ and the deputy Labour leader’s departure would leave “a big hole’’ in the party. Earlier, she told BBC radio that Ian Austin’s advice (see 7:20 a.m.) for Labour supporters to vote Tory was “absolutely absurd.’’ If they want to protect their communities, they should back Labour, Long-Bailey said.Tories Make Hay With Labour Woes (8:20 a.m.)The Conservatives immediately jumped on divisions in the opposition Labour Party, and welcomed former MP Ian Austin’s endorsement (see 7:20 a.m.) of Prime Minister Boris Johnson.“Ian Austin has been a Labour MP for 14 years so he knows Corbyn better than most,’’ Chief Secretary to the Treasury Rishi Sunak said in an email. “He says that a vote for Corbyn’s Labour would put businesses and jobs at risk, that Corbyn’s economic policies would make our country worse and that his ideas on Brexit are a complete fantasy.’’The split gives the Tories a chance to turn up the heat on Labour after two days in which Johnson and his cabinet came under fire amid accusations they are out of touch with ordinary people.Remain Alliance Targets 60 Seats (7:30 a.m.)The Liberal Democrats, Greens and Plaid Cymru have reached an electoral pact that will see two of the parties standing aside in 60 seats to ensure MPs are elected from the “Remain Alliance” opposed to Brexit.Constituencies targeted include Richmond Park, in west London and Cheltenham, where the Liberal Democrats will be given a clear run. The Liberal Democrats will stand aside in Isle of Wight and Brighton Pavilion to assist the Greens, according to former MP Heidi Allen who coordinated the move.“We are facing the real danger of a no-deal Brexit or a hard Brexit with a Boris Johnson government,” Allen told BBC radio. “This is country first stuff, it’s not about them and them winning, it’s about what’s best for the country.”Former Labour MP Ian Austin: Vote Tory (7:20 a.m.)Former Labour MP Ian Austin, once a senior adviser to prime minister Gordon Brown and a member of the party for 34 years, said he would not be standing for Parliament on Dec. 12 and advised voters to back Boris Johnson.Austin quit the party in February, citing Jeremy Corbyn’s failure to tackle antisemitism in the party and had been sitting as independent in the House of Commons. He said Corbyn has spent his life siding with extremists and shouldn’t be trusted with power.“I tell decent patriotic Labour voters that they should be voting for Boris Johnson, I can’t believe it’s come to this,” Austin told BBC Radio. “I regard myself as proper, decent, traditional Labour. I just think Jeremy Corbyn’s not fit to run the country.”Earlier:Boris Johnson’s Conservatives Fight for Survival in ScotlandLabour Vows Big Spending After Watson Quits: U.K. Campaign TrailBrexit Bulletin: Time to Count the Cost of DelayCorbyn and Johnson Go Wild on Spending: Ferdinando Giugliano\--With assistance from Anna Edwards and Greg Ritchie.To contact the reporters on this story: Robert Hutton in London at rhutton1@bloomberg.net;Andrew Atkinson in London at a.atkinson@bloomberg.net;Thomas Penny in London at tpenny@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Stuart Biggs, Thomas PennyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, follow us @Brexit and subscribe to our podcast.Both of the U.K.’s major parties are rolling out big spending plans. Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid said a Conservative government would borrow about 20 billion pounds ($26 billion) extra a year to invest in infrastructure, overhauling fiscal rules after almost a decade of austerity.Labour’s economy spokesman John McDonnell pledged 250 billion pounds ($321 billion) of infrastructure investment over 10 years, and 150 billion pounds over five years on state education, social housing and health care.Read more: Javid Allows Borrowing for Investment in Revamp of U.K. RulesKey Developments:Javid plans to balance current budget while boosting borrowingMcDonnell says finance sector key to Labour’s investment plansBoris Johnson campaigns in Scotland, Northern IrelandLiberal Democrats, Greens and Plaid Cymru reach electoral pact in 60 seats to try to ensure MPs elected from “Remain alliance”Labour hit by resignation of Deputy Leader Tom WatsonBank of England keeps interest rates unchanged, but says easing may be needed due to Brexit uncertainty and global showdownLabour’s Dawn Butler to Stand for Deputy Leader (1:30 p.m.)Dawn Butler, Labour’s equalities spokeswoman, said she will stand to be the party’s deputy leader following Tom Watson’s decision to stand down.“I’ve thought very carefully about who should replace Tom and after giving it some thought I will be throwing my hat in the ring,” Butler told Bloomberg TV after Watson’s announcement on Wednesday evening. Butler highlighted her “track record of being very supportive to our leader Jeremy Corbyn” as a reason party members should vote for her -- a sign of how much power has shifted firmly to Labour’s socialist wing.McDonnell Pledges Spending Boost, Warns Banks (11:45 a.m.)Labour’s economy spokesman John McDonnell announced his party’s own spending pledge: a National Transformation Fund of 250 billion pounds ($320 billion) over a decade for infrastructure, and a Social Transformation Fund of 150 billion pounds over five years to transform state education, health care and social housing.Speaking in Liverpool, northwest England, McDonnell said the money would go to “areas that haven’t had their fair share for years.” He also said banks would be pushed to fund investment.“We can’t do it if the private finance sector isn’t pulling its weight too,” he said. “The days of the City dictating terms to the rest of the country are over.” McDonnell said there will be opportunities for large-scale private investment alongside government investment “because it will marry up.”Javid Revamps Rules to Boost Borrowing (10:55 a.m.)Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid has opened up the U.K.’s spending taps, setting out new fiscal rules he said a Conservative government will follow that reflect a cheaper environment for borrowing. Javid proposed three rules:A balanced current budgetBorrowing for investment won’t exceed 3% of GDPThat ceiling will be re-evaluated if debt servicing costs rise“It’s a responsible time to invest,” Javid said in a speech in Manchester, northwest England.In practical terms, it means around 20 billion pounds ($26 billion) a year extra for investment, something Javid said would deliver a “decade of renewal.” The announcement ends months of speculation over what would replace the current fiscal rules, which require borrowing to be less than 2% of gross domestic product in 2020-21.Javid will almost certainly breach that ceiling after announcing an extra 13.4 billion pounds ($17.2 billion) of spending on public services in September.Long-Bailey: Media Misrepresents Labour on Brexit (9 a.m.)Labour’s business spokeswoman Rebecca Long-Bailey accused the media of misrepresenting the main opposition party’s position on Brexit, and said voters back it once they have it explained to them.“Our position is to ensure we get a credible deal that puts the economy first and protects jobs and living standards and to deliver that to a public vote -- with Remain on the ballot paper,’’ she said in an interview with Bloomberg TV. “It seems to go down well whether you voted to leave or voted Remain, because the final decision will be yours to make.’’Long-Bailey said Tom Watson is “a force of nature’’ and the deputy Labour leader’s departure would leave “a big hole’’ in the party. Earlier, she told BBC radio that Ian Austin’s advice (see 7:20 a.m.) for Labour supporters to vote Tory was “absolutely absurd.’’ If they want to protect their communities, they should back Labour, Long-Bailey said.Tories Make Hay With Labour Woes (8:20 a.m.)The Conservatives immediately jumped on divisions in the opposition Labour Party, and welcomed former MP Ian Austin’s endorsement (see 7:20 a.m.) of Prime Minister Boris Johnson.“Ian Austin has been a Labour MP for 14 years so he knows Corbyn better than most,’’ Chief Secretary to the Treasury Rishi Sunak said in an email. “He says that a vote for Corbyn’s Labour would put businesses and jobs at risk, that Corbyn’s economic policies would make our country worse and that his ideas on Brexit are a complete fantasy.’’The split gives the Tories a chance to turn up the heat on Labour after two days in which Johnson and his cabinet came under fire amid accusations they are out of touch with ordinary people.Remain Alliance Targets 60 Seats (7:30 a.m.)The Liberal Democrats, Greens and Plaid Cymru have reached an electoral pact that will see two of the parties standing aside in 60 seats to ensure MPs are elected from the “Remain Alliance” opposed to Brexit.Constituencies targeted include Richmond Park, in west London and Cheltenham, where the Liberal Democrats will be given a clear run. The Liberal Democrats will stand aside in Isle of Wight and Brighton Pavilion to assist the Greens, according to former MP Heidi Allen who coordinated the move.“We are facing the real danger of a no-deal Brexit or a hard Brexit with a Boris Johnson government,” Allen told BBC radio. “This is country first stuff, it’s not about them and them winning, it’s about what’s best for the country.”Former Labour MP Ian Austin: Vote Tory (7:20 a.m.)Former Labour MP Ian Austin, once a senior adviser to prime minister Gordon Brown and a member of the party for 34 years, said he would not be standing for Parliament on Dec. 12 and advised voters to back Boris Johnson.Austin quit the party in February, citing Jeremy Corbyn’s failure to tackle antisemitism in the party and had been sitting as independent in the House of Commons. He said Corbyn has spent his life siding with extremists and shouldn’t be trusted with power.“I tell decent patriotic Labour voters that they should be voting for Boris Johnson, I can’t believe it’s come to this,” Austin told BBC Radio. “I regard myself as proper, decent, traditional Labour. I just think Jeremy Corbyn’s not fit to run the country.”Earlier:Boris Johnson’s Conservatives Fight for Survival in ScotlandLabour Vows Big Spending After Watson Quits: U.K. Campaign TrailBrexit Bulletin: Time to Count the Cost of DelayCorbyn and Johnson Go Wild on Spending: Ferdinando Giugliano\--With assistance from Anna Edwards and Greg Ritchie.To contact the reporters on this story: Robert Hutton in London at rhutton1@bloomberg.net;Andrew Atkinson in London at a.atkinson@bloomberg.net;Thomas Penny in London at tpenny@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Stuart Biggs, Thomas PennyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 22/79   Euro Emerges as Brave Bet Against Dollar Heading Toward 2020
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- For those thinking of betting against the resilient dollar, the dilemma has been what to actually buy instead. The answer, for some, is at once obvious and brave: the euro.While the euro-dollar pair is the most actively traded in the world, the prospects for Europe haven’t exactly stood out in recent times. The euro area has been contending with a sagging regional economy, the fallout from global trade disputes and risks stemming from Brexit uncertainty. It’s also home to large swaths of negative-yielding debt.All that has acted as a drag on the euro, which has lagged behind most of its major peers this year. But as some of these challenges recede, the currency is once again becoming an attractive option for some buyers, and October saw it post its best month against the greenback since early 2018. Some investors are betting that gradual improvement in growth and progress in U.S.-China talks could fan risk sentiment and drive the euro higher.“A period of relative stability in trade negotiations” should buoy the currency, said Francesca Fornasari, a portfolio manager at Insight Investment, which has $844 billion in assets under management. There are also “expectations of an increased shift towards fiscal policy as a means to support growth in Europe.”So far this year, it hasn’t been a good idea to bet against the dollar, even amid expectations the greenback would weaken. The dollar has consistently bounced back after soft periods and reached a more than two-year high in early October. Before last month, the euro fell in eight out of nine months.The Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index has risen more than 0.5% so far this week.Headwinds EasingStill, some of the year’s major headwinds for the euro are easing. Both Chinese and U.S. officials have spoken positively about ongoing negotiations to reach a preliminary trade deal, which could further stimulate risk appetite and remove the haven bid for the greenback.Furthermore, the Brexit deadline has been pushed back to Jan. 31, removing the threat of a no-deal divorce this year. New European Central Bank President Christine Lagarde recently sounded a stronger tone than her predecessor on galvanizing fiscal stimulus to facilitate growth.JPMorgan Chase & Co. strategists led by Paul Meggyesi say they are “exploring opportunities” to go long the euro versus the dollar, but remain cautious in part because of the economic malaise. The group is encouraged by data showing the euro area posted a record annual surplus on its basic balance -- a measure that includes current account, net equity and net foreign direct investment flows.“This massive basic surplus should cushion the euro against future economic disappointment,” the strategists wrote in a note Nov. 1.Euro-zone economic data has been stronger than expected recently, with the Citi Economic Surprise Index for the region well off a bottom reached on Oct. 10, though the gauge continues to show that reports are undershooting forecasts. A rebound in German factory orders added to signs that the euro-area economy has passed the worst of its recent troubles.Charting the FuturePrice patterns also support the idea of a euro recovery, according to Citigroup Inc. technical strategists including Tom Fitzpatrick.The euro-dollar pair in October completed a bullish outside month, meaning that month’s trading range was wider than the previous month’s, with prices closing at a higher level, the strategists said in a note Nov. 1. On the other hand, the Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index and the U.S. Dollar Index both posted bearish outside months, which suggests broad greenback weakness, they said.Citi recommended an outright long position in the euro versus dollar on Nov. 1 at $1.1146, with a stop loss at $1.1025. The trade has an initial target of $1.14 or higher, but could hit or exceed $1.18 by year-end, Fitzpatrick said. The rate was at $1.1076 at 8:39am in New York on Thursday.Meanwhile, Standard Chartered strategists Geoff Kendrick and Steve Englander say the market may have seen the lows in the currency pair, according to a note published Nov. 6. They recommend a long position in the euro versus the dollar at $1.1090. The trade has a target of $1.1500 and a stop loss at $1.0950.And sentiment among options traders is hovering near the most bullish for the euro against the dollar since July for time periods ranging from three months to one year.Barriers RemainStill, the shared currency faces challenges and not everyone is convinced its time to shine is near. Data this week showed that the 19-nation euro region’s manufacturing sector remained firmly in contraction, even as a purchasing managers’ index rose. Job losses accelerated and order books deteriorated.The International Monetary Fund on Wednesday warned Europe to prepare emergency plans for an economic slump, as risks to the region’s outlook spread and monetary policy has all but exhausted its arsenal. The European Commission cut its outlook for growth and inflation Thursday.The region’s economy has been “hurt” by the U.S.-China trade war and its manufacturing and inflation data remain sluggish, said Anne Mathias, global rates and FX strategist at Vanguard. Vanguard is still short the euro in its active funds where it has currency positions, Mathias said, adding that she has a “neutral to bullish” stance on the greenback.It doesn’t help that Europe’s yields are among the most negative in the world. Yield-hungry investors are attracted to U.S. assets as the Federal Reserve pauses its rate-cutting cycle. Treasury 10-year yields rose above 1.88% Thursday to the highest since September.Yet, the elements supporting the shared currency mitigate the headwinds, according to Sebastien Galy, macro strategist at Nordea Investment.He forecasts that the euro should climb to $1.14 to $1.16 in the first half of next year.“Once the Chinese growth machine starts to kick in again, exports from the euro zone will rise, supporting the euro, while the Chinese sell incoming dollars to buy euros,” he said. “That should drive” the shared currency higher.(Updates prices in 6th, 14th and 20th paragraphs.)\--With assistance from Vassilis Karamanis and Robert Fullem.To contact the reporter on this story: Susanne Barton in New York at swalker33@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Benjamin Purvis at bpurvis@bloomberg.net, Greg Chang, Nick BakerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- For those thinking of betting against the resilient dollar, the dilemma has been what to actually buy instead. The answer, for some, is at once obvious and brave: the euro.While the euro-dollar pair is the most actively traded in the world, the prospects for Europe haven’t exactly stood out in recent times. The euro area has been contending with a sagging regional economy, the fallout from global trade disputes and risks stemming from Brexit uncertainty. It’s also home to large swaths of negative-yielding debt.All that has acted as a drag on the euro, which has lagged behind most of its major peers this year. But as some of these challenges recede, the currency is once again becoming an attractive option for some buyers, and October saw it post its best month against the greenback since early 2018. Some investors are betting that gradual improvement in growth and progress in U.S.-China talks could fan risk sentiment and drive the euro higher.“A period of relative stability in trade negotiations” should buoy the currency, said Francesca Fornasari, a portfolio manager at Insight Investment, which has $844 billion in assets under management. There are also “expectations of an increased shift towards fiscal policy as a means to support growth in Europe.”So far this year, it hasn’t been a good idea to bet against the dollar, even amid expectations the greenback would weaken. The dollar has consistently bounced back after soft periods and reached a more than two-year high in early October. Before last month, the euro fell in eight out of nine months.The Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index has risen more than 0.5% so far this week.Headwinds EasingStill, some of the year’s major headwinds for the euro are easing. Both Chinese and U.S. officials have spoken positively about ongoing negotiations to reach a preliminary trade deal, which could further stimulate risk appetite and remove the haven bid for the greenback.Furthermore, the Brexit deadline has been pushed back to Jan. 31, removing the threat of a no-deal divorce this year. New European Central Bank President Christine Lagarde recently sounded a stronger tone than her predecessor on galvanizing fiscal stimulus to facilitate growth.JPMorgan Chase & Co. strategists led by Paul Meggyesi say they are “exploring opportunities” to go long the euro versus the dollar, but remain cautious in part because of the economic malaise. The group is encouraged by data showing the euro area posted a record annual surplus on its basic balance -- a measure that includes current account, net equity and net foreign direct investment flows.“This massive basic surplus should cushion the euro against future economic disappointment,” the strategists wrote in a note Nov. 1.Euro-zone economic data has been stronger than expected recently, with the Citi Economic Surprise Index for the region well off a bottom reached on Oct. 10, though the gauge continues to show that reports are undershooting forecasts. A rebound in German factory orders added to signs that the euro-area economy has passed the worst of its recent troubles.Charting the FuturePrice patterns also support the idea of a euro recovery, according to Citigroup Inc. technical strategists including Tom Fitzpatrick.The euro-dollar pair in October completed a bullish outside month, meaning that month’s trading range was wider than the previous month’s, with prices closing at a higher level, the strategists said in a note Nov. 1. On the other hand, the Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index and the U.S. Dollar Index both posted bearish outside months, which suggests broad greenback weakness, they said.Citi recommended an outright long position in the euro versus dollar on Nov. 1 at $1.1146, with a stop loss at $1.1025. The trade has an initial target of $1.14 or higher, but could hit or exceed $1.18 by year-end, Fitzpatrick said. The rate was at $1.1076 at 8:39am in New York on Thursday.Meanwhile, Standard Chartered strategists Geoff Kendrick and Steve Englander say the market may have seen the lows in the currency pair, according to a note published Nov. 6. They recommend a long position in the euro versus the dollar at $1.1090. The trade has a target of $1.1500 and a stop loss at $1.0950.And sentiment among options traders is hovering near the most bullish for the euro against the dollar since July for time periods ranging from three months to one year.Barriers RemainStill, the shared currency faces challenges and not everyone is convinced its time to shine is near. Data this week showed that the 19-nation euro region’s manufacturing sector remained firmly in contraction, even as a purchasing managers’ index rose. Job losses accelerated and order books deteriorated.The International Monetary Fund on Wednesday warned Europe to prepare emergency plans for an economic slump, as risks to the region’s outlook spread and monetary policy has all but exhausted its arsenal. The European Commission cut its outlook for growth and inflation Thursday.The region’s economy has been “hurt” by the U.S.-China trade war and its manufacturing and inflation data remain sluggish, said Anne Mathias, global rates and FX strategist at Vanguard. Vanguard is still short the euro in its active funds where it has currency positions, Mathias said, adding that she has a “neutral to bullish” stance on the greenback.It doesn’t help that Europe’s yields are among the most negative in the world. Yield-hungry investors are attracted to U.S. assets as the Federal Reserve pauses its rate-cutting cycle. Treasury 10-year yields rose above 1.88% Thursday to the highest since September.Yet, the elements supporting the shared currency mitigate the headwinds, according to Sebastien Galy, macro strategist at Nordea Investment.He forecasts that the euro should climb to $1.14 to $1.16 in the first half of next year.“Once the Chinese growth machine starts to kick in again, exports from the euro zone will rise, supporting the euro, while the Chinese sell incoming dollars to buy euros,” he said. “That should drive” the shared currency higher.(Updates prices in 6th, 14th and 20th paragraphs.)\--With assistance from Vassilis Karamanis and Robert Fullem.To contact the reporter on this story: Susanne Barton in New York at swalker33@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Benjamin Purvis at bpurvis@bloomberg.net, Greg Chang, Nick BakerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 23/79   Don't Ignore The Fact That This Insider Just Sold Some Shares In Kirby Corporation (NYSE:KEX)
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Some Kirby Corporation (NYSE:KEX) shareholders may be a little concerned to see that the Independent Director, William...

