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News Slideshows (11/09/2019 15 hours)


  • 1/79   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


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    Press Review


    Willian   Berlin Wall   Tammy Abraham   Dr. Tiffany Anderson   Dion Waiters   Month 1   Championship Saturday   To Be So Lonely   Dean Kamen   MEET DAY   
  • 2/79   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


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  • 3/79   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


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  • 4/79   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


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  • 5/79   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


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  • 6/79   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


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  • 7/79   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


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  • 8/79   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


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  • 9/79   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


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  • 10/79   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


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  • 11/79   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


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  • 12/79   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


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  • 13/79   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


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  • 14/79   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named.  Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does.  At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


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  • 15/79   PHOTOS: Fluorescent turtle embryo wins forty-fifth annual Nikon Small World Competition

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.


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  • 16/79   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


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  • 17/79   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


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  • 18/79   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


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  • 19/79   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


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  • 20/79   Ukraine foes start troop withdrawal in war-torn east
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The Ukrainian army and Moscow-backed separatists on Saturday launched the last phase of a troop pullback ahead of a high-stakes summit with Russia, the warring sides said.  The long-awaited withdrawal of troops in the conflict-riven Donetsk and Lugansk regions is a precondition for the first face-to-face talks between Russian President Vladimir Putin and his Ukrainian counterpart Volodymyr Zelensky.  The Paris summit, whose date has yet to be confirmed, will be mediated by the leaders of France and Germany.

    The Ukrainian army and Moscow-backed separatists on Saturday launched the last phase of a troop pullback ahead of a high-stakes summit with Russia, the warring sides said. The long-awaited withdrawal of troops in the conflict-riven Donetsk and Lugansk regions is a precondition for the first face-to-face talks between Russian President Vladimir Putin and his Ukrainian counterpart Volodymyr Zelensky. The Paris summit, whose date has yet to be confirmed, will be mediated by the leaders of France and Germany.


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  • 21/79   Is There An Opportunity With Ciena Corporation's (NYSE:CIEN) 20% Undervaluation?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today we will run through one way of estimating the intrinsic value of Ciena Corporation (NYSE:CIEN) by estimating the...

    Today we will run through one way of estimating the intrinsic value of Ciena Corporation (NYSE:CIEN) by estimating the...


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  • 22/79   Do Institutions Own Shares In Cadence Design Systems, Inc. (NASDAQ:CDNS)?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The big shareholder groups in Cadence Design Systems, Inc. (NASDAQ:CDNS) have power over the company. Institutions...

    The big shareholder groups in Cadence Design Systems, Inc. (NASDAQ:CDNS) have power over the company. Institutions...


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  • 23/79   Why Ceridian HCM Holding Inc.’s (NYSE:CDAY) Return On Capital Employed Might Be A Concern
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today we'll evaluate Ceridian HCM Holding Inc. (NYSE:CDAY) to determine whether it could have potential as an...

    Today we'll evaluate Ceridian HCM Holding Inc. (NYSE:CDAY) to determine whether it could have potential as an...


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  • 24/79   Bolsonaro asks Brazilians 'not to give ammunition' to freed Lula
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Brasília (AFP) - Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro asked his supporters Saturday 'not to give ammunition to the scoundrel,' the day after popular leftist leader Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva walked free from jail.  Breaking his silence on the release of his arch-nemesis, Bolsonaro told his Twitter followers: 'Lovers of freedom and good, we are a majority.  Lula's dramatic exit from jail in the southern city of Curitiba on Friday came a day after a controversial Supreme Court ruling that could release thousands of convicts and undermine a sprawling corruption investigation called Car Wash.

    Brasília (AFP) - Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro asked his supporters Saturday 'not to give ammunition to the scoundrel,' the day after popular leftist leader Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva walked free from jail. Breaking his silence on the release of his arch-nemesis, Bolsonaro told his Twitter followers: 'Lovers of freedom and good, we are a majority. Lula's dramatic exit from jail in the southern city of Curitiba on Friday came a day after a controversial Supreme Court ruling that could release thousands of convicts and undermine a sprawling corruption investigation called Car Wash.


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  • 25/79   Is Chubb Limited's (NYSE:CB) CEO Salary Justified?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Evan Greenberg became the CEO of Chubb Limited (NYSE:CB) in 2004. This report will, first, examine the CEO...

    Evan Greenberg became the CEO of Chubb Limited (NYSE:CB) in 2004. This report will, first, examine the CEO...


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  • 26/79   The Independent Director of FLIR Systems, Inc. (NASDAQ:FLIR), Catherine Halligan, Just Sold 37% Of Their Holding
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Anyone interested in FLIR Systems, Inc. (NASDAQ:FLIR) should probably be aware that the Independent Director...

    Anyone interested in FLIR Systems, Inc. (NASDAQ:FLIR) should probably be aware that the Independent Director...


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  • 27/79   Have Insiders Been Buying CAI International, Inc. (NYSE:CAI) Shares?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    We've lost count of how many times insiders have accumulated shares in a company that goes on to improve markedly. On...

    We've lost count of how many times insiders have accumulated shares in a company that goes on to improve markedly. On...


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  • 28/79   What Kind Of Investor Owns Most Of Business First Bancshares, Inc. (NASDAQ:BFST)?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    If you want to know who really controls Business First Bancshares, Inc. (NASDAQ:BFST), then you'll have to look at the...

    If you want to know who really controls Business First Bancshares, Inc. (NASDAQ:BFST), then you'll have to look at the...


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  • 29/79   Do Institutions Own Bank First Corporation (NASDAQ:BFC) Shares?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    A look at the shareholders of Bank First Corporation (NASDAQ:BFC) can tell us which group is most powerful...

    A look at the shareholders of Bank First Corporation (NASDAQ:BFC) can tell us which group is most powerful...


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  • 30/79   Trade Alert: The Chairman Of Emclaire Financial Corp (NASDAQ:EMCF), William Marsh, Has Just Spent US$116k Buying Shares
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Investors who take an interest in Emclaire Financial Corp (NASDAQ:EMCF) should definitely note that the Chairman...

    Investors who take an interest in Emclaire Financial Corp (NASDAQ:EMCF) should definitely note that the Chairman...


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  • 31/79   Should You Be Concerned About Bed Bath & Beyond Inc.'s (NASDAQ:BBBY) Historical Volatility?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    If you own shares in Bed Bath & Beyond Inc. (NASDAQ:BBBY) then it's worth thinking about how it contributes to the...

    If you own shares in Bed Bath & Beyond Inc. (NASDAQ:BBBY) then it's worth thinking about how it contributes to the...


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  • 32/79   Have Insiders Been Selling Acuity Brands, Inc. (NYSE:AYI) Shares?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    It is not uncommon to see companies perform well in the years after insiders buy shares. On the other hand, we'd be...

    It is not uncommon to see companies perform well in the years after insiders buy shares. On the other hand, we'd be...


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  • 33/79   This Insider Has Just Sold Shares In Dover Corporation (NYSE:DOV)
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    We'd be surprised if Dover Corporation (NYSE:DOV) shareholders haven't noticed that the Independent Director...

    We'd be surprised if Dover Corporation (NYSE:DOV) shareholders haven't noticed that the Independent Director...


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  • 34/79   How Much Did ECN Capital Corp.'s (TSE:ECN) CEO Pocket Last Year?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Steve Hudson became the CEO of ECN Capital Corp. (TSE:ECN) in 2016. This report will, first, examine the CEO...

    Steve Hudson became the CEO of ECN Capital Corp. (TSE:ECN) in 2016. This report will, first, examine the CEO...


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  • 35/79   Introducing AudioCodes (NASDAQ:AUDC), The Stock That Soared 356% In The Last Five Years
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    For many, the main point of investing in the stock market is to achieve spectacular returns. While not every stock...

    For many, the main point of investing in the stock market is to achieve spectacular returns. While not every stock...


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  • 36/79   Do Directors Own Atrion Corporation (NASDAQ:ATRI) Shares?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Every investor in Atrion Corporation (NASDAQ:ATRI) should be aware of the most powerful shareholder groups. Large...

    Every investor in Atrion Corporation (NASDAQ:ATRI) should be aware of the most powerful shareholder groups. Large...


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  • 37/79   Microsoft uses AI to diagnose cervical cancer faster in India
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    This is because the existing methodology that cytopathologists use is time consuming to begin with, but also because there are very few of them in the nation.  At SRL Diagnostics, the largest chain to offer diagnostic services in pathology and radiology in India, we are getting an early look of this.  Last year, Microsoft  partnered with SRL Diagnostics to co-create an AI Network for Pathology to ease the burden of cytopathologists and histopathologists.

    This is because the existing methodology that cytopathologists use is time consuming to begin with, but also because there are very few of them in the nation. At SRL Diagnostics, the largest chain to offer diagnostic services in pathology and radiology in India, we are getting an early look of this. Last year, Microsoft partnered with SRL Diagnostics to co-create an AI Network for Pathology to ease the burden of cytopathologists and histopathologists.


