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News Slideshows (11/29/2019 03 hours)


  • 1/79   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


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    Press Review


    Cowboys   Taysom Hill   Jerry Jones   Bills   NFC East   Ellie Goulding   Maher   Dak Prescott   Eli Apple   Cole Beasley   Stone Cold   America's Team   Afghanistan   Tony Romo   Cowgirls   Ed Oliver   Hulk Hogan   Ridley   Conor   Kris Richard   Tre White   Lattimore   Gage   Dan Bailey   Kellen Moore   Christian Blake   Grady Jarrett   Andre the Giant   No Julio   John Brown   Young Sheldon   Queen Key   Matt Luke   Markus Howard   Jimmy Johnson   
  • 2/79   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


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  • 3/79   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


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  • 4/79   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


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  • 5/79   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


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  • 6/79   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


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  • 7/79   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


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  • 8/79   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


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  • 9/79   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


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  • 10/79   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


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  • 11/79   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


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  • 12/79   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


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  • 13/79   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


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  • 14/79   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named.  Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does.  At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


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  • 15/79   PHOTOS: Fluorescent turtle embryo wins forty-fifth annual Nikon Small World Competition

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.


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  • 16/79   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


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  • 17/79   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


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  • 18/79   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


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  • 19/79   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


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  • 20/79   Zimbabwe facing 'man-made' starvation, UN expert warns
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Zimbabwe is facing 'man-made' starvation with 60 percent of the people failing to meet basic food needs, a UN special envoy said Thursday after touring the southern African country.  Hilal Elver, Special Rapporteur on the right to food, ranked Zimbabwe among the four top countries facing severe food shortages outside nations in conflict zones.  'The people of Zimbabwe are slowly getting to a point of suffering a man-made starvation,' she told a news conference in Harare, adding that eight million people would be affected by the end of the year.

    Zimbabwe is facing 'man-made' starvation with 60 percent of the people failing to meet basic food needs, a UN special envoy said Thursday after touring the southern African country. Hilal Elver, Special Rapporteur on the right to food, ranked Zimbabwe among the four top countries facing severe food shortages outside nations in conflict zones. 'The people of Zimbabwe are slowly getting to a point of suffering a man-made starvation,' she told a news conference in Harare, adding that eight million people would be affected by the end of the year.


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  • 21/79   Stocks Mixed on Last Day of Month; Treasuries Slip: Markets Wrap
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Asia stocks were heading for a mixed end to the month as a retreat in Hong Kong offset muted trading elsewhere in the region. Treasury yields edged higher.Shares were little changed in Tokyo, Shanghai and Sydney, and fell in Hong Kong and Seoul. U.S. futures edged lower and the dollar was steady. American equity and bond markets were shut Thursday for Thanksgiving, while European shares retreated. The won was flat after the Bank of Korea kept its policy rate unchanged, as expected.Investors continue to wait for progress on a U.S.-China trade deal, with the next batch of American tariffs on Chinese goods due to begin Dec. 15. This week, China has said it will retaliate against a U.S. bill in support of Hong Kong protesters, though stopped short of offering any details.“Markets are on a sort of ‘wait and hold’ in terms of that phase-one trade deal,” David Riley, chief investment strategist at BlueBay Asset Management, told Bloomberg TV. “If there is a skinny deal, that will allow markets and risk assets to grind higher even if there is no real prospect of a phase two or subsequent detailed negotiation occurring this side of U.S. Presidential elections.”Elsewhere, oil held gains after OPEC+ signaled it will stick with existing output cuts at next week’s meeting. The Chilean peso set a record low for a second day and the central bank said it will directly intervene.These are the main moves in markets:StocksJapan’s Topix index rose 0.1% as of 10:33 a.m. in Tokyo.South Korea’s Kospi slid 0.7%.The Shanghai Composite was little changed.Hong Kong’s Hang Seng dropped 1.1%.Futures on the S&P 500 Index remained about 0.2% lower.Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 Index gained 0.1%.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries remained at 1.77% as trading began following the Thanksgiving break.Australia’s 10-year yield added two basis points to 1.02%.CurrenciesThe yen was steady at 109.50 per dollar.The offshore yuan remained at 7.0312 per dollar.The euro bought $1.1012.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude held at $58.07 a barrel.Gold was at $1,457.11 an ounce, little changed.\--With assistance from Cormac Mullen, Guy Johnson and Yakob Peterseil.To contact the reporter on this story: Adam Haigh in Sydney at ahaigh1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Christopher Anstey at canstey@bloomberg.net, Joanna Ossinger, Cormac MullenFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Asia stocks were heading for a mixed end to the month as a retreat in Hong Kong offset muted trading elsewhere in the region. Treasury yields edged higher.Shares were little changed in Tokyo, Shanghai and Sydney, and fell in Hong Kong and Seoul. U.S. futures edged lower and the dollar was steady. American equity and bond markets were shut Thursday for Thanksgiving, while European shares retreated. The won was flat after the Bank of Korea kept its policy rate unchanged, as expected.Investors continue to wait for progress on a U.S.-China trade deal, with the next batch of American tariffs on Chinese goods due to begin Dec. 15. This week, China has said it will retaliate against a U.S. bill in support of Hong Kong protesters, though stopped short of offering any details.“Markets are on a sort of ‘wait and hold’ in terms of that phase-one trade deal,” David Riley, chief investment strategist at BlueBay Asset Management, told Bloomberg TV. “If there is a skinny deal, that will allow markets and risk assets to grind higher even if there is no real prospect of a phase two or subsequent detailed negotiation occurring this side of U.S. Presidential elections.”Elsewhere, oil held gains after OPEC+ signaled it will stick with existing output cuts at next week’s meeting. The Chilean peso set a record low for a second day and the central bank said it will directly intervene.These are the main moves in markets:StocksJapan’s Topix index rose 0.1% as of 10:33 a.m. in Tokyo.South Korea’s Kospi slid 0.7%.The Shanghai Composite was little changed.Hong Kong’s Hang Seng dropped 1.1%.Futures on the S&P 500 Index remained about 0.2% lower.Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 Index gained 0.1%.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries remained at 1.77% as trading began following the Thanksgiving break.Australia’s 10-year yield added two basis points to 1.02%.CurrenciesThe yen was steady at 109.50 per dollar.The offshore yuan remained at 7.0312 per dollar.The euro bought $1.1012.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude held at $58.07 a barrel.Gold was at $1,457.11 an ounce, little changed.\--With assistance from Cormac Mullen, Guy Johnson and Yakob Peterseil.To contact the reporter on this story: Adam Haigh in Sydney at ahaigh1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Christopher Anstey at canstey@bloomberg.net, Joanna Ossinger, Cormac MullenFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 22/79   Great Panther Revises Guidance for Tucano Gold Mine
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    GREAT PANTHER MINING LIMITED (NYSE American: GPL; TSX: GPR) ("Great Panther", the "Company") reports that it is revising its fourth quarter production guidance for its Tucano Gold Mine ("Tucano") in Brazil to between 31,000 and 33,000 ounces of gold, down from 39,000 to 44,000 ounces. Accordingly, annual consolidated guidance, which includes the Company's Mexican operations (and Tucano operations from the March 5, 2019 acquisition date), is adjusted to 142,000 – 149,000 gold equivalent ounces, an approximate 6% decrease from the midpoint of the prior production guidance range of 150,000 to 160,000 gold equivalent ounces (1).

    GREAT PANTHER MINING LIMITED (NYSE American: GPL; TSX: GPR) ("Great Panther", the "Company") reports that it is revising its fourth quarter production guidance for its Tucano Gold Mine ("Tucano") in Brazil to between 31,000 and 33,000 ounces of gold, down from 39,000 to 44,000 ounces. Accordingly, annual consolidated guidance, which includes the Company's Mexican operations (and Tucano operations from the March 5, 2019 acquisition date), is adjusted to 142,000 – 149,000 gold equivalent ounces, an approximate 6% decrease from the midpoint of the prior production guidance range of 150,000 to 160,000 gold equivalent ounces (1).