    Some Kirby Corporation (NYSE:KEX) shareholders may be a little concerned to see that the Independent Director, William...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 24/79   We're A Little Worried About Quadro Resources's (CVE:QRO) Cash Burn Rate
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Even when a business is losing money, it's possible for shareholders to make money if they buy a good business at the...

    Even when a business is losing money, it's possible for shareholders to make money if they buy a good business at the...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 25/79   Methode Electronics (NYSE:MEI) Shareholders Have Enjoyed A 20% Share Price Gain
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Passive investing in index funds can generate returns that roughly match the overall market. But one can do better...

    Passive investing in index funds can generate returns that roughly match the overall market. But one can do better...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 26/79   'Put me in, coach': Second Lady Karen Pence embraces bigger role on 2020 campaign trail
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    As President Donald Trump struggles to keep his support among women, Second Lady Karen Pence is expanding her role in the 2020 re-election campaign.

    As President Donald Trump struggles to keep his support among women, Second Lady Karen Pence is expanding her role in the 2020 re-election campaign.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 27/79   Oil Resumes Gains as Trade Tariff Rollback Counters OPEC Curbs
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Oil jumped as China and the U.S. made progress in resolving the trade dispute that has weighed on global markets this year, offsetting signs that OPEC and its partners won’t make deeper cuts to supply.Brent crude rose as much as 1.6% in London, reversing much of Wednesday’s 1.9% decline. China and the U.S. have agreed to proportionally roll back tariffs on each other’s goods in phases, a Chinese Ministry of Commerce spokesman said. OPEC and its allies are more likely to stick to their current output targets when the group meets next month, according to delegates across the coalition.“We are seeing a decent comeback in the oil market today after the positive trade news,” said Jens Naervig Pedersen, a senior analyst at Danske Bank A/S in Copenhagen. “The oil market is in a better state than two weeks ago, but we are still in a fragile environment, where it won’t take a lot to tip the scale in a negative direction again.”Oil is still down about 16% from the peak reached in April on concern that a sluggish global economy and climbing supplies from the U.S. and elsewhere will soon tip the market into oversupply. U.S. crude inventories surged by 7.9 million barrels last week, almost four times more than the median estimate in a Bloomberg survey.See also: WTI to Stay at $50-$60 Amid U.S.-China Trade Delay: MizuhoBrent for January settlement climbed as much as 96 cents to $62.70 a barrel on the ICE Futures Europe Exchange, and traded at $62.57 as of 8:34 a.m. New York time. The contract dropped $1.22 to $61.74 on Wednesday. The global benchmark crude traded at a $5.35 premium to West Texas Intermediate.WTI for December delivery gained 93 cents, or 1.7%, to $57.28 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract fell 88 cents to close at $56.35 on Wednesday.See also: China Said to Mull at Least $5 Billion Aramco IPO InvestmentThe amount of tariff relief that would come in the first phase of a U.S.-China rollback, set to be signed in the coming weeks, would depend on the content of that agreement, spokesman Gao Feng said on Thursday without giving further details. The two sides had “constructive discussions” in the past two weeks, he said.Russia’s Energy Minister Alexander Novak said on Wednesday that the market is rather balanced and a Brent price of more than $60 indicated that the situation is stable. Ministers from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries meet in Vienna on Dec. 5 and 6.\--With assistance from James Thornhill.To contact the reporter on this story: Grant Smith in London at gsmith52@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Serene Cheong at scheong20@bloomberg.net, Helen Robertson, Christopher SellFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Oil jumped as China and the U.S. made progress in resolving the trade dispute that has weighed on global markets this year, offsetting signs that OPEC and its partners won’t make deeper cuts to supply.Brent crude rose as much as 1.6% in London, reversing much of Wednesday’s 1.9% decline. China and the U.S. have agreed to proportionally roll back tariffs on each other’s goods in phases, a Chinese Ministry of Commerce spokesman said. OPEC and its allies are more likely to stick to their current output targets when the group meets next month, according to delegates across the coalition.“We are seeing a decent comeback in the oil market today after the positive trade news,” said Jens Naervig Pedersen, a senior analyst at Danske Bank A/S in Copenhagen. “The oil market is in a better state than two weeks ago, but we are still in a fragile environment, where it won’t take a lot to tip the scale in a negative direction again.”Oil is still down about 16% from the peak reached in April on concern that a sluggish global economy and climbing supplies from the U.S. and elsewhere will soon tip the market into oversupply. U.S. crude inventories surged by 7.9 million barrels last week, almost four times more than the median estimate in a Bloomberg survey.See also: WTI to Stay at $50-$60 Amid U.S.-China Trade Delay: MizuhoBrent for January settlement climbed as much as 96 cents to $62.70 a barrel on the ICE Futures Europe Exchange, and traded at $62.57 as of 8:34 a.m. New York time. The contract dropped $1.22 to $61.74 on Wednesday. The global benchmark crude traded at a $5.35 premium to West Texas Intermediate.WTI for December delivery gained 93 cents, or 1.7%, to $57.28 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract fell 88 cents to close at $56.35 on Wednesday.See also: China Said to Mull at Least $5 Billion Aramco IPO InvestmentThe amount of tariff relief that would come in the first phase of a U.S.-China rollback, set to be signed in the coming weeks, would depend on the content of that agreement, spokesman Gao Feng said on Thursday without giving further details. The two sides had “constructive discussions” in the past two weeks, he said.Russia’s Energy Minister Alexander Novak said on Wednesday that the market is rather balanced and a Brent price of more than $60 indicated that the situation is stable. Ministers from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries meet in Vienna on Dec. 5 and 6.\--With assistance from James Thornhill.To contact the reporter on this story: Grant Smith in London at gsmith52@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Serene Cheong at scheong20@bloomberg.net, Helen Robertson, Christopher SellFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 28/79   Is Medifast, Inc.'s (NYSE:MED) CEO Pay Fair?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Dan Chard became the CEO of Medifast, Inc. (NYSE:MED) in 2016. This analysis aims first to contrast CEO compensation...

