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News Slideshows (11/08/2019 03 hours)


  • 1/79   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


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    Press Review


    Bloomberg   Rivers   Erik Harris   Jeff Goldblum   Trent Scott   Matt Blake   Maxx Crosby   Woody Allen   Carli Lloyd   Christen Press   Eric Holder   Silver Slugger   Talladega Nights   Trump Foundation   Melvin Ingram   Jeritza   Hunter Henry   Karl Joseph   Patrick Reed   Steyer   Alex DeBrincat   Carey Price   Lundqvist   
  • 2/79   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


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  • 3/79   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


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  • 4/79   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


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  • 5/79   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


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  • 6/79   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


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  • 7/79   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


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  • 8/79   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


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  • 9/79   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


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  • 10/79   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


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  • 11/79   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


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  • 12/79   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


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  • 13/79   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


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  • 14/79   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named.  Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does.  At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


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  • 15/79   PHOTOS: Fluorescent turtle embryo wins forty-fifth annual Nikon Small World Competition

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.


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  • 16/79   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


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  • 17/79   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


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  • 18/79   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


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  • 19/79   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


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  • 20/79   Asia Stocks Mixed; Japan Bond Yields Edge Up: Markets Wrap
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Asian stocks were mixed Friday and U.S. equity futures edged lower as the risk-on mood that’s permeated global financial markets this week showed signs of abating. Benchmark Japanese bond yields inched toward an exit from negative territoryJapanese and Chinese shares gained, while equities in Hong Kong dipped. Futures on the S&P 500 slipped after the index notched another record high. Japanese 10-year government bond yields were on track for their biggest weekly climb since May 2013, the month the taper tantrum began. China’s offshore yuan was trading stronger than 7 per dollar. Gold headed for its worst week since May 2017, back when the global economic narrative was all about synchronous growth.Behind the optimism: continued indications that the U.S. and China are heading toward an interim deal to halt the trade war. American and Chinese officials both said Thursday that a phase-one agreement would feature pledges to roll back tariffs on each others’ goods in phases.“Moving from a non-escalation to a de-escalation, which would be rolling back the tariffs, has got everybody excited,” Adam Taback, global head of alternative investments at Wells Fargo Investment Institute, told Bloomberg TV.Bonds have been the more notable mover than stocks this week. Ten-year yields in France and Belgium climbed back above 0% for the first time in months Thursday, while the German equivalent surged 10 basis points. Japanese 10-year rates are a few basis points away from zero.Elsewhere, oil slipped but remained set for a weekly gain amid the signs of progress on trade. The dollar was little changed.Here are the main moves in markets:StocksJapan’s Topix Index rose 0.4% as of 10:30 a.m. in Tokyo.South Korea’s Kospi slid 0.1%.Hong Kong’s Hang Seng slipped 0.3%.The Shanghai Composite added 0.4%.Futures on the S&P 500 Index dropped 0.2%. The index rose 0.3% on Thursday to a record high.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries was at 1.92%, up about 20 basis points for the week.Japanese 10-year yields ticked up to -0.038%.Australia’s 10-year yield rose eight basis points to 1.29%.CurrenciesThe yen was at 109.25 per dollar.The offshore yuan traded at 6.9724 per dollar.The euro bought $1.1051.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude traded at $57.08 a barrel.Gold was at $1,467.44 an ounce, down more than 3% for the week.To contact the reporter on this story: Adam Haigh in Sydney at ahaigh1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Christopher Anstey at canstey@bloomberg.net, Cormac MullenFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Asian stocks were mixed Friday and U.S. equity futures edged lower as the risk-on mood that’s permeated global financial markets this week showed signs of abating. Benchmark Japanese bond yields inched toward an exit from negative territoryJapanese and Chinese shares gained, while equities in Hong Kong dipped. Futures on the S&P 500 slipped after the index notched another record high. Japanese 10-year government bond yields were on track for their biggest weekly climb since May 2013, the month the taper tantrum began. China’s offshore yuan was trading stronger than 7 per dollar. Gold headed for its worst week since May 2017, back when the global economic narrative was all about synchronous growth.Behind the optimism: continued indications that the U.S. and China are heading toward an interim deal to halt the trade war. American and Chinese officials both said Thursday that a phase-one agreement would feature pledges to roll back tariffs on each others’ goods in phases.“Moving from a non-escalation to a de-escalation, which would be rolling back the tariffs, has got everybody excited,” Adam Taback, global head of alternative investments at Wells Fargo Investment Institute, told Bloomberg TV.Bonds have been the more notable mover than stocks this week. Ten-year yields in France and Belgium climbed back above 0% for the first time in months Thursday, while the German equivalent surged 10 basis points. Japanese 10-year rates are a few basis points away from zero.Elsewhere, oil slipped but remained set for a weekly gain amid the signs of progress on trade. The dollar was little changed.Here are the main moves in markets:StocksJapan’s Topix Index rose 0.4% as of 10:30 a.m. in Tokyo.South Korea’s Kospi slid 0.1%.Hong Kong’s Hang Seng slipped 0.3%.The Shanghai Composite added 0.4%.Futures on the S&P 500 Index dropped 0.2%. The index rose 0.3% on Thursday to a record high.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries was at 1.92%, up about 20 basis points for the week.Japanese 10-year yields ticked up to -0.038%.Australia’s 10-year yield rose eight basis points to 1.29%.CurrenciesThe yen was at 109.25 per dollar.The offshore yuan traded at 6.9724 per dollar.The euro bought $1.1051.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude traded at $57.08 a barrel.Gold was at $1,467.44 an ounce, down more than 3% for the week.To contact the reporter on this story: Adam Haigh in Sydney at ahaigh1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Christopher Anstey at canstey@bloomberg.net, Cormac MullenFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 21/79   Oil Pares Weekly Gain as Investors Weigh Trade Deal Progress
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Oil pared a weekly gain as investors weighed signs of progress in the prolonged U.S.-China trade war that’s undermined global crude demand.While futures in New York lost 0.5% in early Asian trade, oil is still up 1.2% for the week. The U.S. and China have agreed to roll back tariffs on each other’s goods in phases as they work toward a deal, both sides said. Renewed trade optimism offset swelling American crude inventories and indications OPEC and its allies won’t make deeper cuts to supply.Oil is still down about 14% since an April peak as the trade spat sapped crude consumption and global supplies expanded. The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and its partners will likely keep output steady when they meet next month as markets are on track to re-balance, according to Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and Trafigura Group Ltd.West Texas Intermediate for December delivery lost 27 cents to $56.88 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange as of 9:43 a.m. Singapore time. The contract rose 80 cents to $57.15 on Thursday.See also: Aramco Taps Billionaire Olayans, Prince Alwaleed for IPO OrdersBrent for January settlement fell 17 cents, or 0.3%, to $62.12 a barrel on the London-based ICE Futures Europe Exchange. The contract is up 0.7% this week. The global benchmark crude traded at a $5.21 premium to WTI.\--With assistance from James Thornhill.To contact the reporter on this story: Ann Koh in Singapore at akoh15@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Serene Cheong at scheong20@bloomberg.net, Ben Sharples, Andrew JanesFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Oil pared a weekly gain as investors weighed signs of progress in the prolonged U.S.-China trade war that’s undermined global crude demand.While futures in New York lost 0.5% in early Asian trade, oil is still up 1.2% for the week. The U.S. and China have agreed to roll back tariffs on each other’s goods in phases as they work toward a deal, both sides said. Renewed trade optimism offset swelling American crude inventories and indications OPEC and its allies won’t make deeper cuts to supply.Oil is still down about 14% since an April peak as the trade spat sapped crude consumption and global supplies expanded. The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and its partners will likely keep output steady when they meet next month as markets are on track to re-balance, according to Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and Trafigura Group Ltd.West Texas Intermediate for December delivery lost 27 cents to $56.88 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange as of 9:43 a.m. Singapore time. The contract rose 80 cents to $57.15 on Thursday.See also: Aramco Taps Billionaire Olayans, Prince Alwaleed for IPO OrdersBrent for January settlement fell 17 cents, or 0.3%, to $62.12 a barrel on the London-based ICE Futures Europe Exchange. The contract is up 0.7% this week. The global benchmark crude traded at a $5.21 premium to WTI.\--With assistance from James Thornhill.To contact the reporter on this story: Ann Koh in Singapore at akoh15@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Serene Cheong at scheong20@bloomberg.net, Ben Sharples, Andrew JanesFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 22/79   Evaluating eClerx Services Limited’s (NSE:ECLERX) Investments In Its Business
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today we are going to look at eClerx Services Limited (NSE:ECLERX) to see whether it might be an attractive investment...

    Today we are going to look at eClerx Services Limited (NSE:ECLERX) to see whether it might be an attractive investment...


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  • 23/79   Gap CEO Art Peck steps down amid slumping sales, stock price
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Gap announced Thursday that CEO Art Peck is stepping down as the company struggles to turn around a long-standing sales slump.  The San Francisco-based retailer also lowered its earnings outlook for the year as sales at the Gap, Banana Republic and Old Navy fell in the most recent quarter.  The shares were trading at around $41 when Peck took the CEO spot in early 2015.

    Gap announced Thursday that CEO Art Peck is stepping down as the company struggles to turn around a long-standing sales slump. The San Francisco-based retailer also lowered its earnings outlook for the year as sales at the Gap, Banana Republic and Old Navy fell in the most recent quarter. The shares were trading at around $41 when Peck took the CEO spot in early 2015.


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  • 24/79   Why You Should Like China Jishan Holdings Limited’s (SGX:J18) ROCE
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today we'll evaluate China Jishan Holdings Limited (SGX:J18) to determine whether it could have potential as an...

    Today we'll evaluate China Jishan Holdings Limited (SGX:J18) to determine whether it could have potential as an...


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  • 25/79   What Is Edvantage Group Holdings's (HKG:382) P/E Ratio After Its Share Price Rocketed?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    It's really great to see that even after a strong run, Edvantage Group Holdings (HKG:382) shares have been powering...

    It's really great to see that even after a strong run, Edvantage Group Holdings (HKG:382) shares have been powering...


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  • 26/79   NRA drops lawsuit over San Francisco's 'terrorist' label
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The notice filed Thursday in the U.S. District Court of Northern California was heralded by City Attorney Dennis Herrera, who has called it a 'frivolous lawsuit' based on a deliberate misinterpretation by the NRA.  'This was a baseless attempt to silence San Francisco's valid criticisms of the NRA and distract from the gun violence epidemic facing our country,' Herrera said in a statement.

    The notice filed Thursday in the U.S. District Court of Northern California was heralded by City Attorney Dennis Herrera, who has called it a 'frivolous lawsuit' based on a deliberate misinterpretation by the NRA. 'This was a baseless attempt to silence San Francisco's valid criticisms of the NRA and distract from the gun violence epidemic facing our country,' Herrera said in a statement.


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  • 27/79   NRA drops lawsuit over San Francisco's 'terrorist' label
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The notice filed Thursday in the U.S. District Court of Northern California was heralded by City Attorney Dennis Herrera, who has called it a 'frivolous lawsuit' based on a deliberate misinterpretation by the NRA.  'This was a baseless attempt to silence San Francisco's valid criticisms of the NRA and distract from the gun violence epidemic facing our country,' Herrera said in a statement.

    The notice filed Thursday in the U.S. District Court of Northern California was heralded by City Attorney Dennis Herrera, who has called it a 'frivolous lawsuit' based on a deliberate misinterpretation by the NRA. 'This was a baseless attempt to silence San Francisco's valid criticisms of the NRA and distract from the gun violence epidemic facing our country,' Herrera said in a statement.


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  • 28/79   These 4 Measures Indicate That China Infrastructure Investment (HKG:600) Is Using Debt Safely
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Howard Marks put it nicely when he said that, rather than worrying about share price volatility, 'The possibility of...

    Howard Marks put it nicely when he said that, rather than worrying about share price volatility, 'The possibility of...


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  • 29/79   More than two million pounds of chicken recalled
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Simmons Prepared Foods, Inc. issued a voluntary recall after discovering the contamination during a routine safety check

    Simmons Prepared Foods, Inc. issued a voluntary recall after discovering the contamination during a routine safety check


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  • 30/79   Does Market Volatility Impact KK Culture Holdings Limited's (HKG:550) Share Price?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    If you're interested in KK Culture Holdings Limited (HKG:550), then you might want to consider its beta (a measure of...

    If you're interested in KK Culture Holdings Limited (HKG:550), then you might want to consider its beta (a measure of...


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  • 31/79   WhatsApp adds shopping catalog feature, courting e-commerce
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Facebook Inc  on Thursday launched a catalog feature for its WhatsApp messaging app, it said in a blog post, building out the service's e-commerce tools as it moves slowly toward monetizing the app it bought in 2014 for $19 billion.  Facebook has been trying to boost revenue from higher-growth units like Instagram and Whatsapp, which has 1.5 billion users.  The move comes after Facebook added a shopping feature to Instagram in March that lets users click a 'checkout' option on items tagged for sale and pay for them directly within the app.

    Facebook Inc on Thursday launched a catalog feature for its WhatsApp messaging app, it said in a blog post, building out the service's e-commerce tools as it moves slowly toward monetizing the app it bought in 2014 for $19 billion. Facebook has been trying to boost revenue from higher-growth units like Instagram and Whatsapp, which has 1.5 billion users. The move comes after Facebook added a shopping feature to Instagram in March that lets users click a 'checkout' option on items tagged for sale and pay for them directly within the app.


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  • 32/79   Here's What Deep Industries Limited's (NSE:DEEPIND) P/E Ratio Is Telling Us
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The goal of this article is to teach you how to use price to earnings ratios (P/E ratios). To keep it practical, we'll...

    The goal of this article is to teach you how to use price to earnings ratios (P/E ratios). To keep it practical, we'll...


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  • 33/79   Do Directors Own ISDN Holdings Limited (SGX:I07) Shares?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    If you want to know who really controls ISDN Holdings Limited (SGX:I07), then you'll have to look at the makeup of its...

    If you want to know who really controls ISDN Holdings Limited (SGX:I07), then you'll have to look at the makeup of its...