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  • 38/79   DoorDash Won Food Delivery by Seizing the Suburbs and $2 Billion
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- There aren’t many jobs in Davidson, North Carolina, that offer the flexibility and decent pay that Alfonso Auz was looking for. He tried a bunch of gigs, including driving for Uber, before eventually settling on DoorDash Inc. Auz, 47, usually makes at least $150 a day delivering food from restaurants in his hometown, without having to commute to the nearest job center, Charlotte, 40 minutes away. “I usually turn on the app while I’m still at home,” Auz said.Towns like Davidson are at the center of a strategy that secured DoorDash a firm position atop the U.S. food delivery market, said Tony Xu, DoorDash’s chief executive officer. The suburbs, he said, were underestimated by competitors, giving DoorDash the opportunity to forge nationwide exclusivity deals with the likes of the Cheesecake Factory and Chili’s. “While our competitors focus on the cities, we focused on the suburbs,” said Xu. “That’s how we were able to become the market leader.”The other part of the strategy, according to analysts, rival businesses and venture capitalists, involves a war chest of about $2 billion. That’s how much DoorDash has received from investors in the six years since the business was established, and almost two-thirds of it came in the last 18 months. SoftBank Group Corp., the Japanese conglomerate whose investments have reshaped Silicon Valley, took an interest in DoorDash last year and helped lift the valuation of the unprofitable company to $12.6 billion this past May. Other backers include Sequoia Capital and Singaporean government investment funds.Today, DoorDash is the prime example of SoftBank’s investing philosophy seeming to work as intended. Behind SoftBank’s $100 billion tech fund is the idea that an ample supply of money can propel a company to the top of a market. DoorDash accounts for 35% of online food delivery sales in the U.S., according to Edison Trends, a market research firm. DoorDash’s rise has come at the expense of the other major delivery apps from Uber Technologies Inc., Grubhub Inc. and Postmates Inc., which have all lost share in the last year. DoorDash is in 4,000 towns, compared with 500 cities for UberEats. “DoorDash came out of nowhere,” said Hetal Pandya, an analyst at Edison Trends.Critics say DoorDash followed the SoftBank model down a destructive path of growth at all costs and a backward business model that doesn’t account for profit. DoorDash may find itself unpalatable to public market investors, who have largely turned against big unprofitable stocks. The company has been eyeing an initial public offering next year. “We believe we have the right unit economics to enable us to build a sustainable and profitable business,” said a spokeswoman for DoorDash.DoorDash’s spending has impacted competitors. Grubhub shares fell 42% last week in their biggest one-day drop ever, after the company gave a dismal forecast and published an unusual, 10-page manifesto signed by the CEO and financial chief. In it, they throw shade at competitors, saying Grubhub is the only profitable food delivery business. A week later, Uber reported fewer-than-expected food delivery orders in an otherwise favorable quarter. The stock fell to an all-time low the next day.Fast food restaurants aren’t faring much better. Delivery apps charge restaurants fees, sometimes as much as 30% of sales, which cut into profit margins. That has pushed larger chains to negotiate lower fees in exchange for exclusive agreements, as Shake Shack Inc. did with Grubhub. However, going with the third-place app contributed to an underwhelming quarter and reduced sales targets for the burger chain, whose stock dipped 21% Tuesday. The old-fashioned way of hiring drivers isn’t a reliable option, either. The CEO of Papa John’s International Inc. said Wednesday that a shortage of drivers is forcing the pizza company to work with the app providers.Just a few years ago, DoorDash was struggling to find investors and agreed to cut its share price to raise capital. By late last year, annual sales had tripled. But questions remain about how sustainable the business is. Over the summer, a DoorDash investor prepared an informal presentation arguing the merits of a sale of the company to Uber, according to a copy of the document obtained by Bloomberg.Uber, which also counts SoftBank as its largest shareholder, is sitting on $12.7 billion in cash, and its CEO, Dara Khosrowshahi, told analysts on a conference call this week that the company is open to acquisitions in food delivery. However, Khosrowshahi has also committed to cut spending in service of turning a profit by 2021. Representatives for the companies declined to comment on the prospect of a merger. Mike Walsh, an early Uber investor, said DoorDash is probably too big for Uber to swallow.Instead, DoorDash made a purchase of its own. The company spent $410 million in August for Caviar, a food delivery app owned by Square Inc. “We have a lot of money in the bank,” said Xu, the DoorDash CEO. “We are in no rush to spend it all.”Geographic comprehensiveness comes at no small expense to DoorDash, but it’s what draws many restaurant operators to the app. About 80% of Chili’s locations are in the suburbs, and DoorDash is helping bring in customers who may not otherwise eat there, said Steve Provost, the chief concept officer for Chili’s parent company Brinker International Inc. “The idea of non-pizza delivery in the suburbs is a relatively new phenomenon,” he said.DoorDash’s sprawl throughout American suburbia hasn’t hurt its position in major cities, though. Holly Richards, a 29-year-old executive assistant in San Francisco, said she prefers DoorDash because of its competitive prices, wide selection and, most importantly, its generous refund policy. UberEats would only give her a 20% off coupon when she complained that her Indian dumplings arrived cold, Richards said: “DoorDash is the only company that has offered me a full refund for food that did not arrive in a timely matter.”\--With assistance from Leslie Patton and Lizette Chapman.To contact the author of this story: Candy Cheng in San Francisco at ccheng86@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Mark Milian at mmilian@bloomberg.net, Anne VanderMeyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- There aren’t many jobs in Davidson, North Carolina, that offer the flexibility and decent pay that Alfonso Auz was looking for. He tried a bunch of gigs, including driving for Uber, before eventually settling on DoorDash Inc. Auz, 47, usually makes at least $150 a day delivering food from restaurants in his hometown, without having to commute to the nearest job center, Charlotte, 40 minutes away. “I usually turn on the app while I’m still at home,” Auz said.Towns like Davidson are at the center of a strategy that secured DoorDash a firm position atop the U.S. food delivery market, said Tony Xu, DoorDash’s chief executive officer. The suburbs, he said, were underestimated by competitors, giving DoorDash the opportunity to forge nationwide exclusivity deals with the likes of the Cheesecake Factory and Chili’s. “While our competitors focus on the cities, we focused on the suburbs,” said Xu. “That’s how we were able to become the market leader.”The other part of the strategy, according to analysts, rival businesses and venture capitalists, involves a war chest of about $2 billion. That’s how much DoorDash has received from investors in the six years since the business was established, and almost two-thirds of it came in the last 18 months. SoftBank Group Corp., the Japanese conglomerate whose investments have reshaped Silicon Valley, took an interest in DoorDash last year and helped lift the valuation of the unprofitable company to $12.6 billion this past May. Other backers include Sequoia Capital and Singaporean government investment funds.Today, DoorDash is the prime example of SoftBank’s investing philosophy seeming to work as intended. Behind SoftBank’s $100 billion tech fund is the idea that an ample supply of money can propel a company to the top of a market. DoorDash accounts for 35% of online food delivery sales in the U.S., according to Edison Trends, a market research firm. DoorDash’s rise has come at the expense of the other major delivery apps from Uber Technologies Inc., Grubhub Inc. and Postmates Inc., which have all lost share in the last year. DoorDash is in 4,000 towns, compared with 500 cities for UberEats. “DoorDash came out of nowhere,” said Hetal Pandya, an analyst at Edison Trends.Critics say DoorDash followed the SoftBank model down a destructive path of growth at all costs and a backward business model that doesn’t account for profit. DoorDash may find itself unpalatable to public market investors, who have largely turned against big unprofitable stocks. The company has been eyeing an initial public offering next year. “We believe we have the right unit economics to enable us to build a sustainable and profitable business,” said a spokeswoman for DoorDash.DoorDash’s spending has impacted competitors. Grubhub shares fell 42% last week in their biggest one-day drop ever, after the company gave a dismal forecast and published an unusual, 10-page manifesto signed by the CEO and financial chief. In it, they throw shade at competitors, saying Grubhub is the only profitable food delivery business. A week later, Uber reported fewer-than-expected food delivery orders in an otherwise favorable quarter. The stock fell to an all-time low the next day.Fast food restaurants aren’t faring much better. Delivery apps charge restaurants fees, sometimes as much as 30% of sales, which cut into profit margins. That has pushed larger chains to negotiate lower fees in exchange for exclusive agreements, as Shake Shack Inc. did with Grubhub. However, going with the third-place app contributed to an underwhelming quarter and reduced sales targets for the burger chain, whose stock dipped 21% Tuesday. The old-fashioned way of hiring drivers isn’t a reliable option, either. The CEO of Papa John’s International Inc. said Wednesday that a shortage of drivers is forcing the pizza company to work with the app providers.Just a few years ago, DoorDash was struggling to find investors and agreed to cut its share price to raise capital. By late last year, annual sales had tripled. But questions remain about how sustainable the business is. Over the summer, a DoorDash investor prepared an informal presentation arguing the merits of a sale of the company to Uber, according to a copy of the document obtained by Bloomberg.Uber, which also counts SoftBank as its largest shareholder, is sitting on $12.7 billion in cash, and its CEO, Dara Khosrowshahi, told analysts on a conference call this week that the company is open to acquisitions in food delivery. However, Khosrowshahi has also committed to cut spending in service of turning a profit by 2021. Representatives for the companies declined to comment on the prospect of a merger. Mike Walsh, an early Uber investor, said DoorDash is probably too big for Uber to swallow.Instead, DoorDash made a purchase of its own. The company spent $410 million in August for Caviar, a food delivery app owned by Square Inc. “We have a lot of money in the bank,” said Xu, the DoorDash CEO. “We are in no rush to spend it all.”Geographic comprehensiveness comes at no small expense to DoorDash, but it’s what draws many restaurant operators to the app. About 80% of Chili’s locations are in the suburbs, and DoorDash is helping bring in customers who may not otherwise eat there, said Steve Provost, the chief concept officer for Chili’s parent company Brinker International Inc. “The idea of non-pizza delivery in the suburbs is a relatively new phenomenon,” he said.DoorDash’s sprawl throughout American suburbia hasn’t hurt its position in major cities, though. Holly Richards, a 29-year-old executive assistant in San Francisco, said she prefers DoorDash because of its competitive prices, wide selection and, most importantly, its generous refund policy. UberEats would only give her a 20% off coupon when she complained that her Indian dumplings arrived cold, Richards said: “DoorDash is the only company that has offered me a full refund for food that did not arrive in a timely matter.”\--With assistance from Leslie Patton and Lizette Chapman.To contact the author of this story: Candy Cheng in San Francisco at ccheng86@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Mark Milian at mmilian@bloomberg.net, Anne VanderMeyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 39/79   Aspen Group, Inc.'s (NASDAQ:ASPU) Path To Profitability
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Aspen Group, Inc.'s (NASDAQ:ASPU): Aspen Group, Inc. provides online higher education services in the United States...

    Aspen Group, Inc.'s (NASDAQ:ASPU): Aspen Group, Inc. provides online higher education services in the United States...


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  • 40/79   No coalition troops hurt in rocket attack at Iraq base
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A barrage of Katyusha rockets targeted an Iraqi air base that houses American troops south of the city of Mosul on Friday, officials said.  The rocket fire appears to have originated in Mosul and struck the Iraqi army base in Qayyara, about 60 kilometers (38 miles) south of Mosul, where coalition forces are helping the Iraqis battle remnants of the Islamic State group, Iraqi security officials said.  Iraqi officials did not immediately say whether there were any casualties, though a coalition spokeswoman later said no coalition troops had been injured.

    A barrage of Katyusha rockets targeted an Iraqi air base that houses American troops south of the city of Mosul on Friday, officials said. The rocket fire appears to have originated in Mosul and struck the Iraqi army base in Qayyara, about 60 kilometers (38 miles) south of Mosul, where coalition forces are helping the Iraqis battle remnants of the Islamic State group, Iraqi security officials said. Iraqi officials did not immediately say whether there were any casualties, though a coalition spokeswoman later said no coalition troops had been injured.


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  • 41/79   Researchers didn't think humans attacked woolly mammoths – until they uncovered a trap in Mexico
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Woolly mammoth bones found in Mexico prove that hunters actually attacked the mammal, instead of waiting for them to die

    Woolly mammoth bones found in Mexico prove that hunters actually attacked the mammal, instead of waiting for them to die


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  • 42/79   The Vietnamese victims of UK truck tragedy
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    British police on Friday confirmed the names of the 39 victims, who are all Vietnamese nationals, found dead in a refrigerated truck in southeast England last month.  After Tiep dropped out of high school, he told his family he wanted to work overseas instead of becoming a fisherman in his coastal home province.  On October 21, two days before the truck was found, he wrote to his family asking them to get $13,000 to pay to smugglers for his trip to the UK, the last they heard from him.