    Dan Chard became the CEO of Medifast, Inc. (NYSE:MED) in 2016. This analysis aims first to contrast CEO compensation...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 29/79   U.S. weekly jobless claims fall more than expected
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The number of Americans filing applications for unemployment benefits fell more than expected last week, consistent with strong labor market conditions and continued job growth.  Initial claims for state unemployment benefits decreased 8,000 to a seasonally adjusted 211,000 for the week ended Nov. 2, the Labor Department said on Thursday.  Data for the prior week was revised to show 1,000 more applications received than previously reported.

    The number of Americans filing applications for unemployment benefits fell more than expected last week, consistent with strong labor market conditions and continued job growth. Initial claims for state unemployment benefits decreased 8,000 to a seasonally adjusted 211,000 for the week ended Nov. 2, the Labor Department said on Thursday. Data for the prior week was revised to show 1,000 more applications received than previously reported.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 30/79   Those Who Purchased Pizza Pizza Royalty (TSE:PZA) Shares Three Years Ago Have A 40% Loss To Show For It
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    For many investors, the main point of stock picking is to generate higher returns than the overall market. But its...

    For many investors, the main point of stock picking is to generate higher returns than the overall market. But its...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 31/79   Stocks Rise on Mounting Trade Optimism; Bonds Fall: Markets Wrap
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- U.S equity futures climbed with European stocks after China said it agreed with America to roll back tariffs on each other’s goods in phases as they work toward a trade deal. Treasuries and gold declined.Contracts on the S&P 500 rose alongside the Stoxx Europe 600 after a Chinese government spokesman said the economic superpowers would remove the duties in phases “as progress is made on the agreement.” China is also reportedly studying the removal of curbs on U.S. poultry imports. Shares advanced in Hong Kong and China’s yuan strengthened offshore. Equities trading in Shanghai and Tokyo had already closed.West Texas-grade oil futures rose past $57 a barrel in New York, and a Bloomberg index of commodities advanced. The pound weakened after two Bank of England policy makers unexpectedly voted for an interest rate cut. European sovereign bonds declined.Risk appetite is picking up as China’s latest assertions of progress on trade helped counter earlier reports that a preliminary accord may not happen this month as the two sides continued to wrangle over a location to sign it. With economic indicators showing signs of stabilization, investors will now be looking for further evidence that a global recession can be avoided.“Before we see material evidence of an agreement, any trade headline will be seen as a short-term trading opportunity,” said Linus Yip, a Hong Kong-based strategist with First Shanghai Securities Ltd. “We see good news coming out, and the market is reacting to that. I don’t know if it will last for a long time.”Here are some key events coming up this week:Earnings are due this week from companies including Walt Disney.The USDA World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates Report for November comes out Friday.These are the main moves in markets:StocksFutures on the S&P 500 Index advanced 0.4% as of 8:30 a.m. New York time.The Stoxx Europe 600 Index increased 0.2%.The Shanghai Composite Index was little changed.The MSCI Emerging Market Index gained 0.3%.CurrenciesThe Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index was little changed.The euro increased 0.1% to $1.1078.The British pound sank 0.4% to $1.2802.The onshore yuan gained 0.3% to 6.975 per dollar.The Japanese yen declined 0.2% to 109.15 per dollar.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries advanced five basis points to 1.88%.The yield on two-year Treasuries gained four basis points to 1.65%.Germany’s 10-year yield advanced five basis points to -0.28%.Britain’s 10-year yield increased three basis points to 0.741%.Japan’s 10-year yield climbed two basis points to -0.064%.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude gained 1.6% to $57.27 a barrel.Iron ore decreased 0.3% to $80.05 per metric ton.Gold dipped 0.4% to $1,484.88 an ounce.\--With assistance from Adam Haigh, Andreea Papuc, Elena Popina and Cecile Vannucci.To contact the reporter on this story: Todd White in Madrid at twhite2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Christopher Anstey at canstey@bloomberg.net, Yakob PeterseilFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- U.S equity futures climbed with European stocks after China said it agreed with America to roll back tariffs on each other’s goods in phases as they work toward a trade deal. Treasuries and gold declined.Contracts on the S&P 500 rose alongside the Stoxx Europe 600 after a Chinese government spokesman said the economic superpowers would remove the duties in phases “as progress is made on the agreement.” China is also reportedly studying the removal of curbs on U.S. poultry imports. Shares advanced in Hong Kong and China’s yuan strengthened offshore. Equities trading in Shanghai and Tokyo had already closed.West Texas-grade oil futures rose past $57 a barrel in New York, and a Bloomberg index of commodities advanced. The pound weakened after two Bank of England policy makers unexpectedly voted for an interest rate cut. European sovereign bonds declined.Risk appetite is picking up as China’s latest assertions of progress on trade helped counter earlier reports that a preliminary accord may not happen this month as the two sides continued to wrangle over a location to sign it. With economic indicators showing signs of stabilization, investors will now be looking for further evidence that a global recession can be avoided.“Before we see material evidence of an agreement, any trade headline will be seen as a short-term trading opportunity,” said Linus Yip, a Hong Kong-based strategist with First Shanghai Securities Ltd. “We see good news coming out, and the market is reacting to that. I don’t know if it will last for a long time.”Here are some key events coming up this week:Earnings are due this week from companies including Walt Disney.The USDA World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates Report for November comes out Friday.These are the main moves in markets:StocksFutures on the S&P 500 Index advanced 0.4% as of 8:30 a.m. New York time.The Stoxx Europe 600 Index increased 0.2%.The Shanghai Composite Index was little changed.The MSCI Emerging Market Index gained 0.3%.CurrenciesThe Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index was little changed.The euro increased 0.1% to $1.1078.The British pound sank 0.4% to $1.2802.The onshore yuan gained 0.3% to 6.975 per dollar.The Japanese yen declined 0.2% to 109.15 per dollar.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries advanced five basis points to 1.88%.The yield on two-year Treasuries gained four basis points to 1.65%.Germany’s 10-year yield advanced five basis points to -0.28%.Britain’s 10-year yield increased three basis points to 0.741%.Japan’s 10-year yield climbed two basis points to -0.064%.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude gained 1.6% to $57.27 a barrel.Iron ore decreased 0.3% to $80.05 per metric ton.Gold dipped 0.4% to $1,484.88 an ounce.\--With assistance from Adam Haigh, Andreea Papuc, Elena Popina and Cecile Vannucci.To contact the reporter on this story: Todd White in Madrid at twhite2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Christopher Anstey at canstey@bloomberg.net, Yakob PeterseilFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 32/79   Sea levels could rise even faster, higher than feared: study
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Global warming could drive a much more dramatic increase in sea levels than current projections suggest, scientists say, citing a rise of 10 metres (33 feet) during Earth's last warming interlude more than 100,000 years ago.  During the last interglacial period, 'sea levels rose at up to three metres per century, far exceeding the roughly 0.3-metre rise observed over the past 150 years,' they said in a blog about their findings, published Wednesday in the journal Nature Communications.  The scientists reported that during Earth's last interglacial period 125,000 to 118,000 years ago, when temperatures were only 1.0 degrees Celsius higher than today, the sea rose 10 metres.

    Global warming could drive a much more dramatic increase in sea levels than current projections suggest, scientists say, citing a rise of 10 metres (33 feet) during Earth's last warming interlude more than 100,000 years ago. During the last interglacial period, 'sea levels rose at up to three metres per century, far exceeding the roughly 0.3-metre rise observed over the past 150 years,' they said in a blog about their findings, published Wednesday in the journal Nature Communications. The scientists reported that during Earth's last interglacial period 125,000 to 118,000 years ago, when temperatures were only 1.0 degrees Celsius higher than today, the sea rose 10 metres.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 33/79   Bond Titans Ramp Up Growth Bets in Fight Against Deflation Fear
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Calling for a resurgence in inflation has proved a fool’s errand all year but the likes of BlackRock Inc. and Eaton Vance are in fighting spirits as they bet in the bond market against economic doom and gloom.As recent data undercut the case for recession and deflation, just a modest rise in price expectations which are still close to multi-year lows would boost long positions in so-called breakeven trades, according to fund managers.With developed market bonds flashing price stagnation for the next decade, the thinking goes that fixed-income strategies betting on a firmer inflation trajectory look too attractive to pass up.“Our view around inflation continues to be more positive than the market is pricing,” said Scott Thiel, BlackRock’s chief fixed-income strategist. “If financial conditions stayed where they were, we would get a situation where growth would effectively bottom and then re-accelerate back into more positive territory.”Thiel likes index-linked bonds in the U.S. and northern Europe, and sees the potential for a 15 basis-point upward move in breakeven rates across the board.Practically no one is betting on runaway inflation. But the BlackRock investor is not alone in eyeing a stronger price outlook relative to market expectations, even after this month’s upward move in U.S. breakevens driving nominal Treasury yields higher.Merian Global Investors has been adding to breakeven trades over the past two months, with long positions in France, Italy and Germany. Eaton Vance touts cheap breakevens in Australia and New Zealand in its Global Macro strategy and its Short Duration Strategic Fund.Buoyed by monetary stimulus and the prospect of government spending around the world, Amundi SA still talks up U.S. 10-year breakevens. “The Fed’s easier stance could provide a floor to the currently very depressed level, particularly if the recent escalation of trade war recedes somewhat,” said Vincent Mortier, deputy CIO at the 1.56 billion euro ($1.7 billion) manager.It may not take much to move the needle, amid signs economic data may be bottoming out relative to expectations. In Germany, domestic demand has held up despite trade weakness. The country’s sale of index-linked bonds due in 2030 this week drew bids 2.3 times the amount on offer, an increase from the average cover of around 1.6 times in the first half of the year.Lower oil prices relative to October last year may also be “skewing” the price outlook to the downside, according to Dariush Mirfendereski, the London-based global head of inflation trading at HSBC Bank Plc.“If you believe base effects are more one-offs -- and not a predictor of the next 10 years -- then any overshoot or undershoot of rates could be an opportunity to be a contrarian investor,” he said. “The longer the maturity of the bonds, the better this type of trading strategy is likely to work.”With signs the U.S and China may be rolling back on tariffs to work toward a deal, machinations in global commerce could prove a win-win for inflation-protection investing.Easing tensions are likely to juice short-term price expectations via improved business and consumer confidence. But BlackRock, Eaton Vance and Merian Global Investors warn the longer-term threat of protectionism risks higher inflation through tariffs, disruption of supply chains and exporters shifting to consumption-led growth.“When the trade war heats up, inflation expectation falls due to the demand shock nature of the trade war -- which shows me that markets are trading as if weaker demand will lower inflation,” said Eric Stein, co-director of Global Fixed Income at Eaton Vance. “They ignore the supply-side effects of higher tariffs, which could lead to higher inflation. Breakevens are very attractive place to invest.”For Merian Global Investors’ Mark Nash, the improved outlook in China and a softer dollar -- keeping global financial conditions easy -- could also help lift the price outlook, including in the euro zone where expectations remain not far off record lows.“The risk-reward is quite good as such low inflation is expected now,” said the London-based head of fixed income.It all suggests the interest-rate market could end 2019 on a more buoyant note on the economic trajectory relative to the recent angst.“The market is too pessimistic,” said Jim McCormick, global head of desk strategy at NatWest Markets. “Across much of the G-10 countries, wages are rising. Yet the inflation market implies we are staring at deflation risks.”(Adds U.S.-China tariff report in 13th paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Anchalee Worrachate in London at aworrachate@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Samuel Potter at spotter33@bloomberg.net, Sid Verma, Todd WhiteFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Calling for a resurgence in inflation has proved a fool’s errand all year but the likes of BlackRock Inc. and Eaton Vance are in fighting spirits as they bet in the bond market against economic doom and gloom.As recent data undercut the case for recession and deflation, just a modest rise in price expectations which are still close to multi-year lows would boost long positions in so-called breakeven trades, according to fund managers.With developed market bonds flashing price stagnation for the next decade, the thinking goes that fixed-income strategies betting on a firmer inflation trajectory look too attractive to pass up.“Our view around inflation continues to be more positive than the market is pricing,” said Scott Thiel, BlackRock’s chief fixed-income strategist. “If financial conditions stayed where they were, we would get a situation where growth would effectively bottom and then re-accelerate back into more positive territory.”Thiel likes index-linked bonds in the U.S. and northern Europe, and sees the potential for a 15 basis-point upward move in breakeven rates across the board.Practically no one is betting on runaway inflation. But the BlackRock investor is not alone in eyeing a stronger price outlook relative to market expectations, even after this month’s upward move in U.S. breakevens driving nominal Treasury yields higher.Merian Global Investors has been adding to breakeven trades over the past two months, with long positions in France, Italy and Germany. Eaton Vance touts cheap breakevens in Australia and New Zealand in its Global Macro strategy and its Short Duration Strategic Fund.Buoyed by monetary stimulus and the prospect of government spending around the world, Amundi SA still talks up U.S. 10-year breakevens. “The Fed’s easier stance could provide a floor to the currently very depressed level, particularly if the recent escalation of trade war recedes somewhat,” said Vincent Mortier, deputy CIO at the 1.56 billion euro ($1.7 billion) manager.It may not take much to move the needle, amid signs economic data may be bottoming out relative to expectations. In Germany, domestic demand has held up despite trade weakness. The country’s sale of index-linked bonds due in 2030 this week drew bids 2.3 times the amount on offer, an increase from the average cover of around 1.6 times in the first half of the year.Lower oil prices relative to October last year may also be “skewing” the price outlook to the downside, according to Dariush Mirfendereski, the London-based global head of inflation trading at HSBC Bank Plc.“If you believe base effects are more one-offs -- and not a predictor of the next 10 years -- then any overshoot or undershoot of rates could be an opportunity to be a contrarian investor,” he said. “The longer the maturity of the bonds, the better this type of trading strategy is likely to work.”With signs the U.S and China may be rolling back on tariffs to work toward a deal, machinations in global commerce could prove a win-win for inflation-protection investing.Easing tensions are likely to juice short-term price expectations via improved business and consumer confidence. But BlackRock, Eaton Vance and Merian Global Investors warn the longer-term threat of protectionism risks higher inflation through tariffs, disruption of supply chains and exporters shifting to consumption-led growth.“When the trade war heats up, inflation expectation falls due to the demand shock nature of the trade war -- which shows me that markets are trading as if weaker demand will lower inflation,” said Eric Stein, co-director of Global Fixed Income at Eaton Vance. “They ignore the supply-side effects of higher tariffs, which could lead to higher inflation. Breakevens are very attractive place to invest.”For Merian Global Investors’ Mark Nash, the improved outlook in China and a softer dollar -- keeping global financial conditions easy -- could also help lift the price outlook, including in the euro zone where expectations remain not far off record lows.“The risk-reward is quite good as such low inflation is expected now,” said the London-based head of fixed income.It all suggests the interest-rate market could end 2019 on a more buoyant note on the economic trajectory relative to the recent angst.“The market is too pessimistic,” said Jim McCormick, global head of desk strategy at NatWest Markets. “Across much of the G-10 countries, wages are rising. Yet the inflation market implies we are staring at deflation risks.”(Adds U.S.-China tariff report in 13th paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Anchalee Worrachate in London at aworrachate@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Samuel Potter at spotter33@bloomberg.net, Sid Verma, Todd WhiteFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 34/79   France's Macron says NATO experiencing 'brain death'
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    French President Emmanuel Macron said he believed NATO was undergoing 'brain death,' lamenting a lack of coordination between Europe and the United States and unilateral action in Syria by key member Turkey, in an interview published Thursday.  'What we are currently experiencing is the brain death of NATO,' Macron told The Economist magazine.  The president's explosive comments, appearing to question the very future of NATO, threatened to send shock waves through the alliance ahead of a summit in Britain next month.