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  • 34/79   Protests to Shave $275 Million From Hong Kong Disneyland Profit
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Walt Disney Co. said the protracted political unrest in Hong Kong is denting earnings at the local Disneyland park after increasingly violent protests caused a major drop in visitors to the city.Operating income at Hong Kong Disneyland could decline by about $275 million in the fiscal year ending September 2020 if the demonstrations continue to track current trends, Chief Financial Officer Christine McCarthy told investors in an earnings call on Thursday. The company expects operating income at the park to fall $80 million in the current quarter after slipping $55 million in the previous three months, she said.Hong Kong’s economy entered a recession in the third quarter as almost five months of unrest hurt local businesses. Tourism has plummeted across the board, especially arrivals from mainland China, which accounts for almost 80% of all visitors to the city. For instance, Hyatt Hotels Corp. said revenue per available room plunged more than 50% in the city in October.Companies Around the World Hit by Hong Kong ProtestsEarlier Thursday, Disney reported better-than-expected fourth-quarter results, sending its shares up as much as 4.5% in extended trading. Results for the quarter were led by the company’s storied film studio, which released hits such as the live-action “Lion King” during the period.Growth in operating income at Disneyland Paris and Shanghai was largely offset by the slippage in Hong Kong, McCarthy said.In February, Hong Kong Disneyland had anticipated an “amazing year” based on a new Marvel attraction and a new bridge connecting Macau on the mainland.To contact the reporter on this story: Christopher Palmeri in Los Angeles at cpalmeri1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Nick Turner at nturner7@bloomberg.net, ;Sam Nagarajan at samnagarajan@bloomberg.net, Rachel ChangFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Walt Disney Co. said the protracted political unrest in Hong Kong is denting earnings at the local Disneyland park after increasingly violent protests caused a major drop in visitors to the city.Operating income at Hong Kong Disneyland could decline by about $275 million in the fiscal year ending September 2020 if the demonstrations continue to track current trends, Chief Financial Officer Christine McCarthy told investors in an earnings call on Thursday. The company expects operating income at the park to fall $80 million in the current quarter after slipping $55 million in the previous three months, she said.Hong Kong’s economy entered a recession in the third quarter as almost five months of unrest hurt local businesses. Tourism has plummeted across the board, especially arrivals from mainland China, which accounts for almost 80% of all visitors to the city. For instance, Hyatt Hotels Corp. said revenue per available room plunged more than 50% in the city in October.Companies Around the World Hit by Hong Kong ProtestsEarlier Thursday, Disney reported better-than-expected fourth-quarter results, sending its shares up as much as 4.5% in extended trading. Results for the quarter were led by the company’s storied film studio, which released hits such as the live-action “Lion King” during the period.Growth in operating income at Disneyland Paris and Shanghai was largely offset by the slippage in Hong Kong, McCarthy said.In February, Hong Kong Disneyland had anticipated an “amazing year” based on a new Marvel attraction and a new bridge connecting Macau on the mainland.To contact the reporter on this story: Christopher Palmeri in Los Angeles at cpalmeri1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Nick Turner at nturner7@bloomberg.net, ;Sam Nagarajan at samnagarajan@bloomberg.net, Rachel ChangFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 35/79   Dalmia Bharat Sugar and Industries Limited's (NSE:DALMIASUG) 1.8% Dividend Yield Looks Pretty Interesting
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Dividend paying stocks like Dalmia Bharat Sugar and Industries Limited (NSE:DALMIASUG) tend to be popular with...

    Dividend paying stocks like Dalmia Bharat Sugar and Industries Limited (NSE:DALMIASUG) tend to be popular with...


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  • 36/79   Jeff Sessions Jumps Into Race to Reclaim Alabama Senate Seat
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Jeff Sessions said he’ll run for the Alabama Senate seat that he vacated in 2017 to became President Donald Trump’s first U.S. attorney general, a return to politics that could be challenging given his tumultuous relationship with the president.Sessions, 72, a former top Republican on the Senate Judiciary and Budget panels, easily held onto his seat for two decades, and his entry shakes up the race to defeat Democratic incumbent Doug Jones.Sessions, who on Thursday night announced his candidacy in a video on his campaign’s website, said he remains a strong Trump supporter despite “our ups and downs.”“When I left President Trump’s cabinet,” Sessions said on the video, “did I write a tell-all book? No. Did I go on CNN and attack the president? No. Have I said a cross word about President Trump? No.“And I’ll tell you why: First, that would be dishonorable. I was there to serve his agenda, not mine. Second, the president is doing a great job for America and Alabama, and he has my strong support.”Jones, a former federal prosecutor, won a surprise December 2017 special election over Republican Roy Moore, a former Alabama chief justice who became mired in allegations of sexual assault and misconduct that he denied.Jones is the Senate Democrat most seen at risk of losing in 2020. Republicans already in the contest include U.S. Representative Bradley Byrne, Secretary of State John Merrill, state Representative Arnold Mooney, former Auburn football coach Tommy Tuberville, former televangelist Stanley Adair -- and Moore.Still, it’s not clear that Sessions would win the GOP nomination, given his strained relationship with Trump, according to Jennifer Duffy, Senate editor of the nonpartisan Cook Political Report. He resigned last November after months of complaints and insults from the president over his recusal from the inquiries into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.“I’m disappointed in the attorney general for many reasons,” Trump told reporters about two months before Sessions stepped down.After Special Counsel Robert Mueller began his investigation, Trump publicly called on Sessions to halt it, an extraordinary break from traditional boundaries between presidents and law enforcement. He also said that he never would have nominated Sessions as attorney general if he knew he would recuse himself.“Sessions certainly has name ID and a campaign war chest, but it’s not clear that he can clear a primary field,” Duffy said. “He can make a run-off, but can he win one? That depends on what stance Trump takes. It doesn’t appear that Trump and Sessions have mended their fences. As for the general election, Sessions would certainly be the favorite given that it is a presidential year.”Trump Vs. Sessions?The state’s other senator, Republican Richard Shelby, said he’ll endorse Sessions and that his former colleague has his own pull with voters in the state that would help support him even if Trump lashes out.“He has run before, he is very popular,” Shelby said.Sessions was the first senator to endorse Trump in his 2016 presidential campaign, creating an alliance built on shared support for tougher policies on illegal immigration and a wariness of some trade deals that they said hurt the working class. He went on to advise Trump on national security and foreign policy during the election, and his long-time aide, Stephen Miller, became a senior policy adviser to the campaign and later in the White House.Sessions was confirmed as attorney general on a 52-47 vote, after testifying that he wasn’t aware of contacts between members of the Trump presidential campaign and Russian officials. But news reports later showed he had been in contact with Russians, and he recused himself from the broader investigations into Russian 2016 election meddling.As attorney general, Sessions adopted a hard line on immigration policy, including implementing a “zero tolerance” policy at the southern U.S. border that led to family separations. He also took the position that cities that don’t comply with federal immigration laws should lose federal funding. Trump signed an executive order revoking funding for such cities but it was successfully challenged in federal courtSessions also supported allowing the Justice Department to prosecute providers of medical marijuana.Senate TenureIn the Senate, as the top Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee, he helped lead the fight against both of Obama’s Supreme Court nominees, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan, who were both eventually confirmed. He was term-limited out of the job and became the top Republican on the Senate Budget Committee. He was also a senior member of the Senate Armed Services Committee.He took the toughest immigration stance of any GOP senator. In 2010 he spearheaded efforts to defeat a House-passed bill that would have provided a path to legal status for hundreds of thousands of young undocumented immigrants, known as Dreamers, who were brought to the U.S. as children. The status of those immigrants has remained in limbo ever since.A native of Selma, Alabama, Sessions was a private practicing attorney before becoming the U.S. attorney for Alabama in 1981 at the age of 34. In 1986, his bid to become a federal district court judge was rejected by the Senate Judiciary Committee after Democrats accused Sessions of having made racially insensitive remarks.Sessions served about six more years as Alabama’s top prosecutor, then was elected state attorney general in 1994 before making his first successful bid for the Senate. When he replaced retiring Democratic Senator Howell Heflin, his victory gave Alabama two Republican Senate seats for the first time since Reconstruction.\--With assistance from James Rowley.To contact the reporter on this story: Laura Litvan in Washington at llitvan@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Joe Sobczyk at jsobczyk@bloomberg.net, John HarneyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Jeff Sessions said he’ll run for the Alabama Senate seat that he vacated in 2017 to became President Donald Trump’s first U.S. attorney general, a return to politics that could be challenging given his tumultuous relationship with the president.Sessions, 72, a former top Republican on the Senate Judiciary and Budget panels, easily held onto his seat for two decades, and his entry shakes up the race to defeat Democratic incumbent Doug Jones.Sessions, who on Thursday night announced his candidacy in a video on his campaign’s website, said he remains a strong Trump supporter despite “our ups and downs.”“When I left President Trump’s cabinet,” Sessions said on the video, “did I write a tell-all book? No. Did I go on CNN and attack the president? No. Have I said a cross word about President Trump? No.“And I’ll tell you why: First, that would be dishonorable. I was there to serve his agenda, not mine. Second, the president is doing a great job for America and Alabama, and he has my strong support.”Jones, a former federal prosecutor, won a surprise December 2017 special election over Republican Roy Moore, a former Alabama chief justice who became mired in allegations of sexual assault and misconduct that he denied.Jones is the Senate Democrat most seen at risk of losing in 2020. Republicans already in the contest include U.S. Representative Bradley Byrne, Secretary of State John Merrill, state Representative Arnold Mooney, former Auburn football coach Tommy Tuberville, former televangelist Stanley Adair -- and Moore.Still, it’s not clear that Sessions would win the GOP nomination, given his strained relationship with Trump, according to Jennifer Duffy, Senate editor of the nonpartisan Cook Political Report. He resigned last November after months of complaints and insults from the president over his recusal from the inquiries into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.“I’m disappointed in the attorney general for many reasons,” Trump told reporters about two months before Sessions stepped down.After Special Counsel Robert Mueller began his investigation, Trump publicly called on Sessions to halt it, an extraordinary break from traditional boundaries between presidents and law enforcement. He also said that he never would have nominated Sessions as attorney general if he knew he would recuse himself.“Sessions certainly has name ID and a campaign war chest, but it’s not clear that he can clear a primary field,” Duffy said. “He can make a run-off, but can he win one? That depends on what stance Trump takes. It doesn’t appear that Trump and Sessions have mended their fences. As for the general election, Sessions would certainly be the favorite given that it is a presidential year.”Trump Vs. Sessions?The state’s other senator, Republican Richard Shelby, said he’ll endorse Sessions and that his former colleague has his own pull with voters in the state that would help support him even if Trump lashes out.“He has run before, he is very popular,” Shelby said.Sessions was the first senator to endorse Trump in his 2016 presidential campaign, creating an alliance built on shared support for tougher policies on illegal immigration and a wariness of some trade deals that they said hurt the working class. He went on to advise Trump on national security and foreign policy during the election, and his long-time aide, Stephen Miller, became a senior policy adviser to the campaign and later in the White House.Sessions was confirmed as attorney general on a 52-47 vote, after testifying that he wasn’t aware of contacts between members of the Trump presidential campaign and Russian officials. But news reports later showed he had been in contact with Russians, and he recused himself from the broader investigations into Russian 2016 election meddling.As attorney general, Sessions adopted a hard line on immigration policy, including implementing a “zero tolerance” policy at the southern U.S. border that led to family separations. He also took the position that cities that don’t comply with federal immigration laws should lose federal funding. Trump signed an executive order revoking funding for such cities but it was successfully challenged in federal courtSessions also supported allowing the Justice Department to prosecute providers of medical marijuana.Senate TenureIn the Senate, as the top Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee, he helped lead the fight against both of Obama’s Supreme Court nominees, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan, who were both eventually confirmed. He was term-limited out of the job and became the top Republican on the Senate Budget Committee. He was also a senior member of the Senate Armed Services Committee.He took the toughest immigration stance of any GOP senator. In 2010 he spearheaded efforts to defeat a House-passed bill that would have provided a path to legal status for hundreds of thousands of young undocumented immigrants, known as Dreamers, who were brought to the U.S. as children. The status of those immigrants has remained in limbo ever since.A native of Selma, Alabama, Sessions was a private practicing attorney before becoming the U.S. attorney for Alabama in 1981 at the age of 34. In 1986, his bid to become a federal district court judge was rejected by the Senate Judiciary Committee after Democrats accused Sessions of having made racially insensitive remarks.Sessions served about six more years as Alabama’s top prosecutor, then was elected state attorney general in 1994 before making his first successful bid for the Senate. When he replaced retiring Democratic Senator Howell Heflin, his victory gave Alabama two Republican Senate seats for the first time since Reconstruction.\--With assistance from James Rowley.To contact the reporter on this story: Laura Litvan in Washington at llitvan@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Joe Sobczyk at jsobczyk@bloomberg.net, John HarneyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 37/79   Roger Stone Frenemy Randy Credico Cuts Up — in Criminal Trial
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Over four decades, Randy Credico has been a comedian, an impressionist, a social justice warrior and a talk show host.On Thursday he played the part of government witness, breaking up the criminal trial of his nemesis, Roger Stone, with off-the-cuff comments that left jurors laughing and the judge battling to maintain courtroom decorum.Prosecutors sought Credico’s testimony to prove that Stone -- a longtime Republican operative and sometime adviser to President Donald Trump -- lied to a congressional committee about his communications with WikiLeaks during the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign, hampering its investigation into Russian interference in the race and potential campaign involvement.Stone is also accused of berating and threatening Credico to prevent the comic from contradicting his House Intelligence Committee testimony in September 2017.Moments after taking the stand, Credico was asked by prosecutor Aaron Zelinsky what he did for a living.“It seems like I’m a professional witness,” he deadpanned. He was just warming up.Credico and Stone met in 2002, he told the jury, when he was leading the William Kunstler Fund for Racial Justice and Stone was running an insurgent, third-party gubernatorial campaign in New York. Credico said he liked the ads he’d seen for the candidate, Tom Golisano (who lost), and sought out the man behind them, launching their rocky, 17-year relationship.As Trump was clinching the 2016 Republican presidential nomination, Credico said, the radio host was getting more airtime from WBAI, which he tried to fill with compelling guests. One of them was Stone.“He was a great person to have on the show,” Credico told the court. “This would be a huge catch on my station,” especially in the run-up to the election. Stone was an adviser to the Trump campaign with a reputation as a political brawler and gadfly.Stone had a radio show, too, “Stone Cold Truth,” for which Credico would do promotional spots using his talent for mimicry. In a November 2016 email shown to the jury, the comic offered Stone a roster of voices he could do, including Richard Nixon, Bill Clinton, both presidents Bush and actors John Wayne, Jack Nicholson and Al Pacino.Read More: Trump’s Calls With Stone, Amid Clinton Leaks, Figure in Trial“Would you like to hear some of them?” he volunteered, to laughter in the courtroom. U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson declined.Zelinsky zeroed in on a name on the list in all caps, BRANDO GODFATHER, an impression Credico clearly relished. Credico explained that actors’ voices change over time, making the aging Marlon Brando’s voice in “The Godfather” distinct from his younger self in “On the Waterfront.”Credico said he was tempted to do the “Godfather” Brando. The judge managed to resist.“We know you’re a comedian, but this is serious,” Jackson observed.Not long after Credico sent Stone the lighthearted catalog-of-voices email, their relationship grew darker.Read More: Stone Didn’t Lie, He Just Didn’t Understand, Defense ArguesCredico had had another notorious radio guest, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, who called in for his interview in August 2016 on Credico’s cellphone from the Ecuadorian Embassy in London, where he’d sought asylum.In the late stages of the campaign, WikiLeaks published tens of thousands of documents stolen from Democratic Party computers -- by Russian military intelligence agents, the U.S. concluded -- to tilt the election to Trump from Democrat Hillary Clinton.Stone had claimed he had inside information from an intermediary on what was coming from WikiLeaks. Prosecutors allege he shared that information with senior Trump campaign officials. They also allege that one of Stone’s sources of information was the conservative author and conspiracy theorist Jerome Corsi.Earlier Thursday, jurors heard from former FBI case agent Michelle Taylor. Through her testimony, prosecutors presented dozens of email and text messages between Stone and Credico, sent as Credico began to believe Stone was implicating him, not Corsi, as the WikiLeaks conduit. Stone was called to testify before the House committee and later did just that, fingering Credico for the panel as his go-between.Read More: Stone Trial to Shed Light on Who Shared 2016 Campaign DirtCredico testified Thursday that he’d had no contact with Assange prior to the WikiLeaks founder’s August 2016 appearance on his radio show, a booking coup he admittedly lorded over Stone (and that he pulled off through his close friend Margaret Kunstler, a lawyer for Assange). “It was kind of bragging,” he said. “I was trying to one-up him.”But Credico denied having any knowledge of what WikiLeaks would publish from its trove of stolen documents.“Julian Assange is not going to tell me about future releases,” he said.That didn’t stop Credico from delivering a letter to Assange in London on behalf of the radio station in September 2016, asking if he wanted to do a weekly radio show for WBAI live from the embassy. The missive was received, Credico said, by a hand reaching out from the embassy door like the disembodied Thing from the old “Addams Family” TV show.The case is U.S. v. Stone, 19-cr-18, U.S. District Court, District of Columbia (Washington).To contact the reporter on this story: Andrew Harris in Washington at aharris16@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: David Glovin at dglovin@bloomberg.net, Peter Jeffrey, Joe SchneiderFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Over four decades, Randy Credico has been a comedian, an impressionist, a social justice warrior and a talk show host.On Thursday he played the part of government witness, breaking up the criminal trial of his nemesis, Roger Stone, with off-the-cuff comments that left jurors laughing and the judge battling to maintain courtroom decorum.Prosecutors sought Credico’s testimony to prove that Stone -- a longtime Republican operative and sometime adviser to President Donald Trump -- lied to a congressional committee about his communications with WikiLeaks during the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign, hampering its investigation into Russian interference in the race and potential campaign involvement.Stone is also accused of berating and threatening Credico to prevent the comic from contradicting his House Intelligence Committee testimony in September 2017.Moments after taking the stand, Credico was asked by prosecutor Aaron Zelinsky what he did for a living.“It seems like I’m a professional witness,” he deadpanned. He was just warming up.Credico and Stone met in 2002, he told the jury, when he was leading the William Kunstler Fund for Racial Justice and Stone was running an insurgent, third-party gubernatorial campaign in New York. Credico said he liked the ads he’d seen for the candidate, Tom Golisano (who lost), and sought out the man behind them, launching their rocky, 17-year relationship.As Trump was clinching the 2016 Republican presidential nomination, Credico said, the radio host was getting more airtime from WBAI, which he tried to fill with compelling guests. One of them was Stone.“He was a great person to have on the show,” Credico told the court. “This would be a huge catch on my station,” especially in the run-up to the election. Stone was an adviser to the Trump campaign with a reputation as a political brawler and gadfly.Stone had a radio show, too, “Stone Cold Truth,” for which Credico would do promotional spots using his talent for mimicry. In a November 2016 email shown to the jury, the comic offered Stone a roster of voices he could do, including Richard Nixon, Bill Clinton, both presidents Bush and actors John Wayne, Jack Nicholson and Al Pacino.Read More: Trump’s Calls With Stone, Amid Clinton Leaks, Figure in Trial“Would you like to hear some of them?” he volunteered, to laughter in the courtroom. U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson declined.Zelinsky zeroed in on a name on the list in all caps, BRANDO GODFATHER, an impression Credico clearly relished. Credico explained that actors’ voices change over time, making the aging Marlon Brando’s voice in “The Godfather” distinct from his younger self in “On the Waterfront.”Credico said he was tempted to do the “Godfather” Brando. The judge managed to resist.“We know you’re a comedian, but this is serious,” Jackson observed.Not long after Credico sent Stone the lighthearted catalog-of-voices email, their relationship grew darker.Read More: Stone Didn’t Lie, He Just Didn’t Understand, Defense ArguesCredico had had another notorious radio guest, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, who called in for his interview in August 2016 on Credico’s cellphone from the Ecuadorian Embassy in London, where he’d sought asylum.In the late stages of the campaign, WikiLeaks published tens of thousands of documents stolen from Democratic Party computers -- by Russian military intelligence agents, the U.S. concluded -- to tilt the election to Trump from Democrat Hillary Clinton.Stone had claimed he had inside information from an intermediary on what was coming from WikiLeaks. Prosecutors allege he shared that information with senior Trump campaign officials. They also allege that one of Stone’s sources of information was the conservative author and conspiracy theorist Jerome Corsi.Earlier Thursday, jurors heard from former FBI case agent Michelle Taylor. Through her testimony, prosecutors presented dozens of email and text messages between Stone and Credico, sent as Credico began to believe Stone was implicating him, not Corsi, as the WikiLeaks conduit. Stone was called to testify before the House committee and later did just that, fingering Credico for the panel as his go-between.Read More: Stone Trial to Shed Light on Who Shared 2016 Campaign DirtCredico testified Thursday that he’d had no contact with Assange prior to the WikiLeaks founder’s August 2016 appearance on his radio show, a booking coup he admittedly lorded over Stone (and that he pulled off through his close friend Margaret Kunstler, a lawyer for Assange). “It was kind of bragging,” he said. “I was trying to one-up him.”But Credico denied having any knowledge of what WikiLeaks would publish from its trove of stolen documents.“Julian Assange is not going to tell me about future releases,” he said.That didn’t stop Credico from delivering a letter to Assange in London on behalf of the radio station in September 2016, asking if he wanted to do a weekly radio show for WBAI live from the embassy. The missive was received, Credico said, by a hand reaching out from the embassy door like the disembodied Thing from the old “Addams Family” TV show.The case is U.S. v. Stone, 19-cr-18, U.S. District Court, District of Columbia (Washington).To contact the reporter on this story: Andrew Harris in Washington at aharris16@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: David Glovin at dglovin@bloomberg.net, Peter Jeffrey, Joe SchneiderFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 38/79   Why Samson Holding Ltd.’s (HKG:531) Return On Capital Employed Looks Uninspiring
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today we'll evaluate Samson Holding Ltd. (HKG:531) to determine whether it could have potential as an investment idea...