    British police on Friday confirmed the names of the 39 victims, who are all Vietnamese nationals, found dead in a refrigerated truck in southeast England last month. After Tiep dropped out of high school, he told his family he wanted to work overseas instead of becoming a fisherman in his coastal home province. On October 21, two days before the truck was found, he wrote to his family asking them to get $13,000 to pay to smugglers for his trip to the UK, the last they heard from him.


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  • 43/79   Retired Detective Murdered His Wife to ‘Enjoy’ Retirement With New Lover: Prosecutors
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    APU GOMES/GettyA retired Massachusetts detective fatally shot his wife—then staged her murder as a suicide—so he could be with another woman and keep his pension all for himself, prosecutors alleged in court Thursday. Brian Fanion, a 55-year-old former Westfield Police detective, pleaded not guilty in Hampden Superior Court Thursday morning to a first-degree murder charge in connection with the May 2018 death of his wife, Amy. Authorities at the time ruled the 51-year-old’s shooting death a suicide. Prosecutors alleged Fanion, who joined the force in 1985 and worked as an evidence room detective, was having an affair with another woman at the time of his retirement last year and was desperate to avoid “splitting” his future pension with Amy. “There was only one way to enjoy his retirement and his new love affair and that was to murder his wife,” Assistant District Attorney Mary Sandstrom said in court.Cops: NYPD Officer Ordered Hit on Estranged Husband, Boyfriend’s KidThe intimate affair began last March, prosecutors alleged, which prompted Fanion to look into what effect divorcing his wife of 35 years and living with his new girlfriend would have on his pension. Fanion’s defense attorneys dismissed the affair in court Thursday and argued Amy had long struggled with severe anxiety. “He did have a female friend, it was a non-sexual relationship, they communicated primarily by text message,” defense attorney Jeffrey Brown said in court Thursday, claiming that the friend was also close to Amy. On May 2, 2018, Fanion was allegedly home on a lunch break when he and his wife got into an argument about “retirement plans.” Dispatchers arrived to the Fanion house a little after noon, prosecutors said, after receiving reports of a shooting and found the former detective “standing beside his wife” inside their dining room and “holding her hands.”Authorities said the 51-year-old sustained a fatal gunshot wound to the right side of her head—which prosecutors said is not consistent with being self inflicted. They say the wound is from a gun held about 18 inches away from her head. Mother, Daughter Killed Pregnant Teen With Cable and Ripped Baby From Womb: Police“She had no suicidal ideations, no issue of self harm. This was a woman who was happy, who expressed her love for Brian Fanion, who wanted to continue living,” Sandstrom said. “This was a woman who was not depressed, had no mental health disorder and very much someone who was not suicidal or prepared to take her own life.”Fanion admitted to police he brought home his department-issued handgun that day, despite his wife’s anxiety over firearms. He initially told authorities that while he was in the bathroom, he “heard a gunshot” and came out to “find his wife on the floor,” prosecutors said. “While on the scene, that story changed, and he said that he was inside the bathroom and when he went outside the bathroom he saw his wife put the gun up to her head and discharge the bullet,” Sandstrom said in court while Fanion stood a few feet away, frowning and rocking slightly back and forth. Prosecutors also cited several internet searches on Fanion’s computer at the Westfield Police Department that pointed to his alleged involvement, including his attempts to look up information on the effects of divorces on pensions, gunshot residue, and household poisons people can easily overdose on.“Mere hours before the murder he was looking for apartments and places to stay,” Sandstrom said. “This was a murder in planning for quite some time.”Convicted Killer Now Charged in Estranged Wife’s Cold-Case Murder: ProsecutorsDefense attorney Jeffrey Brown slammed the prosecution’s allegations, claiming that Amy Fanion had long struggled with anxiety and depression, and was somebody “not without her demons”—which she chronicled daily in a diary. Brown also noted that she’d stopped taking several medications before her death. “Her diary is replete with issues she was having and seeking God’s help to get her through these issues,” Brown said, stating that prosecutors are “not interested in the truth here.”Brown also read a statement from the 51-year-old’s immediate and extended family expressing their support for the former detective, who joined the force at age 15, stating they “unequivocally” believe Amy’s death was self-inflicted. Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

    APU GOMES/GettyA retired Massachusetts detective fatally shot his wife—then staged her murder as a suicide—so he could be with another woman and keep his pension all for himself, prosecutors alleged in court Thursday. Brian Fanion, a 55-year-old former Westfield Police detective, pleaded not guilty in Hampden Superior Court Thursday morning to a first-degree murder charge in connection with the May 2018 death of his wife, Amy. Authorities at the time ruled the 51-year-old’s shooting death a suicide. Prosecutors alleged Fanion, who joined the force in 1985 and worked as an evidence room detective, was having an affair with another woman at the time of his retirement last year and was desperate to avoid “splitting” his future pension with Amy. “There was only one way to enjoy his retirement and his new love affair and that was to murder his wife,” Assistant District Attorney Mary Sandstrom said in court.Cops: NYPD Officer Ordered Hit on Estranged Husband, Boyfriend’s KidThe intimate affair began last March, prosecutors alleged, which prompted Fanion to look into what effect divorcing his wife of 35 years and living with his new girlfriend would have on his pension. Fanion’s defense attorneys dismissed the affair in court Thursday and argued Amy had long struggled with severe anxiety. “He did have a female friend, it was a non-sexual relationship, they communicated primarily by text message,” defense attorney Jeffrey Brown said in court Thursday, claiming that the friend was also close to Amy. On May 2, 2018, Fanion was allegedly home on a lunch break when he and his wife got into an argument about “retirement plans.” Dispatchers arrived to the Fanion house a little after noon, prosecutors said, after receiving reports of a shooting and found the former detective “standing beside his wife” inside their dining room and “holding her hands.”Authorities said the 51-year-old sustained a fatal gunshot wound to the right side of her head—which prosecutors said is not consistent with being self inflicted. They say the wound is from a gun held about 18 inches away from her head. Mother, Daughter Killed Pregnant Teen With Cable and Ripped Baby From Womb: Police“She had no suicidal ideations, no issue of self harm. This was a woman who was happy, who expressed her love for Brian Fanion, who wanted to continue living,” Sandstrom said. “This was a woman who was not depressed, had no mental health disorder and very much someone who was not suicidal or prepared to take her own life.”Fanion admitted to police he brought home his department-issued handgun that day, despite his wife’s anxiety over firearms. He initially told authorities that while he was in the bathroom, he “heard a gunshot” and came out to “find his wife on the floor,” prosecutors said. “While on the scene, that story changed, and he said that he was inside the bathroom and when he went outside the bathroom he saw his wife put the gun up to her head and discharge the bullet,” Sandstrom said in court while Fanion stood a few feet away, frowning and rocking slightly back and forth. Prosecutors also cited several internet searches on Fanion’s computer at the Westfield Police Department that pointed to his alleged involvement, including his attempts to look up information on the effects of divorces on pensions, gunshot residue, and household poisons people can easily overdose on.“Mere hours before the murder he was looking for apartments and places to stay,” Sandstrom said. “This was a murder in planning for quite some time.”Convicted Killer Now Charged in Estranged Wife’s Cold-Case Murder: ProsecutorsDefense attorney Jeffrey Brown slammed the prosecution’s allegations, claiming that Amy Fanion had long struggled with anxiety and depression, and was somebody “not without her demons”—which she chronicled daily in a diary. Brown also noted that she’d stopped taking several medications before her death. “Her diary is replete with issues she was having and seeking God’s help to get her through these issues,” Brown said, stating that prosecutors are “not interested in the truth here.”Brown also read a statement from the 51-year-old’s immediate and extended family expressing their support for the former detective, who joined the force at age 15, stating they “unequivocally” believe Amy’s death was self-inflicted. Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


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  • 44/79   Iran says case open on ex-FBI agent missing there on CIA job
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Iran is acknowledging for the first time it has an open case before its Revolutionary Court over the 2007 disappearance of a former FBI agent on an unauthorized CIA mission to the country, renewing questions over what happened to him.  In a filing to the United Nations, Iran said the case over Robert Levinson was 'on going,' without elaborating.

    Iran is acknowledging for the first time it has an open case before its Revolutionary Court over the 2007 disappearance of a former FBI agent on an unauthorized CIA mission to the country, renewing questions over what happened to him. In a filing to the United Nations, Iran said the case over Robert Levinson was 'on going,' without elaborating.


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  • 45/79   Judge stays 'Texas 7' gang member execution for second time
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A federal judge on Thursday stayed the execution of a "Texas 7" gang member who was convicted in the killing of a police officer because the state has refused to provide him with a Buddhist chaplain in the death chamber.

    A federal judge on Thursday stayed the execution of a "Texas 7" gang member who was convicted in the killing of a police officer because the state has refused to provide him with a Buddhist chaplain in the death chamber.


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  • 46/79   How Trump's Visit to an Alabama Football Game Caused Controversy Before He Even Arrived
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Students at the University of Alabama were warned not to be "disruptive" while Trump attends the Alabama-LSU game.

    Students at the University of Alabama were warned not to be "disruptive" while Trump attends the Alabama-LSU game.


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  • 47/79   Bolivia: Protesters cut off mayor’s hair, cover her in red paint and drag her through the streets
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Anti-government protesters have reportedly attacked a mayor from a small Bolivian town, covering her in red paint and cutting her hair.Patricia Arce, a member of the ruling Mas party, was dragged barefoot through the streets by demonstrators before being taken away by the police.

    Anti-government protesters have reportedly attacked a mayor from a small Bolivian town, covering her in red paint and cutting her hair.Patricia Arce, a member of the ruling Mas party, was dragged barefoot through the streets by demonstrators before being taken away by the police.


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  • 48/79   1000-HP Dodge Challenger Was Stolen and Crashed but Still Made It to SEMA
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Not even a police chase could stop this Challenger from making it to the show.

    Not even a police chase could stop this Challenger from making it to the show.


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  • 49/79   Ukraine, Russian-backed rebels begin Donbass village withdrawal
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Ukrainian government forces and Russian-backed rebels began withdrawing from a village in the disputed Donbass region on Saturday, one of a series of measures that could pave the way for a summit between Ukraine, Russia, France and Germany.  Fighting between Ukrainian forces and Russian-backed fighters in the eastern region has killed more than 13,000 since 2014, with both sides accusing each other of violating a ceasefire that was agreed in the Belarus capital Minsk in 2015.  Relations between Ukraine and Russia collapsed following Moscow's annexation of the Crimean peninsula in 2014, which prompted Western sanctions.