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  • 23/79   Bank of Korea Holds Rate After Two Cuts, Sees Slower Growth
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Explore what’s moving the global economy in the new season of the Stephanomics podcast. Subscribe via Apple Podcast, Spotify or Pocket Cast.The Bank of Korea left its key interest rate unchanged Friday, opting to preserve policy room after two rate cuts this year to support an economy hurt by global trade tensions.South Korea’s central bank kept the seven-day repurchase rate at 1.25% in its last decision of the year, as expected by all 27 analysts surveyed by Bloomberg. The central bank said growth would be around 2% for 2019 and slightly above that in 2020, having previously forecast growth of 2.2% for 2019 and 2.5% for 2020.The BOK said in a statement after the decision that it will maintain its accommodative policy stance, and monitor the need to adjust the degree of policy accommodation. The central bank said it will consider how factors such as the U.S-China trade deal, geopolitics, and household debt growth affect the domestic economy and financial stability.Central banks across the globe have lowered interest rates this year to tackle slowing growth and inflation. With interest rates now at, or near, record-low levels in many countries, Australia and New Zealand were among those to pause this month to weigh the effects of stimulus against potential risks.“The BOK will probably wait and watch at least until March,” said Kim Jin-myoung, an economist at Hanwha Investment & Securities. “Things the BOK will watch are how the bolstering of its accommodative stance this year filters through and how external uncertainties play out.”South Korea’s economy is on course for the slowest expansion in a decade this year with economists’ consensus at 1.9%, and next year doesn’t look much better. Even though most economists believe growth will be better than this year, many attribute it to a base effect as opposed to genuine improvement.Exports are headed for a 12th monthly decline and inflation has stayed at or below zero for the last few months, far below the 2% target. Industrial output fell more than expected in October from the previous month. On a positive note, consumer confidence has turned optimistic for the first time since April, and chip inventory is falling.Next StepWith Friday’s hold decision, central bank watchers’ focus will now turn to if, and when, the BOK will resume easing. Governor Lee said in October the bank still had some policy room, while refusing to specify how low the interest rate could go. He also said the bank was studying “unconventional” policy tools, but made it clear it was too early to consider implementing them.South Korea’s economy growing at a pace below its estimated potential of 2.5%-2.6% justifies more rate cuts, but the BOK is wary of financial risks such as an overheating of the property market or rapid household debt gains. A majority of economists surveyed on long-term projections expect the benchmark rate to remain at 1.25% or to be lowered once more. A few expect an additional cut to 0.75%, or even a hike.Although the worst for South Korea may be over, “the likelihood of sub-2% growth in 2019, coupled with still-low inflation pressure, is likely to prompt the BOK to cut rates once again in the first quarter of 2020,” Barclays PLC analysts including Angela Hsieh wrote this week.(Updates to add commments from BOK policy statement)\--With assistance from Hooyeon Kim.To contact the reporter on this story: Sam Kim in Seoul at skim609@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Malcolm Scott at mscott23@bloomberg.net, Jiyeun Lee, Paul JacksonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Explore what’s moving the global economy in the new season of the Stephanomics podcast. Subscribe via Apple Podcast, Spotify or Pocket Cast.The Bank of Korea left its key interest rate unchanged Friday, opting to preserve policy room after two rate cuts this year to support an economy hurt by global trade tensions.South Korea’s central bank kept the seven-day repurchase rate at 1.25% in its last decision of the year, as expected by all 27 analysts surveyed by Bloomberg. The central bank said growth would be around 2% for 2019 and slightly above that in 2020, having previously forecast growth of 2.2% for 2019 and 2.5% for 2020.The BOK said in a statement after the decision that it will maintain its accommodative policy stance, and monitor the need to adjust the degree of policy accommodation. The central bank said it will consider how factors such as the U.S-China trade deal, geopolitics, and household debt growth affect the domestic economy and financial stability.Central banks across the globe have lowered interest rates this year to tackle slowing growth and inflation. With interest rates now at, or near, record-low levels in many countries, Australia and New Zealand were among those to pause this month to weigh the effects of stimulus against potential risks.“The BOK will probably wait and watch at least until March,” said Kim Jin-myoung, an economist at Hanwha Investment & Securities. “Things the BOK will watch are how the bolstering of its accommodative stance this year filters through and how external uncertainties play out.”South Korea’s economy is on course for the slowest expansion in a decade this year with economists’ consensus at 1.9%, and next year doesn’t look much better. Even though most economists believe growth will be better than this year, many attribute it to a base effect as opposed to genuine improvement.Exports are headed for a 12th monthly decline and inflation has stayed at or below zero for the last few months, far below the 2% target. Industrial output fell more than expected in October from the previous month. On a positive note, consumer confidence has turned optimistic for the first time since April, and chip inventory is falling.Next StepWith Friday’s hold decision, central bank watchers’ focus will now turn to if, and when, the BOK will resume easing. Governor Lee said in October the bank still had some policy room, while refusing to specify how low the interest rate could go. He also said the bank was studying “unconventional” policy tools, but made it clear it was too early to consider implementing them.South Korea’s economy growing at a pace below its estimated potential of 2.5%-2.6% justifies more rate cuts, but the BOK is wary of financial risks such as an overheating of the property market or rapid household debt gains. A majority of economists surveyed on long-term projections expect the benchmark rate to remain at 1.25% or to be lowered once more. A few expect an additional cut to 0.75%, or even a hike.Although the worst for South Korea may be over, “the likelihood of sub-2% growth in 2019, coupled with still-low inflation pressure, is likely to prompt the BOK to cut rates once again in the first quarter of 2020,” Barclays PLC analysts including Angela Hsieh wrote this week.(Updates to add commments from BOK policy statement)\--With assistance from Hooyeon Kim.To contact the reporter on this story: Sam Kim in Seoul at skim609@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Malcolm Scott at mscott23@bloomberg.net, Jiyeun Lee, Paul JacksonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 24/79   Stocks stop short of new peaks as Sino-U.S. tensions weigh
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Global shares ticked up on Friday, but hesitated to test an all-time peak as investors worried a new U.S. law backing Hong Kong protests could derail Washington's and Beijing's efforts to end their trade war.  MSCI All Country world index , which tracks shares in 49 countries, were up 0.05% at 549.62, and would need to rise only 0.2% to reach all-time peak hit in January last year before the start of U.S.-China trade war.  U.S. S&P 500 mini futures  were down 0.1%.

    Global shares ticked up on Friday, but hesitated to test an all-time peak as investors worried a new U.S. law backing Hong Kong protests could derail Washington's and Beijing's efforts to end their trade war. MSCI All Country world index , which tracks shares in 49 countries, were up 0.05% at 549.62, and would need to rise only 0.2% to reach all-time peak hit in January last year before the start of U.S.-China trade war. U.S. S&P 500 mini futures were down 0.1%.


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  • 25/79   Here is What Hedge Funds Think About Eli Lilly and Company (LLY)
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    We are still in an overall bull market and many stocks that smart money investors were piling into surged through November 22nd. Among them, Facebook and Microsoft ranked among the top 3 picks and these stocks gained 52% and 49% respectively. Hedge funds' top 3 stock picks returned 39.1% this year and beat the S&P […]

    We are still in an overall bull market and many stocks that smart money investors were piling into surged through November 22nd. Among them, Facebook and Microsoft ranked among the top 3 picks and these stocks gained 52% and 49% respectively. Hedge funds' top 3 stock picks returned 39.1% this year and beat the S&P […]


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  • 26/79   How Trump stealthily went from Mar-a-Lago to Afghanistan
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Air Force One, the plane President Donald Trump took from Washington, D.C., to Florida Tuesday evening, remained parked on the tarmac in Florida

    Air Force One, the plane President Donald Trump took from Washington, D.C., to Florida Tuesday evening, remained parked on the tarmac in Florida


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  • 27/79   Introducing Valmec (ASX:VMX), The Stock That Zoomed 111% In The Last Three Years
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    It might seem bad, but the worst that can happen when you buy a stock (without leverage) is that its share price goes...

    It might seem bad, but the worst that can happen when you buy a stock (without leverage) is that its share price goes...


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  • 28/79   Philips Hue Black Friday Deals (2019): List of Philips Hue Smart Lightstrip, Light Bulb, Switch & Starter Kit Deals Rated by Retail Fuse
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Here's the best Philips Hue deals for Black Friday & Cyber Monday 2019. The list below contains links to the best Philips Hue smart light bulb pack, starter kit, lightstrip, lamp and smart accessories Black Friday & Cyber Monday deals, as identified by the team of researchers at Retail Fuse.

    Here's the best Philips Hue deals for Black Friday & Cyber Monday 2019. The list below contains links to the best Philips Hue smart light bulb pack, starter kit, lightstrip, lamp and smart accessories Black Friday & Cyber Monday deals, as identified by the team of researchers at Retail Fuse.


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  • 29/79   Japanese Factory Output Drops More Than Expected in October
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Japanese industrial production fell more than expected in October as a global trade slump crimped exports and extreme weather disrupted output.Factory production slid 4.2% from a month earlier, matching the worst drop in the last five-and-a-half years and falling more than twice as much as economists forecast, data from the economy ministry showed Friday.The steep drop, following declines in retail sales and exports, comes as the government mulls a stimulus package to help the economy cope with typhoon damage, the global slowdown and an October sales tax hike that’s hit consumers.Key InsightsEconomists have been surprised at the extent to which October’s super storm has hurt economic indicators. The typhoon, which battered the Tokyo area, kept shoppers at home, shut factories and disrupted supply chains.At the same time, some worse-than-expected data suggest that government measures to soften the blow of October’s 2 percentage point tax increase may have been less effective than hoped.“Factories cut back on production after the sales tax and the typhoon also had an impact,” said Takeshi Minami, chief economist at Norinchukin Research Institute. “This makes it easier to call for a large stimulus package.”More fiscal stimulus would be good news for the Bank of Japan, which has appeared reluctant to ramp up its own massive stimulus program, as it strains at the limits of effectiveness.What Bloomberg’s Economist Says...“Corporate plans pointed to an increase in output, but we think October’s weak exports led to cutbacks.”Asia Economist TeamClick here to read more.Get moreThe jobless rate was at 2.4% in October, matching economists’ forecast and hovering just above a multi-decade low, data from the ministry of internal affairs showed.The job-to-applicant ratio held steady at 1.57 in October, meaning there were 157 jobs available for every 100 applicants. The measure was at a 45-year high of 1.63 in April.A separate report Friday showed Tokyo’s core consumer prices, a leading indicator of nationwide price trends, rose 0.6% in November, matching the median forecast from economists.Stripping out fresh food and energy, Tokyo’s consumer prices increased 0.7%, also matching the forecast.(Adds economist’s comment, detail throughout.)\--With assistance from Tomoko Sato and Yoshiaki Nohara.To contact the reporter on this story: Toru Fujioka in Tokyo at tfujioka1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Paul Jackson at pjackson53@bloomberg.net, Jason ClenfieldFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Japanese industrial production fell more than expected in October as a global trade slump crimped exports and extreme weather disrupted output.Factory production slid 4.2% from a month earlier, matching the worst drop in the last five-and-a-half years and falling more than twice as much as economists forecast, data from the economy ministry showed Friday.The steep drop, following declines in retail sales and exports, comes as the government mulls a stimulus package to help the economy cope with typhoon damage, the global slowdown and an October sales tax hike that’s hit consumers.Key InsightsEconomists have been surprised at the extent to which October’s super storm has hurt economic indicators. The typhoon, which battered the Tokyo area, kept shoppers at home, shut factories and disrupted supply chains.At the same time, some worse-than-expected data suggest that government measures to soften the blow of October’s 2 percentage point tax increase may have been less effective than hoped.“Factories cut back on production after the sales tax and the typhoon also had an impact,” said Takeshi Minami, chief economist at Norinchukin Research Institute. “This makes it easier to call for a large stimulus package.”More fiscal stimulus would be good news for the Bank of Japan, which has appeared reluctant to ramp up its own massive stimulus program, as it strains at the limits of effectiveness.What Bloomberg’s Economist Says...“Corporate plans pointed to an increase in output, but we think October’s weak exports led to cutbacks.”Asia Economist TeamClick here to read more.Get moreThe jobless rate was at 2.4% in October, matching economists’ forecast and hovering just above a multi-decade low, data from the ministry of internal affairs showed.The job-to-applicant ratio held steady at 1.57 in October, meaning there were 157 jobs available for every 100 applicants. The measure was at a 45-year high of 1.63 in April.A separate report Friday showed Tokyo’s core consumer prices, a leading indicator of nationwide price trends, rose 0.6% in November, matching the median forecast from economists.Stripping out fresh food and energy, Tokyo’s consumer prices increased 0.7%, also matching the forecast.(Adds economist’s comment, detail throughout.)\--With assistance from Tomoko Sato and Yoshiaki Nohara.To contact the reporter on this story: Toru Fujioka in Tokyo at tfujioka1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Paul Jackson at pjackson53@bloomberg.net, Jason ClenfieldFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 30/79   Why VEEM Ltd’s (ASX:VEE) Return On Capital Employed Might Be A Concern
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today we'll look at VEEM Ltd (ASX:VEE) and reflect on its potential as an investment. In particular, we'll consider...