    Today we'll evaluate Samson Holding Ltd. (HKG:531) to determine whether it could have potential as an investment idea...


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  • 39/79   What Is Lloyds Steels Industries's (NSE:LSIL) P/E Ratio After Its Share Price Rocketed?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Lloyds Steels Industries (NSE:LSIL) shares have had a really impressive month, gaining 33%, after some slippage...

    Lloyds Steels Industries (NSE:LSIL) shares have had a really impressive month, gaining 33%, after some slippage...


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  • 40/79   Giuliani floats new explanation for pressuring Ukraine to investigate Biden
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Trump's personal lawyer said on Wednesday that he pressured Ukrainian officials to investigate Joe Biden to defend President Trump "against false charges."

    Trump's personal lawyer said on Wednesday that he pressured Ukrainian officials to investigate Joe Biden to defend President Trump "against false charges."


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  • 41/79   The Latest: 2 escaped inmates arrested at US-Mexico border
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    An official says two murder suspects who escaped a California jail were captured Wednesday by U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents as they tried to enter the United States from Mexico.  Monterey County Sheriff's Office Capt. John Thornburg says authorities received a tip that 20-year-old Jonathan Salazar and 21-year-old Santos Fonseca had been spotted in Tijuana, across the border from San Diego, and had alerted federal officials.  Thornburg says the two are in the custody of Monterey County officials and are on their way to a jail in Salinas, 440 miles (708 kilometers) north of the U.S.-Mexico border.

    An official says two murder suspects who escaped a California jail were captured Wednesday by U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents as they tried to enter the United States from Mexico. Monterey County Sheriff's Office Capt. John Thornburg says authorities received a tip that 20-year-old Jonathan Salazar and 21-year-old Santos Fonseca had been spotted in Tijuana, across the border from San Diego, and had alerted federal officials. Thornburg says the two are in the custody of Monterey County officials and are on their way to a jail in Salinas, 440 miles (708 kilometers) north of the U.S.-Mexico border.


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  • 42/79   NY Tech Firm Sold Chinese Equipment to U.S. Military after Falsely Claiming It was American-Made
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A Long Island tech firm sold Chinese equipment to the U.S. military while fraudulently claiming the products were American-made, according to New York's NBC 4.Federal agents arrested six current and former executives and employees of Aventura Technologies on Thursday morning, and subsequently raided the company's headquarters. Agents representing the FBI, Customs, the IRS and other agencies were seen carrying out the raid.The suspects are expected to appear in Brooklyn federal court."As alleged, the defendants falsely claimed for years that their surveillance and security equipment was manufactured on Long Island, padding their pockets with money from lucrative contracts without regard for the risk to our country’s national security posed by secretly peddling made-in-China electronics with known cyber vulnerabilities,” United States Attorney Richard Donoghue said in a statement.Company representatives did not return National Review's request for comment in time for publication.The allegations against Aventura Technologies are raising fears about the materials the company sold to the U.S. military, which are currently in use in the navy and other military branches.Aventura describes itself as a "designer, developer and manufacturer" of security hardware and software products for "government, military and enterprise." The company offers cameras and other hardware for video surveillance, face recognition and artificial intelligence software, and a variety of X-ray and scanning equipment, among other products.The raid comes at a time of rising tensions between the U.S. and China. At a Senate subcommittee hearing on Tuesday, Senator Josh Hawley (R., Mo.) criticized tech companies Apple and TikTok for being "two sides of the same coin when it comes to data security: the danger of Chinese tech platforms’ entry into the U.S. market, and the danger of American tech companies’ operations in China.”

    A Long Island tech firm sold Chinese equipment to the U.S. military while fraudulently claiming the products were American-made, according to New York's NBC 4.Federal agents arrested six current and former executives and employees of Aventura Technologies on Thursday morning, and subsequently raided the company's headquarters. Agents representing the FBI, Customs, the IRS and other agencies were seen carrying out the raid.The suspects are expected to appear in Brooklyn federal court."As alleged, the defendants falsely claimed for years that their surveillance and security equipment was manufactured on Long Island, padding their pockets with money from lucrative contracts without regard for the risk to our country’s national security posed by secretly peddling made-in-China electronics with known cyber vulnerabilities,” United States Attorney Richard Donoghue said in a statement.Company representatives did not return National Review's request for comment in time for publication.The allegations against Aventura Technologies are raising fears about the materials the company sold to the U.S. military, which are currently in use in the navy and other military branches.Aventura describes itself as a "designer, developer and manufacturer" of security hardware and software products for "government, military and enterprise." The company offers cameras and other hardware for video surveillance, face recognition and artificial intelligence software, and a variety of X-ray and scanning equipment, among other products.The raid comes at a time of rising tensions between the U.S. and China. At a Senate subcommittee hearing on Tuesday, Senator Josh Hawley (R., Mo.) criticized tech companies Apple and TikTok for being "two sides of the same coin when it comes to data security: the danger of Chinese tech platforms’ entry into the U.S. market, and the danger of American tech companies’ operations in China.”


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  • 43/79   Looking for a hero: shirtless Chilean protester, police-hating dog rise to fame
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A hooded, muscular man shielding himself with a traffic 'Stop'  sign during a clash with police amid protests in the Chilean capital has gone viral on social networks, with the man being lauded as a romantic hero of the struggle that has raged for the past three weeks.  The image of 'PareMan' or 'Captain Pare,' as he has become known - pare means stop in Spanish - was first captured on Oct. 30 by Reuters photographer Jorge Silva during protests on Santiago's central Alameda thoroughfare.  The phrase #PareMan has been trending on social media with some eulogizing him as the 'First Chilean Superhero' of the protests, which started over a hike in public transport fares and has broadened to include grievances over low pensions and salaries, high utility rates and patchy public services.

    A hooded, muscular man shielding himself with a traffic 'Stop' sign during a clash with police amid protests in the Chilean capital has gone viral on social networks, with the man being lauded as a romantic hero of the struggle that has raged for the past three weeks. The image of 'PareMan' or 'Captain Pare,' as he has become known - pare means stop in Spanish - was first captured on Oct. 30 by Reuters photographer Jorge Silva during protests on Santiago's central Alameda thoroughfare. The phrase #PareMan has been trending on social media with some eulogizing him as the 'First Chilean Superhero' of the protests, which started over a hike in public transport fares and has broadened to include grievances over low pensions and salaries, high utility rates and patchy public services.


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  • 44/79   Hawaii Man Dies After Falling 22 Feet Into Lava Tube While Trimming His Trees
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    An elderly Hawaii man died after falling into a 22 feet-deep lava tube in his yard, police said.

    An elderly Hawaii man died after falling into a 22 feet-deep lava tube in his yard, police said.


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  • 45/79   Baghdadi's wife revealed IS group secrets after capture
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The wife of slain Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi revealed "a lot of information" about the jihadist group's "inner workings" after she was captured last year, a Turkish official said. The official said that Baghdadi's spouse identified herself as Rania Mahmoud but was in fact Asma Fawzi Muhammad Al-Qubaysi. The woman was arrested on June 2, 2018 in the province of Hatay, near the Syrian border, along with 10 others, including Baghdadi's daughter, who identified herself as Leila Jabeer.

    The wife of slain Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi revealed "a lot of information" about the jihadist group's "inner workings" after she was captured last year, a Turkish official said. The official said that Baghdadi's spouse identified herself as Rania Mahmoud but was in fact Asma Fawzi Muhammad Al-Qubaysi. The woman was arrested on June 2, 2018 in the province of Hatay, near the Syrian border, along with 10 others, including Baghdadi's daughter, who identified herself as Leila Jabeer.


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  • 46/79   The 10 most-viewed fake-news stories on Facebook in 2019 were just revealed in a new report (FB)
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Fake news stories targeting American voters are still rife on Facebook, and a new investigation from Avaaz just revealed the 10 most-viewed in 2019.

    Fake news stories targeting American voters are still rife on Facebook, and a new investigation from Avaaz just revealed the 10 most-viewed in 2019.


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  • 47/79   We've Got the Details on China's Submarine Drones
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The real deal?

    The real deal?


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  • 48/79   Graham now says Trump's Ukraine policy was too 'incoherent' for quid pro quo
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A day after saying he wouldn’t bother to read the testimony, Sen. Lindsey Graham now says he did read it, and his conclusion is that the Trump administration’s Ukraine policy was too "incoherent" for it to have orchestrated the quid pro quo at the heart of the impeachment inquiry.

    A day after saying he wouldn’t bother to read the testimony, Sen. Lindsey Graham now says he did read it, and his conclusion is that the Trump administration’s Ukraine policy was too "incoherent" for it to have orchestrated the quid pro quo at the heart of the impeachment inquiry.


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  • 49/79   UK police ID all 39 Vietnamese victims found in truck
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    UK police say they have formally identified the 39 people found dead in a container truck in southeastern England and notified their families in the apparent people-smuggling tragedy.  The authorities said Thursday they've been working with Vietnamese police and the coroner to identify the bodies that were found Oct. 23 in the back of a truck in an industrial park in the English town of Grays.  'This is an important step in the investigation and enables us to work with our Vietnamese Police colleagues to support the families of those victims,' Assistant Chief Constable Tim Smith.

    UK police say they have formally identified the 39 people found dead in a container truck in southeastern England and notified their families in the apparent people-smuggling tragedy. The authorities said Thursday they've been working with Vietnamese police and the coroner to identify the bodies that were found Oct. 23 in the back of a truck in an industrial park in the English town of Grays. 'This is an important step in the investigation and enables us to work with our Vietnamese Police colleagues to support the families of those victims,' Assistant Chief Constable Tim Smith.


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  • 50/79   Like roads, many genetic lineages led to ancient Rome
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    At the height of its empire, the inhabitants of ancient Rome genetically resembled the populations of the Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East, according to a DNA study published Thursday.  The paper is based on genome data of 127 individuals from 29 archaeological sites in and around the city, spanning nearly 12,000 years of Roman prehistory and history.  Rome and central Italy's antiquity is well-documented in the rich archaeological and historical record, but relatively little genetic work had been carried out until now.

    At the height of its empire, the inhabitants of ancient Rome genetically resembled the populations of the Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East, according to a DNA study published Thursday. The paper is based on genome data of 127 individuals from 29 archaeological sites in and around the city, spanning nearly 12,000 years of Roman prehistory and history. Rome and central Italy's antiquity is well-documented in the rich archaeological and historical record, but relatively little genetic work had been carried out until now.


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  • 51/79   E-cigs may damage the heart, study says
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Vaping devices and the chemicals they deliver -- increasingly popular among teens -- may damage the cardiovascular system, a study said Thursday, adding to a growing chorus of concern over injury and deaths related to e-cigarettes.  The latest findings, published in the journal Cardiovascular Research, come after the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last month declared an 'outbreak of lung injuries' linked to vaping.  'E-cigarettes contain nicotine, particulate matter, metal and flavourings, not just harmless water vapour,' senior author Loren Wold of Ohio State University wrote in Thursday's study.