    Ukrainian government forces and Russian-backed rebels began withdrawing from a village in the disputed Donbass region on Saturday, one of a series of measures that could pave the way for a summit between Ukraine, Russia, France and Germany. Fighting between Ukrainian forces and Russian-backed fighters in the eastern region has killed more than 13,000 since 2014, with both sides accusing each other of violating a ceasefire that was agreed in the Belarus capital Minsk in 2015. Relations between Ukraine and Russia collapsed following Moscow's annexation of the Crimean peninsula in 2014, which prompted Western sanctions.


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  • 50/79   Mercury putting on rare show Monday, parading across the sun
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Mercury is putting on a rare celestial show next week, parading across the sun in view of most of the world.  The solar system's smallest, innermost planet will resemble a tiny black dot Monday as it passes directly between Earth and the sun.  The entire 5 ½-hour event will be visible, weather permitting, in the eastern U.S. and Canada, and all Central and South America.

    Mercury is putting on a rare celestial show next week, parading across the sun in view of most of the world. The solar system's smallest, innermost planet will resemble a tiny black dot Monday as it passes directly between Earth and the sun. The entire 5 ½-hour event will be visible, weather permitting, in the eastern U.S. and Canada, and all Central and South America.


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  • 51/79   When the Andromeda galaxy crashes into the Milky Way, this is what it could look like from Earth
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The Milky Way is on track to collide with the Andromeda galaxy in about 4 billion years. NASA images reveal what the night sky might look like.

    The Milky Way is on track to collide with the Andromeda galaxy in about 4 billion years. NASA images reveal what the night sky might look like.


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  • 52/79   Mammoth bones found in man-made pit reveal tantalizing evidence of hunting behavior
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Anthropologists in Mexico say they’ve uncovered more than 800 bones from 14 mammoths, in two human-made traps north of Mexico City, which are thought to be 15,000 years old.  The pits -- which are 6 feet deep and 25 yards in diameter -- were discovered when the site was excavated to be used as a garbage dump, according to a statement from Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History.  Researchers think that groups of 20 or 30 prehistoric hunters herded the mammoths with torches and branches, attempting to separate one animal from the group and lead it into a trap.

    Anthropologists in Mexico say they’ve uncovered more than 800 bones from 14 mammoths, in two human-made traps north of Mexico City, which are thought to be 15,000 years old. The pits -- which are 6 feet deep and 25 yards in diameter -- were discovered when the site was excavated to be used as a garbage dump, according to a statement from Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History. Researchers think that groups of 20 or 30 prehistoric hunters herded the mammoths with torches and branches, attempting to separate one animal from the group and lead it into a trap.


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  • 53/79   Blue Origin’s New Glenn rocket and Blue Moon lander proposed … as Lego toys
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Which will go into commercial service first: Blue Origin's orbital-class New Glenn rocket and Blue Moon lunar lander, or the Lego toy versions? The answer will depend not only on how much progress Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos' space venture makes on the real things, but on how many people support the Lego Ideas project as well. The 2,670-piece set would include a 1:110 scale version of the two-stage New Glenn and the human-capable variant of the Blue Moon lander, plus extras including a launch tower, rovers and a satellite. The rocket would be about 40 inches high. The whole assemblage… Read More

    Which will go into commercial service first: Blue Origin's orbital-class New Glenn rocket and Blue Moon lunar lander, or the Lego toy versions? The answer will depend not only on how much progress Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos' space venture makes on the real things, but on how many people support the Lego Ideas project as well. The 2,670-piece set would include a 1:110 scale version of the two-stage New Glenn and the human-capable variant of the Blue Moon lander, plus extras including a launch tower, rovers and a satellite. The rocket would be about 40 inches high. The whole assemblage… Read More


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  • 54/79   Watch Mercury move across the sun online — or in the sky, if you’re lucky and careful
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The planets will be aligned on Monday for a rare astronomical event known as the transit of Mercury, and skywatching fans are sure to see it even if the skies are cloudy, thanks to this little thing called the internet. For folks in Western Washington, watching the action online will be the best bet when the tiny black dot of Mercury's disk crosses the sun. Mercury will make its first contact at 4:35 a.m. PT, when the skies will still be dark in Seattle. It'll be another two and a half hours before the sun creeps over the Cascades. By… Read More

    The planets will be aligned on Monday for a rare astronomical event known as the transit of Mercury, and skywatching fans are sure to see it even if the skies are cloudy, thanks to this little thing called the internet. For folks in Western Washington, watching the action online will be the best bet when the tiny black dot of Mercury's disk crosses the sun. Mercury will make its first contact at 4:35 a.m. PT, when the skies will still be dark in Seattle. It'll be another two and a half hours before the sun creeps over the Cascades. By… Read More


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  • 55/79   Officials believe vitamin E oil is playing a pivotal role in the outbreak of vaping-related lung illnesses, after 39 deaths
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Investigators said vitamin E acetate, an ingredient found in canola, soy, and corn oil, appears to be playing a pivotal role in the spate of vaping-related lung illnesses during a call with reporters on Friday.

    Investigators said vitamin E acetate, an ingredient found in canola, soy, and corn oil, appears to be playing a pivotal role in the spate of vaping-related lung illnesses during a call with reporters on Friday.


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  • 56/79   Boeing traces problem with Starliner parachute system to an unsecured pin
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    For want of a pin, the use of a spaceship's parachute was lost. That may be a simplistic way to explain why one of the three parachutes on Boeing's CST-100 Starliner space taxi failed to open. It does, however, serve as a cautionary tale about the one obvious glitch in Monday's pad abort test of the Starliner, a craft that's due to start transporting NASA astronauts to and from the International Space Station next year. Overall, the test was judged a success: The uncrewed Starliner fired the rocket engines on its launch abort system, slowed its descent with the aid… Read More

    For want of a pin, the use of a spaceship's parachute was lost. That may be a simplistic way to explain why one of the three parachutes on Boeing's CST-100 Starliner space taxi failed to open. It does, however, serve as a cautionary tale about the one obvious glitch in Monday's pad abort test of the Starliner, a craft that's due to start transporting NASA astronauts to and from the International Space Station next year. Overall, the test was judged a success: The uncrewed Starliner fired the rocket engines on its launch abort system, slowed its descent with the aid… Read More


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  • 57/79   Photos from space reveal what climate change looks like, from melting Arctic ice to rampant California fires
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Extreme weather events like hurricanes, droughts, and wildfires are linked to climate change. Such phenomena can be seen from space.

    Extreme weather events like hurricanes, droughts, and wildfires are linked to climate change. Such phenomena can be seen from space.


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  • 58/79   NASA cracks open a sample of moon soil that’s been shut away for four decades
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    For the first time in more than 40 years, NASA has opened up a pristine sample of moon dirt and rocks that was collected during the Apollo missions. Scientists hope that a close analysis of the material from a 2-foot-long, nearly 2-inch-wide core sample will help astronauts get ready for a new series of Artemis moon missions in the 2020s. When Apollo's moonwalkers collected samples of lunar soil and rock, also known as regolith, some of those samples were tucked away at NASA's Johnson Space Center with the expectation that analytical tools would improve over the course of the decades… Read More

    For the first time in more than 40 years, NASA has opened up a pristine sample of moon dirt and rocks that was collected during the Apollo missions. Scientists hope that a close analysis of the material from a 2-foot-long, nearly 2-inch-wide core sample will help astronauts get ready for a new series of Artemis moon missions in the 2020s. When Apollo's moonwalkers collected samples of lunar soil and rock, also known as regolith, some of those samples were tucked away at NASA's Johnson Space Center with the expectation that analytical tools would improve over the course of the decades… Read More


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  • 59/79   2019’s Allen Distinguished Investigators will focus on the mysteries of our cells
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The Paul G. Allen Frontiers Group, a division of Seattle's Allen Institute, is making a total of $7.5 million in awards to its latest class of five biomedical researchers. The themes for this year's Allen Distinguished Investigators focus on stem cell therapies and single-cell interactions in their native environments. “The field of stem cell biology has the potential to change how we treat diseases by helping precision medicine, and there’s so much we still don’t understand about the interplay between cells in living tissues or organs,” Kathy Richmond, director of the Frontiers Group, said today in a news release. "Our… Read More

    The Paul G. Allen Frontiers Group, a division of Seattle's Allen Institute, is making a total of $7.5 million in awards to its latest class of five biomedical researchers. The themes for this year's Allen Distinguished Investigators focus on stem cell therapies and single-cell interactions in their native environments. “The field of stem cell biology has the potential to change how we treat diseases by helping precision medicine, and there’s so much we still don’t understand about the interplay between cells in living tissues or organs,” Kathy Richmond, director of the Frontiers Group, said today in a news release. "Our… Read More


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  • 60/79   Iraqi forces capture major Baghdad bridges from protesters
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Iraqi security forces cleared three flashpoint bridges in Baghdad of anti-government protesters on Saturday, using stun grenades and tear gas amid heavy clashes, while three more protesters were killed in the southern city of Basra overnight.  The demonstrations and a heavy-handed security response have resulted so far in more than 250 deaths.  In the capital, demonstrators were pushed back under clouds of tear gas from the Sinak bridge to the nearby Khilani square, where 35 people were wounded, according to medical officials who spoke on condition of anonymity in line with regulations.

    Iraqi security forces cleared three flashpoint bridges in Baghdad of anti-government protesters on Saturday, using stun grenades and tear gas amid heavy clashes, while three more protesters were killed in the southern city of Basra overnight. The demonstrations and a heavy-handed security response have resulted so far in more than 250 deaths. In the capital, demonstrators were pushed back under clouds of tear gas from the Sinak bridge to the nearby Khilani square, where 35 people were wounded, according to medical officials who spoke on condition of anonymity in line with regulations.


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  • 61/79   Iran says prepared to show footage of inspector incident
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Iran said Saturday it is prepared if necessary to release footage of an incident with a UN nuclear inspector last week that led to it cancelling her accreditation.  US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo accused Iran of 'an outrageous and unwarranted act of intimidation,' while the European Union voiced 'deep concern'.  Iran's Atomic Energy Organisation spokesman Behrouz Kamalvandi said that a check at the entrance gate to the Natanz uranium enrichment plant 'triggered the alarm multiple times, showing (the inspector) was either contaminated with certain materials or had them on her'.

    Iran said Saturday it is prepared if necessary to release footage of an incident with a UN nuclear inspector last week that led to it cancelling her accreditation. US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo accused Iran of 'an outrageous and unwarranted act of intimidation,' while the European Union voiced 'deep concern'. Iran's Atomic Energy Organisation spokesman Behrouz Kamalvandi said that a check at the entrance gate to the Natanz uranium enrichment plant 'triggered the alarm multiple times, showing (the inspector) was either contaminated with certain materials or had them on her'.