    French President Emmanuel Macron said he believed NATO was undergoing 'brain death,' lamenting a lack of coordination between Europe and the United States and unilateral action in Syria by key member Turkey, in an interview published Thursday. 'What we are currently experiencing is the brain death of NATO,' Macron told The Economist magazine. The president's explosive comments, appearing to question the very future of NATO, threatened to send shock waves through the alliance ahead of a summit in Britain next month.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 35/79   Should You Worry About Spectris plc’s (LON:SXS) ROCE?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today we are going to look at Spectris plc (LON:SXS) to see whether it might be an attractive investment prospect. In...

    Today we are going to look at Spectris plc (LON:SXS) to see whether it might be an attractive investment prospect. In...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 36/79   Have KB Home (NYSE:KBH) Insiders Been Selling Their Stock?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Anyone interested in KB Home (NYSE:KBH) should probably be aware that the Executive VP & CFO, Jeff Kaminski, recently...

    Anyone interested in KB Home (NYSE:KBH) should probably be aware that the Executive VP & CFO, Jeff Kaminski, recently...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 37/79   Does MasterCraft Boat Holdings, Inc. (NASDAQ:MCFT) Have A High Beta?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    If you own shares in MasterCraft Boat Holdings, Inc. (NASDAQ:MCFT) then it's worth thinking about how it contributes...

    If you own shares in MasterCraft Boat Holdings, Inc. (NASDAQ:MCFT) then it's worth thinking about how it contributes...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 38/79   Nightfall emerges from stealth with $20M for a cloud-native data loss prevention platform
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Sensitive data leakage is one of the biggest negative side-effects of cloud-based apps and services.  Nightfall -- which integrates with and then automatically scans structured and unstructured data that appears in apps like Slack, GitHub, AWS and hundreds more for sensitive information, which it then acts to secure -- is launching publicly today with $20.3 million in funding.  Nightfall's CEO Isaac Madan said the startup will use the money to expand the scope of what it can detect and where, and to build out its business overall.

    Sensitive data leakage is one of the biggest negative side-effects of cloud-based apps and services. Nightfall -- which integrates with and then automatically scans structured and unstructured data that appears in apps like Slack, GitHub, AWS and hundreds more for sensitive information, which it then acts to secure -- is launching publicly today with $20.3 million in funding. Nightfall's CEO Isaac Madan said the startup will use the money to expand the scope of what it can detect and where, and to build out its business overall.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 39/79   Impeachment: Ex-Trump adviser John Bolton faces tightrope as Democrats seek his testimony on Ukraine
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    If he shows up Thursday, Bolton would be the highest-ranking Trump administration official to testify in the impeachment inquiry.

    If he shows up Thursday, Bolton would be the highest-ranking Trump administration official to testify in the impeachment inquiry.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 40/79   Trump Jr. tweets name of alleged whistleblower
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    For weeks, President Trump and his supporters have demanded the identity of the whistleblower who triggered the impeachment inquiry be exposed. On Wednesday, Trump’s eldest son revealed the name of the alleged whistleblower in a tweet.

    For weeks, President Trump and his supporters have demanded the identity of the whistleblower who triggered the impeachment inquiry be exposed. On Wednesday, Trump’s eldest son revealed the name of the alleged whistleblower in a tweet.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 41/79   Anchor says Buckingham Palace pressure killed ABC's story on Epstein
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    In a leaked video released Tuesday, ABC News anchor Amy Robach said the network killed her story on wealthy pedophile Jeffrey Epstein under pressure from the British royal family.

    In a leaked video released Tuesday, ABC News anchor Amy Robach said the network killed her story on wealthy pedophile Jeffrey Epstein under pressure from the British royal family.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 42/79   Bill Gates says Elizabeth Warren’s wealth tax would leave him ‘counting what he had left over’
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Bill Gates has criticised Elizabeth Warren’s proposed wealth tax, claiming it left him doing “a little math about what I have left over”.The Microsoft founder and billionaire spoke about the Democratic presidential candidate’s plan at The New York Times DealBook conference on Wednesday.

    Bill Gates has criticised Elizabeth Warren’s proposed wealth tax, claiming it left him doing “a little math about what I have left over”.The Microsoft founder and billionaire spoke about the Democratic presidential candidate’s plan at The New York Times DealBook conference on Wednesday.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 43/79   A suspect was arrested in the murder of 9 American Mormons in Mexico, and police think it might be a case of mistaken identity
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Authorities announced Wednesday that it had detained an individual who was holding two hostages in Agua Prieta, a town in the Mexican state of Sonora.

    Authorities announced Wednesday that it had detained an individual who was holding two hostages in Agua Prieta, a town in the Mexican state of Sonora.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 44/79   Israel approves controversial Jerusalem cable car
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Israel’s government has approved a controversial Jerusalem cable car that will ferry thousands of passengers an hour over Palestinian homes in the east of the city to within a few hundred yards of the Western Wall. The plan, which was given the green light this week, imagines a cable car beginning in west Jerusalem and swooping over a valley towards the Old City, where it will deposit visitors at the 16th-century Dung Gate.  The cars will carry up to 3,000 people an hour and Israel’s government says the plan will boost tourism, relieve traffic congestion, and make it easier for worshippers to reach the Western Wall, one of Judaism’s holiest sites.  “We’ve waited 2,000 years to return to the Western Wall and it’s impossible that heavy traffic prevents thousands of people from praying,” said Moshe Kahlon, Israel’s finance minister. But many Palestinians see the plan as an effort to entrench Israel’s presence in east Jerusalem, which most of the international community considers to be Palestinian territory under Israeli military occupation.  Jerusalem - Cable car route The construction is also likely to cause disruption to residents of the Palestinian neighbourhood of Silwan, who will find the cable being built above their homes.  Hanan Ashrawi, a senior Palestinian official, called the cable car plan “an illegal assault on the occupied Palestinian city and its people who have been living there for centuries”. Other critics have taken aim at the plan not because of its politics but because they believe it will be a modern eyesore that will blight the iconic Jerusalem skyline and spoil views of the Dome of the Rock and the turreted walls of the Old City.  Architects and historians have decried the plan as “Disneyfication” of a historic area sacred to Judaism, Islam, and Christianity. Unesco, the global heritage body, has also protested the plan as a threat to the “authentic character” of the Old City.   Opponents of the plan have vowed to sue the government over its decision and the case is likely to be taken up before Israel’s supreme court, potentially heralding a lengthy legal battle that may postpone construction.

    Israel’s government has approved a controversial Jerusalem cable car that will ferry thousands of passengers an hour over Palestinian homes in the east of the city to within a few hundred yards of the Western Wall. The plan, which was given the green light this week, imagines a cable car beginning in west Jerusalem and swooping over a valley towards the Old City, where it will deposit visitors at the 16th-century Dung Gate.  The cars will carry up to 3,000 people an hour and Israel’s government says the plan will boost tourism, relieve traffic congestion, and make it easier for worshippers to reach the Western Wall, one of Judaism’s holiest sites.  “We’ve waited 2,000 years to return to the Western Wall and it’s impossible that heavy traffic prevents thousands of people from praying,” said Moshe Kahlon, Israel’s finance minister. But many Palestinians see the plan as an effort to entrench Israel’s presence in east Jerusalem, which most of the international community considers to be Palestinian territory under Israeli military occupation.  Jerusalem - Cable car route The construction is also likely to cause disruption to residents of the Palestinian neighbourhood of Silwan, who will find the cable being built above their homes.  Hanan Ashrawi, a senior Palestinian official, called the cable car plan “an illegal assault on the occupied Palestinian city and its people who have been living there for centuries”. Other critics have taken aim at the plan not because of its politics but because they believe it will be a modern eyesore that will blight the iconic Jerusalem skyline and spoil views of the Dome of the Rock and the turreted walls of the Old City.  Architects and historians have decried the plan as “Disneyfication” of a historic area sacred to Judaism, Islam, and Christianity. Unesco, the global heritage body, has also protested the plan as a threat to the “authentic character” of the Old City.   Opponents of the plan have vowed to sue the government over its decision and the case is likely to be taken up before Israel’s supreme court, potentially heralding a lengthy legal battle that may postpone construction.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 45/79   South Korea deports North Koreans who fled after killing 16
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    In an extremely unusual case, South Korea deported two North Korean fishermen on Thursday after finding they had killed 16 other crew members on their boat and then fled to South Korean waters, Seoul officials said.  The two North Koreans, both men in their 20s, were captured in their boat south of the countries' eastern sea border last Saturday, according to Seoul's Unification Ministry.  South Korea has a policy of accepting North Koreans who want to resettle in the South to avoid political oppressions and economic poverty at home.

    In an extremely unusual case, South Korea deported two North Korean fishermen on Thursday after finding they had killed 16 other crew members on their boat and then fled to South Korean waters, Seoul officials said. The two North Koreans, both men in their 20s, were captured in their boat south of the countries' eastern sea border last Saturday, according to Seoul's Unification Ministry. South Korea has a policy of accepting North Koreans who want to resettle in the South to avoid political oppressions and economic poverty at home.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 46/79   Lindsey Graham says he won't read transcripts of testimony in 'sham' impeachment process
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Sen. Lindsey Graham, a leading critic of closed-door impeachment hearings by Democratically controlled committees, doesn't plan to read transcripts.