    Today we'll look at VEEM Ltd (ASX:VEE) and reflect on its potential as an investment. In particular, we'll consider...


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  • 31/79   Does Bortex Global (HKG:8118) Deserve A Spot On Your Watchlist?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    It's only natural that many investors, especially those who are new to the game, prefer to buy shares in 'sexy' stocks...

    It's only natural that many investors, especially those who are new to the game, prefer to buy shares in 'sexy' stocks...


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  • 32/79   Hedge Funds Have Never Been This Bullish On CarMax Inc (KMX)
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Hedge funds are not perfect. They have their bad picks just like everyone else. Facebook, a stock hedge funds have loved dearly, lost nearly 40% of its value at one point in 2018. Although hedge funds are not perfect, their consensus picks do deliver solid returns, however. Our data show the top 20 S&P 500 […]

    Hedge funds are not perfect. They have their bad picks just like everyone else. Facebook, a stock hedge funds have loved dearly, lost nearly 40% of its value at one point in 2018. Although hedge funds are not perfect, their consensus picks do deliver solid returns, however. Our data show the top 20 S&P 500 […]


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  • 33/79   Hedge Funds Warming Up To Vistra Energy Corp. (VST)
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Our extensive research has shown that imitating the smart money can generate significant returns for retail investors, which is why we track nearly 750 active prominent money managers and analyze their quarterly 13F filings. The stocks that are heavily bought by hedge funds historically outperformed the market, though there is no shortage of high profile […]

    Our extensive research has shown that imitating the smart money can generate significant returns for retail investors, which is why we track nearly 750 active prominent money managers and analyze their quarterly 13F filings. The stocks that are heavily bought by hedge funds historically outperformed the market, though there is no shortage of high profile […]


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  • 34/79   Sudan adopts law to dissolve Bashir party, 'dismantle' regime
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Sudan's new authorities on Thursday ordered that the party of ousted autocrat Omar al-Bashir be dissolved and his regime 'dismantled', heeding the call of protesters whose campaign led to the leader's overthrow.  Bashir and his Islamist National Congress Party (NCP) had ruled the northeast African country since 1989 before a nationwide protest movement resulted in him being deposed earlier this year.  The country's new ruling sovereign council and the cabinet led by Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok made the decision to dissolve the party, approving a law titled 'Dismantling of the regime of 30th June 1989'.

    Sudan's new authorities on Thursday ordered that the party of ousted autocrat Omar al-Bashir be dissolved and his regime 'dismantled', heeding the call of protesters whose campaign led to the leader's overthrow. Bashir and his Islamist National Congress Party (NCP) had ruled the northeast African country since 1989 before a nationwide protest movement resulted in him being deposed earlier this year. The country's new ruling sovereign council and the cabinet led by Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok made the decision to dissolve the party, approving a law titled 'Dismantling of the regime of 30th June 1989'.


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  • 35/79   Hedge Funds Warming Up To US Foods Holding Corp. (USFD)?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Investing in small cap stocks has historically been a way to outperform the market, as small cap companies typically grow faster on average than the blue chips. That outperformance comes with a price, however, as there are occasional periods of higher volatility. The last 12 months is one of those periods, as the Russell 2000 […]

    Investing in small cap stocks has historically been a way to outperform the market, as small cap companies typically grow faster on average than the blue chips. That outperformance comes with a price, however, as there are occasional periods of higher volatility. The last 12 months is one of those periods, as the Russell 2000 […]


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  • 36/79   Onewheel's Black Friday Deals Are Epic This Year
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Future Motion, maker of the popular Onewheel electric boards, today announced its lowest pricing ever on Onewheel products and accessories during its Black Friday and Cyber Monday sale ending December 2nd. This is the company's only discount of the year.

    Future Motion, maker of the popular Onewheel electric boards, today announced its lowest pricing ever on Onewheel products and accessories during its Black Friday and Cyber Monday sale ending December 2nd. This is the company's only discount of the year.


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  • 37/79   Is Freightways Limited (NZSE:FRE) A Smart Pick For Income Investors?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Dividend paying stocks like Freightways Limited (NZSE:FRE) tend to be popular with investors, and for good reason...

    Dividend paying stocks like Freightways Limited (NZSE:FRE) tend to be popular with investors, and for good reason...


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  • 38/79   Shoppers hit stores on Thanksgiving for Black Friday deals, overload Costco website
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Black Friday shopping got a jump start Thanksgiving.

    Black Friday shopping got a jump start Thanksgiving.


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  • 39/79   Global Energy Efficient Glass Market Report 2019: Market Accounted for $23.20 Billion in 2018 and is Expected to Reach $41.79 Billion by 2027
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The "Energy Efficient Glass - Global Market Outlook (2018-2027)" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.

    The "Energy Efficient Glass - Global Market Outlook (2018-2027)" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.


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  • 40/79   Trump peddles 'war on Thanksgiving' that he probably heard about on Fox News
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Like the so-called war on Christmas, the rhetorical assault on Thanksgiving is being led by the president’s favorite cable news network.

    Like the so-called war on Christmas, the rhetorical assault on Thanksgiving is being led by the president’s favorite cable news network.


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  • 41/79   U.S. accuses Russia of helping Syria cover up chemical weapons use
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The United States on Thursday accused Russia of helping Syria conceal the use of banned toxic munitions in the civil war by undermining the work of the global chemical weapons agency trying to identify those responsible.  The comments by the U.S. representative to the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), Kenneth Ward, drew a rapid denial from Moscow and came as Western powers and Russia clashed at the agency's annual conference in The Hague.  Moscow has for months cited dissent by two former OPCW employees who leaked a document and an email as evidence that the OPCW doctored the conclusions of a March 1 report which found that a toxic chemical containing chlorine was used in a 2018 attack near Damascus.

    The United States on Thursday accused Russia of helping Syria conceal the use of banned toxic munitions in the civil war by undermining the work of the global chemical weapons agency trying to identify those responsible. The comments by the U.S. representative to the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), Kenneth Ward, drew a rapid denial from Moscow and came as Western powers and Russia clashed at the agency's annual conference in The Hague. Moscow has for months cited dissent by two former OPCW employees who leaked a document and an email as evidence that the OPCW doctored the conclusions of a March 1 report which found that a toxic chemical containing chlorine was used in a 2018 attack near Damascus.


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  • 42/79   Dutch prosecutors charge isolated farm father with sex abuse
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A Dutch father accused of holding six of his children against their will on an isolated farm for nine years is now also suspected of sexually abusing two of his other children, prosecutors said Thursday.  The abuse allegations add a grim new element to a case that is shrouded in mystery and garnered huge attention across the Netherlands.  The 67-year-old father and a 58-year-old man, who is reportedly an Austrian national and rented the farm to the family, are suspected of illegal deprivation of liberty and abuse for their alleged detention of six young adults on a farm in the rural farming village of Ruinerwold.

    A Dutch father accused of holding six of his children against their will on an isolated farm for nine years is now also suspected of sexually abusing two of his other children, prosecutors said Thursday. The abuse allegations add a grim new element to a case that is shrouded in mystery and garnered huge attention across the Netherlands. The 67-year-old father and a 58-year-old man, who is reportedly an Austrian national and rented the farm to the family, are suspected of illegal deprivation of liberty and abuse for their alleged detention of six young adults on a farm in the rural farming village of Ruinerwold.


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  • 43/79   Hong Kong police enter ransacked campus after protest siege
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Hong Kong police on Thursday entered a ransacked university campus where authorities faced off for days with barricaded pro-democracy protesters, gathering a huge haul of petrol bombs and other dangerous materials.  The Hong Kong Polytechnic University became the epicentre of the territory's increasingly violent protest movement when clashes broke out on November 17 between police and protesters armed with bows and arrows as well as Molotov cocktails.  The standoff settled into a tense stalemate during which hundreds fled the campus -- some making daring escapes, others caught and beaten by officers during failed breakouts -- leaving a dwindling core of holdouts surrounded by police cordons.

    Hong Kong police on Thursday entered a ransacked university campus where authorities faced off for days with barricaded pro-democracy protesters, gathering a huge haul of petrol bombs and other dangerous materials. The Hong Kong Polytechnic University became the epicentre of the territory's increasingly violent protest movement when clashes broke out on November 17 between police and protesters armed with bows and arrows as well as Molotov cocktails. The standoff settled into a tense stalemate during which hundreds fled the campus -- some making daring escapes, others caught and beaten by officers during failed breakouts -- leaving a dwindling core of holdouts surrounded by police cordons.


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  • 44/79   Customs agents seize $95M in counterfeit goods along with thousands of fake IDs
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Customs officials said in a statement that counterfeiting sales can be traced to organized crime, drug trafficking and terrorist organizations.

    Customs officials said in a statement that counterfeiting sales can be traced to organized crime, drug trafficking and terrorist organizations.


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  • 45/79   Russia says it showed nuclear missile system to U.S. inspectors
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Russia's Ministry of Defense said on Tuesday it had shown the country's new Avangard nuclear missile system to U.S. inspectors for the first time, a development that Moscow said showed a key arms control treaty was still effective.

    Russia's Ministry of Defense said on Tuesday it had shown the country's new Avangard nuclear missile system to U.S. inspectors for the first time, a development that Moscow said showed a key arms control treaty was still effective.