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  • 62/79   Inside Russia’s Shady Seduction Schools, Where Desperate Women Learn How to Lure Rich Men
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    DOCNYCAccording to School of Seduction, working-class women have few options in patriarchal Russia, and all of them involve finding a man. To aid young ladies in that quest, there are seduction schools where they can learn the timeless art of bumping, grinding and butt-wiggling their way into a prospective partner’s heart and pants—in particular, the pocket where he keeps his wallet.Focused on a trio of women navigating this warped and sexist landscape, Alina Rudnitskaya’s documentary (premiering on Nov. 9 at the DOC NYC festival) is an eye-opening snapshot of gender dynamics in modern Russia. Praised by President Vladimir Putin as a place where “a man is a man and a woman is a woman,” it’s a country that instills in its female population the belief that independence is a pathway to ostracization and sorrow, and that marriage and parenthood is the primary means by which happiness can be attained. As a result, there can be no greater aim than to land a man willing to put a literal ring on it—regardless of whether love is also part of the matrimonial package.That’s where the schools of seduction come in. In crowded classrooms, scores of women dressed in underwear and revealing outfits follow the instructions of a middle-aged male teacher who guides them through exercises in which they must bend over a chair in order to receive some rear-end grinding, wiggle their asses in the air, and participate in dance routines where they’re grabbed by the neck and thrashed about, crotch-to-crotch, in a display of intense macho attention (the more violent, the more genuine, apparently). The overarching lesson is clear: self-worth only comes from the interest of a man, and women should use whatever sexual tools they have at their disposal to catch one. With a shamelessness that’s almost as startling as its chauvinism, the program strives to turn women into veritable Venus flytraps.Alex Gibney: How Donald Trump Is Morphing Into Vladimir PutinThe Russian Sleazeball Peddling Girls to BillionairesThe first of Rudnitskaya’s subjects, Lida, isn’t especially gung ho about the shady methods promoted by the School of Seduction. However, stuck living with a mother she can’t stand, and mired in a relationship with a married man, Sergei, who’s initially unwilling to leave his wife for her, she has few alternatives. Lida blames her problems on the fact that she “never had an example of a good family.” Still, TV and radio broadcasts that play intermittently throughout School of Seduction—providing macro context for the micro action at hand—suggest that the root cause of her predicament is the widely disseminated and accepted notion that women aren’t whole unless they’re the subservient half of a marital couple. That concept is backed by the school itself, where Lida nods in agreement as her teacher states that men want women to have brains in a business context but in other things, “no one needs them.”Lida’s subsequent marriage to Sergei and—four years later—dreary housewife existence with a daughter proves the lie that domesticity guarantees bliss. On the contrary, Rudnitskaya’s clear-eyed vérité gaze reveals that, in these circumstances, it just brings about marginalization (once a professional, Lida now cooks and cleans), victimization (she suspects Sergei is cheating on her), and crushing displeasure. Unhappiness similarly plagues Vika, a student trapped in a loveless union with husband Denis, with whom she’s opened a lingerie shop. Vika admits to her therapist that she wants to leave Denis but fears being lonely and scorned by her peers. Meanwhile, she only feels truly alive (and on “fire!”) when partaking in hypersexualized dance classes at the school.Economics play a significant factor in both Lida and Vika’s cases. Aware that they can’t earn as much as their male counterparts, and endlessly told that marriage is the end “goal” (as Vika’s mom outright states to her), Russian women are socially conditioned to feel bad for having independent desires—even though marriage itself, forged out of convenience and necessity more than love, is often a one-way ticket to regret, resentment and despair. Images of Lida’s daughter prancing around in her mother’s high heels underline the inherited corrosiveness of such an ideology, where sexual attractiveness is celebrated above all other qualities, because it’s what allows women to conform to their prescribed (if frequently unrewarding) role as dutiful wives and mothers.School of Seduction most strikingly addresses the consequences of Russia’s misogyny via Diana, a young single mother introduced being chastised by Vika for her schoolgirl outfit and blonde pigtails (which Vika says would, if she wore it, make her “feel like a prostitute”). While that dig may be unduly nasty, there’s some truth to the idea that Diana—and those like her—are intent on selling themselves as sexual objects in direct exchange for financial support. Diana is depicted turning down a boyfriend because he can’t offer her the apartment and money she bluntly claims she requires. And she eventually marries an author who gives her those very things, and yet still fails to satisfy her, as illustrated by her attempt, six years later at a gala ball, to accept a stranger’s offer to take her on vacation sans husband.In late scenes of Diana attending an etiquette school where she dresses in regal gowns and performs a scene from the Nicole Kidman-headlined Grace of Monaco, Rudnitskaya’s film provides a candid view of the brainwashing that’s been perpetrated against these women, all of whom have been led to believe that they can achieve their “fairy tale” by becoming appealing enough to nab a suitor. School of Seduction incisively exposes that idea as a carefully-constructed trap designed to keep them in their place as material “decorations,” striving for emotional fulfillment they can’t possibly attain, and then forced to settle for whatever affection and support they ultimately receive from their less-than-well-suited mates.The fundamental futility of this paradigm is finally expressed by Diana’s son Sascha, who at film’s conclusion tells his mom that, no matter how hard she tries to be cheerily elegant, “your attitude changes” when the camera is off and no one is looking. In Russia, women may be trained to think that securing lifelong joy comes from transforming themselves into sexual temptresses or majestic queens. Yet as School of Seduction illustrates, both reductive guises only lead, in the end, to the same old everyday misery.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

    DOCNYCAccording to School of Seduction, working-class women have few options in patriarchal Russia, and all of them involve finding a man. To aid young ladies in that quest, there are seduction schools where they can learn the timeless art of bumping, grinding and butt-wiggling their way into a prospective partner’s heart and pants—in particular, the pocket where he keeps his wallet.Focused on a trio of women navigating this warped and sexist landscape, Alina Rudnitskaya’s documentary (premiering on Nov. 9 at the DOC NYC festival) is an eye-opening snapshot of gender dynamics in modern Russia. Praised by President Vladimir Putin as a place where “a man is a man and a woman is a woman,” it’s a country that instills in its female population the belief that independence is a pathway to ostracization and sorrow, and that marriage and parenthood is the primary means by which happiness can be attained. As a result, there can be no greater aim than to land a man willing to put a literal ring on it—regardless of whether love is also part of the matrimonial package.That’s where the schools of seduction come in. In crowded classrooms, scores of women dressed in underwear and revealing outfits follow the instructions of a middle-aged male teacher who guides them through exercises in which they must bend over a chair in order to receive some rear-end grinding, wiggle their asses in the air, and participate in dance routines where they’re grabbed by the neck and thrashed about, crotch-to-crotch, in a display of intense macho attention (the more violent, the more genuine, apparently). The overarching lesson is clear: self-worth only comes from the interest of a man, and women should use whatever sexual tools they have at their disposal to catch one. With a shamelessness that’s almost as startling as its chauvinism, the program strives to turn women into veritable Venus flytraps.Alex Gibney: How Donald Trump Is Morphing Into Vladimir PutinThe Russian Sleazeball Peddling Girls to BillionairesThe first of Rudnitskaya’s subjects, Lida, isn’t especially gung ho about the shady methods promoted by the School of Seduction. However, stuck living with a mother she can’t stand, and mired in a relationship with a married man, Sergei, who’s initially unwilling to leave his wife for her, she has few alternatives. Lida blames her problems on the fact that she “never had an example of a good family.” Still, TV and radio broadcasts that play intermittently throughout School of Seduction—providing macro context for the micro action at hand—suggest that the root cause of her predicament is the widely disseminated and accepted notion that women aren’t whole unless they’re the subservient half of a marital couple. That concept is backed by the school itself, where Lida nods in agreement as her teacher states that men want women to have brains in a business context but in other things, “no one needs them.”Lida’s subsequent marriage to Sergei and—four years later—dreary housewife existence with a daughter proves the lie that domesticity guarantees bliss. On the contrary, Rudnitskaya’s clear-eyed vérité gaze reveals that, in these circumstances, it just brings about marginalization (once a professional, Lida now cooks and cleans), victimization (she suspects Sergei is cheating on her), and crushing displeasure. Unhappiness similarly plagues Vika, a student trapped in a loveless union with husband Denis, with whom she’s opened a lingerie shop. Vika admits to her therapist that she wants to leave Denis but fears being lonely and scorned by her peers. Meanwhile, she only feels truly alive (and on “fire!”) when partaking in hypersexualized dance classes at the school.Economics play a significant factor in both Lida and Vika’s cases. Aware that they can’t earn as much as their male counterparts, and endlessly told that marriage is the end “goal” (as Vika’s mom outright states to her), Russian women are socially conditioned to feel bad for having independent desires—even though marriage itself, forged out of convenience and necessity more than love, is often a one-way ticket to regret, resentment and despair. Images of Lida’s daughter prancing around in her mother’s high heels underline the inherited corrosiveness of such an ideology, where sexual attractiveness is celebrated above all other qualities, because it’s what allows women to conform to their prescribed (if frequently unrewarding) role as dutiful wives and mothers.School of Seduction most strikingly addresses the consequences of Russia’s misogyny via Diana, a young single mother introduced being chastised by Vika for her schoolgirl outfit and blonde pigtails (which Vika says would, if she wore it, make her “feel like a prostitute”). While that dig may be unduly nasty, there’s some truth to the idea that Diana—and those like her—are intent on selling themselves as sexual objects in direct exchange for financial support. Diana is depicted turning down a boyfriend because he can’t offer her the apartment and money she bluntly claims she requires. And she eventually marries an author who gives her those very things, and yet still fails to satisfy her, as illustrated by her attempt, six years later at a gala ball, to accept a stranger’s offer to take her on vacation sans husband.In late scenes of Diana attending an etiquette school where she dresses in regal gowns and performs a scene from the Nicole Kidman-headlined Grace of Monaco, Rudnitskaya’s film provides a candid view of the brainwashing that’s been perpetrated against these women, all of whom have been led to believe that they can achieve their “fairy tale” by becoming appealing enough to nab a suitor. School of Seduction incisively exposes that idea as a carefully-constructed trap designed to keep them in their place as material “decorations,” striving for emotional fulfillment they can’t possibly attain, and then forced to settle for whatever affection and support they ultimately receive from their less-than-well-suited mates.The fundamental futility of this paradigm is finally expressed by Diana’s son Sascha, who at film’s conclusion tells his mom that, no matter how hard she tries to be cheerily elegant, “your attitude changes” when the camera is off and no one is looking. In Russia, women may be trained to think that securing lifelong joy comes from transforming themselves into sexual temptresses or majestic queens. Yet as School of Seduction illustrates, both reductive guises only lead, in the end, to the same old everyday misery.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