    Vaping devices and the chemicals they deliver -- increasingly popular among teens -- may damage the cardiovascular system, a study said Thursday, adding to a growing chorus of concern over injury and deaths related to e-cigarettes. The latest findings, published in the journal Cardiovascular Research, come after the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last month declared an 'outbreak of lung injuries' linked to vaping. 'E-cigarettes contain nicotine, particulate matter, metal and flavourings, not just harmless water vapour,' senior author Loren Wold of Ohio State University wrote in Thursday's study.


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  • 52/79   Pacific bird refuge struggles as ocean garbage patch grows
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Flying into the uninhabited Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, Midway Atoll appears out of the vast blue Pacific as a tiny oasis of coral-fringed land with pristine white sand beaches that are teeming with life.  The Hawaiian Islands act like a comb that gathers debris as it floats across the Pacific.

    Flying into the uninhabited Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, Midway Atoll appears out of the vast blue Pacific as a tiny oasis of coral-fringed land with pristine white sand beaches that are teeming with life. The Hawaiian Islands act like a comb that gathers debris as it floats across the Pacific.


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  • 53/79   Boeing traces problem with Starliner parachute system to an unsecured pin
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    For want of a pin, the use of a spaceship's parachute was lost. That may be a simplistic way to explain why one of the three parachutes on Boeing's CST-100 Starliner space taxi failed to open. It does, however, serve as a cautionary tale about the one obvious glitch in Monday's pad abort test of the Starliner, a craft that's due to start transporting NASA astronauts to and from the International Space Station next year. Overall, the test was judged a success: The uncrewed Starliner fired the rocket engines on its launch abort system, slowed its descent with the aid… Read More

    For want of a pin, the use of a spaceship's parachute was lost. That may be a simplistic way to explain why one of the three parachutes on Boeing's CST-100 Starliner space taxi failed to open. It does, however, serve as a cautionary tale about the one obvious glitch in Monday's pad abort test of the Starliner, a craft that's due to start transporting NASA astronauts to and from the International Space Station next year. Overall, the test was judged a success: The uncrewed Starliner fired the rocket engines on its launch abort system, slowed its descent with the aid… Read More


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  • 54/79   Photos from space reveal what climate change looks like, from melting Arctic ice to rampant California fires
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Extreme weather events like hurricanes, droughts, and wildfires are linked to climate change. Such phenomena can be seen from space.

    Extreme weather events like hurricanes, droughts, and wildfires are linked to climate change. Such phenomena can be seen from space.


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  • 55/79   NASA cracks open a sample of moon soil that’s been shut away for four decades
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    For the first time in more than 40 years, NASA has opened up a pristine sample of moon dirt and rocks that was collected during the Apollo missions. Scientists hope that a close analysis of the material from a 2-foot-long, nearly 2-inch-wide core sample will help astronauts get ready for a new series of Artemis moon missions in the 2020s. When Apollo's moonwalkers collected samples of lunar soil and rock, also known as regolith, some of those samples were tucked away at NASA's Johnson Space Center with the expectation that analytical tools would improve over the course of the decades… Read More

    For the first time in more than 40 years, NASA has opened up a pristine sample of moon dirt and rocks that was collected during the Apollo missions. Scientists hope that a close analysis of the material from a 2-foot-long, nearly 2-inch-wide core sample will help astronauts get ready for a new series of Artemis moon missions in the 2020s. When Apollo's moonwalkers collected samples of lunar soil and rock, also known as regolith, some of those samples were tucked away at NASA's Johnson Space Center with the expectation that analytical tools would improve over the course of the decades… Read More


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  • 56/79   2019’s Allen Distinguished Investigators will focus on the mysteries of our cells
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The Paul G. Allen Frontiers Group, a division of Seattle's Allen Institute, is making a total of $7.5 million in awards to its latest class of five biomedical researchers. The themes for this year's Allen Distinguished Investigators focus on stem cell therapies and single-cell interactions in their native environments. “The field of stem cell biology has the potential to change how we treat diseases by helping precision medicine, and there’s so much we still don’t understand about the interplay between cells in living tissues or organs,” Kathy Richmond, director of the Frontiers Group, said today in a news release. "Our… Read More

    The Paul G. Allen Frontiers Group, a division of Seattle's Allen Institute, is making a total of $7.5 million in awards to its latest class of five biomedical researchers. The themes for this year's Allen Distinguished Investigators focus on stem cell therapies and single-cell interactions in their native environments. “The field of stem cell biology has the potential to change how we treat diseases by helping precision medicine, and there’s so much we still don’t understand about the interplay between cells in living tissues or organs,” Kathy Richmond, director of the Frontiers Group, said today in a news release. "Our… Read More


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  • 57/79   Spaceflight and Rocket Lab will put a Japanese shooting-star satellite into orbit
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Seattle-based Spaceflight says it's handling the pre-launch logistics for a Japanese satellite that's designed to spray artificial shooting stars into the sky. Tokyo-based ALE's spacecraft is just one of seven satellites due to be sent into orbit from New Zealand as early as Nov. 25, aboard a Rocket Lab Electron launch vehicle. It'll be the 10th Electron launch, earning the nickname "Running Out of Fingers." It'll also be the first launch to test the guidance and navigation hardware as well as the sensors that Rocket Lab will eventually use to help make the Electron's first stage recoverable. No recovery will… Read More

    Seattle-based Spaceflight says it's handling the pre-launch logistics for a Japanese satellite that's designed to spray artificial shooting stars into the sky. Tokyo-based ALE's spacecraft is just one of seven satellites due to be sent into orbit from New Zealand as early as Nov. 25, aboard a Rocket Lab Electron launch vehicle. It'll be the 10th Electron launch, earning the nickname "Running Out of Fingers." It'll also be the first launch to test the guidance and navigation hardware as well as the sensors that Rocket Lab will eventually use to help make the Electron's first stage recoverable. No recovery will… Read More


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  • 58/79   Boeing proposes lunar lander for NASA crews, rivaling Blue Origin (and SpaceX?)
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Boeing says it has submitted its proposal for a lunar lander capable of putting astronauts on the moon by as early as 2024, joining a competition that includes Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin space venture and most likely SpaceX as well. Today marked the deadline for submissions. NASA says it's aiming to select at least two proposed landing systems by January for further development. Two separate teams could be selected to build landers for moon missions in 2024 and 2025. NASA envisions a system that includes a transfer vehicle to ferry a lander from a lunar-orbiting Gateway outpost to… Read More

    Boeing says it has submitted its proposal for a lunar lander capable of putting astronauts on the moon by as early as 2024, joining a competition that includes Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin space venture and most likely SpaceX as well. Today marked the deadline for submissions. NASA says it's aiming to select at least two proposed landing systems by January for further development. Two separate teams could be selected to build landers for moon missions in 2024 and 2025. NASA envisions a system that includes a transfer vehicle to ferry a lander from a lunar-orbiting Gateway outpost to… Read More


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  • 59/79   Why Didn't She Get Alzheimer's? The Answer Could Hold a Key to Fighting the Disease
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The woman's genetic profile showed she would develop Alzheimer's by the time she turned 50.A member of the world's largest family to suffer from Alzheimer's, she, like generations of her relatives, was born with a gene mutation that causes people to begin having memory and thinking problems in their 40s and deteriorate rapidly toward death around age 60.But remarkably, she experienced no cognitive decline at all until her 70s, nearly three decades later than expected.How did that happen? New research provides an answer, one that experts say could change the scientific understanding of Alzheimer's disease and inspire new ideas about how to prevent and treat it.In a study published Monday in the journal Nature Medicine, researchers say the woman, whose name they withheld to protect her privacy, has another mutation that has protected her from dementia even though her brain has developed a major neurological feature of Alzheimer's disease.This ultra rare mutation appears to help stave off the disease by minimizing the binding of a particular sugar compound to an important gene. That finding suggests that treatments could be developed to give other people that same protective mechanism."I'm very excited to see this new study come out -- the impact is dramatic," said Dr. Yadong Huang, a senior investigator at Gladstone Institutes, who was not involved in the research. "For both research and therapeutic development, this new finding is very important."A drug or gene therapy would not be available any time soon because scientists first need to replicate the protective mechanism found in this one patient by testing it in laboratory animals and human brain cells.Still, this case comes at a time when the Alzheimer's field is craving new approaches after billions of dollars have been spent on developing and testing treatments and some 200 drug trials have failed. It has been more than 15 years since the last treatment for dementia was approved, and the few drugs available do not work very well for very long.The woman is entering her late 70s now and lives in Medellin, the epicenter for an extended Colombian family of about 6,000 people whose members have been plagued with dementia for centuries, a condition they called "La Bobera" -- "the foolishness" -- and attributed to superstitious causes.Decades ago, a Colombian neurologist, Dr. Francisco Lopera, began painstakingly collecting the family's birth and death records in Medellin and remote Andes mountain villages. He documented the sprawling family tree and took dangerous risks in guerrilla and drug-trafficking territory to cajole relatives of people who died with dementia into giving him their brains for analysis.Through this work, Lopera, whose brain bank at the University of Antioquia now contains 300 brains, helped discover that their Alzheimer's was caused by a mutation on a gene called Presenilin 1.While this type of hereditary early-onset dementia accounts for only a small proportion of the roughly 30 million people worldwide with Alzheimer's, it is important because unlike most forms of Alzheimer's, the Colombian version has been traced to a specific cause and a consistent pattern. So Lopera and a team of American scientists have spent years studying the family, searching for answers both to help the Colombians and to address the mounting epidemic of the more typical old-age Alzheimer's disease.When they found that the woman had the Presenilin 1 mutation, but had not yet even developed a pre-Alzheimer's condition called mild cognitive impairment, the scientists were mystified."We have a single person who is resilient to Alzheimer's disease when she should be at high risk," said Dr. Eric Reiman, executive director of the Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix and a leader of the research team.The woman was flown to Boston, where some of the researchers are based, for brain scans and other tests. Those results were puzzling, said Yakeel Quiroz, a Colombian neuropsychologist who directs the familial dementia neuroimaging lab at Massachusetts General Hospital.The woman's brain was laden with the foremost hallmark of Alzheimer's: plaques of amyloid protein."The highest levels of amyloid that we have seen so far," said Quiroz, adding that the excessive amyloid probably accumulated because the woman has lived much longer than other family members with the Alzheimer's-causing mutation.But the woman had few other neurological signs of the disease -- not much of a protein called tau, which forms tangles in Alzheimer's brains, and little neurodegeneration or brain atrophy."Her brain was functioning really well," said Quiroz, who, like Reiman, is a senior author of the study. "Compared to people who are 45 or 50, she's actually better."She said the woman, who raised four children, had only one year of formal education and could barely read or write, so it was unlikely her cognitive protection came from educational stimulation."She has a secret in her biology," Lopera said. "This case is a big window to discover new approaches."Quiroz consulted Dr. Joseph Arboleda-Velasquez, who, like her, is an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School (he is also Quiroz's husband). Arboleda-Velasquez, a cell biologist at Massachusetts Eye and Ear, conducted extensive genetic testing and sequencing, determining that the woman has an extremely rare mutation on a gene called APOE.APOE is important in general-population Alzheimer's. One variant, APOE4, present in about 14% of people, greatly increases risk and is present in 40% of people with Alzheimer's. People with another variant, APOE2, occurring in about 7% of the population, are less likely to develop Alzheimer's, while those with the most common variant, APOE3, are in the middle.The Colombian woman has two copies of APOE3, but both copies have a mutation called Christchurch (for the New Zealand city where it was discovered). The Christchurch mutation is extremely rare, but several years ago, Reiman's daughter Rebecca, a technologist, helped determine that a handful of Colombian family members have that mutation on one of their APOE genes. They developed Alzheimer's as early as their relatives, though -- unlike the woman with mutations on both APOE genes."The fact that she had two copies, not just one, really kind of sealed the deal," Arboleda-Velasquez said.The woman's mutation is in an area of the APOE gene that binds with a sugar-protein compound called heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), which is involved in spreading tau in Alzheimer's disease.In laboratory experiments, the researchers found that the less a variant of APOE binds to HSPG, the less it is linked to Alzheimer's. With the Christchurch mutation, there was barely any binding.That, said Arboleda-Velasquez, "was the piece that completed the puzzle because, 'Oh, this is how the mutation has such a strong effect.'"Researchers were also able to develop a compound that, in laboratory dish experiments, mimicked the action of the mutation, suggesting it's possible to make drugs that prevent APOE from binding to HSPG.Dr. Guojun Bu, who studies APOE, said that while the findings involved a single case and more research is needed, the implications could be profound."When you have delayed onset of Alzheimer's by three decades, you say wow," said Bu, chairman of the neuroscience department at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, who was not involved in the study.He said the research suggests that instead of drugs attacking amyloid or tau, which have failed in many clinical trials, a medication or gene therapy targeting APOE could be promising.Reiman, who led another newly published study showing that APOE has a bigger impact on a person's risk of getting Alzheimer's than previously thought, said potential treatments could try to reduce or even silence APOE activity in the brain. People born without APOE appear to have no cognitive problems, but they do have very high cholesterol that requires treatment.Huang, who wrote a commentary about the study and is affiliated with two companies focusing on potential APOE-related treatments, said the findings also challenge a leading Alzheimer's theory about the role of amyloid.Since the woman had huge amounts of amyloid but few other Alzheimer's indicators, "it actually illustrates, to my knowledge for the first time, a very clear dissociation of amyloid accumulation from tau pathology, neurodegeneration and even cognitive decline," he said.Lopera said the woman is just beginning to develop dementia, and he recently disclosed her genetic profile to her four adult children, who each have only one copy of the Christchurch mutation.The researchers are also evaluating a few other members of the Colombian family, who appear to also have some resistance to Alzheimer's. They are not as old as the woman, and they do not have the Christchurch mutation, but the team hopes to find other genetic factors from studying them and examine whether those factors operate along the same or different biological pathways, Reiman said."We've learned that at least one individual can live for very long having the cause of Alzheimer's, and she's resistant to it," Arboleda-Velasquez said. "What this patient is teaching is there could be a pathway for correcting the disease."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company