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  • 46/79   TikTok Blocks Teen Who Posted About China's Detention Camps
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    SHANGHAI -- The teenage girl, pink eyelash curler in hand, begins her video innocently: "Hi, guys. I'm going to teach you guys how to get long lashes."After a few seconds, she asks viewers to put down their curlers. "Use your phone that you're using right now to search up what's happening in China, how they're getting concentration camps, throwing innocent Muslims in there," she says.The sly bait-and-switch puts a serious topic -- the mass detentions of minority Muslims in northwest China -- in front of an audience that might not have known about it before. The 40-second clip has amassed more than 498,000 likes on TikTok, a social platform where the users skew young and the videos skew silly.But the video's creator, Feroza Aziz, said this week that TikTok had suspended her account after she posted the clip. That added to a widespread fear about the platform: that its owner, Chinese social media giant ByteDance, censors or punishes videos that China's government might not like.A ByteDance spokesman, Josh Gartner, said Aziz had been blocked from her TikTok account because she used a previous account to post a video that contained an image of Osama bin Laden. This violated TikTok's policies against terrorist content, Gartner said, which is why the platform banned both her account and the devices from which she was posting."If she tries to use the device that she used last time, she will probably have a problem," Gartner said.Aziz, a 17-year-old Muslim high school student in New Jersey, said in an email on Tuesday that her TikTok videos tried to make light of the racism and discrimination she experienced growing up in the United States. In one video, she addressed a slur that she said she and other Muslims heard regularly: that they would marry bin Laden."I think that TikTok should not ban content that doesn't harm anyone or shows anyone being harmed," Aziz said.In recent months, U.S. lawmakers have expressed concerns that TikTok censors video content at Beijing's behest and shares user data with Chinese authorities.The head of TikTok, Alex Zhu, denied those accusations in an interview with The Times this month. Zhu said that Chinese regulators did not influence TikTok in any way and that even ByteDance could not control TikTok's policies for managing video content in the United States.But episodes such as Aziz's show how difficult it might be for TikTok to escape the fog of suspicion that surrounds it and other Chinese tech companies.China's government rigidly controls the internet within the nation's borders. It exerts influence, sometimes subtly, over the activities of private businesses. The concern is that, when companies like ByteDance and telecom equipment maker Huawei expand overseas, Beijing's long arm follows them.China would certainly prefer that the world did not talk about its clampdown on Muslims. Over the past few years, the government has corralled as many as 1 million ethnic Uighurs, Kazakhs and others into internment camps and prisons.Chinese leaders have presented their efforts as a mild and benevolent campaign to fight Islamic extremism. But internal Communist Party documents reported by The Times this month provided an inside glimpse at the crackdown and confirmed its coercive nature.On Tuesday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said at a news conference in Washington that the documents showed "brutal detention and systematic repression" of Uighurs and called on China to immediately release those who were detained. President Donald Trump, however, has refused to impose sanctions on Chinese officials deemed responsible, despite recommendations from some U.S. officials to do so.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company

    SHANGHAI -- The teenage girl, pink eyelash curler in hand, begins her video innocently: "Hi, guys. I'm going to teach you guys how to get long lashes."After a few seconds, she asks viewers to put down their curlers. "Use your phone that you're using right now to search up what's happening in China, how they're getting concentration camps, throwing innocent Muslims in there," she says.The sly bait-and-switch puts a serious topic -- the mass detentions of minority Muslims in northwest China -- in front of an audience that might not have known about it before. The 40-second clip has amassed more than 498,000 likes on TikTok, a social platform where the users skew young and the videos skew silly.But the video's creator, Feroza Aziz, said this week that TikTok had suspended her account after she posted the clip. That added to a widespread fear about the platform: that its owner, Chinese social media giant ByteDance, censors or punishes videos that China's government might not like.A ByteDance spokesman, Josh Gartner, said Aziz had been blocked from her TikTok account because she used a previous account to post a video that contained an image of Osama bin Laden. This violated TikTok's policies against terrorist content, Gartner said, which is why the platform banned both her account and the devices from which she was posting."If she tries to use the device that she used last time, she will probably have a problem," Gartner said.Aziz, a 17-year-old Muslim high school student in New Jersey, said in an email on Tuesday that her TikTok videos tried to make light of the racism and discrimination she experienced growing up in the United States. In one video, she addressed a slur that she said she and other Muslims heard regularly: that they would marry bin Laden."I think that TikTok should not ban content that doesn't harm anyone or shows anyone being harmed," Aziz said.In recent months, U.S. lawmakers have expressed concerns that TikTok censors video content at Beijing's behest and shares user data with Chinese authorities.The head of TikTok, Alex Zhu, denied those accusations in an interview with The Times this month. Zhu said that Chinese regulators did not influence TikTok in any way and that even ByteDance could not control TikTok's policies for managing video content in the United States.But episodes such as Aziz's show how difficult it might be for TikTok to escape the fog of suspicion that surrounds it and other Chinese tech companies.China's government rigidly controls the internet within the nation's borders. It exerts influence, sometimes subtly, over the activities of private businesses. The concern is that, when companies like ByteDance and telecom equipment maker Huawei expand overseas, Beijing's long arm follows them.China would certainly prefer that the world did not talk about its clampdown on Muslims. Over the past few years, the government has corralled as many as 1 million ethnic Uighurs, Kazakhs and others into internment camps and prisons.Chinese leaders have presented their efforts as a mild and benevolent campaign to fight Islamic extremism. But internal Communist Party documents reported by The Times this month provided an inside glimpse at the crackdown and confirmed its coercive nature.On Tuesday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said at a news conference in Washington that the documents showed "brutal detention and systematic repression" of Uighurs and called on China to immediately release those who were detained. President Donald Trump, however, has refused to impose sanctions on Chinese officials deemed responsible, despite recommendations from some U.S. officials to do so.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company


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  • 47/79   7 People Sentenced to Death for Bangladesh’s Worst Terrorist Attack
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- A trial court sentenced seven people to death for their roles in Bangladesh’s worst terrorist attack, which killed 20 diners, most of them foreigners, in a cafe in 2016.Judge Mojibur Rahman pronounced the verdict in a packed Dhaka courtroom on Wednesday, Dhaka Metropolitan Chief Public Prosecutor Abdullah Abu said at a briefing. The decision brings to a close the year-long trial that followed a two-year investigation, which saw one accused being acquitted. The indicted have the right to appeal.“They wanted to destabilize the country and destroy the economy by forcing foreigners and investors to leave Bangladesh,” prosecutors said in case documents.Nine Italians, seven Japanese, one Indian and three Bangladeshis were killed by terrorists who stormed the Holey Artisan restaurant in the diplomatic area of Dhaka in 2016. The Islamic State claimed responsibility for the 12-hour hostage crisis.Security forces shot dead five attackers and also, reports say mistakenly, a pizza chef during the rescue operation codenamed “Thunderbolt.”The convicts yelled “Allahu Akbar,” or “Allah is the greatest,” in the courtroom, according to prosecutor Abu.At least two suspected militants tied to the attack are at large, according to Monirul Islam, chief of the police’s counterterrorism unit.To contact the reporter on this story: Arun Devnath in Dhaka at adevnath@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Arijit Ghosh at aghosh@bloomberg.net, Jeanette Rodrigues, Abhay SinghFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- A trial court sentenced seven people to death for their roles in Bangladesh’s worst terrorist attack, which killed 20 diners, most of them foreigners, in a cafe in 2016.Judge Mojibur Rahman pronounced the verdict in a packed Dhaka courtroom on Wednesday, Dhaka Metropolitan Chief Public Prosecutor Abdullah Abu said at a briefing. The decision brings to a close the year-long trial that followed a two-year investigation, which saw one accused being acquitted. The indicted have the right to appeal.“They wanted to destabilize the country and destroy the economy by forcing foreigners and investors to leave Bangladesh,” prosecutors said in case documents.Nine Italians, seven Japanese, one Indian and three Bangladeshis were killed by terrorists who stormed the Holey Artisan restaurant in the diplomatic area of Dhaka in 2016. The Islamic State claimed responsibility for the 12-hour hostage crisis.Security forces shot dead five attackers and also, reports say mistakenly, a pizza chef during the rescue operation codenamed “Thunderbolt.”The convicts yelled “Allahu Akbar,” or “Allah is the greatest,” in the courtroom, according to prosecutor Abu.At least two suspected militants tied to the attack are at large, according to Monirul Islam, chief of the police’s counterterrorism unit.To contact the reporter on this story: Arun Devnath in Dhaka at adevnath@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Arijit Ghosh at aghosh@bloomberg.net, Jeanette Rodrigues, Abhay SinghFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 48/79   Your talking points for the 2020 race, in time for Thanksgiving dinner
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Frequently asked questions — and some straightforward answers — about every candidate still in the race for the White House.

    Frequently asked questions — and some straightforward answers — about every candidate still in the race for the White House.


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  • 49/79   Texas chemical fire rages for second day, thousands evacuated
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The fiery blast inside a distillation column at the Port Neches, Texas, TPC Group facility on Wednesday injured three workers, blew locked doors off their hinges and spewed a plume of toxic chemicals for miles (kilometers).  The plant manufactures petrochemicals used to make rubber and resins, and the volatile organic compounds in the explosion's smoke can lead to eye, nose and throat irritation, shortness of breath, headaches and nausea, the pollution regulator Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) said.  The plant, 90 miles (145 km) east of Houston, has a long history of environmental violations and has been out of compliance with federal clean air laws for years, according to the Texas Tribune and state records; it was also declared a high priority violator by the Environmental Protection Agency.

    The fiery blast inside a distillation column at the Port Neches, Texas, TPC Group facility on Wednesday injured three workers, blew locked doors off their hinges and spewed a plume of toxic chemicals for miles (kilometers). The plant manufactures petrochemicals used to make rubber and resins, and the volatile organic compounds in the explosion's smoke can lead to eye, nose and throat irritation, shortness of breath, headaches and nausea, the pollution regulator Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) said. The plant, 90 miles (145 km) east of Houston, has a long history of environmental violations and has been out of compliance with federal clean air laws for years, according to the Texas Tribune and state records; it was also declared a high priority violator by the Environmental Protection Agency.


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  • 50/79   A network of cables at the bottom of the ocean is helping scientists detect earthquakes
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The cables detected a new fault system near the San Andreas Fault, which runs along the California coast.