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  • 63/79   The Night the Cold War World Turned Upside Down
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Gerardy Malie/GettyThe scene was Potsdamer Platz in the heart of divided Berlin at about 5 a.m. on Nov. 12, 1989. On the far side of the Wall that had become the quintessential symbol of Moscow’s brutal domination in Eastern Europe the first hint of dawn was breaking.I’ve always thought I remembered it well, but it’s been a long time.Floodlights had been brought in on the western side, the free side, where U.S. President Ronald Reagan had stood more than two years before and called on the Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev to “tear down this wall.” But it had stood until this moment, and it was covered with the graffiti of anger, of despair, of hope, messages on top of messages. Someone had written “Free Estonia” with a rough outline of that captive Baltic republic. On top of that, someone else had drawn a bold equation: the hammer and sickle = the swastika.The first breaches in the infamous barrier that symbolized so perfectly the Iron Curtain had come a couple of days before, but they were more a matter of gates opening than walls falling. Berlin was still divided, West Berlin was still a sealed-off island of freedom in the heart of oppressive East Germany. But we had heard that the communists were going to open up a passage here in Potsdamer Platz—truly open up the city—so we waited in freezing air that was filled with our vaporizing breaths and expectations and, every so often, a spray of sparkling wine. The top of a small crane appeared on the East German side and we could see men in uniforms attaching it to a segment of the Wall. Sparks flew as acetylene torches burned through the rebar holding the pieces together. The crowd waited, and chanted, and waited.* * *Two and a half days earlier, on Nov. 9, 1989, thanks in part to a fumbled press statement by the spokesman for the East German government, the narrow checkpoints long manned by fearsome guards had suddenly opened up, and the people of the East, trapped for so long, had started flooding through. Grim-faced border guards began to smile. Some ripped the insignia off their uniforms. Was it all ending? Was their long captivity over? People started driving their sputtering East German Trabant cars into the land of BMW and Mercedes. Young men climbed the wall to dominate it and beat it, sometimes pounding it with their fists as if they could break it apart with their bare hands.Prize-winning photographs by my friends, the great photographers David Turnley and Peter Turnley, convey the emotions of those days as well as anything I have ever seen. But nobody knew how long the moment would last. Could the checkpoints close again? Would new guards be brought in to reimpose the Soviet communist order? Whether for good or evil, anything seemed possible. I had arrived late to the party, flying in from Paris on Friday, Nov. 10, but through the weekend, day and night, I did not sleep and neither did the city. For our team of Newsweek magazine reporters and photographers, there was a blur of logistics and filing issues. Media were flooding to the Wall, the major networks built stages in front it, famous anchors were flying in. But by the night of the 11th, with our magazine deadlines past, there was a chance to explore.Under a full moon, with my fellow Newsweek correspondent Karen Breslau as a guide, we walked in the Tiergarten, following the path that the Wall cut through the park. A blind man could have done the same, just listening to the noise of picks and hammers and screwdrivers as people chipped away at the barrier. They were not looking for souvenirs that night, they were looking to break into the prison of East Berlin, to tear it down like a vast Bastille, hammering at the idea of the Wall. But it resisted. It would not give way.We went to Checkpoint Charlie, made famous in countless Cold War spy movies as the entrance for foreigners passing from what was once the American zone into what had remained, essentially, the Russian zone of the city. We just walked through. On the western side, and even on top of the Wall, the mood was riotous, a dance of shadows backlit by the television lights. But in the east there hung in the air, still, a menacing stillness.So much had happened so quickly, and so much was left unresolved.* * *Slightly more than half of the world’s population today was not yet born in November 1989, and even those who were 10 or 15 years old at the time have no idea, really, what the Cold War was like for people on both sides of that great divide. Some of the recent binge fare on television gives an inkling. Chernobyl, about the nuclear disaster in the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic in April 1986, is a devastating and largely accurate picture of the stultifying, ultimately self-destructive qualities of Soviet communism. The Polish film Cold War is a love story set against a more subtle but equally enervating and ominous background. The Americans is full of evocative anachronisms, but The Lives of Others (2006) is a more realistic portrayal of the way the police state of the KGB and the East German Stasi insinuated themselves into every aspect of life and love. Even in the faraway United States, whole generations grew up in a Strangelovian world of nuclear confrontation, an anxious peace based on the idea that humans could stumble into an apocalypse as the governments of the West and of the Soviet Union pursued policies under the rubric MAD, for Mutually Assured Destruction. Berlin was always at the center of it.* * *At the end of World War II, Europe had been divided between the Allied forces coalescing as NATO and the Soviets under Joseph Stalin. Defeated Germany was split between East and West, and Berlin itself partitioned. In the summer of 1948, Stalin imposed a blockade to try to bring the Allied-occupied part of the city to its knees, but the United States responded with a massive airlift that lasted almost a year, before, finally, a secure land corridor was opened. That was the good news. The bad news: later that same summer, the Soviets exploded their first nuclear weapon and the race toward MAD began.Men and women now in their sixties and seventies grew up drilling in schools to survive nuclear attacks by hiding under their desks in the improbable hope that it might help them make it through the first blast, then rushing into well-marked fallout shelters where they were told they might be able to live for weeks or months underground protected from radioactive dust. In fact, the generation now quaintly dubbed “boomers” grew up thinking the entire planet could be blown straight to hell. When the East Germans first started building the Berlin Wall in August 1961 to keep their people from crossing to the West, the sense of crisis, echoing the earlier blockade, was enormous and a huge test for the new U.S. administration of President John F. Kennedy. It came just four months after the abortive Bay of Pigs attempt to overthrow the Soviet-backed regime of Fidel Castro and was part of a succession of aggressive tests by the Soviets that seemed to have the world on the brink of destruction. The omens of apocalypse culminated in the crisis of October 1962 when Kennedy confronted the Russians over nuclear missiles placed in Cuba. Remarkably, the Soviets backed down in public in exchange for certain assurances Kennedy made in private and the world stepped back from assured destruction. But it was not until the summer of 1963 that Kennedy went to West Germany and then to West Berlin. In a kind of victory lap, he declared, “All free men, wherever they may live, are citizens of Berlin, and, therefore, as a free man, I take pride in the words ‘Ich bin ein Berliner.’” I am a Berliner.1989 was 26 years later and mutually assured destruction had given way to gradual efforts at arms control, but the threat remained, and despite the invocation of Reagan (who was consciously trying to build on Kennedy’s speech), the Wall remained.That weekend in November, we did not know for certain if the world of the Cold War was ending, but we could feel it being turned upside down. The Soviet Union’s grip on Europe had been loosening for months, and now the harshest of its satellites seemed to have lost control completely.* * *Through the many years since then, certain images and moments have come back to me often. But I made no pictures and took few notes at the time, thinking foolishly that such an experience would live forever in my memory. But I know too much now about how we remember things to be confident that what has stayed with me as recollection and anecdote has real validity as fact. We imagine history more often than we remember it.Sometimes I wonder how Vladimir Putin, a Soviet KGB officer serving in East Germany at that time, imagines what happened that weekend in November. Everything suggests he has twisted it into a vast plot by nefarious Western governments, and in the 20 years he has ruled the remnants of the Soviet Union, now called the Russian Federation, he has devoted his cunning and intelligence to rebuilding the old empire, reviving the Cold War, challenging successive American administrations until, in the present one, he found a friend and, often, an advocate.None of that could be foreseen in 1989 or even in the first few years that followed, although there were hints. Americans are dangerously careless about the dignity of those they defeat, and so it was with Russia, where some sentiment of revindication and revenge was inevitable. In societies where “free enterprise” had been deemed a crime, as one East European businessman long exiled in the West told me, it was like girls in a strict boarding school suddenly discovering they could kiss a boy and the sky would not fall, so why not go all the way? Democracy was an alien ideal, kleptocracy became the norm.For me, images come back from that full-moon Saturday night traveling through the two sides of Berlin with Karen Breslau as if I were being shown the way from the Inferno to Purgatory. We descended into the U-Bahn, the subway, in hopes we could get back to the West that way, but no luck. We went back to the surface again, and it was getting late, really late–it must have been about four in the morning–but cars were still heading toward some passage to the West. Was it Checkpoint Charlie? I can’t be sure. But what I do remember is that we stuck out our thumbs and we were picked up by two Palestinians who’d been studying in East Germany. Having spent a lot of time in the Middle East, I suspected they were connected to one of the many organizations dubbed terrorist by the U.S. government, but they got us close enough to where we wanted to go, which was Potsdamer Platz.* * *A few days ago I called Karen, who now lives in San Francisco, and whom I had not seen or talked to for many years. On FaceTime we reminisced about that night. And her memories were not mine at all. She recalled the big political developments she was writing about at the time, the invasion of the network anchors, the befuddled guards, the sense of celebration, the cold of that night, but not the Palestinians, not the U-Bahn. OK. She lived in Berlin. What was special to me on a brief visit was not so unique for her. But there was one particular moment that I wanted to confirm, and as I described it there were glimmers of recognition, but the memory wasn’t quite there.The image that had stayed with me was the East German crane on the far side of the Wall fighting to lift out the first segment. It was reinforced concrete 3.6 meters high, almost 12 feet, and L-shaped, and even when the rebars connecting it to the rest of the Wall were severed it had to be rocked back and forth like a tooth fighting extraction before, finally, it broke out, was lifted high, and an East German officer stepped through to shake hands with a West German counterpart.What struck me that night was the graffiti on that particular piece of concrete. The image was too perfect, even though the East Germans working the crane could not have known. But Karen didn’t remember and I wondered if I misremembered.So I did what one does these days and googled videos of Potsdamer Platz on Nov. 12, 1989.They are grainy and lines of static cut across them every so often. The time stamps run beneath, counting the minutes and seconds after 5 a.m., and the images I remember in bold relief, I see, would not have been so clear as I recall them though the fog or my breath and the spray of champagne. But they are there. High in the morning sky, sliced out of the old graffiti context and given a whole new one, floated the broken hammer and sickle, and the word “Free.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