    The woman's genetic profile showed she would develop Alzheimer's by the time she turned 50.A member of the world's largest family to suffer from Alzheimer's, she, like generations of her relatives, was born with a gene mutation that causes people to begin having memory and thinking problems in their 40s and deteriorate rapidly toward death around age 60.But remarkably, she experienced no cognitive decline at all until her 70s, nearly three decades later than expected.How did that happen? New research provides an answer, one that experts say could change the scientific understanding of Alzheimer's disease and inspire new ideas about how to prevent and treat it.In a study published Monday in the journal Nature Medicine, researchers say the woman, whose name they withheld to protect her privacy, has another mutation that has protected her from dementia even though her brain has developed a major neurological feature of Alzheimer's disease.This ultra rare mutation appears to help stave off the disease by minimizing the binding of a particular sugar compound to an important gene. That finding suggests that treatments could be developed to give other people that same protective mechanism."I'm very excited to see this new study come out -- the impact is dramatic," said Dr. Yadong Huang, a senior investigator at Gladstone Institutes, who was not involved in the research. "For both research and therapeutic development, this new finding is very important."A drug or gene therapy would not be available any time soon because scientists first need to replicate the protective mechanism found in this one patient by testing it in laboratory animals and human brain cells.Still, this case comes at a time when the Alzheimer's field is craving new approaches after billions of dollars have been spent on developing and testing treatments and some 200 drug trials have failed. It has been more than 15 years since the last treatment for dementia was approved, and the few drugs available do not work very well for very long.The woman is entering her late 70s now and lives in Medellin, the epicenter for an extended Colombian family of about 6,000 people whose members have been plagued with dementia for centuries, a condition they called "La Bobera" -- "the foolishness" -- and attributed to superstitious causes.Decades ago, a Colombian neurologist, Dr. Francisco Lopera, began painstakingly collecting the family's birth and death records in Medellin and remote Andes mountain villages. He documented the sprawling family tree and took dangerous risks in guerrilla and drug-trafficking territory to cajole relatives of people who died with dementia into giving him their brains for analysis.Through this work, Lopera, whose brain bank at the University of Antioquia now contains 300 brains, helped discover that their Alzheimer's was caused by a mutation on a gene called Presenilin 1.While this type of hereditary early-onset dementia accounts for only a small proportion of the roughly 30 million people worldwide with Alzheimer's, it is important because unlike most forms of Alzheimer's, the Colombian version has been traced to a specific cause and a consistent pattern. So Lopera and a team of American scientists have spent years studying the family, searching for answers both to help the Colombians and to address the mounting epidemic of the more typical old-age Alzheimer's disease.When they found that the woman had the Presenilin 1 mutation, but had not yet even developed a pre-Alzheimer's condition called mild cognitive impairment, the scientists were mystified."We have a single person who is resilient to Alzheimer's disease when she should be at high risk," said Dr. Eric Reiman, executive director of the Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix and a leader of the research team.The woman was flown to Boston, where some of the researchers are based, for brain scans and other tests. Those results were puzzling, said Yakeel Quiroz, a Colombian neuropsychologist who directs the familial dementia neuroimaging lab at Massachusetts General Hospital.The woman's brain was laden with the foremost hallmark of Alzheimer's: plaques of amyloid protein."The highest levels of amyloid that we have seen so far," said Quiroz, adding that the excessive amyloid probably accumulated because the woman has lived much longer than other family members with the Alzheimer's-causing mutation.But the woman had few other neurological signs of the disease -- not much of a protein called tau, which forms tangles in Alzheimer's brains, and little neurodegeneration or brain atrophy."Her brain was functioning really well," said Quiroz, who, like Reiman, is a senior author of the study. "Compared to people who are 45 or 50, she's actually better."She said the woman, who raised four children, had only one year of formal education and could barely read or write, so it was unlikely her cognitive protection came from educational stimulation."She has a secret in her biology," Lopera said. "This case is a big window to discover new approaches."Quiroz consulted Dr. Joseph Arboleda-Velasquez, who, like her, is an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School (he is also Quiroz's husband). Arboleda-Velasquez, a cell biologist at Massachusetts Eye and Ear, conducted extensive genetic testing and sequencing, determining that the woman has an extremely rare mutation on a gene called APOE.APOE is important in general-population Alzheimer's. One variant, APOE4, present in about 14% of people, greatly increases risk and is present in 40% of people with Alzheimer's. People with another variant, APOE2, occurring in about 7% of the population, are less likely to develop Alzheimer's, while those with the most common variant, APOE3, are in the middle.The Colombian woman has two copies of APOE3, but both copies have a mutation called Christchurch (for the New Zealand city where it was discovered). The Christchurch mutation is extremely rare, but several years ago, Reiman's daughter Rebecca, a technologist, helped determine that a handful of Colombian family members have that mutation on one of their APOE genes. They developed Alzheimer's as early as their relatives, though -- unlike the woman with mutations on both APOE genes."The fact that she had two copies, not just one, really kind of sealed the deal," Arboleda-Velasquez said.The woman's mutation is in an area of the APOE gene that binds with a sugar-protein compound called heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), which is involved in spreading tau in Alzheimer's disease.In laboratory experiments, the researchers found that the less a variant of APOE binds to HSPG, the less it is linked to Alzheimer's. With the Christchurch mutation, there was barely any binding.That, said Arboleda-Velasquez, "was the piece that completed the puzzle because, 'Oh, this is how the mutation has such a strong effect.'"Researchers were also able to develop a compound that, in laboratory dish experiments, mimicked the action of the mutation, suggesting it's possible to make drugs that prevent APOE from binding to HSPG.Dr. Guojun Bu, who studies APOE, said that while the findings involved a single case and more research is needed, the implications could be profound."When you have delayed onset of Alzheimer's by three decades, you say wow," said Bu, chairman of the neuroscience department at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, who was not involved in the study.He said the research suggests that instead of drugs attacking amyloid or tau, which have failed in many clinical trials, a medication or gene therapy targeting APOE could be promising.Reiman, who led another newly published study showing that APOE has a bigger impact on a person's risk of getting Alzheimer's than previously thought, said potential treatments could try to reduce or even silence APOE activity in the brain. People born without APOE appear to have no cognitive problems, but they do have very high cholesterol that requires treatment.Huang, who wrote a commentary about the study and is affiliated with two companies focusing on potential APOE-related treatments, said the findings also challenge a leading Alzheimer's theory about the role of amyloid.Since the woman had huge amounts of amyloid but few other Alzheimer's indicators, "it actually illustrates, to my knowledge for the first time, a very clear dissociation of amyloid accumulation from tau pathology, neurodegeneration and even cognitive decline," he said.Lopera said the woman is just beginning to develop dementia, and he recently disclosed her genetic profile to her four adult children, who each have only one copy of the Christchurch mutation.The researchers are also evaluating a few other members of the Colombian family, who appear to also have some resistance to Alzheimer's. They are not as old as the woman, and they do not have the Christchurch mutation, but the team hopes to find other genetic factors from studying them and examine whether those factors operate along the same or different biological pathways, Reiman said."We've learned that at least one individual can live for very long having the cause of Alzheimer's, and she's resistant to it," Arboleda-Velasquez said. "What this patient is teaching is there could be a pathway for correcting the disease."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company


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  • 60/79   U.S. Envoy in Syria Says Not Enough Was Done to Avert Turkish Attack
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    WASHINGTON -- The top American diplomat on the ground in northern Syria has criticized the Trump administration for not trying harder to prevent Turkey's military offensive there last month -- and said Turkish-backed militia fighters committed "war crimes and ethnic cleansing."In a searing internal memo, the diplomat, William V. Roebuck, raised the question of whether tougher U.S. diplomacy, blunter threats of economic sanctions and increased military patrols could have deterred Turkey from attacking. Similar measures had dissuaded Turkish military action before."It's a tough call, and the answer is probably not," Roebuck wrote in the 3,200-word memo. "But we won't know because we didn't try." He did note several reasons the Turks might not have been deterred: the small U.S. military presence at two border outposts, Turkey's decadeslong standing as a NATO ally and its formidable army massing at the Syrian frontier.In an unusually blunt critique, Roebuck said the political and military turmoil that upended the administration's policy in northern Syria -- and left Syrian Kurdish allies abandoned and opened the door for a possible Islamic State resurgence -- was a "sideshow" to the bloody, yearslong upheaval in Syria overall.But, he said, "it is a catastrophic sideshow and it is to a significant degree of our making."Roebuck, a respected 27-year diplomat and former U.S. ambassador to Bahrain, sent the unclassified memo Oct. 31 to his boss, James F. Jeffrey, the State Department's special envoy on Syria policy, and to about four dozen State Department, White House and Pentagon officials who work on Syria issues. Roebuck is Jeffrey's deputy.The New York Times obtained a copy of the memo from someone who said it was important to make Roebuck's assessment public. Jeffrey and Roebuck declined to comment Thursday.Morgan Ortagus, the State Department spokeswoman, also declined to comment on Roebuck's memo. "That said, we have made clear that we strongly disagreed with President Erdogan's decision to enter Syria and that we did everything short of a military confrontation to prevent it," Ortagus said in a statement Thursday."No one can deny that the situation in Syria is very complicated, and there are no easy solutions and no easy choices," she said. "There will always be a variety of opinions on how this complex situation should be managed. This administration's job is to do what is best for U.S. national security and the American people. That is what we have done in Syria and what we will continue to do."Roebuck's memo appears to be the first formal expression of dissent on Syria from a Trump administration official to be made public. Pentagon officials voiced alarm by the sudden shift in Syria policy, but top officials never made their views public.Roebuck's memo also comes as the president already has expressed disdain for some State Department officials because of their testimony in Congress during the impeachment inquiry over Ukraine policy.For nearly two years, Roebuck has worked on the ground in northern Syria with Syrian Kurdish and Arab military and civilian officials who make up what is called the Syrian Democratic Forces. Roebuck has been an important interlocutor with Mazlum Kobani, the Syrian Kurdish military commander whose fighters have worked closely with American Special Operations forces to combat the Islamic State.Roebuck focused his harshest criticism on Turkey's military offensive and specifically on Turkey's deployment of Syrian Arab fighters in its vanguard force. Roebuck added his voice to accusations by human rights groups that these fighters have killed Kurdish prisoners, including one of them lying on the ground with his hands bound behind his back, and committed other atrocities as they emptied major Kurdish population centers in northern Syria."Turkey's military operation in northern Syria, spearheaded by armed Islamist groups on its payroll, represents an intentioned-laced effort at ethnic cleansing," Roebuck wrote, calling the abuses "what can only be described as war crimes and ethnic cleansing.""One day when the diplomatic history is written," he said, "people will wonder what happened here and why officials didn't do more to stop it or at least speak out more forcefully to blame Turkey for its behavior: an unprovoked military operation that has killed some 200 civilians, left well over 100,000 people (and counting) newly displaced and homeless because of its military operation."Roebuck continued, "To protect our interests, we need to speak out more forcefully, publicly and privately, to reduce the blame placed on the U.S. and to highlight the Turkish responsibilities for civilian well-being."By acting now, Roebuck wrote, "we have a chance to minimize the damage for us and hopefully correct some of the impact of Turkey's current policies, as we seek to implement the president's guidance for our presence in northeastern Syria."A senior State Department official, who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss diplomatic matters, told reporters Wednesday that the United States had immediately raised the reports of atrocities with the Turkish government. Kurdish forces in Syria have made allegations of atrocities, which the Turkish government has denied.But the senior official acknowledged that the Turkish-based Syrian force included ill-disciplined Arab fighters -- the Arabs and Kurds have a history of sometimes bloody rivalry in the region -- and that some embrace radical Islamic ideology.Roebuck's memo comes at a tumultuous time on the ground in northern Syria and at a delicate moment for the administration's Syria policy. Jeffrey is scheduled to travel to Ankara and Istanbul for meetings Friday and Saturday with senior Turkish officials and members of the Syrian opposition to the government of President Bashar Assad of Syria.The memo came two weeks after Vice President Mike Pence agreed to a deal with President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey that accepted a Turkish military presence in a broad part of northern Syria in exchange for the promise of a five-day cease-fire, completing an abrupt reversal of U.S. policy in the Syrian conflict. Pence hailed the agreement as a diplomatic victory for President Donald Trump, calling it a "solution we believe will save lives."The memo also came about a week after President Vladimir Putin of Russia met with Erdogan in Sochi, Russia, to discuss how their countries and other regional players would divide control of Syria, devastated by eight years of civil war.The negotiations cemented Putin's strategic advantage: Russian and Turkish troops have taken joint control over a vast swath of formerly Kurdish-held territory in northern Syria. The change strengthened the rapid expansion of Russian influence in Syria at the expense of the United States and its Kurdish former allies.Under criticism for abandoning the Syrian Kurds and ceding territory they once held to Syria, Turkey and Russia, Trump changed course yet again last month and approved the deployment of several hundred American troops to guard oil fields in eastern Syria against the Islamic State, even as hundreds of other American forces were withdrawing under Trump's initial order.Roebuck said the president's decision salvaged an important part of the mission against the Islamic State and preserved some space on the ground for the Syrian Kurds to operate after they were forced to pull back from the border.But the United States will pay a price, he wrote."The decision to stay is a good one, even if the 'protection of the oil' rationale plays into toxic Middle Eastern conspiracy theories that will need to be lanced with careful, sustained messaging reinforcing the truism that Syria's oil is Syria's and for the benefit of the Syrian people," Roebuck wrote.Roebuck is the second senior American official in the past week who has questioned whether the United States pressed hard enough with measures like joint American-Turkish ground and air patrols along the border, to avert a Turkish offensive into northern Syria. In an interview with Defense One, the Pentagon's top Middle East policy official, Michael P. Mulroy, said, "We would have prevented the need for an incursion."The White House and senior administration officials have said that Turkey's offensive was inevitable and that Trump's decision to pull about two dozen Special Forces off the border prevented them from being caught in the crossfire between Turkish forces and the Kurds.Critics have said that Trump, in an Oct. 6 phone call with Erdogan, paved the way for the Turkish invasion by not pushing back hard enough on the Turkish leader's threat of military action.As critical as he was about Turkey, Roebuck praised the Syrian Democratic Forces as a stout and reliable partner that had suffered massive casualties. He said the group had helped defeat the Islamic State and lead American commandos to the hideout of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the Islamic State leader, and had provided reasonably sound local governance as well as a relatively stable security environment.It was not a perfect situation, Roebuck said, but it was working and allowed United States forces to operate there in low numbers and safely at very low cost. "It wasn't a bad start," he said.At the end of his memo, Roebuck offered some diplomatic options, including maintaining relations with Turkey and making clear to Turkish leaders they will bear the brunt of the costs for the military operation.He also advocated using what time the United States has left in northeastern Syria to help stabilize the situation for the Kurdish population. Kobani, the Syrian Kurdish commander, said in a Twitter message Wednesday that the Syrian Democratic Forces were resuming counterterrorism, or CT, operations as well as helping secure the oil fields, which provide the Kurds badly needed revenue."President Trump has been clear and consistent about wanting to get our forces out of Syria," Roebuck concluded. "The residual presence to protect the oil and fight ISIS buys us some time," he said, using an alternate name for the Islamic State.But he cautioned: "Our diplomacy will also need to recognize we -- with our local partners -- have lost significant leverage and inherited a shrunken, less stable platform to support both our CT efforts and the mission of finding a comprehensive political solution for Syria."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company