    The cables detected a new fault system near the San Andreas Fault, which runs along the California coast.


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  • 51/79   18,000-year-old puppy discovered in Siberia could be missing link between dogs and wolves
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    An 18,000-year-old puppy unearthed in Siberia could prove to be the missing link between dogs and wolves, scientists believe.  The puppy was discovered perfectly preserved by permafrost near Yakutsk, eastern Siberia last summer and carbon dating has revealed it has been frozen for around 18,000 years.   Researchers at the Centre for Palaeogenetics in Stockholm, Sweden announced this week that extensive DNA tests have so far been unable to confirm whether the animal was a dog or a wolf.  The experts believe this may be because the canine comes from the period when dogs were domesticated and hope the creature will prove crucial to uncovering when exactly the evolution began.   "It's normally relatively easy to tell the difference between the two," researcher David Stanton told CNN. Dogor was so well-preserved because he was found in a tunnel that was dug into the permafrost "We have a lot of data from it already, and with that amount of data, you'd expect to tell if it was one or the other. The fact that we can't might suggest that it's from a population that was ancestral to both - to dogs and wolves". A 2017 study published in the journal Nature Communications suggested that modern dogs were domesticated from a single wolf population 20,000 to 40,000 years ago but tests on this specimen could offer further clues as to the precise period. "We don't know exactly when dogs were domesticated, but it may have been from about that time. We are interested in whether it is in fact a dog or a wolf, or perhaps it's something halfway between the two," Mr Stanton added. Scientists believe some modern dogs descended from just one wolf population that lived continuously in Europe for thousands of years.  If confirmed to be a dog, scientists believe it will be the earliest confirmed "It seems that dogs were domesticated from a lineage of wolves that went  extinct," said Mr Stanton. "So that's why it's such a difficult problem to work on to understand where and when dogs were domesticated." The researchers' genome analysis has revealed that the puppy was a male so the scientists, after discussing with their Russian colleagues, have named the puppy 'Dogor'. The name means "friend" in Yakutian - as well as referencing the question "dog or wolf?" The scientists hope that further genome data tests on the creature will reveal more about Dogor's origins. Photographs released by the Centre for Palaeogenetics show the puppy in an almost perfect condition, with its nose, whiskers and teeth remarkably intact. Dogor can be seen almost completely covered in fur except for an exposed rib cage.  Dogor was discovered in a remote part of north-east Siberia and is so well-preserved because it was found in a tunnel that was dug into the permafrost. He was later sent to Oxford University's Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit for dating, which revealed that the corpse dated back at least 18,000 years, meaning Dogor would have lived during the last Ice Age. He is being kept in Russia while Mr Stanton and his colleague Love Dalen study his rib bone back in Sweden.

    An 18,000-year-old puppy unearthed in Siberia could prove to be the missing link between dogs and wolves, scientists believe.  The puppy was discovered perfectly preserved by permafrost near Yakutsk, eastern Siberia last summer and carbon dating has revealed it has been frozen for around 18,000 years.   Researchers at the Centre for Palaeogenetics in Stockholm, Sweden announced this week that extensive DNA tests have so far been unable to confirm whether the animal was a dog or a wolf.  The experts believe this may be because the canine comes from the period when dogs were domesticated and hope the creature will prove crucial to uncovering when exactly the evolution began.   "It's normally relatively easy to tell the difference between the two," researcher David Stanton told CNN. Dogor was so well-preserved because he was found in a tunnel that was dug into the permafrost "We have a lot of data from it already, and with that amount of data, you'd expect to tell if it was one or the other. The fact that we can't might suggest that it's from a population that was ancestral to both - to dogs and wolves". A 2017 study published in the journal Nature Communications suggested that modern dogs were domesticated from a single wolf population 20,000 to 40,000 years ago but tests on this specimen could offer further clues as to the precise period. "We don't know exactly when dogs were domesticated, but it may have been from about that time. We are interested in whether it is in fact a dog or a wolf, or perhaps it's something halfway between the two," Mr Stanton added. Scientists believe some modern dogs descended from just one wolf population that lived continuously in Europe for thousands of years.  If confirmed to be a dog, scientists believe it will be the earliest confirmed "It seems that dogs were domesticated from a lineage of wolves that went  extinct," said Mr Stanton. "So that's why it's such a difficult problem to work on to understand where and when dogs were domesticated." The researchers' genome analysis has revealed that the puppy was a male so the scientists, after discussing with their Russian colleagues, have named the puppy 'Dogor'. The name means "friend" in Yakutian - as well as referencing the question "dog or wolf?" The scientists hope that further genome data tests on the creature will reveal more about Dogor's origins. Photographs released by the Centre for Palaeogenetics show the puppy in an almost perfect condition, with its nose, whiskers and teeth remarkably intact. Dogor can be seen almost completely covered in fur except for an exposed rib cage.  Dogor was discovered in a remote part of north-east Siberia and is so well-preserved because it was found in a tunnel that was dug into the permafrost. He was later sent to Oxford University's Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit for dating, which revealed that the corpse dated back at least 18,000 years, meaning Dogor would have lived during the last Ice Age. He is being kept in Russia while Mr Stanton and his colleague Love Dalen study his rib bone back in Sweden.


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  • 52/79   European parliament declares 'climate emergency'
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The European Parliament voted on Thursday to declare a 'climate and environment emergency' in a symbolic gesture just ahead of the latest UN global crisis summit.  The legislature, sitting in Strasbourg, backed the motion by a comfortable 429 to 225 majority, increasing pressure on EU capitals and the European Commission to take more drastic action.  The motion urges the commission 'to ensure that all relevant legislative and budgetary proposals are fully aligned with the objective of limiting global warming to under 1.5 degrees C (35.7 degrees Fahrenheit)'.

    The European Parliament voted on Thursday to declare a 'climate and environment emergency' in a symbolic gesture just ahead of the latest UN global crisis summit. The legislature, sitting in Strasbourg, backed the motion by a comfortable 429 to 225 majority, increasing pressure on EU capitals and the European Commission to take more drastic action. The motion urges the commission 'to ensure that all relevant legislative and budgetary proposals are fully aligned with the objective of limiting global warming to under 1.5 degrees C (35.7 degrees Fahrenheit)'.


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  • 53/79   The human species will likely destroy itself long before the sun kills everyone on Earth, a Harvard scientists says
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Scientist Avi Loeb wrote that we should colonize space to survive the sun's future expansion. But humanity might wipe itself out before then, he said.

    Scientist Avi Loeb wrote that we should colonize space to survive the sun's future expansion. But humanity might wipe itself out before then, he said.


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  • 54/79   NASA’s in the market for quick taxi rides to and from International Space Station
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    NASA already has committed billions of dollars to procuring regularly scheduled rides to and from the International Space Station from commercial space taxi operators — but now it says it's interested in buying short-term trips as well. The proposed arrangement, detailed on Tuesday, is aimed at giving a boost to the commercialization of space operations in low Earth orbit, as well as to NASA's drive to send astronauts to the moon by 2024. It also makes the line dividing government-funded and privately funded space efforts even fuzzier. SpaceX and Boeing are both building spacecraft to serve as taxis to the… Read More

    NASA already has committed billions of dollars to procuring regularly scheduled rides to and from the International Space Station from commercial space taxi operators — but now it says it's interested in buying short-term trips as well. The proposed arrangement, detailed on Tuesday, is aimed at giving a boost to the commercialization of space operations in low Earth orbit, as well as to NASA's drive to send astronauts to the moon by 2024. It also makes the line dividing government-funded and privately funded space efforts even fuzzier. SpaceX and Boeing are both building spacecraft to serve as taxis to the… Read More


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  • 55/79   A stunning animation by a planetary scientist shows how huge our solar system is — and why that makes it so hard to depict
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The planets are so far apart, and the sun is so big, that you wouldn't be able to see anything in an accurate model of the solar system.

    The planets are so far apart, and the sun is so big, that you wouldn't be able to see anything in an accurate model of the solar system.


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  • 56/79   Expedition Titan uses mixed reality to turn Saturn’s mysterious moon into a thrill ride
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    It's doubtful anyone alive today will get to ride through the ice volcanoes of Saturn's largest moon — but you can do the next best thing at Seattle's Pacific Science Center, thanks to a mixed-reality experience called Expedition Titan. The walk-through production is the latest showcase for Hyperspace XR, a startup-in-residence that's pioneering the frontiers of mixed reality at the science center. That frontier is associated with other labels of immersive experiences, including virtual reality (MR), extended reality (XR) and augmented reality (AR). Hyperspace XR's brand of mixed reality involves creating a real-world environment — complete with walls, doorways and… Read More

    It's doubtful anyone alive today will get to ride through the ice volcanoes of Saturn's largest moon — but you can do the next best thing at Seattle's Pacific Science Center, thanks to a mixed-reality experience called Expedition Titan. The walk-through production is the latest showcase for Hyperspace XR, a startup-in-residence that's pioneering the frontiers of mixed reality at the science center. That frontier is associated with other labels of immersive experiences, including virtual reality (MR), extended reality (XR) and augmented reality (AR). Hyperspace XR's brand of mixed reality involves creating a real-world environment — complete with walls, doorways and… Read More