    Gerardy Malie/GettyThe scene was Potsdamer Platz in the heart of divided Berlin at about 5 a.m. on Nov. 12, 1989. On the far side of the Wall that had become the quintessential symbol of Moscow’s brutal domination in Eastern Europe the first hint of dawn was breaking.I’ve always thought I remembered it well, but it’s been a long time.Floodlights had been brought in on the western side, the free side, where U.S. President Ronald Reagan had stood more than two years before and called on the Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev to “tear down this wall.” But it had stood until this moment, and it was covered with the graffiti of anger, of despair, of hope, messages on top of messages. Someone had written “Free Estonia” with a rough outline of that captive Baltic republic. On top of that, someone else had drawn a bold equation: the hammer and sickle = the swastika.The first breaches in the infamous barrier that symbolized so perfectly the Iron Curtain had come a couple of days before, but they were more a matter of gates opening than walls falling. Berlin was still divided, West Berlin was still a sealed-off island of freedom in the heart of oppressive East Germany. But we had heard that the communists were going to open up a passage here in Potsdamer Platz—truly open up the city—so we waited in freezing air that was filled with our vaporizing breaths and expectations and, every so often, a spray of sparkling wine. The top of a small crane appeared on the East German side and we could see men in uniforms attaching it to a segment of the Wall. Sparks flew as acetylene torches burned through the rebar holding the pieces together. The crowd waited, and chanted, and waited.* * *Two and a half days earlier, on Nov. 9, 1989, thanks in part to a fumbled press statement by the spokesman for the East German government, the narrow checkpoints long manned by fearsome guards had suddenly opened up, and the people of the East, trapped for so long, had started flooding through. Grim-faced border guards began to smile. Some ripped the insignia off their uniforms. Was it all ending? Was their long captivity over? People started driving their sputtering East German Trabant cars into the land of BMW and Mercedes. Young men climbed the wall to dominate it and beat it, sometimes pounding it with their fists as if they could break it apart with their bare hands.Prize-winning photographs by my friends, the great photographers David Turnley and Peter Turnley, convey the emotions of those days as well as anything I have ever seen. But nobody knew how long the moment would last. Could the checkpoints close again? Would new guards be brought in to reimpose the Soviet communist order? Whether for good or evil, anything seemed possible. I had arrived late to the party, flying in from Paris on Friday, Nov. 10, but through the weekend, day and night, I did not sleep and neither did the city. For our team of Newsweek magazine reporters and photographers, there was a blur of logistics and filing issues. Media were flooding to the Wall, the major networks built stages in front it, famous anchors were flying in. But by the night of the 11th, with our magazine deadlines past, there was a chance to explore.Under a full moon, with my fellow Newsweek correspondent Karen Breslau as a guide, we walked in the Tiergarten, following the path that the Wall cut through the park. A blind man could have done the same, just listening to the noise of picks and hammers and screwdrivers as people chipped away at the barrier. They were not looking for souvenirs that night, they were looking to break into the prison of East Berlin, to tear it down like a vast Bastille, hammering at the idea of the Wall. But it resisted. It would not give way.We went to Checkpoint Charlie, made famous in countless Cold War spy movies as the entrance for foreigners passing from what was once the American zone into what had remained, essentially, the Russian zone of the city. We just walked through. On the western side, and even on top of the Wall, the mood was riotous, a dance of shadows backlit by the television lights. But in the east there hung in the air, still, a menacing stillness.So much had happened so quickly, and so much was left unresolved.* * *Slightly more than half of the world’s population today was not yet born in November 1989, and even those who were 10 or 15 years old at the time have no idea, really, what the Cold War was like for people on both sides of that great divide. Some of the recent binge fare on television gives an inkling. Chernobyl, about the nuclear disaster in the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic in April 1986, is a devastating and largely accurate picture of the stultifying, ultimately self-destructive qualities of Soviet communism. The Polish film Cold War is a love story set against a more subtle but equally enervating and ominous background. The Americans is full of evocative anachronisms, but The Lives of Others (2006) is a more realistic portrayal of the way the police state of the KGB and the East German Stasi insinuated themselves into every aspect of life and love. Even in the faraway United States, whole generations grew up in a Strangelovian world of nuclear confrontation, an anxious peace based on the idea that humans could stumble into an apocalypse as the governments of the West and of the Soviet Union pursued policies under the rubric MAD, for Mutually Assured Destruction. Berlin was always at the center of it.* * *At the end of World War II, Europe had been divided between the Allied forces coalescing as NATO and the Soviets under Joseph Stalin. Defeated Germany was split between East and West, and Berlin itself partitioned. In the summer of 1948, Stalin imposed a blockade to try to bring the Allied-occupied part of the city to its knees, but the United States responded with a massive airlift that lasted almost a year, before, finally, a secure land corridor was opened. That was the good news. The bad news: later that same summer, the Soviets exploded their first nuclear weapon and the race toward MAD began.Men and women now in their sixties and seventies grew up drilling in schools to survive nuclear attacks by hiding under their desks in the improbable hope that it might help them make it through the first blast, then rushing into well-marked fallout shelters where they were told they might be able to live for weeks or months underground protected from radioactive dust. In fact, the generation now quaintly dubbed “boomers” grew up thinking the entire planet could be blown straight to hell. When the East Germans first started building the Berlin Wall in August 1961 to keep their people from crossing to the West, the sense of crisis, echoing the earlier blockade, was enormous and a huge test for the new U.S. administration of President John F. Kennedy. It came just four months after the abortive Bay of Pigs attempt to overthrow the Soviet-backed regime of Fidel Castro and was part of a succession of aggressive tests by the Soviets that seemed to have the world on the brink of destruction. The omens of apocalypse culminated in the crisis of October 1962 when Kennedy confronted the Russians over nuclear missiles placed in Cuba. Remarkably, the Soviets backed down in public in exchange for certain assurances Kennedy made in private and the world stepped back from assured destruction. But it was not until the summer of 1963 that Kennedy went to West Germany and then to West Berlin. In a kind of victory lap, he declared, “All free men, wherever they may live, are citizens of Berlin, and, therefore, as a free man, I take pride in the words ‘Ich bin ein Berliner.’” I am a Berliner.1989 was 26 years later and mutually assured destruction had given way to gradual efforts at arms control, but the threat remained, and despite the invocation of Reagan (who was consciously trying to build on Kennedy’s speech), the Wall remained.That weekend in November, we did not know for certain if the world of the Cold War was ending, but we could feel it being turned upside down. The Soviet Union’s grip on Europe had been loosening for months, and now the harshest of its satellites seemed to have lost control completely.* * *Through the many years since then, certain images and moments have come back to me often. But I made no pictures and took few notes at the time, thinking foolishly that such an experience would live forever in my memory. But I know too much now about how we remember things to be confident that what has stayed with me as recollection and anecdote has real validity as fact. We imagine history more often than we remember it.Sometimes I wonder how Vladimir Putin, a Soviet KGB officer serving in East Germany at that time, imagines what happened that weekend in November. Everything suggests he has twisted it into a vast plot by nefarious Western governments, and in the 20 years he has ruled the remnants of the Soviet Union, now called the Russian Federation, he has devoted his cunning and intelligence to rebuilding the old empire, reviving the Cold War, challenging successive American administrations until, in the present one, he found a friend and, often, an advocate.None of that could be foreseen in 1989 or even in the first few years that followed, although there were hints. Americans are dangerously careless about the dignity of those they defeat, and so it was with Russia, where some sentiment of revindication and revenge was inevitable. In societies where “free enterprise” had been deemed a crime, as one East European businessman long exiled in the West told me, it was like girls in a strict boarding school suddenly discovering they could kiss a boy and the sky would not fall, so why not go all the way? Democracy was an alien ideal, kleptocracy became the norm.For me, images come back from that full-moon Saturday night traveling through the two sides of Berlin with Karen Breslau as if I were being shown the way from the Inferno to Purgatory. We descended into the U-Bahn, the subway, in hopes we could get back to the West that way, but no luck. We went back to the surface again, and it was getting late, really late–it must have been about four in the morning–but cars were still heading toward some passage to the West. Was it Checkpoint Charlie? I can’t be sure. But what I do remember is that we stuck out our thumbs and we were picked up by two Palestinians who’d been studying in East Germany. Having spent a lot of time in the Middle East, I suspected they were connected to one of the many organizations dubbed terrorist by the U.S. government, but they got us close enough to where we wanted to go, which was Potsdamer Platz.* * *A few days ago I called Karen, who now lives in San Francisco, and whom I had not seen or talked to for many years. On FaceTime we reminisced about that night. And her memories were not mine at all. She recalled the big political developments she was writing about at the time, the invasion of the network anchors, the befuddled guards, the sense of celebration, the cold of that night, but not the Palestinians, not the U-Bahn. OK. She lived in Berlin. What was special to me on a brief visit was not so unique for her. But there was one particular moment that I wanted to confirm, and as I described it there were glimmers of recognition, but the memory wasn’t quite there.The image that had stayed with me was the East German crane on the far side of the Wall fighting to lift out the first segment. It was reinforced concrete 3.6 meters high, almost 12 feet, and L-shaped, and even when the rebars connecting it to the rest of the Wall were severed it had to be rocked back and forth like a tooth fighting extraction before, finally, it broke out, was lifted high, and an East German officer stepped through to shake hands with a West German counterpart.What struck me that night was the graffiti on that particular piece of concrete. The image was too perfect, even though the East Germans working the crane could not have known. But Karen didn’t remember and I wondered if I misremembered.So I did what one does these days and googled videos of Potsdamer Platz on Nov. 12, 1989.They are grainy and lines of static cut across them every so often. The time stamps run beneath, counting the minutes and seconds after 5 a.m., and the images I remember in bold relief, I see, would not have been so clear as I recall them though the fog or my breath and the spray of champagne. But they are there. High in the morning sky, sliced out of the old graffiti context and given a whole new one, floated the broken hammer and sickle, and the word “Free.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