    Sen. Lindsey Graham, a leading critic of closed-door impeachment hearings by Democratically controlled committees, doesn't plan to read transcripts.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 47/79   Merkel’s Fading Power Laid Bare as German Ministers Go Rogue
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- For the second time in as many weeks, one of Angela Merkel’s chief cabinet members has gone rogue.Finance Minister Olaf Scholz’s bid to break years of deadlock over European efforts to complete a banking union was announced with fanfare Wednesday.But he hadn’t cleared it with the chancellor, his boss.“This contribution to a discussion has yet to be discussed within the government,” Merkel’s chief spokesman, Steffen Seibert, told reporters.The free-for-all in a once-disciplined government has left Germans wondering who is really in charge as Merkel approaches her 15th year in office.The chancellor’s authority was similarly tested two weeks ago, when her defense minister, Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer, set out a peace plan for northern Syria. While Merkel was given a heads up on that occasion, the chancellery was caught out all the same when Kramp-Karrenbauer unleashed the proposal without squaring it with their coalition partners. The idea was pilloried by the Social Democrats as unworkable and Foreign Minister Heiko Maas complained he’d found out about the plan by text message.The Next ChancellorWhat connects both episodes is the looming question of who will follow Merkel as chancellor when her term ends in 2021 at the latest. Both AKK, as the defense chief is known, and Scholz may be in the running even as they uphold responsibilities in the creaking coalition.It’s a dangerous game though. Both Merkel’s Christian Democrats and the SPD have suffered in the polls as the coalition limps forward. They could face serious punishment if the political maneuvers were to trigger an election.So on the same day that Scholz made his move on banking union, he also joined Merkel at the Chancellery in Berlin to stage a show of unity as the cabinet vaunted its policy achievements since coming together last year.“This shows that we’re capable and willing to work,” the chancellor said.Rift With MerkelHer party is unhappy all the same. AKK, who was Merkel’s chosen successor as CDU leader, is already facing an open revolt over her lackluster performance and her bond with the chancellor has broken down.Merkel left her one-time protegee to face the music after the CDU’s embarrassing defeat in the eastern state of Thuringia last week. When CDU lawmakers protested Merkel’s plans to cut a deal with the SPD over pensions at a closed-door meeting Tuesday, AKK kept silent leaving the chancellor to defend her decision alone, according to a party official who was present.AKK took another swipe at her boss on Thursday, complaining that German foreign policy has in the past been too preachy without delivering concrete results."We Germans are often very good at setting out high moral standards for ourselves and for others, rather than suggesting concrete measures and following through with them," she said during a speech in Munich.She also called for Germany to establish a presence in the Pacific to push back against China and more leeway from the Bundestag to send troops abroad, suggestions that are likely to stir up more trouble with the SPD.On Merkel’s other flank, Scholz is trying to win a contest for the leadership of the SPD. His rivals have signaled they could pull out of the coalition triggering a snap election and bringing down the curtain on Merkel’s political career.No One in ChargeThe mood in Berlin though is one of drift rather than revolution. While Merkel’s power has waned, neither of the contenders have succeeded in stamping their authority on the administration.AKK’s Syria proposal, a mission to secure a swath of land to protect Kurds along Turkey’s border, was dispatched within days of its unveiling as Russian President Vladimir Putin and Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey carved the area between them as U.S. forces pulled out.Scholz’s plan to complete the banking union, while stirring promise within the 19-member euro area, had a cold reception in Merkel’s Bundestag caucus. CDU lawmaker Olav Gutting, who sits on the Bundestag finance committee, insisted Merkel’s party will stand by the conditions for a deposit insurance set out by Scholz’s predecessor, Wolfgang Schaeuble.“Risks must first be reduced and controlled on a sustainable basis,” Gutting said in an email to Bloomberg News. “Then you can have a European deposit insurance.”(Updates with AKK quotes in 14th paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: Patrick Donahue in Berlin at pdonahue1@bloomberg.net;Arne Delfs in Berlin at adelfs@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Ben Sills at bsills@bloomberg.net, Caroline AlexanderFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- For the second time in as many weeks, one of Angela Merkel’s chief cabinet members has gone rogue.Finance Minister Olaf Scholz’s bid to break years of deadlock over European efforts to complete a banking union was announced with fanfare Wednesday.But he hadn’t cleared it with the chancellor, his boss.“This contribution to a discussion has yet to be discussed within the government,” Merkel’s chief spokesman, Steffen Seibert, told reporters.The free-for-all in a once-disciplined government has left Germans wondering who is really in charge as Merkel approaches her 15th year in office.The chancellor’s authority was similarly tested two weeks ago, when her defense minister, Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer, set out a peace plan for northern Syria. While Merkel was given a heads up on that occasion, the chancellery was caught out all the same when Kramp-Karrenbauer unleashed the proposal without squaring it with their coalition partners. The idea was pilloried by the Social Democrats as unworkable and Foreign Minister Heiko Maas complained he’d found out about the plan by text message.The Next ChancellorWhat connects both episodes is the looming question of who will follow Merkel as chancellor when her term ends in 2021 at the latest. Both AKK, as the defense chief is known, and Scholz may be in the running even as they uphold responsibilities in the creaking coalition.It’s a dangerous game though. Both Merkel’s Christian Democrats and the SPD have suffered in the polls as the coalition limps forward. They could face serious punishment if the political maneuvers were to trigger an election.So on the same day that Scholz made his move on banking union, he also joined Merkel at the Chancellery in Berlin to stage a show of unity as the cabinet vaunted its policy achievements since coming together last year.“This shows that we’re capable and willing to work,” the chancellor said.Rift With MerkelHer party is unhappy all the same. AKK, who was Merkel’s chosen successor as CDU leader, is already facing an open revolt over her lackluster performance and her bond with the chancellor has broken down.Merkel left her one-time protegee to face the music after the CDU’s embarrassing defeat in the eastern state of Thuringia last week. When CDU lawmakers protested Merkel’s plans to cut a deal with the SPD over pensions at a closed-door meeting Tuesday, AKK kept silent leaving the chancellor to defend her decision alone, according to a party official who was present.AKK took another swipe at her boss on Thursday, complaining that German foreign policy has in the past been too preachy without delivering concrete results."We Germans are often very good at setting out high moral standards for ourselves and for others, rather than suggesting concrete measures and following through with them," she said during a speech in Munich.She also called for Germany to establish a presence in the Pacific to push back against China and more leeway from the Bundestag to send troops abroad, suggestions that are likely to stir up more trouble with the SPD.On Merkel’s other flank, Scholz is trying to win a contest for the leadership of the SPD. His rivals have signaled they could pull out of the coalition triggering a snap election and bringing down the curtain on Merkel’s political career.No One in ChargeThe mood in Berlin though is one of drift rather than revolution. While Merkel’s power has waned, neither of the contenders have succeeded in stamping their authority on the administration.AKK’s Syria proposal, a mission to secure a swath of land to protect Kurds along Turkey’s border, was dispatched within days of its unveiling as Russian President Vladimir Putin and Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey carved the area between them as U.S. forces pulled out.Scholz’s plan to complete the banking union, while stirring promise within the 19-member euro area, had a cold reception in Merkel’s Bundestag caucus. CDU lawmaker Olav Gutting, who sits on the Bundestag finance committee, insisted Merkel’s party will stand by the conditions for a deposit insurance set out by Scholz’s predecessor, Wolfgang Schaeuble.“Risks must first be reduced and controlled on a sustainable basis,” Gutting said in an email to Bloomberg News. “Then you can have a European deposit insurance.”(Updates with AKK quotes in 14th paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: Patrick Donahue in Berlin at pdonahue1@bloomberg.net;Arne Delfs in Berlin at adelfs@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Ben Sills at bsills@bloomberg.net, Caroline AlexanderFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 48/79   The 10 most-viewed fake-news stories on Facebook in 2019 were just revealed in a new report — take a look (FB)
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Fake news stories targeting American voters are still rife on Facebook, and a new investigation from Avaaz just revealed the 10 most-viewed in 2019.

    Fake news stories targeting American voters are still rife on Facebook, and a new investigation from Avaaz just revealed the 10 most-viewed in 2019.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 49/79   Iranians plead guilty after arrest for spying on dissidents
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Two men arrested last year for spying on Iranian dissidents in the United States have pleaded guilty to charges in a Washington court, the Justice Department announced Wednesday.  Iranian-US dual citizen Ahmadreza Mohammadi Doostdar and Majid Ghorbani, an Iranian resident of California, tried to penetrate the Mujahedin-e Khalq (MEK), a group of Iranian dissidents in exile, in New York and Washington from 2017-2018, according to the department.  Doostdar traveled to the United States form Iran on three occasions to recruit Ghorbani and give him instructions and thousands of dollars in payments, according to the charges.

    Two men arrested last year for spying on Iranian dissidents in the United States have pleaded guilty to charges in a Washington court, the Justice Department announced Wednesday. Iranian-US dual citizen Ahmadreza Mohammadi Doostdar and Majid Ghorbani, an Iranian resident of California, tried to penetrate the Mujahedin-e Khalq (MEK), a group of Iranian dissidents in exile, in New York and Washington from 2017-2018, according to the department. Doostdar traveled to the United States form Iran on three occasions to recruit Ghorbani and give him instructions and thousands of dollars in payments, according to the charges.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 50/79   E-cigs may damage the heart, study says
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Vaping devices and the chemicals they deliver -- increasingly popular among teens -- may damage the cardiovascular system, a study said Thursday, adding to a growing chorus of concern over injury and deaths related to e-cigarettes.  The latest findings, published in the journal Cardiovascular Research, come after the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last month declared an 'outbreak of lung injuries' linked to vaping.  'E-cigarettes contain nicotine, particulate matter, metal and flavourings, not just harmless water vapour,' senior author Loren Wold of Ohio State University wrote in Thursday's study.

    Vaping devices and the chemicals they deliver -- increasingly popular among teens -- may damage the cardiovascular system, a study said Thursday, adding to a growing chorus of concern over injury and deaths related to e-cigarettes. The latest findings, published in the journal Cardiovascular Research, come after the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last month declared an 'outbreak of lung injuries' linked to vaping. 'E-cigarettes contain nicotine, particulate matter, metal and flavourings, not just harmless water vapour,' senior author Loren Wold of Ohio State University wrote in Thursday's study.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 51/79   Iconic Pacific bird sanctuary ravaged by plastic and death
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Flying into the uninhabited Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, Midway Atoll appears out of the vast blue Pacific as a tiny oasis of coral-fringed land with pristine white sand beaches that are teeming with life.  The Hawaiian Islands act like a comb that gathers debris as it floats across the Pacific.

    Flying into the uninhabited Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, Midway Atoll appears out of the vast blue Pacific as a tiny oasis of coral-fringed land with pristine white sand beaches that are teeming with life. The Hawaiian Islands act like a comb that gathers debris as it floats across the Pacific.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 52/79   2019’s Allen Distinguished Investigators will focus on the mysteries of our cells
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The Paul G. Allen Frontiers Group, a division of Seattle's Allen Institute, is making a total of $7.5 million in awards to its latest class of five biomedical researchers. The themes for this year's Allen Distinguished Investigators focus on stem cell therapies and single-cell interactions in their native environments. “The field of stem cell biology has the potential to change how we treat diseases by helping precision medicine, and there’s so much we still don’t understand about the interplay between cells in living tissues or organs,” Kathy Richmond, director of the Frontiers Group, said today in a news release. "Our… Read More

    The Paul G. Allen Frontiers Group, a division of Seattle's Allen Institute, is making a total of $7.5 million in awards to its latest class of five biomedical researchers. The themes for this year's Allen Distinguished Investigators focus on stem cell therapies and single-cell interactions in their native environments. “The field of stem cell biology has the potential to change how we treat diseases by helping precision medicine, and there’s so much we still don’t understand about the interplay between cells in living tissues or organs,” Kathy Richmond, director of the Frontiers Group, said today in a news release. "Our… Read More


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 53/79   NASA cracks open a sample of moon soil that’s been shut away for four decades
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    For the first time in more than 40 years, NASA has opened up a pristine sample of moon dirt and rocks that was collected during the Apollo missions. Scientists hope that a close analysis of the material from a 2-foot-long, nearly 2-inch-wide core sample will help astronauts get ready for a new series of Artemis moon missions in the 2020s. When Apollo's moonwalkers collected samples of lunar soil and rock, also known as regolith, some of those samples were tucked away at NASA's Johnson Space Center with the expectation that analytical tools would improve over the course of the decades… Read More

    For the first time in more than 40 years, NASA has opened up a pristine sample of moon dirt and rocks that was collected during the Apollo missions. Scientists hope that a close analysis of the material from a 2-foot-long, nearly 2-inch-wide core sample will help astronauts get ready for a new series of Artemis moon missions in the 2020s. When Apollo's moonwalkers collected samples of lunar soil and rock, also known as regolith, some of those samples were tucked away at NASA's Johnson Space Center with the expectation that analytical tools would improve over the course of the decades… Read More


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 54/79   Standing tall: Scientists find oldest example of upright ape
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    An international team of researchers says the fossilized partial skeleton of a male ape that lived almost 12 million years ago in the humid forests of what is now southern Germany bears a striking resemblance to modern human bones.  The findings 'raise fundamental questions about our previous understanding of the evolution of the great apes and humans,' said Madelaine Boehme of the University of Tuebingen, Germany, who led the research.  Boehme, along with researchers from Bulgaria, Germany, Canada and the United States, examined more than 15,000 bones recovered from a trove of archaeological remains known as the Hammerschmiede, or Hammer Smithy, about 70 kilometers (44 miles) west of the Germany city of Munich.