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  • 57/79   'Functionally Extinct': Do Dire Claims About Koalas Help or Hurt Them?
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    There is no doubt that the fires tearing across eastern Australia have been hurting koalas.With large areas of their crucial habitat ravaged, it is unclear what the future holds for a species that was already under threat before this round of bush fires. Some koalas have been rescued -- singed and dehydrated -- from the wild. And with blazes still burning, it is hard to know how many have been killed.But in describing the plight of these animals, is it possible to go too far?The phrase "functionally extinct" made the rounds in news articles and on social media over the weekend. The term refers to a species that no longer plays a role in an ecosystem or that is on its way to extinction, possibly irremovably.That provoked a visceral reaction from readers who wondered if the fuzzy marsupials, a national symbol of Australia, will be gone forever.In fact, koalas are not extinct. And some scientists warned that exaggeration can hurt, rather than help, conservation efforts."What is particularly frustrating about the term 'functional extinction' is it indicates a population that is basically past the point of no return, so it means that nothing really can be done," said Jacquelyn Gill, an associate professor at the University of Maine's Climate Change Institute and School of Biology and Ecology."That might seem like scientists quibbling over terms or trying to argue for nerdy levels of precision, but a strong statement like that should mean something," she said.Are koalas going extinct soon?Koalas could go extinct. The International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List, the authority on the conservation status of the world's species, says the koala population is declining and vulnerable -- but not endangered.There could be hundreds of thousands of koalas, but nailing down a number has proved impossible. Estimates range wildly, and every region is different. In some places, scientists say, koalas' numbers have declined by up to 80%.Noah Greenwald, the endangered species director at the Center for Biological Diversity, said there might have been around 300,000 koalas in Australia in 2016. But things may have changed since then -- especially given the recent fires."They're in a lot of trouble, and they need our care and our help if they're going to survive," he said.Koalas evolved to exist alongside wildfires, but the animals are facing new threats from human development, which has dislocated local populations and impaired their ability to survive fires, as well as climate change.Where did that phrase come from?On social media, many people who shared an article that used the term "functionally extinct" to describe koalas pointed to an article that appeared in Forbes on Saturday. That article, written by a senior contributor to the publication, was about the effects of the recent fires, but it appeared to cite a statement that was issued in May.The first person cited in the article was Deborah Tabart, the head of the Australian Koala Foundation.The foundation, a nonprofit conservation organization based in Brisbane, said in a statement May 10 that it believed koalas "may be functionally extinct in the entire landscape of Australia." The statement also said that the organization believed there were no more than 80,000 koalas left in the country.The organization doubled down on its use of the phrase in a different statement last month. But while the bush fires raged this month, Tabart said in another statement that "it is difficult for the Australian Koala Foundation to make any meaningful comments regarding the current Australian bush fires until the fires are over and people on the ground have evaluated the situation."The Forbes article Saturday also noted that "some researchers call into question" whether koalas were functionally extinct, "noting how difficult it is to measure total koala populations and that populations could be a much larger than estimated by the AKF."On Monday, another contributor to Forbes criticized the use of the phrase "functionally extinct" to describe koalas.The writer of the Saturday article, Trevor Nace, said in an email that "the use of the term 'functionally extinct' was Tabart's term, not mine, and was reported on by me, along with alternate views from experts."On Monday afternoon, Forbes removed the phrase "functionally extinct" from the headline and changed the beginning of the article to put less emphasis on the term.The tumult over a turn of phraseIn an interview, Tabart defended her use of the term and said that the threat of the end of a species should galvanize action, not discourage it."I want this fight," she added. "Bring it on."She said that she defined functional extinction as a situation in which a species would be gone by the third generation, and that she based her population estimates on extensive research, including land and tree surveys across eastern Australia. The data is available on her organization's website."I have driven to pretty much every part of the country," she said. "I absolutely know that there's not one koala population that's safe. I don't care what anyone says. I have been there. I've seen it. I've written about it. I've been dedicated to this job for 31 years."But Greenwald said he thought the term could have negative effects. "I think it's premature to call them functionally extinct," he said. "That would almost suggest that we give up hope, and I don't think it's at that point yet."Gill said there was a lot of space between a dire situation and a point of no return -- space for people to understand and to act."My main concern is that trust is one of our biggest assets when it comes to the scientific community and the conservation community," she added. "And I don't want to see that squandered."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company

    There is no doubt that the fires tearing across eastern Australia have been hurting koalas.With large areas of their crucial habitat ravaged, it is unclear what the future holds for a species that was already under threat before this round of bush fires. Some koalas have been rescued -- singed and dehydrated -- from the wild. And with blazes still burning, it is hard to know how many have been killed.But in describing the plight of these animals, is it possible to go too far?The phrase "functionally extinct" made the rounds in news articles and on social media over the weekend. The term refers to a species that no longer plays a role in an ecosystem or that is on its way to extinction, possibly irremovably.That provoked a visceral reaction from readers who wondered if the fuzzy marsupials, a national symbol of Australia, will be gone forever.In fact, koalas are not extinct. And some scientists warned that exaggeration can hurt, rather than help, conservation efforts."What is particularly frustrating about the term 'functional extinction' is it indicates a population that is basically past the point of no return, so it means that nothing really can be done," said Jacquelyn Gill, an associate professor at the University of Maine's Climate Change Institute and School of Biology and Ecology."That might seem like scientists quibbling over terms or trying to argue for nerdy levels of precision, but a strong statement like that should mean something," she said.Are koalas going extinct soon?Koalas could go extinct. The International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List, the authority on the conservation status of the world's species, says the koala population is declining and vulnerable -- but not endangered.There could be hundreds of thousands of koalas, but nailing down a number has proved impossible. Estimates range wildly, and every region is different. In some places, scientists say, koalas' numbers have declined by up to 80%.Noah Greenwald, the endangered species director at the Center for Biological Diversity, said there might have been around 300,000 koalas in Australia in 2016. But things may have changed since then -- especially given the recent fires."They're in a lot of trouble, and they need our care and our help if they're going to survive," he said.Koalas evolved to exist alongside wildfires, but the animals are facing new threats from human development, which has dislocated local populations and impaired their ability to survive fires, as well as climate change.Where did that phrase come from?On social media, many people who shared an article that used the term "functionally extinct" to describe koalas pointed to an article that appeared in Forbes on Saturday. That article, written by a senior contributor to the publication, was about the effects of the recent fires, but it appeared to cite a statement that was issued in May.The first person cited in the article was Deborah Tabart, the head of the Australian Koala Foundation.The foundation, a nonprofit conservation organization based in Brisbane, said in a statement May 10 that it believed koalas "may be functionally extinct in the entire landscape of Australia." The statement also said that the organization believed there were no more than 80,000 koalas left in the country.The organization doubled down on its use of the phrase in a different statement last month. But while the bush fires raged this month, Tabart said in another statement that "it is difficult for the Australian Koala Foundation to make any meaningful comments regarding the current Australian bush fires until the fires are over and people on the ground have evaluated the situation."The Forbes article Saturday also noted that "some researchers call into question" whether koalas were functionally extinct, "noting how difficult it is to measure total koala populations and that populations could be a much larger than estimated by the AKF."On Monday, another contributor to Forbes criticized the use of the phrase "functionally extinct" to describe koalas.The writer of the Saturday article, Trevor Nace, said in an email that "the use of the term 'functionally extinct' was Tabart's term, not mine, and was reported on by me, along with alternate views from experts."On Monday afternoon, Forbes removed the phrase "functionally extinct" from the headline and changed the beginning of the article to put less emphasis on the term.The tumult over a turn of phraseIn an interview, Tabart defended her use of the term and said that the threat of the end of a species should galvanize action, not discourage it."I want this fight," she added. "Bring it on."She said that she defined functional extinction as a situation in which a species would be gone by the third generation, and that she based her population estimates on extensive research, including land and tree surveys across eastern Australia. The data is available on her organization's website."I have driven to pretty much every part of the country," she said. "I absolutely know that there's not one koala population that's safe. I don't care what anyone says. I have been there. I've seen it. I've written about it. I've been dedicated to this job for 31 years."But Greenwald said he thought the term could have negative effects. "I think it's premature to call them functionally extinct," he said. "That would almost suggest that we give up hope, and I don't think it's at that point yet."Gill said there was a lot of space between a dire situation and a point of no return -- space for people to understand and to act."My main concern is that trust is one of our biggest assets when it comes to the scientific community and the conservation community," she added. "And I don't want to see that squandered."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company


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  • 58/79   Scientists Created Fake Rhino Horn. But Should We Use It?
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    In Africa, 892 rhinos were poached for their horns in 2018, down from a high of 1,349 killed in 2015. The decline in deaths is encouraging, but conservationists agree that poaching still poses a dire threat to Africa's rhino population, which hovers around 24,500 animals.Now, in the hopes of driving down the value of rhino horn and reducing poaching even more, scientists have created a convincing artificial rhino horn made from horsehair."We're not trying to supplant boots-on-the-ground, vigilant customs officials and protection of rhino habitat," said Fritz Vollrath, a biologist at the University of Oxford and senior author of the study, published in Scientific Reports. "But these measures alone so far have not been sufficient to save the rhino, so what we're doing here is bringing out a really good fake."The product that Vollrath and colleagues at Fudan University in China have produced looks identical to rhino horn under a microscope. It has a similar chemical signature and behaves like rhino horn when cut or shaved. It even smells the same when burned.With such properties, Vollrath believes his artificial horn could be used to covertly flood the market with a cheap, convincing replacement, reducing the demand that leads to rhinos being slaughtered.A number of experts pushed back, however, saying such a product is unnecessary and even dangerous.Some wealthy elites in China and Vietnam continue to give rhino horn as gifts and, in Vietnam, bring it to parties as a hangover preventive. In China, it's also carved into jewelry and ornate cups, and collected for speculation purposes."What we've seen is that most rhino horn is now being used for status symbols," said Olivia Swaak-Goldman, executive director of the Wildlife Justice Commission, a nonprofit organization that investigates wildlife trafficking networks.Status depends on rhino horn's exclusivity, high price and rarity, things that Vollrath believes his artificial horn could undermine.Rhino horn, as Vollrath puts it, is "nothing but a tuft of nose hair stuck together with glue that comes out of the animal's nose glands." He and his colleagues chose horsehair as a basis for their fake rhino horn because horses are a close relative of rhinos. They cleaned and tightly bundled the hair, then bound it together with a mixture of liquefied silk, which stood in for the collagen found in rhino horn, as well as cellulose, which represented the plant material that gets rubbed in as rhinos sharpen their horns.Pembient, a Seattle-based bioengineering company, is exploring the development of 3D-printed rhino horn. Matthew Markus, Pembient's chief executive, said he would be open to testing the new horsehair formula.But his company has also faced pushback from conservationists.Critics say that fake rhino horn risks stimulating demand for real horn and that it would complicate policing. "There's already scarce resources for wildlife crime, and we don't want to make it even more difficult for law enforcement," said Swaak-Goldman, who works with governments and law enforcement agencies.Peter Knights, chief executive of WildAid, a nonprofit organization dedicated to ending illegal wildlife trade, added that the market in Vietnam was already flooded with convincing fakes, like water buffalo horn, which accounts for up to 90% of what's sold as rhino horn.Frederick Chen, an economist at Wake Forest University, said that there was more than one way to flood a market, however. "Conservation groups tend to clump different strategies under one roof and have a knee-jerk reaction that they have to reject them all," he said. "But the dangers they point out don't apply to all strategies."Chen agreed that introducing a product marketed as an artificial alternative would risk driving up demand for real rhino horn. But covertly introducing a product that passes as real rhino horn but later reveals itself to have some undesirable defect -- horns that deteriorate after purchase, for example, or horns that, when consumed, trigger a stomachache -- could ultimately undermine demand. "If you introduce quality uncertainty into the market, you are trying to create confusion and essentially destroy the rhino horn market," he said.For now, these ideas remain in the realm of theory, and much of that theory goes against real-world evidence suggesting what might happen if the market was flooded with fake horn, said Solomon Hsiang, an economist at the University of California, Berkeley. Hsiang cautioned, for example, that experiments trying to undermine black markets in elephant ivory by selling legal ivory backfired and ultimately led to increased poaching.Engineering fake rhino horn "seems like an elaborate technological approach that is not without potentially serious risk," Hsiang said, when a much simpler strategy would be to focus on targeted demand reduction.According to Lynn Johnson, founder of Nature Needs More, a nonprofit organization that aims to reduce wildlife demand and supply, demand reduction campaigns should focus on top rhino horn users, who are usually wealthy, elite men.Johnson interviewed 20 such individuals in Vietnam and found that they did not fall for fakes: They take measures to ensure their purchase is genuine, including working with a trusted supply chain and requesting the rhino's tail as proof of provenance.They also told her that they view rhino horn as a luxury product that confers prestige. A 2018 study involving 30 Vietnamese rhino horn buyers found that most no longer believed it could cure cancer, a newfangled use that became popular around a decade ago, but they still sought it out as a symbolic final gesture to comfort terminally ill relatives.Belief in rhino horn's traditional medical properties also seems to be on the decline. A survey of 400 people in Vietnam carried out by WildAid in 2016 revealed that 23% thought rhino horn had medicinal value, down from 69% in 2014.But as long as influential people continue to hold rhino horn in high regard, Johnson says that younger and less successful people will also continue to see it as something desirable. "As soon as people can afford the real thing, they'll buy it," she said.Changing the minds of top users, something Johnson and her colleagues are trying to do, is therefore key to quashing demand, she said."I'm a scientist, but you have to know when science won't help," she said. "Calls for fake rhino horn just shows that there's a lack of understanding about the true commercial nature and consumer desire of current demand."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company