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  • 64/79   Which Political Party Has the Best Track Record for U.K. Stocks?
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Want the lowdown on European markets? In your inbox before the open, every day. Sign up here.The winner of next month’s U.K. election is increasingly hard to predict. Equities watchers may take some comfort in knowing that historically, it hasn’t really made much difference who was in power.The old adage suggests that the Conservative Party is pro-business and better for markets than the left-of-center and, in this election, socialist-leaning Labour Party. Yet taking real returns, adjusted for inflation, for U.K. equities from 1900 to the present day, Kleinwort Hambros found little difference between the two major parties.Conservative governments have held office for a total of 67 years during that period, delivering a 7.6% real return, according to a recent report from the private bank. Labour has had 37 years in power and returned 7.7%. The remaining years had the Liberal Party in office in the early part of the 20th century, and investors would have lost 0.7% in real terms under their tenure.Ultimately, “the basic inference is that it really doesn’t matter,” who is in Downing Street, said Fahad Kamal, chief market strategist at Kleinwort Hambros.Clearly, there are caveats. This period includes two world wars, market crashes and global geopolitical troubles from the Cuban missile crisis to 9/11. And the correlation between the benchmark FTSE 100 and the S&P 500 as well as the MSCI World has been increasing over the years and is now close to the perfect value of 1, signaling that U.K. equities are much more sensitive to global and U.S. market movements than internal political affairs such as Brexit.As Britain prepares to head for the polls, early data gives the Conservatives a clear lead. But because it’s effectively a second referendum on Brexit, foretelling the impact on equity markets could turn into a fool’s game as sentiment shifts during the campaign.“The outcomes here are very messy” and something of a “a dog’s dinner,” said Nathan Thooft, head of global asset allocation at Manulife Investment Management. “Even if you know what the possibilities are, you don’t know what the probabilities are and furthermore, you don’t know what the market interpretation will be because there are so many moving parts.”To contact the reporters on this story: Sam Unsted in London at sunsted@bloomberg.net;Ksenia Galouchko in London at kgalouchko1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Beth Mellor at bmellor@bloomberg.net, Jon Menon, Namitha JagadeeshFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Want the lowdown on European markets? In your inbox before the open, every day. Sign up here.The winner of next month’s U.K. election is increasingly hard to predict. Equities watchers may take some comfort in knowing that historically, it hasn’t really made much difference who was in power.The old adage suggests that the Conservative Party is pro-business and better for markets than the left-of-center and, in this election, socialist-leaning Labour Party. Yet taking real returns, adjusted for inflation, for U.K. equities from 1900 to the present day, Kleinwort Hambros found little difference between the two major parties.Conservative governments have held office for a total of 67 years during that period, delivering a 7.6% real return, according to a recent report from the private bank. Labour has had 37 years in power and returned 7.7%. The remaining years had the Liberal Party in office in the early part of the 20th century, and investors would have lost 0.7% in real terms under their tenure.Ultimately, “the basic inference is that it really doesn’t matter,” who is in Downing Street, said Fahad Kamal, chief market strategist at Kleinwort Hambros.Clearly, there are caveats. This period includes two world wars, market crashes and global geopolitical troubles from the Cuban missile crisis to 9/11. And the correlation between the benchmark FTSE 100 and the S&P 500 as well as the MSCI World has been increasing over the years and is now close to the perfect value of 1, signaling that U.K. equities are much more sensitive to global and U.S. market movements than internal political affairs such as Brexit.As Britain prepares to head for the polls, early data gives the Conservatives a clear lead. But because it’s effectively a second referendum on Brexit, foretelling the impact on equity markets could turn into a fool’s game as sentiment shifts during the campaign.“The outcomes here are very messy” and something of a “a dog’s dinner,” said Nathan Thooft, head of global asset allocation at Manulife Investment Management. “Even if you know what the possibilities are, you don’t know what the probabilities are and furthermore, you don’t know what the market interpretation will be because there are so many moving parts.”To contact the reporters on this story: Sam Unsted in London at sunsted@bloomberg.net;Ksenia Galouchko in London at kgalouchko1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Beth Mellor at bmellor@bloomberg.net, Jon Menon, Namitha JagadeeshFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 65/79   Hopes of young Lebanese to escape sectarianism put to test
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Singer Tania Saleh grew up amid a civil war that robbed her of her childhood, of her friends and neighbors and of the Lebanon she so loved.  Based on a poem written in 1975, the year the war broke out, the lyrics still felt searing and relevant enough for Saleh to add to an album in 2017.  The demonstrators have provided those eager to see the country move past its sectarian legacy with a glimpse of what can be.

    Singer Tania Saleh grew up amid a civil war that robbed her of her childhood, of her friends and neighbors and of the Lebanon she so loved. Based on a poem written in 1975, the year the war broke out, the lyrics still felt searing and relevant enough for Saleh to add to an album in 2017. The demonstrators have provided those eager to see the country move past its sectarian legacy with a glimpse of what can be.


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  • 66/79   Iranian media say injuries jump to 520 in Friday quake
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Iran's state TV is saying the number of injured people from a magnitude 5.9 earthquake on Friday has jumped to 520 from more than 300.  Saturday's report said the updated figure followed the end of rescue operations in more than 80 remote villages Tark county in Iran's Eastern Azerbaijan province, some 400 kilometers (250 miles) northwest of the capital, Tehran.  Iran experiences an earthquake per day on average.

    Iran's state TV is saying the number of injured people from a magnitude 5.9 earthquake on Friday has jumped to 520 from more than 300. Saturday's report said the updated figure followed the end of rescue operations in more than 80 remote villages Tark county in Iran's Eastern Azerbaijan province, some 400 kilometers (250 miles) northwest of the capital, Tehran. Iran experiences an earthquake per day on average.


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  • 67/79   Why Iran's Military Is So Focused on Missiles (Think History and a War with America)
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The increasing number, precision, range, and lethality of Iran's missiles indicate the seriousness of the Iranian government’s determination to strengthen its defensive capabilities as one of the most important pillars of its national security.

    The increasing number, precision, range, and lethality of Iran's missiles indicate the seriousness of the Iranian government’s determination to strengthen its defensive capabilities as one of the most important pillars of its national security.


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  • 68/79   Nikki Haley: ‘There’s Just Nothing Impeachable’ About Trump’s Actions
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Stephanie Keith/GettyAs the impeachment inquiry against him heats up, President Trump appears to have gotten perhaps his most dramatic defense yet from former U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley: According to her, impeachment proceedings are akin to “the death penalty for a public official” and Trump simply doesn’t deserve the death penalty. In excerpts from an interview with CBS News released late Friday, Haley scoffed at the idea that Trump would actually be removed from office.“You're going to impeach a president for asking for a favor that didn't happen and giving money and it wasn't withheld?” Haley told CBS' Norah O'Donnell. “I don't know what you would impeach him on.”The former ambassador, who resigned in late 2018, went on to liken impeachment proceedings to capital punishment.“And look, Norah, impeachment is like the death penalty for a public official. When you look at the transcript, there's nothing in that transcript that warrants the death penalty for the president,” she said, referring to a transcript of the July 25 phone call between Trump and the Ukrainian president that sparked the impeachment inquiry.O'Donnell pushed back, noting that the National Security Council's top Ukraine expert, Alexander Vindman—who listened in on the call—had testified to Congress that the rough transcript of the call released by the White House was not complete.“There's still things that are missing from it,” O'Donnell said.“The Ukrainians never did the investigation, and the president released the funds,” Haley replied. “I mean, when you look at those, there's just nothing impeachable there.”“I think the biggest thing that bothers me is the American people should decide this,” Haley added, apparently taking issue with Congress' constitutional right to impeach a president if deemed appropriate. “Why do we have a bunch of people in Congress making this decision?”The first public hearings of the impeachment inquiry are slated to begin next week—with former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch and two top diplomats, William Taylor and George Kent, expected to testify. The inquiry was sparked by a whistleblower complaint about the July 25 call. The whistleblower raised concerns about Trump leveraging military aid to pressure Ukraine into investigating widely debunked corruption allegations against his potential political rival, former Vice President Joe Biden and his son, along with alleged 2016 election interference by Ukrainians.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

    Stephanie Keith/GettyAs the impeachment inquiry against him heats up, President Trump appears to have gotten perhaps his most dramatic defense yet from former U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley: According to her, impeachment proceedings are akin to “the death penalty for a public official” and Trump simply doesn’t deserve the death penalty. In excerpts from an interview with CBS News released late Friday, Haley scoffed at the idea that Trump would actually be removed from office.“You're going to impeach a president for asking for a favor that didn't happen and giving money and it wasn't withheld?” Haley told CBS' Norah O'Donnell. “I don't know what you would impeach him on.”The former ambassador, who resigned in late 2018, went on to liken impeachment proceedings to capital punishment.“And look, Norah, impeachment is like the death penalty for a public official. When you look at the transcript, there's nothing in that transcript that warrants the death penalty for the president,” she said, referring to a transcript of the July 25 phone call between Trump and the Ukrainian president that sparked the impeachment inquiry.O'Donnell pushed back, noting that the National Security Council's top Ukraine expert, Alexander Vindman—who listened in on the call—had testified to Congress that the rough transcript of the call released by the White House was not complete.“There's still things that are missing from it,” O'Donnell said.“The Ukrainians never did the investigation, and the president released the funds,” Haley replied. “I mean, when you look at those, there's just nothing impeachable there.”“I think the biggest thing that bothers me is the American people should decide this,” Haley added, apparently taking issue with Congress' constitutional right to impeach a president if deemed appropriate. “Why do we have a bunch of people in Congress making this decision?”The first public hearings of the impeachment inquiry are slated to begin next week—with former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch and two top diplomats, William Taylor and George Kent, expected to testify. The inquiry was sparked by a whistleblower complaint about the July 25 call. The whistleblower raised concerns about Trump leveraging military aid to pressure Ukraine into investigating widely debunked corruption allegations against his potential political rival, former Vice President Joe Biden and his son, along with alleged 2016 election interference by Ukrainians.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


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  • 69/79   Pompeo slams Iran 'intimidation' of IAEA inspector as 'outrageous'
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The top US diplomat said Iran 'detained' the inspector, who the International Atomic Energy Agency has said had been briefly prevented from leaving Iran.  Iran said Thursday it had cancelled the inspector's accreditation after she triggered an alarm last week at the entrance to the Natanz uranium enrichment plant.  The alarm during a check at the entrance to the plant in central Iran had raised concerns that she could be carrying a 'suspect product' on her, Iran's Atomic Energy Organization said in a statement posted online.

    The top US diplomat said Iran 'detained' the inspector, who the International Atomic Energy Agency has said had been briefly prevented from leaving Iran. Iran said Thursday it had cancelled the inspector's accreditation after she triggered an alarm last week at the entrance to the Natanz uranium enrichment plant. The alarm during a check at the entrance to the plant in central Iran had raised concerns that she could be carrying a 'suspect product' on her, Iran's Atomic Energy Organization said in a statement posted online.


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  • 70/79   5 Turkey Cooking Tips Will Guarantee You Have the Perfect Bird This Holidays
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    There's no need to wing it at Thanksgiving this year.

    There's no need to wing it at Thanksgiving this year.


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  • 71/79   9 Easy Ways to Make Your Jack-o'-Lanterns Last Longer
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    A little bleach goes a long way.

    A little bleach goes a long way.


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  • 72/79   Is It Time for a Medication Reconciliation?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    More than half of adult Americans regularly take at least one prescription drug, according to a recent Consumer Reports nationally representative survey. And for those who take any medication on ...

    More than half of adult Americans regularly take at least one prescription drug, according to a recent Consumer Reports nationally representative survey. And for those who take any medication on ...


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  • 73/79   Brown-Bag Lunches for Kids With Food Allergies
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...


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  • 74/79   What to Feed Your Family When the Power Goes Out
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...


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  • 75/79   Try These Healthy Snack Ideas for Kids
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...

    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...


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  • 76/79   The 9 Best Jobs for Teachers To Make Some Cash During the Summer Break
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.


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  • 77/79   How to Spot and Avoid Algal Blooms
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...


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  • 78/79   Get These 4 Vaccines for College
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If your child is a college student—or soon to be one—making sure he or she is fully vaccinated is critically important, especially for those who will be living in a dorm or other shared space. Th...

    If your child is a college student—or soon to be one—making sure he or she is fully vaccinated is critically important, especially for those who will be living in a dorm or other shared space. Th...


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  • 79/79   DNA detectives: New tech can mean a diagnosis for your child, but not a lot of answers
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Four-year-old Eli Kadkhoda is one of a handful of children with IRF2BPL-related condition, named after the gene to which it is linked. Its patients are all healthy at birth, stumbling and losing speech by kindergarten, wheelchair-dependent soon after.

    Four-year-old Eli Kadkhoda is one of a handful of children with IRF2BPL-related condition, named after the gene to which it is linked. Its patients are all healthy at birth, stumbling and losing speech by kindergarten, wheelchair-dependent soon after.


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