    An international team of researchers says the fossilized partial skeleton of a male ape that lived almost 12 million years ago in the humid forests of what is now southern Germany bears a striking resemblance to modern human bones. The findings 'raise fundamental questions about our previous understanding of the evolution of the great apes and humans,' said Madelaine Boehme of the University of Tuebingen, Germany, who led the research. Boehme, along with researchers from Bulgaria, Germany, Canada and the United States, examined more than 15,000 bones recovered from a trove of archaeological remains known as the Hammerschmiede, or Hammer Smithy, about 70 kilometers (44 miles) west of the Germany city of Munich.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 55/79   Why Didn't She Get Alzheimer's? The Answer Could Hold a Key to Fighting the Disease
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The woman's genetic profile showed she would develop Alzheimer's by the time she turned 50.A member of the world's largest family to suffer from Alzheimer's, she, like generations of her relatives, was born with a gene mutation that causes people to begin having memory and thinking problems in their 40s and deteriorate rapidly toward death around age 60.But remarkably, she experienced no cognitive decline at all until her 70s, nearly three decades later than expected.How did that happen? New research provides an answer, one that experts say could change the scientific understanding of Alzheimer's disease and inspire new ideas about how to prevent and treat it.In a study published Monday in the journal Nature Medicine, researchers say the woman, whose name they withheld to protect her privacy, has another mutation that has protected her from dementia even though her brain has developed a major neurological feature of Alzheimer's disease.This ultra rare mutation appears to help stave off the disease by minimizing the binding of a particular sugar compound to an important gene. That finding suggests that treatments could be developed to give other people that same protective mechanism."I'm very excited to see this new study come out -- the impact is dramatic," said Dr. Yadong Huang, a senior investigator at Gladstone Institutes, who was not involved in the research. "For both research and therapeutic development, this new finding is very important."A drug or gene therapy would not be available any time soon because scientists first need to replicate the protective mechanism found in this one patient by testing it in laboratory animals and human brain cells.Still, this case comes at a time when the Alzheimer's field is craving new approaches after billions of dollars have been spent on developing and testing treatments and some 200 drug trials have failed. It has been more than 15 years since the last treatment for dementia was approved, and the few drugs available do not work very well for very long.The woman is entering her late 70s now and lives in Medellin, the epicenter for an extended Colombian family of about 6,000 people whose members have been plagued with dementia for centuries, a condition they called "La Bobera" -- "the foolishness" -- and attributed to superstitious causes.Decades ago, a Colombian neurologist, Dr. Francisco Lopera, began painstakingly collecting the family's birth and death records in Medellin and remote Andes mountain villages. He documented the sprawling family tree and took dangerous risks in guerrilla and drug-trafficking territory to cajole relatives of people who died with dementia into giving him their brains for analysis.Through this work, Lopera, whose brain bank at the University of Antioquia now contains 300 brains, helped discover that their Alzheimer's was caused by a mutation on a gene called Presenilin 1.While this type of hereditary early-onset dementia accounts for only a small proportion of the roughly 30 million people worldwide with Alzheimer's, it is important because unlike most forms of Alzheimer's, the Colombian version has been traced to a specific cause and a consistent pattern. So Lopera and a team of American scientists have spent years studying the family, searching for answers both to help the Colombians and to address the mounting epidemic of the more typical old-age Alzheimer's disease.When they found that the woman had the Presenilin 1 mutation, but had not yet even developed a pre-Alzheimer's condition called mild cognitive impairment, the scientists were mystified."We have a single person who is resilient to Alzheimer's disease when she should be at high risk," said Dr. Eric Reiman, executive director of the Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix and a leader of the research team.The woman was flown to Boston, where some of the researchers are based, for brain scans and other tests. Those results were puzzling, said Yakeel Quiroz, a Colombian neuropsychologist who directs the familial dementia neuroimaging lab at Massachusetts General Hospital.The woman's brain was laden with the foremost hallmark of Alzheimer's: plaques of amyloid protein."The highest levels of amyloid that we have seen so far," said Quiroz, adding that the excessive amyloid probably accumulated because the woman has lived much longer than other family members with the Alzheimer's-causing mutation.But the woman had few other neurological signs of the disease -- not much of a protein called tau, which forms tangles in Alzheimer's brains, and little neurodegeneration or brain atrophy."Her brain was functioning really well," said Quiroz, who, like Reiman, is a senior author of the study. "Compared to people who are 45 or 50, she's actually better."She said the woman, who raised four children, had only one year of formal education and could barely read or write, so it was unlikely her cognitive protection came from educational stimulation."She has a secret in her biology," Lopera said. "This case is a big window to discover new approaches."Quiroz consulted Dr. Joseph Arboleda-Velasquez, who, like her, is an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School (he is also Quiroz's husband). Arboleda-Velasquez, a cell biologist at Massachusetts Eye and Ear, conducted extensive genetic testing and sequencing, determining that the woman has an extremely rare mutation on a gene called APOE.APOE is important in general-population Alzheimer's. One variant, APOE4, present in about 14% of people, greatly increases risk and is present in 40% of people with Alzheimer's. People with another variant, APOE2, occurring in about 7% of the population, are less likely to develop Alzheimer's, while those with the most common variant, APOE3, are in the middle.The Colombian woman has two copies of APOE3, but both copies have a mutation called Christchurch (for the New Zealand city where it was discovered). The Christchurch mutation is extremely rare, but several years ago, Reiman's daughter Rebecca, a technologist, helped determine that a handful of Colombian family members have that mutation on one of their APOE genes. They developed Alzheimer's as early as their relatives, though -- unlike the woman with mutations on both APOE genes."The fact that she had two copies, not just one, really kind of sealed the deal," Arboleda-Velasquez said.The woman's mutation is in an area of the APOE gene that binds with a sugar-protein compound called heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), which is involved in spreading tau in Alzheimer's disease.In laboratory experiments, the researchers found that the less a variant of APOE binds to HSPG, the less it is linked to Alzheimer's. With the Christchurch mutation, there was barely any binding.That, said Arboleda-Velasquez, "was the piece that completed the puzzle because, 'Oh, this is how the mutation has such a strong effect.'"Researchers were also able to develop a compound that, in laboratory dish experiments, mimicked the action of the mutation, suggesting it's possible to make drugs that prevent APOE from binding to HSPG.Dr. Guojun Bu, who studies APOE, said that while the findings involved a single case and more research is needed, the implications could be profound."When you have delayed onset of Alzheimer's by three decades, you say wow," said Bu, chairman of the neuroscience department at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, who was not involved in the study.He said the research suggests that instead of drugs attacking amyloid or tau, which have failed in many clinical trials, a medication or gene therapy targeting APOE could be promising.Reiman, who led another newly published study showing that APOE has a bigger impact on a person's risk of getting Alzheimer's than previously thought, said potential treatments could try to reduce or even silence APOE activity in the brain. People born without APOE appear to have no cognitive problems, but they do have very high cholesterol that requires treatment.Huang, who wrote a commentary about the study and is affiliated with two companies focusing on potential APOE-related treatments, said the findings also challenge a leading Alzheimer's theory about the role of amyloid.Since the woman had huge amounts of amyloid but few other Alzheimer's indicators, "it actually illustrates, to my knowledge for the first time, a very clear dissociation of amyloid accumulation from tau pathology, neurodegeneration and even cognitive decline," he said.Lopera said the woman is just beginning to develop dementia, and he recently disclosed her genetic profile to her four adult children, who each have only one copy of the Christchurch mutation.The researchers are also evaluating a few other members of the Colombian family, who appear to also have some resistance to Alzheimer's. They are not as old as the woman, and they do not have the Christchurch mutation, but the team hopes to find other genetic factors from studying them and examine whether those factors operate along the same or different biological pathways, Reiman said."We've learned that at least one individual can live for very long having the cause of Alzheimer's, and she's resistant to it," Arboleda-Velasquez said. "What this patient is teaching is there could be a pathway for correcting the disease."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company

    The woman's genetic profile showed she would develop Alzheimer's by the time she turned 50.A member of the world's largest family to suffer from Alzheimer's, she, like generations of her relatives, was born with a gene mutation that causes people to begin having memory and thinking problems in their 40s and deteriorate rapidly toward death around age 60.But remarkably, she experienced no cognitive decline at all until her 70s, nearly three decades later than expected.How did that happen? New research provides an answer, one that experts say could change the scientific understanding of Alzheimer's disease and inspire new ideas about how to prevent and treat it.In a study published Monday in the journal Nature Medicine, researchers say the woman, whose name they withheld to protect her privacy, has another mutation that has protected her from dementia even though her brain has developed a major neurological feature of Alzheimer's disease.This ultra rare mutation appears to help stave off the disease by minimizing the binding of a particular sugar compound to an important gene. That finding suggests that treatments could be developed to give other people that same protective mechanism."I'm very excited to see this new study come out -- the impact is dramatic," said Dr. Yadong Huang, a senior investigator at Gladstone Institutes, who was not involved in the research. "For both research and therapeutic development, this new finding is very important."A drug or gene therapy would not be available any time soon because scientists first need to replicate the protective mechanism found in this one patient by testing it in laboratory animals and human brain cells.Still, this case comes at a time when the Alzheimer's field is craving new approaches after billions of dollars have been spent on developing and testing treatments and some 200 drug trials have failed. It has been more than 15 years since the last treatment for dementia was approved, and the few drugs available do not work very well for very long.The woman is entering her late 70s now and lives in Medellin, the epicenter for an extended Colombian family of about 6,000 people whose members have been plagued with dementia for centuries, a condition they called "La Bobera" -- "the foolishness" -- and attributed to superstitious causes.Decades ago, a Colombian neurologist, Dr. Francisco Lopera, began painstakingly collecting the family's birth and death records in Medellin and remote Andes mountain villages. He documented the sprawling family tree and took dangerous risks in guerrilla and drug-trafficking territory to cajole relatives of people who died with dementia into giving him their brains for analysis.Through this work, Lopera, whose brain bank at the University of Antioquia now contains 300 brains, helped discover that their Alzheimer's was caused by a mutation on a gene called Presenilin 1.While this type of hereditary early-onset dementia accounts for only a small proportion of the roughly 30 million people worldwide with Alzheimer's, it is important because unlike most forms of Alzheimer's, the Colombian version has been traced to a specific cause and a consistent pattern. So Lopera and a team of American scientists have spent years studying the family, searching for answers both to help the Colombians and to address the mounting epidemic of the more typical old-age Alzheimer's disease.When they found that the woman had the Presenilin 1 mutation, but had not yet even developed a pre-Alzheimer's condition called mild cognitive impairment, the scientists were mystified."We have a single person who is resilient to Alzheimer's disease when she should be at high risk," said Dr. Eric Reiman, executive director of the Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix and a leader of the research team.The woman was flown to Boston, where some of the researchers are based, for brain scans and other tests. Those results were puzzling, said Yakeel Quiroz, a Colombian neuropsychologist who directs the familial dementia neuroimaging lab at Massachusetts General Hospital.The woman's brain was laden with the foremost hallmark of Alzheimer's: plaques of amyloid protein."The highest levels of amyloid that we have seen so far," said Quiroz, adding that the excessive amyloid probably accumulated because the woman has lived much longer than other family members with the Alzheimer's-causing mutation.But the woman had few other neurological signs of the disease -- not much of a protein called tau, which forms tangles in Alzheimer's brains, and little neurodegeneration or brain atrophy."Her brain was functioning really well," said Quiroz, who, like Reiman, is a senior author of the study. "Compared to people who are 45 or 50, she's actually better."She said the woman, who raised four children, had only one year of formal education and could barely read or write, so it was unlikely her cognitive protection came from educational stimulation."She has a secret in her biology," Lopera said. "This case is a big window to discover new approaches."Quiroz consulted Dr. Joseph Arboleda-Velasquez, who, like her, is an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School (he is also Quiroz's husband). Arboleda-Velasquez, a cell biologist at Massachusetts Eye and Ear, conducted extensive genetic testing and sequencing, determining that the woman has an extremely rare mutation on a gene called APOE.APOE is important in general-population Alzheimer's. One variant, APOE4, present in about 14% of people, greatly increases risk and is present in 40% of people with Alzheimer's. People with another variant, APOE2, occurring in about 7% of the population, are less likely to develop Alzheimer's, while those with the most common variant, APOE3, are in the middle.The Colombian woman has two copies of APOE3, but both copies have a mutation called Christchurch (for the New Zealand city where it was discovered). The Christchurch mutation is extremely rare, but several years ago, Reiman's daughter Rebecca, a technologist, helped determine that a handful of Colombian family members have that mutation on one of their APOE genes. They developed Alzheimer's as early as their relatives, though -- unlike the woman with mutations on both APOE genes."The fact that she had two copies, not just one, really kind of sealed the deal," Arboleda-Velasquez said.The woman's mutation is in an area of the APOE gene that binds with a sugar-protein compound called heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), which is involved in spreading tau in Alzheimer's disease.In laboratory experiments, the researchers found that the less a variant of APOE binds to HSPG, the less it is linked to Alzheimer's. With the Christchurch mutation, there was barely any binding.That, said Arboleda-Velasquez, "was the piece that completed the puzzle because, 'Oh, this is how the mutation has such a strong effect.'"Researchers were also able to develop a compound that, in laboratory dish experiments, mimicked the action of the mutation, suggesting it's possible to make drugs that prevent APOE from binding to HSPG.Dr. Guojun Bu, who studies APOE, said that while the findings involved a single case and more research is needed, the implications could be profound."When you have delayed onset of Alzheimer's by three decades, you say wow," said Bu, chairman of the neuroscience department at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, who was not involved in the study.He said the research suggests that instead of drugs attacking amyloid or tau, which have failed in many clinical trials, a medication or gene therapy targeting APOE could be promising.Reiman, who led another newly published study showing that APOE has a bigger impact on a person's risk of getting Alzheimer's than previously thought, said potential treatments could try to reduce or even silence APOE activity in the brain. People born without APOE appear to have no cognitive problems, but they do have very high cholesterol that requires treatment.Huang, who wrote a commentary about the study and is affiliated with two companies focusing on potential APOE-related treatments, said the findings also challenge a leading Alzheimer's theory about the role of amyloid.Since the woman had huge amounts of amyloid but few other Alzheimer's indicators, "it actually illustrates, to my knowledge for the first time, a very clear dissociation of amyloid accumulation from tau pathology, neurodegeneration and even cognitive decline," he said.Lopera said the woman is just beginning to develop dementia, and he recently disclosed her genetic profile to her four adult children, who each have only one copy of the Christchurch mutation.The researchers are also evaluating a few other members of the Colombian family, who appear to also have some resistance to Alzheimer's. They are not as old as the woman, and they do not have the Christchurch mutation, but the team hopes to find other genetic factors from studying them and examine whether those factors operate along the same or different biological pathways, Reiman said."We've learned that at least one individual can live for very long having the cause of Alzheimer's, and she's resistant to it," Arboleda-Velasquez said. "What this patient is teaching is there could be a pathway for correcting the disease."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 56/79   Brain-scanning helmet helps track children in motion
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Scientists have used a modified bike helmet to create a device that can monitor brain activity in children in realtime.  The technology may eventually be used on patients with neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and epilepsy, they reported Tuesday in Nature Communications.  Researchers inserted a wearable magnetoencephalography (MEG) device into a standard bike helmet, and successfully recorded the brain's response to maternal touch in children aged two to five.