    WASHINGTON -- The top American diplomat on the ground in northern Syria has criticized the Trump administration for not trying harder to prevent Turkey's military offensive there last month -- and said Turkish-backed militia fighters committed "war crimes and ethnic cleansing."In a searing internal memo, the diplomat, William V. Roebuck, raised the question of whether tougher U.S. diplomacy, blunter threats of economic sanctions and increased military patrols could have deterred Turkey from attacking. Similar measures had dissuaded Turkish military action before."It's a tough call, and the answer is probably not," Roebuck wrote in the 3,200-word memo. "But we won't know because we didn't try." He did note several reasons the Turks might not have been deterred: the small U.S. military presence at two border outposts, Turkey's decadeslong standing as a NATO ally and its formidable army massing at the Syrian frontier.In an unusually blunt critique, Roebuck said the political and military turmoil that upended the administration's policy in northern Syria -- and left Syrian Kurdish allies abandoned and opened the door for a possible Islamic State resurgence -- was a "sideshow" to the bloody, yearslong upheaval in Syria overall.But, he said, "it is a catastrophic sideshow and it is to a significant degree of our making."Roebuck, a respected 27-year diplomat and former U.S. ambassador to Bahrain, sent the unclassified memo Oct. 31 to his boss, James F. Jeffrey, the State Department's special envoy on Syria policy, and to about four dozen State Department, White House and Pentagon officials who work on Syria issues. Roebuck is Jeffrey's deputy.The New York Times obtained a copy of the memo from someone who said it was important to make Roebuck's assessment public. Jeffrey and Roebuck declined to comment Thursday.Morgan Ortagus, the State Department spokeswoman, also declined to comment on Roebuck's memo. "That said, we have made clear that we strongly disagreed with President Erdogan's decision to enter Syria and that we did everything short of a military confrontation to prevent it," Ortagus said in a statement Thursday."No one can deny that the situation in Syria is very complicated, and there are no easy solutions and no easy choices," she said. "There will always be a variety of opinions on how this complex situation should be managed. This administration's job is to do what is best for U.S. national security and the American people. That is what we have done in Syria and what we will continue to do."Roebuck's memo appears to be the first formal expression of dissent on Syria from a Trump administration official to be made public. Pentagon officials voiced alarm by the sudden shift in Syria policy, but top officials never made their views public.Roebuck's memo also comes as the president already has expressed disdain for some State Department officials because of their testimony in Congress during the impeachment inquiry over Ukraine policy.For nearly two years, Roebuck has worked on the ground in northern Syria with Syrian Kurdish and Arab military and civilian officials who make up what is called the Syrian Democratic Forces. Roebuck has been an important interlocutor with Mazlum Kobani, the Syrian Kurdish military commander whose fighters have worked closely with American Special Operations forces to combat the Islamic State.Roebuck focused his harshest criticism on Turkey's military offensive and specifically on Turkey's deployment of Syrian Arab fighters in its vanguard force. Roebuck added his voice to accusations by human rights groups that these fighters have killed Kurdish prisoners, including one of them lying on the ground with his hands bound behind his back, and committed other atrocities as they emptied major Kurdish population centers in northern Syria."Turkey's military operation in northern Syria, spearheaded by armed Islamist groups on its payroll, represents an intentioned-laced effort at ethnic cleansing," Roebuck wrote, calling the abuses "what can only be described as war crimes and ethnic cleansing.""One day when the diplomatic history is written," he said, "people will wonder what happened here and why officials didn't do more to stop it or at least speak out more forcefully to blame Turkey for its behavior: an unprovoked military operation that has killed some 200 civilians, left well over 100,000 people (and counting) newly displaced and homeless because of its military operation."Roebuck continued, "To protect our interests, we need to speak out more forcefully, publicly and privately, to reduce the blame placed on the U.S. and to highlight the Turkish responsibilities for civilian well-being."By acting now, Roebuck wrote, "we have a chance to minimize the damage for us and hopefully correct some of the impact of Turkey's current policies, as we seek to implement the president's guidance for our presence in northeastern Syria."A senior State Department official, who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss diplomatic matters, told reporters Wednesday that the United States had immediately raised the reports of atrocities with the Turkish government. Kurdish forces in Syria have made allegations of atrocities, which the Turkish government has denied.But the senior official acknowledged that the Turkish-based Syrian force included ill-disciplined Arab fighters -- the Arabs and Kurds have a history of sometimes bloody rivalry in the region -- and that some embrace radical Islamic ideology.Roebuck's memo comes at a tumultuous time on the ground in northern Syria and at a delicate moment for the administration's Syria policy. Jeffrey is scheduled to travel to Ankara and Istanbul for meetings Friday and Saturday with senior Turkish officials and members of the Syrian opposition to the government of President Bashar Assad of Syria.The memo came two weeks after Vice President Mike Pence agreed to a deal with President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey that accepted a Turkish military presence in a broad part of northern Syria in exchange for the promise of a five-day cease-fire, completing an abrupt reversal of U.S. policy in the Syrian conflict. Pence hailed the agreement as a diplomatic victory for President Donald Trump, calling it a "solution we believe will save lives."The memo also came about a week after President Vladimir Putin of Russia met with Erdogan in Sochi, Russia, to discuss how their countries and other regional players would divide control of Syria, devastated by eight years of civil war.The negotiations cemented Putin's strategic advantage: Russian and Turkish troops have taken joint control over a vast swath of formerly Kurdish-held territory in northern Syria. The change strengthened the rapid expansion of Russian influence in Syria at the expense of the United States and its Kurdish former allies.Under criticism for abandoning the Syrian Kurds and ceding territory they once held to Syria, Turkey and Russia, Trump changed course yet again last month and approved the deployment of several hundred American troops to guard oil fields in eastern Syria against the Islamic State, even as hundreds of other American forces were withdrawing under Trump's initial order.Roebuck said the president's decision salvaged an important part of the mission against the Islamic State and preserved some space on the ground for the Syrian Kurds to operate after they were forced to pull back from the border.But the United States will pay a price, he wrote."The decision to stay is a good one, even if the 'protection of the oil' rationale plays into toxic Middle Eastern conspiracy theories that will need to be lanced with careful, sustained messaging reinforcing the truism that Syria's oil is Syria's and for the benefit of the Syrian people," Roebuck wrote.Roebuck is the second senior American official in the past week who has questioned whether the United States pressed hard enough with measures like joint American-Turkish ground and air patrols along the border, to avert a Turkish offensive into northern Syria. In an interview with Defense One, the Pentagon's top Middle East policy official, Michael P. Mulroy, said, "We would have prevented the need for an incursion."The White House and senior administration officials have said that Turkey's offensive was inevitable and that Trump's decision to pull about two dozen Special Forces off the border prevented them from being caught in the crossfire between Turkish forces and the Kurds.Critics have said that Trump, in an Oct. 6 phone call with Erdogan, paved the way for the Turkish invasion by not pushing back hard enough on the Turkish leader's threat of military action.As critical as he was about Turkey, Roebuck praised the Syrian Democratic Forces as a stout and reliable partner that had suffered massive casualties. He said the group had helped defeat the Islamic State and lead American commandos to the hideout of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the Islamic State leader, and had provided reasonably sound local governance as well as a relatively stable security environment.It was not a perfect situation, Roebuck said, but it was working and allowed United States forces to operate there in low numbers and safely at very low cost. "It wasn't a bad start," he said.At the end of his memo, Roebuck offered some diplomatic options, including maintaining relations with Turkey and making clear to Turkish leaders they will bear the brunt of the costs for the military operation.He also advocated using what time the United States has left in northeastern Syria to help stabilize the situation for the Kurdish population. Kobani, the Syrian Kurdish commander, said in a Twitter message Wednesday that the Syrian Democratic Forces were resuming counterterrorism, or CT, operations as well as helping secure the oil fields, which provide the Kurds badly needed revenue."President Trump has been clear and consistent about wanting to get our forces out of Syria," Roebuck concluded. "The residual presence to protect the oil and fight ISIS buys us some time," he said, using an alternate name for the Islamic State.But he cautioned: "Our diplomacy will also need to recognize we -- with our local partners -- have lost significant leverage and inherited a shrunken, less stable platform to support both our CT efforts and the mission of finding a comprehensive political solution for Syria."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company