    In Africa, 892 rhinos were poached for their horns in 2018, down from a high of 1,349 killed in 2015. The decline in deaths is encouraging, but conservationists agree that poaching still poses a dire threat to Africa's rhino population, which hovers around 24,500 animals.Now, in the hopes of driving down the value of rhino horn and reducing poaching even more, scientists have created a convincing artificial rhino horn made from horsehair."We're not trying to supplant boots-on-the-ground, vigilant customs officials and protection of rhino habitat," said Fritz Vollrath, a biologist at the University of Oxford and senior author of the study, published in Scientific Reports. "But these measures alone so far have not been sufficient to save the rhino, so what we're doing here is bringing out a really good fake."The product that Vollrath and colleagues at Fudan University in China have produced looks identical to rhino horn under a microscope. It has a similar chemical signature and behaves like rhino horn when cut or shaved. It even smells the same when burned.With such properties, Vollrath believes his artificial horn could be used to covertly flood the market with a cheap, convincing replacement, reducing the demand that leads to rhinos being slaughtered.A number of experts pushed back, however, saying such a product is unnecessary and even dangerous.Some wealthy elites in China and Vietnam continue to give rhino horn as gifts and, in Vietnam, bring it to parties as a hangover preventive. In China, it's also carved into jewelry and ornate cups, and collected for speculation purposes."What we've seen is that most rhino horn is now being used for status symbols," said Olivia Swaak-Goldman, executive director of the Wildlife Justice Commission, a nonprofit organization that investigates wildlife trafficking networks.Status depends on rhino horn's exclusivity, high price and rarity, things that Vollrath believes his artificial horn could undermine.Rhino horn, as Vollrath puts it, is "nothing but a tuft of nose hair stuck together with glue that comes out of the animal's nose glands." He and his colleagues chose horsehair as a basis for their fake rhino horn because horses are a close relative of rhinos. They cleaned and tightly bundled the hair, then bound it together with a mixture of liquefied silk, which stood in for the collagen found in rhino horn, as well as cellulose, which represented the plant material that gets rubbed in as rhinos sharpen their horns.Pembient, a Seattle-based bioengineering company, is exploring the development of 3D-printed rhino horn. Matthew Markus, Pembient's chief executive, said he would be open to testing the new horsehair formula.But his company has also faced pushback from conservationists.Critics say that fake rhino horn risks stimulating demand for real horn and that it would complicate policing. "There's already scarce resources for wildlife crime, and we don't want to make it even more difficult for law enforcement," said Swaak-Goldman, who works with governments and law enforcement agencies.Peter Knights, chief executive of WildAid, a nonprofit organization dedicated to ending illegal wildlife trade, added that the market in Vietnam was already flooded with convincing fakes, like water buffalo horn, which accounts for up to 90% of what's sold as rhino horn.Frederick Chen, an economist at Wake Forest University, said that there was more than one way to flood a market, however. "Conservation groups tend to clump different strategies under one roof and have a knee-jerk reaction that they have to reject them all," he said. "But the dangers they point out don't apply to all strategies."Chen agreed that introducing a product marketed as an artificial alternative would risk driving up demand for real rhino horn. But covertly introducing a product that passes as real rhino horn but later reveals itself to have some undesirable defect -- horns that deteriorate after purchase, for example, or horns that, when consumed, trigger a stomachache -- could ultimately undermine demand. "If you introduce quality uncertainty into the market, you are trying to create confusion and essentially destroy the rhino horn market," he said.For now, these ideas remain in the realm of theory, and much of that theory goes against real-world evidence suggesting what might happen if the market was flooded with fake horn, said Solomon Hsiang, an economist at the University of California, Berkeley. Hsiang cautioned, for example, that experiments trying to undermine black markets in elephant ivory by selling legal ivory backfired and ultimately led to increased poaching.Engineering fake rhino horn "seems like an elaborate technological approach that is not without potentially serious risk," Hsiang said, when a much simpler strategy would be to focus on targeted demand reduction.According to Lynn Johnson, founder of Nature Needs More, a nonprofit organization that aims to reduce wildlife demand and supply, demand reduction campaigns should focus on top rhino horn users, who are usually wealthy, elite men.Johnson interviewed 20 such individuals in Vietnam and found that they did not fall for fakes: They take measures to ensure their purchase is genuine, including working with a trusted supply chain and requesting the rhino's tail as proof of provenance.They also told her that they view rhino horn as a luxury product that confers prestige. A 2018 study involving 30 Vietnamese rhino horn buyers found that most no longer believed it could cure cancer, a newfangled use that became popular around a decade ago, but they still sought it out as a symbolic final gesture to comfort terminally ill relatives.Belief in rhino horn's traditional medical properties also seems to be on the decline. A survey of 400 people in Vietnam carried out by WildAid in 2016 revealed that 23% thought rhino horn had medicinal value, down from 69% in 2014.But as long as influential people continue to hold rhino horn in high regard, Johnson says that younger and less successful people will also continue to see it as something desirable. "As soon as people can afford the real thing, they'll buy it," she said.Changing the minds of top users, something Johnson and her colleagues are trying to do, is therefore key to quashing demand, she said."I'm a scientist, but you have to know when science won't help," she said. "Calls for fake rhino horn just shows that there's a lack of understanding about the true commercial nature and consumer desire of current demand."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company


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  • 59/79   Archaeologists discovered a catacomb filled with mummified lion cubs, crocodiles, and cobras in an ancient Egyptian city of the dead
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Egyptologists discovered an ancient city of the dead in Saqqara. The grave site recently revealed dozens of mummified creatures, including lion cubs.

    Egyptologists discovered an ancient city of the dead in Saqqara. The grave site recently revealed dozens of mummified creatures, including lion cubs.