    Scientists have used a modified bike helmet to create a device that can monitor brain activity in children in realtime. The technology may eventually be used on patients with neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and epilepsy, they reported Tuesday in Nature Communications. Researchers inserted a wearable magnetoencephalography (MEG) device into a standard bike helmet, and successfully recorded the brain's response to maternal touch in children aged two to five.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 57/79   Scientists warn of 'untold suffering' in climate 'emergency'
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Humanity faces 'untold suffering' if it fails to tackle the 'climate emergency' threatening life on Earth, more than 11,000 scientists warned Tuesday.  In a declaration in the journal BioScience, they noted that 40 years ago, scientists from 50 nations at the first World Climate Change Conference 'agreed that alarming trends... made it urgently necessary to act'.  'An immense increase of scale in endeavours to conserve our biosphere is needed to avoid untold suffering,' the scientists said in BioScience, a peer-reviewed publication of the American Institute of Biological Sciences.

    Humanity faces 'untold suffering' if it fails to tackle the 'climate emergency' threatening life on Earth, more than 11,000 scientists warned Tuesday. In a declaration in the journal BioScience, they noted that 40 years ago, scientists from 50 nations at the first World Climate Change Conference 'agreed that alarming trends... made it urgently necessary to act'. 'An immense increase of scale in endeavours to conserve our biosphere is needed to avoid untold suffering,' the scientists said in BioScience, a peer-reviewed publication of the American Institute of Biological Sciences.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 58/79   More than 11,000 scientists have declared a 'climate emergency.' One of the best things we can do, they say, is have fewer children.
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    After analyzing 40 years' worth of data, thousands of scientists from around the world say our planet is in the midst of a "climate emergency."

    After analyzing 40 years' worth of data, thousands of scientists from around the world say our planet is in the midst of a "climate emergency."


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 59/79   Spaceflight and Rocket Lab will put a Japanese shooting-star satellite into orbit
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Seattle-based Spaceflight says it's handling the pre-launch logistics for a Japanese satellite that's designed to spray artificial shooting stars into the sky. Tokyo-based ALE's spacecraft is just one of seven satellites due to be sent into orbit from New Zealand as early as Nov. 25, aboard a Rocket Lab Electron launch vehicle. It'll be the 10th Electron launch, earning the nickname "Running Out of Fingers." It'll also be the first launch to test the guidance and navigation hardware as well as the sensors that Rocket Lab will eventually use to help make the Electron's first stage recoverable. No recovery will… Read More

    Seattle-based Spaceflight says it's handling the pre-launch logistics for a Japanese satellite that's designed to spray artificial shooting stars into the sky. Tokyo-based ALE's spacecraft is just one of seven satellites due to be sent into orbit from New Zealand as early as Nov. 25, aboard a Rocket Lab Electron launch vehicle. It'll be the 10th Electron launch, earning the nickname "Running Out of Fingers." It'll also be the first launch to test the guidance and navigation hardware as well as the sensors that Rocket Lab will eventually use to help make the Electron's first stage recoverable. No recovery will… Read More


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 60/79   Iraq's key port closed again; 4 protesters killed in Baghdad
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Four Iraqis were shot and killed on Thursday as they tried to remove barriers blocking their march in central Baghdad, while in the south, protesters forced the closing of the country's main port hours after services had resumed following days of closure, officials said.  Demonstrators have been trying to reach the Green Zone, which houses government offices and foreign embassies.  Along with the four killed, at least 24 protesters were wounded as security forces fired live rounds and tear gas to disperse the march in downtown's Rashid Street, where the central bank is located, security and medical officials said.

    Four Iraqis were shot and killed on Thursday as they tried to remove barriers blocking their march in central Baghdad, while in the south, protesters forced the closing of the country's main port hours after services had resumed following days of closure, officials said. Demonstrators have been trying to reach the Green Zone, which houses government offices and foreign embassies. Along with the four killed, at least 24 protesters were wounded as security forces fired live rounds and tear gas to disperse the march in downtown's Rashid Street, where the central bank is located, security and medical officials said.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 61/79   AP Interview: Ex-speaker Bercow brands Brexit a huge mistake
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    John Bercow, the former House of Commons speaker who oversaw Britain's bruising parliamentary battles over Brexit, says leaving the European Union would be a historic mistake for the U.K., but it's not too late to reverse the decision.  'We're in a world of power blocs and of trade blocs,' Bercow told the Associated Press in an interview Thursday.

    John Bercow, the former House of Commons speaker who oversaw Britain's bruising parliamentary battles over Brexit, says leaving the European Union would be a historic mistake for the U.K., but it's not too late to reverse the decision. 'We're in a world of power blocs and of trade blocs,' Bercow told the Associated Press in an interview Thursday.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 62/79   Canadian Miner Targeted in Burkina Faso Attack; 38 Killed
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Next Africa newsletter and follow Bloomberg Africa on TwitterUnidentified assailants attacked a convoy transporting workers of Canadian gold producer Semafo Inc. in Burkina Faso, killing at least 38 people, the government said.The deaths come as West African governments battle a widening insurgency by Islamist militants and at a time when gold producers and prospectors are pouring money into the region as prices rally. The conflict has displaced more than half a million people in Burkina Faso, according to the United Nations, and led to increasing discontent with how President Roch Marc Christian Kabore’s government is handling the situation.Five buses transporting employees, contractors and suppliers were ambushed Wednesday on a road between the eastern town of Fada and Semafo’s Boungou mine, the Montreal-based company said in a statement. The incident happened about 40 kilometers (25 miles) away from the Boungou site and the mine’s operations are unaffected, it said.The convoy was hit by a “complex attack,” in which 33 people were wounded, Burkina Faso’s government spokesman said by phone, revising down an earlier injury toll of 60. The state will provide further details later on Thursday, while Semafo said it will issue an update “when complete details are known.”Semafo’s stock closed down 11% at C$3.49 in Toronto on Wednesday, the biggest drop since April 2017. Shares in Australia’s Perenti Global Ltd. slumped by a similar margin after it said members of its workforce in Burkina Faso were involved in the incident.The attack is the third related to Semafo in the past 15 months, after two incidents last year left at least seven people dead.No one claimed responsibility for the assault, but Islamist insurgents and militants linked to al-Qaeda and the Islamic State have carried out several attacks on security forces and civilians in West Africa in the past five years, killing almost 700 people.Burkina Faso was largely stable until Islamist insurgencies in neighboring Mali came under increasing pressure from French and Malian counter-terrorism troops, resulting in cross-border raids and the spread of violence in some of the nation’s poorest provinces.(Updates number of injuries in fourth paragraph)\--With assistance from Victoria Batchelor.To contact the reporters on this story: Simon Gongo in Ouagadougou at sgongo@bloomberg.net;Katarina Hoije in Abidjan at khoije@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Andre Janse van Vuuren at ajansevanvuu@bloomberg.net, Ekow DontohFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Next Africa newsletter and follow Bloomberg Africa on TwitterUnidentified assailants attacked a convoy transporting workers of Canadian gold producer Semafo Inc. in Burkina Faso, killing at least 38 people, the government said.The deaths come as West African governments battle a widening insurgency by Islamist militants and at a time when gold producers and prospectors are pouring money into the region as prices rally. The conflict has displaced more than half a million people in Burkina Faso, according to the United Nations, and led to increasing discontent with how President Roch Marc Christian Kabore’s government is handling the situation.Five buses transporting employees, contractors and suppliers were ambushed Wednesday on a road between the eastern town of Fada and Semafo’s Boungou mine, the Montreal-based company said in a statement. The incident happened about 40 kilometers (25 miles) away from the Boungou site and the mine’s operations are unaffected, it said.The convoy was hit by a “complex attack,” in which 33 people were wounded, Burkina Faso’s government spokesman said by phone, revising down an earlier injury toll of 60. The state will provide further details later on Thursday, while Semafo said it will issue an update “when complete details are known.”Semafo’s stock closed down 11% at C$3.49 in Toronto on Wednesday, the biggest drop since April 2017. Shares in Australia’s Perenti Global Ltd. slumped by a similar margin after it said members of its workforce in Burkina Faso were involved in the incident.The attack is the third related to Semafo in the past 15 months, after two incidents last year left at least seven people dead.No one claimed responsibility for the assault, but Islamist insurgents and militants linked to al-Qaeda and the Islamic State have carried out several attacks on security forces and civilians in West Africa in the past five years, killing almost 700 people.Burkina Faso was largely stable until Islamist insurgencies in neighboring Mali came under increasing pressure from French and Malian counter-terrorism troops, resulting in cross-border raids and the spread of violence in some of the nation’s poorest provinces.(Updates number of injuries in fourth paragraph)\--With assistance from Victoria Batchelor.To contact the reporters on this story: Simon Gongo in Ouagadougou at sgongo@bloomberg.net;Katarina Hoije in Abidjan at khoije@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Andre Janse van Vuuren at ajansevanvuu@bloomberg.net, Ekow DontohFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 63/79   US-led coalition launches operation to protect Gulf waters
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    A US-led naval coalition officially launched operations in Bahrain Thursday to protect shipping in the troubled waters of the Gulf, after a string of attacks that Washington and its allies blamed on Iran.  Iran, which has denied any responsibility for the mystery attacks, has put forward its own proposals for boosting Gulf security that pointedly exclude outside powers.  Bahrain, which hosts the US Navy's Fifth Fleet, joined the International Maritime Security Construct (IMSC) in August.

    A US-led naval coalition officially launched operations in Bahrain Thursday to protect shipping in the troubled waters of the Gulf, after a string of attacks that Washington and its allies blamed on Iran. Iran, which has denied any responsibility for the mystery attacks, has put forward its own proposals for boosting Gulf security that pointedly exclude outside powers. Bahrain, which hosts the US Navy's Fifth Fleet, joined the International Maritime Security Construct (IMSC) in August.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 64/79   Iran injects gas in new centrifuges as atomic deal unravels
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Iran injected uranium gas into centrifuges at its underground Fordo nuclear complex early Thursday, taking its most-significant step away from its 2015 nuclear deal with world powers.  Tehran meanwhile also acknowledged blocking an official from the International Atomic Energy Agency from visiting its nuclear site at Natanz last week, the first known case of a United Nations inspector being blocked amid heightened tensions over its atomic program.  Iran's representative to the IAEA said Tehran had asked the agency never to send the inspector again, without elaborating on what happened.

    Iran injected uranium gas into centrifuges at its underground Fordo nuclear complex early Thursday, taking its most-significant step away from its 2015 nuclear deal with world powers. Tehran meanwhile also acknowledged blocking an official from the International Atomic Energy Agency from visiting its nuclear site at Natanz last week, the first known case of a United Nations inspector being blocked amid heightened tensions over its atomic program. Iran's representative to the IAEA said Tehran had asked the agency never to send the inspector again, without elaborating on what happened.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 65/79   Albanian boy freed from IS camp on way home to Italy
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    An Albanian boy who was taken to Syria by his mother when she joined the Islamic State group has been freed from a crowded detention camp in northeastern Syria and is on track to return home with his father in Italy, Red Cross and Red Crescent officials said Thursday.  The story of 11-year-old Alvin, who found himself with no family at the al-Hol camp after his mother died amid fighting in northeast Syria, has captivated public attention in Italy after a glitzy TV news show reported on his father's agonized efforts to bring him home.  The evacuation also comes amid the shifting strategic landscape in Syria's northeast.