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  • 61/79   Boris Johnson Pledges New Post-Brexit Visas for Doctors and Nurses
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced plans for special visas to make it easier for the U.K.’s National Health Service to recruit doctors and nurses from other countries after Brexit.The NHS visa would form part of a new points-based immigration system to be introduced after the U.K. completes its divorce from the European Union, Johnson’s Conservative Party said in an emailed statement on Friday.Fees for the visa would be halved to 464 pounds ($595) from 928 pounds, medical professionals joining the NHS would receive extra points and applicants would be fast-tracked under the plans, the party said. Health care is set to be a key battleground in the campaign for the Dec. 12 election. It’s traditionally been a weak issue for Johnson’s Conservatives, and the prime minister has sought to gain ground by pledging to plow cash into hospitals around the country, calling it a "people’s priority."Jeremy Corbyn, leader of the opposition Labour Party, has repeatedly accused Johnson of planning to "sell out" the NHS in a trade deal with U.S. President Donald Trump. As a result, medicine prices would surge, benefiting U.S pharmaceutical companies, Corbyn says.To contact the reporter on this story: Alex Morales in London at amorales2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Thomas PennyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced plans for special visas to make it easier for the U.K.’s National Health Service to recruit doctors and nurses from other countries after Brexit.The NHS visa would form part of a new points-based immigration system to be introduced after the U.K. completes its divorce from the European Union, Johnson’s Conservative Party said in an emailed statement on Friday.Fees for the visa would be halved to 464 pounds ($595) from 928 pounds, medical professionals joining the NHS would receive extra points and applicants would be fast-tracked under the plans, the party said. Health care is set to be a key battleground in the campaign for the Dec. 12 election. It’s traditionally been a weak issue for Johnson’s Conservatives, and the prime minister has sought to gain ground by pledging to plow cash into hospitals around the country, calling it a "people’s priority."Jeremy Corbyn, leader of the opposition Labour Party, has repeatedly accused Johnson of planning to "sell out" the NHS in a trade deal with U.S. President Donald Trump. As a result, medicine prices would surge, benefiting U.S pharmaceutical companies, Corbyn says.To contact the reporter on this story: Alex Morales in London at amorales2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Thomas PennyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 62/79   Corbyn’s U.K. Labour Party Is a Mess But Can Still Win Power
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- They are divided, unpopular and have been accused by their own former colleagues of racism. But Jeremy Corbyn and his allies in the U.K.’s Labour Party could yet take power in next month’s general election.After Prime Minister Boris Johnson had a terrible first day campaigning on Wednesday, it was Corbyn’s turn on Thursday.As bad as Corbyn looks on paper, he has a potential path to power. The Conservatives have been in office so long that austerity-bitten voters want change. Opinion polls have misjudged the public mood before. Johnson is a gaffe-prone leader who is a divisive figure in the Brexit landscape.With enough support in Labour heartlands in northern and central England, and with Johnson viewed increasingly with suspicion in Scotland, it could come down simply to voters disliking Corbyn less than they dislike Johnson.Corbyn himself is a deeply divisive figure in his own political tribe. Just this week, his deputy quit and a former Labour member of Parliament publicly urged the country to vote Conservative. The Jewish Chronicle newspaper then ran a front page article describing Corbyn as an anti-Semite.It was a grim narrative for a political opposition hoping to persuade the country to put it into power on Dec. 12. Labour could be doing so much better.The Conservatives have been in office for nine years, and have been tearing themselves apart over Brexit for the past three. Johnson is now seeking to do something relatively rare for a government in British elections and increase the number of seats his ruling party has in parliament.Polling BadlyCorbyn meanwhile has been calling for an election ever since the last one, in June 2017, put him within striking distance of replacing the Tories as the government. Yet with the campaign now under way, the opinion polls tell a very different story.After rating close to the Conservatives for much of the last two years, Labour goes into the race behind. According to YouGov Plc, it hasn’t polled above 27% in six months. The Conservatives are on 36%.Corbyn, in particular, polls badly. Just 23% of people say they have a positive view of him -- against 59% who say they have a negative view. More than half of people who voted Labour in the 2017 election think Corbyn should be replaced as leader.It’s a view shared privately by many Labour MPs, including some inside his shadow cabinet team. Others, like Ian Austin, have gone so far as to quit the party in protest at his leadership. “I regard myself as proper, decent, traditional Labour,” Austin told the BBC. “I just think Jeremy Corbyn’s not fit to run the country.” Saying people should vote for Johnson instead, he added: “I can’t believe it’s come to this.”‘Racist Views’For Austin, the final straw was the rise of anti-Semitism within Labour under Corbyn. Addressing the issue after a speech in Liverpool later, the party’s finance spokesman, John McDonnell acknowledged there had been a problem, and added that “one anti-Semite is too many,” but insisted the issue had been dealt with.That’s not what the Jewish Chronicle thinks. Its front page accused Corbyn of “near total inaction” which it said had emboldened anti-Semites in the party. “How can the racist views of a party leader -- and the deep fear he inspires among an ethnic minority -- not be among the most fundamental of issues?” it asked.Within Labour, Watson had been the figurehead of internal opposition to Corbyn, staying in place despite attempts to sideline or remove him. Though he said his decision was “personal, not political,” it was notable that his letter of resignation expressed no desire to see either a Labour government or Corbyn as prime minister.Corbyn’s team is likely to be happy to see the back of Watson, but his departure raises the same question for Labour that Philip Hammond‘s did for the Conservatives earlier this week: What does it say about the party that lifelong members no longer see a future representing it in parliament?Johnson’s WeaknessAfter decades in which Labour has aimed for the center ground of politics, talking about wealth creation as well as public spending, Corbyn has moved it firmly to the left. It’s not simply about taxation and spending. On foreign policy, Corbyn’s position is far outside the consensus of post-war British politics. He’s a critic of NATO, viewing it as a “danger to world peace.”Yet none of this means Corbyn can’t become prime minister next month. The 2017 election saw him shrug off criticism of his views, and pick up votes where they mattered.Corbyn’s strategy then included a series of voter-pleasing offers such as extra bank holidays. Those tactics seem to be in play again. On Friday, Labour will announce a package of measures to improve working conditions for women, included a strategy to reduce the gender pay gap, extra maternity pay and the ability for both women and men to choose working hours that suit them.For his part, Johnson’s holds a Brexit position that has forced him into a strategy where he risks losing seats in pro-EU cities, the south of England, and Scotland. If he is to retain power and win a majority, Johnson must prevail in northern and central England -- but many of these are Labour strongholds that the Tories have never won.When they tried this strategy in 2017, they came within a few thousand votes of losing power entirely. Lifelong Labour voters in these industrial districts may still balk at ditching their tribal allegiances in order to vote for the Tories, a party many have spent their lives hating.Britain’s Election Gamble -- What You Need to Know: QuickTakeThere’s another factor counting in Corbyn’s favor. If the Conservatives are the largest party after the election but fall short of an overall majority, they will probably find it difficult to form a coalition or even a looser alliance to prop up Johnson.In another so-called hung parliament, Corbyn would have more potential allies among smaller parties. The Scottish National Party has said they would never work to keep Johnson in office but could help Corbyn in exchange for a referendum on independence for Scotland.The smaller Liberal Democrats have ruled out supporting a Corbyn government, but party leader Jo Swinson might face the same choice as Austin: Corbyn or Johnson. And as an opponent of Brexit, she couldn’t back the Tory leader.(Updates with Labour announcement in 18th paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Robert Hutton in London at rhutton1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Alex MoralesFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- They are divided, unpopular and have been accused by their own former colleagues of racism. But Jeremy Corbyn and his allies in the U.K.’s Labour Party could yet take power in next month’s general election.After Prime Minister Boris Johnson had a terrible first day campaigning on Wednesday, it was Corbyn’s turn on Thursday.As bad as Corbyn looks on paper, he has a potential path to power. The Conservatives have been in office so long that austerity-bitten voters want change. Opinion polls have misjudged the public mood before. Johnson is a gaffe-prone leader who is a divisive figure in the Brexit landscape.With enough support in Labour heartlands in northern and central England, and with Johnson viewed increasingly with suspicion in Scotland, it could come down simply to voters disliking Corbyn less than they dislike Johnson.Corbyn himself is a deeply divisive figure in his own political tribe. Just this week, his deputy quit and a former Labour member of Parliament publicly urged the country to vote Conservative. The Jewish Chronicle newspaper then ran a front page article describing Corbyn as an anti-Semite.It was a grim narrative for a political opposition hoping to persuade the country to put it into power on Dec. 12. Labour could be doing so much better.The Conservatives have been in office for nine years, and have been tearing themselves apart over Brexit for the past three. Johnson is now seeking to do something relatively rare for a government in British elections and increase the number of seats his ruling party has in parliament.Polling BadlyCorbyn meanwhile has been calling for an election ever since the last one, in June 2017, put him within striking distance of replacing the Tories as the government. Yet with the campaign now under way, the opinion polls tell a very different story.After rating close to the Conservatives for much of the last two years, Labour goes into the race behind. According to YouGov Plc, it hasn’t polled above 27% in six months. The Conservatives are on 36%.Corbyn, in particular, polls badly. Just 23% of people say they have a positive view of him -- against 59% who say they have a negative view. More than half of people who voted Labour in the 2017 election think Corbyn should be replaced as leader.It’s a view shared privately by many Labour MPs, including some inside his shadow cabinet team. Others, like Ian Austin, have gone so far as to quit the party in protest at his leadership. “I regard myself as proper, decent, traditional Labour,” Austin told the BBC. “I just think Jeremy Corbyn’s not fit to run the country.” Saying people should vote for Johnson instead, he added: “I can’t believe it’s come to this.”‘Racist Views’For Austin, the final straw was the rise of anti-Semitism within Labour under Corbyn. Addressing the issue after a speech in Liverpool later, the party’s finance spokesman, John McDonnell acknowledged there had been a problem, and added that “one anti-Semite is too many,” but insisted the issue had been dealt with.That’s not what the Jewish Chronicle thinks. Its front page accused Corbyn of “near total inaction” which it said had emboldened anti-Semites in the party. “How can the racist views of a party leader -- and the deep fear he inspires among an ethnic minority -- not be among the most fundamental of issues?” it asked.Within Labour, Watson had been the figurehead of internal opposition to Corbyn, staying in place despite attempts to sideline or remove him. Though he said his decision was “personal, not political,” it was notable that his letter of resignation expressed no desire to see either a Labour government or Corbyn as prime minister.Corbyn’s team is likely to be happy to see the back of Watson, but his departure raises the same question for Labour that Philip Hammond‘s did for the Conservatives earlier this week: What does it say about the party that lifelong members no longer see a future representing it in parliament?Johnson’s WeaknessAfter decades in which Labour has aimed for the center ground of politics, talking about wealth creation as well as public spending, Corbyn has moved it firmly to the left. It’s not simply about taxation and spending. On foreign policy, Corbyn’s position is far outside the consensus of post-war British politics. He’s a critic of NATO, viewing it as a “danger to world peace.”Yet none of this means Corbyn can’t become prime minister next month. The 2017 election saw him shrug off criticism of his views, and pick up votes where they mattered.Corbyn’s strategy then included a series of voter-pleasing offers such as extra bank holidays. Those tactics seem to be in play again. On Friday, Labour will announce a package of measures to improve working conditions for women, included a strategy to reduce the gender pay gap, extra maternity pay and the ability for both women and men to choose working hours that suit them.For his part, Johnson’s holds a Brexit position that has forced him into a strategy where he risks losing seats in pro-EU cities, the south of England, and Scotland. If he is to retain power and win a majority, Johnson must prevail in northern and central England -- but many of these are Labour strongholds that the Tories have never won.When they tried this strategy in 2017, they came within a few thousand votes of losing power entirely. Lifelong Labour voters in these industrial districts may still balk at ditching their tribal allegiances in order to vote for the Tories, a party many have spent their lives hating.Britain’s Election Gamble -- What You Need to Know: QuickTakeThere’s another factor counting in Corbyn’s favor. If the Conservatives are the largest party after the election but fall short of an overall majority, they will probably find it difficult to form a coalition or even a looser alliance to prop up Johnson.In another so-called hung parliament, Corbyn would have more potential allies among smaller parties. The Scottish National Party has said they would never work to keep Johnson in office but could help Corbyn in exchange for a referendum on independence for Scotland.The smaller Liberal Democrats have ruled out supporting a Corbyn government, but party leader Jo Swinson might face the same choice as Austin: Corbyn or Johnson. And as an opponent of Brexit, she couldn’t back the Tory leader.(Updates with Labour announcement in 18th paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Robert Hutton in London at rhutton1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Alex MoralesFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 63/79   Labour Vies With Tories to Ramp Up Spending Plans: U.K. Votes
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, follow us @Brexit and subscribe to our podcast.Both of the U.K.’s major parties are rolling out big spending plans. Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid said a Conservative government would borrow about 20 billion pounds ($26 billion) extra a year to invest in infrastructure, overhauling fiscal rules after almost a decade of austerity.Labour’s economy spokesman John McDonnell pledged 250 billion pounds ($321 billion) of infrastructure investment over 10 years, and 150 billion pounds over five years on state education, social housing and health care.Read more: Javid Allows Borrowing for Investment in Revamp of U.K. RulesKey Developments:Javid plans to balance current budget while boosting borrowingMcDonnell says finance sector key to Labour’s investment plansBoris Johnson campaigns in Scotland, Northern IrelandLiberal Democrats, Greens and Plaid Cymru reach electoral pact in 60 seats to try to ensure MPs elected from “Remain alliance”Labour hit by resignation of Deputy Leader Tom WatsonBank of England keeps interest rates unchanged, but says easing may be needed due to Brexit uncertainty and global showdownTory Candidate Quits Over Rape Remarks (10:15 p.m.)The Tory candidate who said women should keep their “knickers on” to avoid being raped has quit after a backlash over his selection (See 3 p.m.) Nick Conrad said in a statement emailed by the party that he had “reluctantly concluded” he should stand down and allow another candidate to contest the seat of Broadland, in eastern England.“It has become clear to me that the media attention on my previous comments have become a distraction,” Conrad said. “For me, the most important thing is for the Conservative Party to be successful in the forthcoming election -- getting Brexit done and delivering on the people’s priorities.”Small Donations to Labour Top 1 Million Pounds (4 p.m.)The main opposition Labour Party said that it’s raised more than 1 million pounds ($1.3 million) in small donations in 10 days. In a statement, Labour also said that in the first two days of the campaign, it raised as much as in the first two weeks of the last general election in 2017.The average size of donation to the party was 26 pounds, Labour said.Tory, Brexit Party Supporters Want Pact (3:05 p.m.)Most voters who plan to vote for the Conservatives or the Brexit Party would like to see an electoral pact between the two, according to a YouGov poll published on Thursday.Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage has requested a pact with Boris Johnson’s Tories -- but only on condition the premier drops the divorce deal he negotiated with the European Union. Johnson has refused.YouGov found that 70% of those planning to vote for the Tories, and 81% of Brexit Party supporters, want the two leaders to come to an agreement. The pollster said in seats where one of the party’s candidates stood aside, Tory candidates could count on the votes of 72% of Brexit Party supporters, while Farage’s party could secure 62% of Tory voters. It surveyed 552 Tory supporters and 110 Brexit Party backers.Smaller pro-EU parties have already reached a limited electoral pact, with the Liberal Democrats, the Greens and the Welsh nationalists Plaid Cymru announcing a deal covering 60 seats on Thursday (see 7:30 a.m.).Backlash Over Tory Candidate’s Rape Remarks (3 p.m.)The Conservatives are under pressure to withdraw a candidate who said women should keep their “knickers on” to avoid being raped. “I think women need to be more aware of a man’s sexual desire,” former BBC radio presenter Nick Conrad said during a 2014 program, according to the broadcaster. Conrad was chosen as the Tory candidate for Broadland, eastern England, on Wednesday.Labour MP Angela Rayner said Conrad’s views “have no place in the 21st Century, let alone in Parliament” and urged the Conservatives to drop him as a candidate.Business and energy minister Kwasi Kwarteng said he was “appalled” by Conrad’s remarks, but stood by the candidate. “We can’t keep beating him up for something that he’s apologized for,” Kwarteng said on Sky News. Sky also cited Prime Minister Boris Johnson as saying Conrad’s comments were “completely unacceptable.”Labour’s Dawn Butler to Stand for Deputy Leader (1:30 p.m.)Dawn Butler, Labour’s equalities spokeswoman, said she will stand to be the party’s deputy leader following Tom Watson’s decision to stand down.“I’ve thought very carefully about who should replace Tom and after giving it some thought I will be throwing my hat in the ring,” Butler told Bloomberg TV after Watson’s announcement on Wednesday evening.Butler highlighted her “track record of being very supportive to our leader Jeremy Corbyn” as a reason party members should vote for her -- a sign of how much power has shifted firmly to Labour’s socialist wing.McDonnell Pledges Spending Boost, Warns Banks (11:45 a.m.)Labour’s economy spokesman John McDonnell announced his party’s own spending pledge: a National Transformation Fund of 250 billion pounds ($320 billion) over a decade for infrastructure, and a Social Transformation Fund of 150 billion pounds over five years to transform state education, health care and social housing.Speaking in Liverpool, northwest England, McDonnell said the money would go to “areas that haven’t had their fair share for years.” He also said banks would be pushed to fund investment.“We can’t do it if the private finance sector isn’t pulling its weight too,” he said. “The days of the City dictating terms to the rest of the country are over.” McDonnell said there will be opportunities for large-scale private investment alongside government investment “because it will marry up.”Javid Revamps Rules to Boost Borrowing (10:55 a.m.)Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid has opened up the U.K.’s spending taps, setting out new fiscal rules he said a Conservative government will follow that reflect a cheaper environment for borrowing. Javid proposed three rules:A balanced current budgetBorrowing for investment won’t exceed 3% of GDPThat ceiling will be re-evaluated if debt servicing costs rise“It’s a responsible time to invest,” Javid said in a speech in Manchester, northwest England.In practical terms, it means around 20 billion pounds ($26 billion) a year extra for investment, something Javid said would deliver a “decade of renewal.” The announcement ends months of speculation over what would replace the current fiscal rules, which require borrowing to be less than 2% of gross domestic product in 2020-21.Javid will almost certainly breach that ceiling after announcing an extra 13.4 billion pounds ($17.2 billion) of spending on public services in September.Long-Bailey: Media Misrepresents Labour on Brexit (9 a.m.)Labour’s business spokeswoman Rebecca Long-Bailey accused the media of misrepresenting the main opposition party’s position on Brexit, and said voters back it once they have it explained to them.“Our position is to ensure we get a credible deal that puts the economy first and protects jobs and living standards and to deliver that to a public vote -- with Remain on the ballot paper,” she said in an interview with Bloomberg TV. “It seems to go down well whether you voted to leave or voted Remain, because the final decision will be yours to make.”Long-Bailey said Tom Watson is “a force of nature” and the deputy Labour leader’s departure would leave “a big hole” in the party. Earlier, she told BBC radio that Ian Austin’s advice (see 7:20 a.m.) for Labour supporters to vote Tory was “absolutely absurd.” If they want to protect their communities, they should back Labour, Long-Bailey said.Tories Make Hay With Labour Woes (8:20 a.m.)The Conservatives immediately jumped on divisions in the opposition Labour Party, and welcomed former MP Ian Austin’s endorsement (see 7:20 a.m.) of Prime Minister Boris Johnson.“Ian Austin has been a Labour MP for 14 years so he knows Corbyn better than most,” Chief Secretary to the Treasury Rishi Sunak said in an email. “He says that a vote for Corbyn’s Labour would put businesses and jobs at risk, that Corbyn’s economic policies would make our country worse and that his ideas on Brexit are a complete fantasy.”The split gives the Tories a chance to turn up the heat on Labour after two days in which Johnson and his cabinet came under fire amid accusations they are out of touch with ordinary people.Remain Alliance Targets 60 Seats (7:30 a.m.)The Liberal Democrats, Greens and Plaid Cymru have reached an electoral pact that will see two of the parties standing aside in 60 seats to ensure MPs are elected from the “Remain Alliance” opposed to Brexit.Constituencies targeted include Richmond Park, in west London and Cheltenham, where the Liberal Democrats will be given a clear run. The Liberal Democrats will stand aside in Isle of Wight and Brighton Pavilion to assist the Greens, according to former MP Heidi Allen who coordinated the move.“We are facing the real danger of a no-deal Brexit or a hard Brexit with a Boris Johnson government,” Allen told BBC radio. “This is country first stuff, it’s not about them and them winning, it’s about what’s best for the country.”Former Labour MP Ian Austin: Vote Tory (7:20 a.m.)Former Labour MP Ian Austin, once a senior adviser to prime minister Gordon Brown and a member of the party for 34 years, said he would not be standing for Parliament on Dec. 12 and advised voters to back Boris Johnson.Austin quit the party in February, citing Jeremy Corbyn’s failure to tackle antisemitism in the party and had been sitting as independent in the House of Commons. He said Corbyn has spent his life siding with extremists and shouldn’t be trusted with power.“I tell decent patriotic Labour voters that they should be voting for Boris Johnson, I can’t believe it’s come to this,” Austin told BBC Radio. “I regard myself as proper, decent, traditional Labour. I just think Jeremy Corbyn’s not fit to run the country.”Earlier:Boris Johnson’s Conservatives Fight for Survival in ScotlandLabour Vows Big Spending After Watson Quits: U.K. Campaign TrailBrexit Bulletin: Time to Count the Cost of DelayCorbyn and Johnson Go Wild on Spending: Ferdinando Giugliano\--With assistance from Anna Edwards, Thomas Penny and Greg Ritchie.To contact the reporters on this story: Robert Hutton in London at rhutton1@bloomberg.net;Andrew Atkinson in London at a.atkinson@bloomberg.net;Alex Morales in London at amorales2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Stuart Biggs, John HarneyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, follow us @Brexit and subscribe to our podcast.Both of the U.K.’s major parties are rolling out big spending plans. Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid said a Conservative government would borrow about 20 billion pounds ($26 billion) extra a year to invest in infrastructure, overhauling fiscal rules after almost a decade of austerity.Labour’s economy spokesman John McDonnell pledged 250 billion pounds ($321 billion) of infrastructure investment over 10 years, and 150 billion pounds over five years on state education, social housing and health care.Read more: Javid Allows Borrowing for Investment in Revamp of U.K. RulesKey Developments:Javid plans to balance current budget while boosting borrowingMcDonnell says finance sector key to Labour’s investment plansBoris Johnson campaigns in Scotland, Northern IrelandLiberal Democrats, Greens and Plaid Cymru reach electoral pact in 60 seats to try to ensure MPs elected from “Remain alliance”Labour hit by resignation of Deputy Leader Tom WatsonBank of England keeps interest rates unchanged, but says easing may be needed due to Brexit uncertainty and global showdownTory Candidate Quits Over Rape Remarks (10:15 p.m.)The Tory candidate who said women should keep their “knickers on” to avoid being raped has quit after a backlash over his selection (See 3 p.m.) Nick Conrad said in a statement emailed by the party that he had “reluctantly concluded” he should stand down and allow another candidate to contest the seat of Broadland, in eastern England.“It has become clear to me that the media attention on my previous comments have become a distraction,” Conrad said. “For me, the most important thing is for the Conservative Party to be successful in the forthcoming election -- getting Brexit done and delivering on the people’s priorities.”Small Donations to Labour Top 1 Million Pounds (4 p.m.)The main opposition Labour Party said that it’s raised more than 1 million pounds ($1.3 million) in small donations in 10 days. In a statement, Labour also said that in the first two days of the campaign, it raised as much as in the first two weeks of the last general election in 2017.The average size of donation to the party was 26 pounds, Labour said.Tory, Brexit Party Supporters Want Pact (3:05 p.m.)Most voters who plan to vote for the Conservatives or the Brexit Party would like to see an electoral pact between the two, according to a YouGov poll published on Thursday.Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage has requested a pact with Boris Johnson’s Tories -- but only on condition the premier drops the divorce deal he negotiated with the European Union. Johnson has refused.YouGov found that 70% of those planning to vote for the Tories, and 81% of Brexit Party supporters, want the two leaders to come to an agreement. The pollster said in seats where one of the party’s candidates stood aside, Tory candidates could count on the votes of 72% of Brexit Party supporters, while Farage’s party could secure 62% of Tory voters. It surveyed 552 Tory supporters and 110 Brexit Party backers.Smaller pro-EU parties have already reached a limited electoral pact, with the Liberal Democrats, the Greens and the Welsh nationalists Plaid Cymru announcing a deal covering 60 seats on Thursday (see 7:30 a.m.).Backlash Over Tory Candidate’s Rape Remarks (3 p.m.)The Conservatives are under pressure to withdraw a candidate who said women should keep their “knickers on” to avoid being raped. “I think women need to be more aware of a man’s sexual desire,” former BBC radio presenter Nick Conrad said during a 2014 program, according to the broadcaster. Conrad was chosen as the Tory candidate for Broadland, eastern England, on Wednesday.Labour MP Angela Rayner said Conrad’s views “have no place in the 21st Century, let alone in Parliament” and urged the Conservatives to drop him as a candidate.Business and energy minister Kwasi Kwarteng said he was “appalled” by Conrad’s remarks, but stood by the candidate. “We can’t keep beating him up for something that he’s apologized for,” Kwarteng said on Sky News. Sky also cited Prime Minister Boris Johnson as saying Conrad’s comments were “completely unacceptable.”Labour’s Dawn Butler to Stand for Deputy Leader (1:30 p.m.)Dawn Butler, Labour’s equalities spokeswoman, said she will stand to be the party’s deputy leader following Tom Watson’s decision to stand down.“I’ve thought very carefully about who should replace Tom and after giving it some thought I will be throwing my hat in the ring,” Butler told Bloomberg TV after Watson’s announcement on Wednesday evening.Butler highlighted her “track record of being very supportive to our leader Jeremy Corbyn” as a reason party members should vote for her -- a sign of how much power has shifted firmly to Labour’s socialist wing.McDonnell Pledges Spending Boost, Warns Banks (11:45 a.m.)Labour’s economy spokesman John McDonnell announced his party’s own spending pledge: a National Transformation Fund of 250 billion pounds ($320 billion) over a decade for infrastructure, and a Social Transformation Fund of 150 billion pounds over five years to transform state education, health care and social housing.Speaking in Liverpool, northwest England, McDonnell said the money would go to “areas that haven’t had their fair share for years.” He also said banks would be pushed to fund investment.“We can’t do it if the private finance sector isn’t pulling its weight too,” he said. “The days of the City dictating terms to the rest of the country are over.” McDonnell said there will be opportunities for large-scale private investment alongside government investment “because it will marry up.”Javid Revamps Rules to Boost Borrowing (10:55 a.m.)Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid has opened up the U.K.’s spending taps, setting out new fiscal rules he said a Conservative government will follow that reflect a cheaper environment for borrowing. Javid proposed three rules:A balanced current budgetBorrowing for investment won’t exceed 3% of GDPThat ceiling will be re-evaluated if debt servicing costs rise“It’s a responsible time to invest,” Javid said in a speech in Manchester, northwest England.In practical terms, it means around 20 billion pounds ($26 billion) a year extra for investment, something Javid said would deliver a “decade of renewal.” The announcement ends months of speculation over what would replace the current fiscal rules, which require borrowing to be less than 2% of gross domestic product in 2020-21.Javid will almost certainly breach that ceiling after announcing an extra 13.4 billion pounds ($17.2 billion) of spending on public services in September.Long-Bailey: Media Misrepresents Labour on Brexit (9 a.m.)Labour’s business spokeswoman Rebecca Long-Bailey accused the media of misrepresenting the main opposition party’s position on Brexit, and said voters back it once they have it explained to them.“Our position is to ensure we get a credible deal that puts the economy first and protects jobs and living standards and to deliver that to a public vote -- with Remain on the ballot paper,” she said in an interview with Bloomberg TV. “It seems to go down well whether you voted to leave or voted Remain, because the final decision will be yours to make.”Long-Bailey said Tom Watson is “a force of nature” and the deputy Labour leader’s departure would leave “a big hole” in the party. Earlier, she told BBC radio that Ian Austin’s advice (see 7:20 a.m.) for Labour supporters to vote Tory was “absolutely absurd.” If they want to protect their communities, they should back Labour, Long-Bailey said.Tories Make Hay With Labour Woes (8:20 a.m.)The Conservatives immediately jumped on divisions in the opposition Labour Party, and welcomed former MP Ian Austin’s endorsement (see 7:20 a.m.) of Prime Minister Boris Johnson.“Ian Austin has been a Labour MP for 14 years so he knows Corbyn better than most,” Chief Secretary to the Treasury Rishi Sunak said in an email. “He says that a vote for Corbyn’s Labour would put businesses and jobs at risk, that Corbyn’s economic policies would make our country worse and that his ideas on Brexit are a complete fantasy.”The split gives the Tories a chance to turn up the heat on Labour after two days in which Johnson and his cabinet came under fire amid accusations they are out of touch with ordinary people.Remain Alliance Targets 60 Seats (7:30 a.m.)The Liberal Democrats, Greens and Plaid Cymru have reached an electoral pact that will see two of the parties standing aside in 60 seats to ensure MPs are elected from the “Remain Alliance” opposed to Brexit.Constituencies targeted include Richmond Park, in west London and Cheltenham, where the Liberal Democrats will be given a clear run. The Liberal Democrats will stand aside in Isle of Wight and Brighton Pavilion to assist the Greens, according to former MP Heidi Allen who coordinated the move.“We are facing the real danger of a no-deal Brexit or a hard Brexit with a Boris Johnson government,” Allen told BBC radio. “This is country first stuff, it’s not about them and them winning, it’s about what’s best for the country.”Former Labour MP Ian Austin: Vote Tory (7:20 a.m.)Former Labour MP Ian Austin, once a senior adviser to prime minister Gordon Brown and a member of the party for 34 years, said he would not be standing for Parliament on Dec. 12 and advised voters to back Boris Johnson.Austin quit the party in February, citing Jeremy Corbyn’s failure to tackle antisemitism in the party and had been sitting as independent in the House of Commons. He said Corbyn has spent his life siding with extremists and shouldn’t be trusted with power.“I tell decent patriotic Labour voters that they should be voting for Boris Johnson, I can’t believe it’s come to this,” Austin told BBC Radio. “I regard myself as proper, decent, traditional Labour. I just think Jeremy Corbyn’s not fit to run the country.”Earlier:Boris Johnson’s Conservatives Fight for Survival in ScotlandLabour Vows Big Spending After Watson Quits: U.K. Campaign TrailBrexit Bulletin: Time to Count the Cost of DelayCorbyn and Johnson Go Wild on Spending: Ferdinando Giugliano\--With assistance from Anna Edwards, Thomas Penny and Greg Ritchie.To contact the reporters on this story: Robert Hutton in London at rhutton1@bloomberg.net;Andrew Atkinson in London at a.atkinson@bloomberg.net;Alex Morales in London at amorales2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Stuart Biggs, John HarneyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 64/79   Senior US envoy in Syria highly critical of troop withdrawal
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    A senior American diplomat has written a highly critical assessment of the Trump administration's abrupt withdrawal of troops from northeast Syria last month, a decision that paved the way for an attack on U.S.-allied forces in the area, officials said Thursday.  In an internal memo, William Roebuck, the top American diplomat in northern Syria, takes the Trump administration to task for not doing more to prevent Turkey's invasion or protect the Kurds, who fought alongside U.S. forces in the battle against the Islamic State group, according to two U.S. officials familiar with the matter.