    An Albanian boy who was taken to Syria by his mother when she joined the Islamic State group has been freed from a crowded detention camp in northeastern Syria and is on track to return home with his father in Italy, Red Cross and Red Crescent officials said Thursday. The story of 11-year-old Alvin, who found himself with no family at the al-Hol camp after his mother died amid fighting in northeast Syria, has captivated public attention in Italy after a glitzy TV news show reported on his father's agonized efforts to bring him home. The evacuation also comes amid the shifting strategic landscape in Syria's northeast.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 66/79   Trump’s Neglect of U.S. Allies Is Killing NATO, Macron Says
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- U.S. President Donald Trump has turned his back on his European allies and undermined the 70-year-old North Atlantic Treaty Organization, creating an existential threat for America’s transatlantic partners, according to French President Emmanuel Macron.“What we are currently experiencing is the brain death of NATO,” Macron said in an interview with The Economist published on Thursday, also calling into question the bedrock principle of “collective defense” -- that allies would come to one another’s aid. “There’s a considerable risk that in the long run we will disappear geopolitically, or at least that we will no longer be in control of our destiny,” he said.Last month, Trump withdrew U.S. forces from northeastern Syria, which critics have said gave Turkey a green light to attack American-allied Kurdish militias, risking a resurgence of the Islamic State and a slaughter of the Kurds. Turkey and the U.S., both members of NATO, didn’t consult with their alliance partners before acting, infuriating Macron.Trump has pushed traditional allies away in pursing his “America First” agenda, calling the European Union a “foe,” which is “almost as bad as China, just smaller,” and flirting with the idea of leaving NATO if members didn’t contribute more money.But his most recent actions corroborated Macron’s fears that the U.S. president wasn’t committed to NATO values and rules, and gave further impetus to the French leader’s push for Europe to assert its own autonomy. The American withdrawal left Europe dealing with the prospect of Islamic State veterans escaping from prisons and of ceding influence in the region to Russia’s Vladimir Putin.“You have no coordination of the United States’ strategic decision with NATO’s partners and we are witnessing an aggression led by another NATO partner, Turkey, in an area where our interests are at stake, without coordination,” Macron told the magazine. He called for a clarification of NATO’s strategic objectives while still supporting his idea of strengthening a European defense.Strategic AutonomyThe situation in Syria, and Macron’s words, will be fodder for discussion when leaders of NATO members meet next month near London for the annual reunion, which will also celebrate the alliance’s 70 years of existence.Read More: Syria Shows Risks of U.S. Withdrawal for Europe: IrrelevanceSeparately, German Defense Minister Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer echoed Macron’s comments, saying that U.S. interest in protecting the global order was “dwindling” and that Europe needed to do more for its own defense.“A country of our size and economic and technical might, a nation in our geopolitical situation and with our global interests, cannot simply stand on the sidelines and look on,” Kramp-Karrenbauer said. “We have to make our own proposals, develop ideas, suggest options.”Macron has repeatedly called EU allies to accelerate moves toward “strategic autonomy” that would allow Europe to end its overwhelming military dependence on the U.S., and remake the post-World War II and post-Cold War security architecture.European ArmyThe French president had already used tough words and images to pressure European members, for example when in 2018 he called for the creation of a “European Army.” Trump opposed any such plan, saying it was “very insulting,” and any move that would encroach on NATO’s competency would face considerable challenges with most alliance members.“The European defense union will always be oriented toward a cooperation with NATO, which will remain the anchor of Europe’s security,” Kramp-Karrenbauer said on Thursday at Germany’s military university in Munich. “We want complementarity, not competition.”NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg disagreed that the alliance was obsolete.“We do work, we modernize more and we invest more than we did for decades,” Stoltenberg told reporters on Thursday. “The U.S. is realizing that NATO is important to them.”To contact the reporter on this story: Helene Fouquet in Paris at hfouquet1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Ben Sills at bsills@bloomberg.net, Richard Bravo, Caroline AlexanderFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- U.S. President Donald Trump has turned his back on his European allies and undermined the 70-year-old North Atlantic Treaty Organization, creating an existential threat for America’s transatlantic partners, according to French President Emmanuel Macron.“What we are currently experiencing is the brain death of NATO,” Macron said in an interview with The Economist published on Thursday, also calling into question the bedrock principle of “collective defense” -- that allies would come to one another’s aid. “There’s a considerable risk that in the long run we will disappear geopolitically, or at least that we will no longer be in control of our destiny,” he said.Last month, Trump withdrew U.S. forces from northeastern Syria, which critics have said gave Turkey a green light to attack American-allied Kurdish militias, risking a resurgence of the Islamic State and a slaughter of the Kurds. Turkey and the U.S., both members of NATO, didn’t consult with their alliance partners before acting, infuriating Macron.Trump has pushed traditional allies away in pursing his “America First” agenda, calling the European Union a “foe,” which is “almost as bad as China, just smaller,” and flirting with the idea of leaving NATO if members didn’t contribute more money.But his most recent actions corroborated Macron’s fears that the U.S. president wasn’t committed to NATO values and rules, and gave further impetus to the French leader’s push for Europe to assert its own autonomy. The American withdrawal left Europe dealing with the prospect of Islamic State veterans escaping from prisons and of ceding influence in the region to Russia’s Vladimir Putin.“You have no coordination of the United States’ strategic decision with NATO’s partners and we are witnessing an aggression led by another NATO partner, Turkey, in an area where our interests are at stake, without coordination,” Macron told the magazine. He called for a clarification of NATO’s strategic objectives while still supporting his idea of strengthening a European defense.Strategic AutonomyThe situation in Syria, and Macron’s words, will be fodder for discussion when leaders of NATO members meet next month near London for the annual reunion, which will also celebrate the alliance’s 70 years of existence.Read More: Syria Shows Risks of U.S. Withdrawal for Europe: IrrelevanceSeparately, German Defense Minister Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer echoed Macron’s comments, saying that U.S. interest in protecting the global order was “dwindling” and that Europe needed to do more for its own defense.“A country of our size and economic and technical might, a nation in our geopolitical situation and with our global interests, cannot simply stand on the sidelines and look on,” Kramp-Karrenbauer said. “We have to make our own proposals, develop ideas, suggest options.”Macron has repeatedly called EU allies to accelerate moves toward “strategic autonomy” that would allow Europe to end its overwhelming military dependence on the U.S., and remake the post-World War II and post-Cold War security architecture.European ArmyThe French president had already used tough words and images to pressure European members, for example when in 2018 he called for the creation of a “European Army.” Trump opposed any such plan, saying it was “very insulting,” and any move that would encroach on NATO’s competency would face considerable challenges with most alliance members.“The European defense union will always be oriented toward a cooperation with NATO, which will remain the anchor of Europe’s security,” Kramp-Karrenbauer said on Thursday at Germany’s military university in Munich. “We want complementarity, not competition.”NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg disagreed that the alliance was obsolete.“We do work, we modernize more and we invest more than we did for decades,” Stoltenberg told reporters on Thursday. “The U.S. is realizing that NATO is important to them.”To contact the reporter on this story: Helene Fouquet in Paris at hfouquet1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Ben Sills at bsills@bloomberg.net, Richard Bravo, Caroline AlexanderFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 67/79   N. Korea calls Abe an 'idiot' over criticism of weapons test
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    North Korea on Thursday called Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe an 'idiot' after he criticized a recent weapons test by the North.  The statement ridiculed Abe's expressed willingness to meet North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, saying he would be 'well-advised not to dream forever of crossing the threshold of Pyongyang,' North Korea's capital, after insulting the North's 'just measures' for self-defense.

    North Korea on Thursday called Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe an 'idiot' after he criticized a recent weapons test by the North. The statement ridiculed Abe's expressed willingness to meet North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, saying he would be 'well-advised not to dream forever of crossing the threshold of Pyongyang,' North Korea's capital, after insulting the North's 'just measures' for self-defense.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 68/79   Aid group says hospital hit during Houthi attack in Yemen
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    An international medical relief agency said Thursday that a hospital it runs in western Yemen was damaged in a recent attack.  Yemeni military officials blamed the Houthi rebels for the drone and missile attack that targeted buildings near the hospital, causing huge explosions that killed at least eight people.  In a statement, Doctors Without Borders said they closed the hospital because of the attack and that there were no reports of deaths or injuries among its patients.

    An international medical relief agency said Thursday that a hospital it runs in western Yemen was damaged in a recent attack. Yemeni military officials blamed the Houthi rebels for the drone and missile attack that targeted buildings near the hospital, causing huge explosions that killed at least eight people. In a statement, Doctors Without Borders said they closed the hospital because of the attack and that there were no reports of deaths or injuries among its patients.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 69/79   EU court cancels decision against UKIP ally over misspending
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    In a victory for Brexit activist Nigel Farage, the EU's top court on Thursday annulled a decision from the European Parliament that demanded a political group linked to the British party UKIP reimburse tens of thousands in EU funds.  The Alliance for Direct Democracy in Europe had been asked in 2016 to repay 172,655 euros (about $190,000) and denied a further 500,616 euros ($555,000) in EU grants after the European Parliament ruled it had misspent EU funds on Farage's party's domestic campaign in Britain, breaking the bloc's spending rules.

    In a victory for Brexit activist Nigel Farage, the EU's top court on Thursday annulled a decision from the European Parliament that demanded a political group linked to the British party UKIP reimburse tens of thousands in EU funds. The Alliance for Direct Democracy in Europe had been asked in 2016 to repay 172,655 euros (about $190,000) and denied a further 500,616 euros ($555,000) in EU grants after the European Parliament ruled it had misspent EU funds on Farage's party's domestic campaign in Britain, breaking the bloc's spending rules.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 70/79   9 Easy Ways to Make Your Jack-o'-Lanterns Last Longer
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    A little bleach goes a long way.

    A little bleach goes a long way.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 71/79   Is It Time for a Medication Reconciliation?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    More than half of adult Americans regularly take at least one prescription drug, according to a recent Consumer Reports nationally representative survey. And for those who take any medication on ...

    More than half of adult Americans regularly take at least one prescription drug, according to a recent Consumer Reports nationally representative survey. And for those who take any medication on ...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 72/79   5 Turkey Cooking Tips Will Guarantee You Have the Perfect Bird This Holidays
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    There's no need to wing it at Thanksgiving this year.

    There's no need to wing it at Thanksgiving this year.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 73/79   Brown-Bag Lunches for Kids With Food Allergies
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 74/79   What to Feed Your Family When the Power Goes Out
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 75/79   Try These Healthy Snack Ideas for Kids
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...

    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 76/79   The 9 Best Jobs for Teachers To Make Some Cash During the Summer Break
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 77/79   How to Spot and Avoid Algal Blooms
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 78/79   Get These 4 Vaccines for College
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If your child is a college student—or soon to be one—making sure he or she is fully vaccinated is critically important, especially for those who will be living in a dorm or other shared space. Th...

    If your child is a college student—or soon to be one—making sure he or she is fully vaccinated is critically important, especially for those who will be living in a dorm or other shared space. Th...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 79/79   DNA detectives: New tech can mean a diagnosis for your child, but not a lot of answers
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Four-year-old Eli Kadkhoda is one of a handful of children with IRF2BPL-related condition, named after the gene to which it is linked. Its patients are all healthy at birth, stumbling and losing speech by kindergarten, wheelchair-dependent soon after.

    Four-year-old Eli Kadkhoda is one of a handful of children with IRF2BPL-related condition, named after the gene to which it is linked. Its patients are all healthy at birth, stumbling and losing speech by kindergarten, wheelchair-dependent soon after.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.

 
 


       

Voice Sythesis
The Microsoft SAPI 5 ActiveX object is needed.
In the security option of your browser, you must not disable the initialization of non signed ActiveX controls.
You can install and use any English voice compatible with SAPI 5.
(such as the speech component of Microsoft).
Download
No Voice Title Title and Description
Voice and Output



Rate

 

 
Volume

 

 

Slideshow Speed (Quick to Slow)
Zero One Two Three Four Five

Blog and RSS feed URLs
http://moblog.whmsoft.net/en
http://moblog.whmsoft.net/en/?feed=rss2

Subscribe to WhmSoft Services Photo Gallery by Email
Subscribe to RSS Feed with Google Subscribe to RSS Feed with Yahoo! Subscribe to RSS Feed with AOL Subscribe to RSS Feed with Bloglines
Subscribe to RSS Feed with Netvibes Subscribe to RSS Feed with Newsgator Subscribe to RSS Feed with Pageflakes Subscribe to RSS Feed with Rojo

Slideshow - News Photos - From Yahoo! News
  • Meta
  • Hot Products



    Leave a Reply