    A senior American diplomat has written a highly critical assessment of the Trump administration's abrupt withdrawal of troops from northeast Syria last month, a decision that paved the way for an attack on U.S.-allied forces in the area, officials said Thursday. In an internal memo, William Roebuck, the top American diplomat in northern Syria, takes the Trump administration to task for not doing more to prevent Turkey's invasion or protect the Kurds, who fought alongside U.S. forces in the battle against the Islamic State group, according to two U.S. officials familiar with the matter.


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  • 65/79   Canadian Miner Targeted in Burkina Faso Attack; 38 Killed
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Next Africa newsletter and follow Bloomberg Africa on TwitterUnidentified assailants attacked a convoy transporting workers of Canadian gold producer Semafo Inc. in Burkina Faso, killing at least 38 people, the government said.The deaths come as West African governments battle a widening insurgency by Islamist militants and at a time when gold producers and prospectors are pouring money into the region as prices rally. The conflict has displaced more than half a million people in Burkina Faso, according to the United Nations, and led to increasing discontent with how President Roch Marc Christian Kabore’s government is handling the situation.Five buses transporting employees, contractors and suppliers were ambushed Wednesday on a road between the eastern town of Fada and Semafo’s Boungou mine, the Montreal-based company said in a statement. The incident happened about 40 kilometers (25 miles) away from the Boungou site. While the mine’s operations are unaffected, they were suspended out of respect for the victims and to ensure operational safety, Semafo said.The convoy was hit by a “complex attack,” in which 33 people were wounded, Burkina Faso’s government spokesman said by phone, revising down an earlier injury toll of 60. The state will provide further details later on Thursday, while Semafo said it will issue an update “when complete details are known.”Semafo’s stock fell as much as 7.2% to C$3.24 in Toronto on Thursday, the lowest since February. Shares in Australia’s Perenti Global Ltd. also slumped after it said members of its workforce in Burkina Faso were involved in the incident.The attack is the third related to Semafo in the past 15 months, after two incidents last year left at least seven people dead. It prompted President Kabore to call on a “general mobilization” of men and women to push back the militants.No one claimed responsibility for the assault, but Islamist insurgents and militants linked to al-Qaeda and the Islamic State have carried out several attacks on security forces and civilians in West Africa in the past five years, killing almost 700 people.Burkina Faso was largely stable until Islamist insurgencies in neighboring Mali came under increasing pressure from French and Malian counter-terrorism troops, resulting in cross-border raids and the spread of violence in some of the nation’s poorest provinces.(Updates with mine supension, president’s comments in third and sixth paragraphs.)\--With assistance from Victoria Batchelor and Justina Vasquez.To contact the reporters on this story: Simon Gongo in Ouagadougou at sgongo@bloomberg.net;Katarina Hoije in Abidjan at khoije@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Andre Janse van Vuuren at ajansevanvuu@bloomberg.net, Joe Richter, Steven FrankFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Next Africa newsletter and follow Bloomberg Africa on TwitterUnidentified assailants attacked a convoy transporting workers of Canadian gold producer Semafo Inc. in Burkina Faso, killing at least 38 people, the government said.The deaths come as West African governments battle a widening insurgency by Islamist militants and at a time when gold producers and prospectors are pouring money into the region as prices rally. The conflict has displaced more than half a million people in Burkina Faso, according to the United Nations, and led to increasing discontent with how President Roch Marc Christian Kabore’s government is handling the situation.Five buses transporting employees, contractors and suppliers were ambushed Wednesday on a road between the eastern town of Fada and Semafo’s Boungou mine, the Montreal-based company said in a statement. The incident happened about 40 kilometers (25 miles) away from the Boungou site. While the mine’s operations are unaffected, they were suspended out of respect for the victims and to ensure operational safety, Semafo said.The convoy was hit by a “complex attack,” in which 33 people were wounded, Burkina Faso’s government spokesman said by phone, revising down an earlier injury toll of 60. The state will provide further details later on Thursday, while Semafo said it will issue an update “when complete details are known.”Semafo’s stock fell as much as 7.2% to C$3.24 in Toronto on Thursday, the lowest since February. Shares in Australia’s Perenti Global Ltd. also slumped after it said members of its workforce in Burkina Faso were involved in the incident.The attack is the third related to Semafo in the past 15 months, after two incidents last year left at least seven people dead. It prompted President Kabore to call on a “general mobilization” of men and women to push back the militants.No one claimed responsibility for the assault, but Islamist insurgents and militants linked to al-Qaeda and the Islamic State have carried out several attacks on security forces and civilians in West Africa in the past five years, killing almost 700 people.Burkina Faso was largely stable until Islamist insurgencies in neighboring Mali came under increasing pressure from French and Malian counter-terrorism troops, resulting in cross-border raids and the spread of violence in some of the nation’s poorest provinces.(Updates with mine supension, president’s comments in third and sixth paragraphs.)\--With assistance from Victoria Batchelor and Justina Vasquez.To contact the reporters on this story: Simon Gongo in Ouagadougou at sgongo@bloomberg.net;Katarina Hoije in Abidjan at khoije@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Andre Janse van Vuuren at ajansevanvuu@bloomberg.net, Joe Richter, Steven FrankFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 66/79   UN office in Bolivia condemns violence in disputed election
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The United Nations on Thursday urged Bolivia's government and opposition to restore 'dialogue and peace' after a third person was killed in street clashes that erupted after a disputed presidential election on Oct. 20.  Limbert Guzman, a 20-year-old student, died late Wednesday in a clinic in the city of Cochabamba following clashes between supporters and foes of President Evo Morales.  The U.N. office in Bolivia called on authorities to investigate in a statement that condemned 'intolerance and violence' in Bolivia.

    The United Nations on Thursday urged Bolivia's government and opposition to restore 'dialogue and peace' after a third person was killed in street clashes that erupted after a disputed presidential election on Oct. 20. Limbert Guzman, a 20-year-old student, died late Wednesday in a clinic in the city of Cochabamba following clashes between supporters and foes of President Evo Morales. The U.N. office in Bolivia called on authorities to investigate in a statement that condemned 'intolerance and violence' in Bolivia.


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  • 67/79   The Latest: Netanyahu says UN watchdog 'confirms Iran lied'
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Israel's prime minister alleges that a meeting earlier in the day of the U.N. nuclear watchdog 'confirms that Iran lied' about its nuclear program.  Addressing the U.N.  General Assembly last year, Netanyahu had described a 'secret atomic warehouse' on the outskirts of Tehran.

    Israel's prime minister alleges that a meeting earlier in the day of the U.N. nuclear watchdog 'confirms that Iran lied' about its nuclear program. Addressing the U.N. General Assembly last year, Netanyahu had described a 'secret atomic warehouse' on the outskirts of Tehran.


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  • 68/79   Doctor: I deliver health care in North Korea. Sanctions make the humanitarian crisis worse.
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    We are rightly concerned with the humanitarian conditions inside North Korea. Yet the international community still inflicts dangerous sanctions.

    We are rightly concerned with the humanitarian conditions inside North Korea. Yet the international community still inflicts dangerous sanctions.


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  • 69/79   Iran alleges UN inspector tested positive for explosives
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Iran alleged Thursday that the U.N. inspector it blocked from a nuclear site last week tested positive for suspected traces of explosive nitrates. The U.N.'s nuclear watchdog, the International Atomic Energy Agency, disputed Iran's claim. The allegation made by Iranian representative Kazem Gharib Abadi came as Iran injected uranium gas into centrifuges at its underground Fordo nuclear complex early Thursday, taking its most-significant step away from its 2015 nuclear deal with world powers.

    Iran alleged Thursday that the U.N. inspector it blocked from a nuclear site last week tested positive for suspected traces of explosive nitrates. The U.N.'s nuclear watchdog, the International Atomic Energy Agency, disputed Iran's claim. The allegation made by Iranian representative Kazem Gharib Abadi came as Iran injected uranium gas into centrifuges at its underground Fordo nuclear complex early Thursday, taking its most-significant step away from its 2015 nuclear deal with world powers.


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  • 70/79   5 Turkey Cooking Tips Will Guarantee You Have the Perfect Bird This Holidays
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    There's no need to wing it at Thanksgiving this year.

    There's no need to wing it at Thanksgiving this year.


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  • 71/79   9 Easy Ways to Make Your Jack-o'-Lanterns Last Longer
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    A little bleach goes a long way.

    A little bleach goes a long way.


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  • 72/79   Is It Time for a Medication Reconciliation?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    More than half of adult Americans regularly take at least one prescription drug, according to a recent Consumer Reports nationally representative survey. And for those who take any medication on ...

    More than half of adult Americans regularly take at least one prescription drug, according to a recent Consumer Reports nationally representative survey. And for those who take any medication on ...


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  • 73/79   Brown-Bag Lunches for Kids With Food Allergies
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...


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  • 74/79   What to Feed Your Family When the Power Goes Out
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...


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  • 75/79   Try These Healthy Snack Ideas for Kids
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...

    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...


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  • 76/79   The 9 Best Jobs for Teachers To Make Some Cash During the Summer Break
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.


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  • 77/79   How to Spot and Avoid Algal Blooms
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...


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Voice Sythesis
The Microsoft SAPI 5 ActiveX object is needed.
In the security option of your browser, you must not disable the initialization of non signed ActiveX controls.
You can install and use any English voice compatible with SAPI 5.
(such as the speech component of Microsoft).
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