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  • 60/79   The Big Question on Hong Kong: How Will China Hit Back at Trump?
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. China is making a habit of issuing vague retaliation threats. So far, however, it hasn’t actually done much.The foreign ministry gave another warning on Thursday after President Donald Trump signed bills backing Hong Kong’s protesters, using language that mirrored a statement last week.China issued similar threats earlier this year after the U.S. approved arms sales to Taiwan, sanctioned companies over human-rights abuses in Xinjiang and put Huawei Technologies Co. on a blacklist.“We suggest that the U.S. stops sticking obstinately to its course or China will take resolute countermeasures,” the foreign ministry said. “The U.S. side will bear all responsibility for the consequences.”Later, foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang dodged questions on when China would reply or whether it would impact trade talks, telling reporters to “stay tuned.”“What will come will come,” he said.The failure to flesh out the details despite having weeks to prepare shows the difficulties China faces in hitting the U.S. without also hurting its own economy, which is growing at the slowest pace in almost three decades. Apart from implementing retaliatory tariffs against the U.S., China has largely stuck to a policy of “strategic composure” when it comes to other aspects of the relationship.Trade Talks ImpactMei Xinyu, a researcher at a think tank under China’s Commerce Ministry, said that the Hong Kong issue will definitely be discussed at the trade negotiation table and China will likely ask the U.S. side to clarify its stance, or even make some promises on refraining from using the bill.He added that China will prepare some countermeasures at the same time, echoing the Foreign Ministry’s remarks earlier, without elaborating on what specific measures will be taken.“It’ll bring a certain degree of uncertainty to the ongoing trade talks,” Mei said. “But it won’t necessarily make or break a deal.”CitigroupWhile slowing down the trade talks is the most obvious way China could retaliate, it’s clear that until now Beijing has tolerated a lot just to keep them on track. Without a phase one deal, China faces the prospect of another tariff hike in mid-December.There are other options, though most of them also carry the risk of backfiring economically.That’s something President Xi Jinping may not want to risk with economic troubles mounting at home and the Hong Kong unrest showing no signs of abating.Unreliable EntitiesIt could hit out at U.S. companies by releasing a long-threatened “unreliable entities” list, stop buying American products, unload Treasuries or curb exports to the U.S. of rare earths, which are critical to everything from smart-phones to electronic vehicles.On the diplomatic side, China could take measures such as halting cooperation on enforcing sanctions related to North Korea and Iran, recalling the Chinese ambassador to the U.S. or downgrading diplomatic relations.Hu Xijin, the editor-in-chief of state-run Global Times, said in a tweet Thursday that China was considering putting the drafters of the law on a no-entry list.“Hong Kong has increasingly become a card in China-U.S. trade war,” E Zhihuan, chief economist at Bank of China (Hong Kong) Ltd, said at a briefing in Beijing. “Now that Trump has showed his card, how we should react tests our wisdom. It’s a very complex and difficult situation.”Trump himself had little choice but to sign the bills, which required sanctions against any officials deemed responsible for human rights abuses or undermining the city’s autonomy, as well as banning the export of crowd-control items such as tear gas and rubber bullets to the city’s police. Near-unanimous support in Congress meant lawmakers could override a veto, and Trump doesn’t want to give Democrats an opening for attack ahead of the 2020 election.In signing the bills, Trump signaled to Xi that action wouldn’t be imminent. He expressed concerns with unspecified portions of the new law, saying they risked interfering with his constitutional authority to carry out American foreign policy.“I signed these bills out of respect for President Xi, China, and the people of Hong Kong,” the president said in a statement Wednesday.Internal AffairsFor China, however, the bills represent an interference in their internal affairs and could even encourage protesters who have become increasingly violent in recent months. While the trade talks are separate, the overall relationship could suffer, according to He Weiwen, who previously served as a commercial attache at the Chinese consulates in New York and San Francisco.“The U.S. has damaged China’s sovereignty and China will of course retaliate,” said He, who is now a senior research fellow at the Center for China and Globalization in Beijing. “Sovereignty prevails over trade for China.”When asked what China is likely to do, however, He didn’t elaborate.“I don’t know what specific moves they will make,” he said. “But there will likely be some consequences.”\--With assistance from Yinan Zhao and Carolynn Look.To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Peter Martin in Beijing at pmartin138@bloomberg.net;Lin Zhu in Beijing at lzhu243@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Daniel Ten Kate at dtenkate@bloomberg.net, Jeffrey Black, James MaygerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. China is making a habit of issuing vague retaliation threats. So far, however, it hasn’t actually done much.The foreign ministry gave another warning on Thursday after President Donald Trump signed bills backing Hong Kong’s protesters, using language that mirrored a statement last week.China issued similar threats earlier this year after the U.S. approved arms sales to Taiwan, sanctioned companies over human-rights abuses in Xinjiang and put Huawei Technologies Co. on a blacklist.“We suggest that the U.S. stops sticking obstinately to its course or China will take resolute countermeasures,” the foreign ministry said. “The U.S. side will bear all responsibility for the consequences.”Later, foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang dodged questions on when China would reply or whether it would impact trade talks, telling reporters to “stay tuned.”“What will come will come,” he said.The failure to flesh out the details despite having weeks to prepare shows the difficulties China faces in hitting the U.S. without also hurting its own economy, which is growing at the slowest pace in almost three decades. Apart from implementing retaliatory tariffs against the U.S., China has largely stuck to a policy of “strategic composure” when it comes to other aspects of the relationship.Trade Talks ImpactMei Xinyu, a researcher at a think tank under China’s Commerce Ministry, said that the Hong Kong issue will definitely be discussed at the trade negotiation table and China will likely ask the U.S. side to clarify its stance, or even make some promises on refraining from using the bill.He added that China will prepare some countermeasures at the same time, echoing the Foreign Ministry’s remarks earlier, without elaborating on what specific measures will be taken.“It’ll bring a certain degree of uncertainty to the ongoing trade talks,” Mei said. “But it won’t necessarily make or break a deal.”CitigroupWhile slowing down the trade talks is the most obvious way China could retaliate, it’s clear that until now Beijing has tolerated a lot just to keep them on track. Without a phase one deal, China faces the prospect of another tariff hike in mid-December.There are other options, though most of them also carry the risk of backfiring economically.That’s something President Xi Jinping may not want to risk with economic troubles mounting at home and the Hong Kong unrest showing no signs of abating.Unreliable EntitiesIt could hit out at U.S. companies by releasing a long-threatened “unreliable entities” list, stop buying American products, unload Treasuries or curb exports to the U.S. of rare earths, which are critical to everything from smart-phones to electronic vehicles.On the diplomatic side, China could take measures such as halting cooperation on enforcing sanctions related to North Korea and Iran, recalling the Chinese ambassador to the U.S. or downgrading diplomatic relations.Hu Xijin, the editor-in-chief of state-run Global Times, said in a tweet Thursday that China was considering putting the drafters of the law on a no-entry list.“Hong Kong has increasingly become a card in China-U.S. trade war,” E Zhihuan, chief economist at Bank of China (Hong Kong) Ltd, said at a briefing in Beijing. “Now that Trump has showed his card, how we should react tests our wisdom. It’s a very complex and difficult situation.”Trump himself had little choice but to sign the bills, which required sanctions against any officials deemed responsible for human rights abuses or undermining the city’s autonomy, as well as banning the export of crowd-control items such as tear gas and rubber bullets to the city’s police. Near-unanimous support in Congress meant lawmakers could override a veto, and Trump doesn’t want to give Democrats an opening for attack ahead of the 2020 election.In signing the bills, Trump signaled to Xi that action wouldn’t be imminent. He expressed concerns with unspecified portions of the new law, saying they risked interfering with his constitutional authority to carry out American foreign policy.“I signed these bills out of respect for President Xi, China, and the people of Hong Kong,” the president said in a statement Wednesday.Internal AffairsFor China, however, the bills represent an interference in their internal affairs and could even encourage protesters who have become increasingly violent in recent months. While the trade talks are separate, the overall relationship could suffer, according to He Weiwen, who previously served as a commercial attache at the Chinese consulates in New York and San Francisco.“The U.S. has damaged China’s sovereignty and China will of course retaliate,” said He, who is now a senior research fellow at the Center for China and Globalization in Beijing. “Sovereignty prevails over trade for China.”When asked what China is likely to do, however, He didn’t elaborate.“I don’t know what specific moves they will make,” he said. “But there will likely be some consequences.”\--With assistance from Yinan Zhao and Carolynn Look.To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Peter Martin in Beijing at pmartin138@bloomberg.net;Lin Zhu in Beijing at lzhu243@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Daniel Ten Kate at dtenkate@bloomberg.net, Jeffrey Black, James MaygerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 61/79   North Korea Tests Trump With Missiles, Signals More Coming
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- North Korea fired two short-range ballistic missiles and could be planning even bigger moves, stepping up pressure as it threatens to walk away from sputtering nuclear talks unless President Donald Trump offers up concessions by year end.The two missiles were fired in rapid succession from North Korea’s east coast Thursday, traveling a distance of about 380 kilometers (240 miles) and reaching a height of about 100 kms, Japanese Defense Minister Taro Kono told reporters. South Korea’s Defense Ministry provided similar data on the flights and called the launches “regrettable.”There may be more to come with the brisk movement of vehicles detected this month near an ICBM launch site, South Korea’s JoongAng Ilbo newspaper reported, citing an unidentified South Korean official. The movement appears to be associated with an engine test and South Korea is keeping a close eye on the situation, it said.The latest test came two years to the date since leader Kim Jong Un’s regime last test-fired an intercontinental ballistic missile capable of hitting all of the U.S. Kim put a brief freeze on testing after that and then resumed firing with a vengeance from May, sending off about two dozen missiles -- almost all of them short-range ballistic missiles.“Kim considers Trump as his political hostage and sees himself in a position to dictate the terms of the deal by demonstrating his capability to influence Trump’s chance for re-election,” said Chun Yungwoo, South Korea’s former chief envoy to international nuclear disarmament talks with North Korea.Kim Jong Un Bolsters Nuclear Threat to U.S. as Trump Talks StallNorth Korea released photos of the Thursday test. Kim, who has been on hand for many of the operations this year, attended the launch and “expressed great satisfaction over the results of the test-fire,” the country’s official Korean Central News Agency reported Friday.The missiles tested appear to be North Korea’s KN-25, a solid-fuel rocket designed to fired off in rapid succession from a mobile launcher that typically holds about four tubes. A series of shorter-range missile launches in recent months has improved North Korea’s ability to make solid-fuel ballistic missiles that are easier to move, hide and fire than many of its liquid-fuel versions.“These tests help improve their solid-fuel motors and not only is it good for their short-range systems, it would likely make their long-range missiles quicker and more powerful,” said Melissa Hanham, a weapons expert and deputy director of the Open Nuclear Network.Kim’s testing freeze ushered in unprecedented diplomacy with Trump, leading to historic meetings in Singapore, Vietnam and the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas. But Kim and Trump have little to show for their negotiations, with the U.S. and North Korea unable to agree on what they mean by denuclearization.Since the talks have started, Kim has been busy churning out fissile material for bombs and developing new missile technology that could make the next big launch of an ICBM even more concerning to Pentagon military planners, weapons experts have said.Trump has brushed off North Korea’s missile tests, which Japan and others say violate United Nations Security Council resolutions, signaling to Kim that he can continue developing his weapons program as long as he doesn’t fire off another ICBM.Kim has given Trump until the end of the year to ease up on sanctions choking his state’s paltry economy. In recent weeks his top cadres have been quoted in official media as expressing frustration by what they saw as U.S. inflexibility. The Trump team has said North Korea can only get rewards when it completely gives up nuclear arms -- a move Pyongyang has said would be tantamount to political suicide.“We, without being given anything, gave things the U.S. president can brag about but the U.S. side has not yet taken any corresponding step,” a spokesman for the State Affairs Commission headed by Kim said earlier this month. He added that the U.S. will face a “greater threat” if it does nothing.\--With assistance from Shinhye Kang and Sophie Jackman.To contact the reporters on this story: Jon Herskovitz in Tokyo at jherskovitz@bloomberg.net;Jihye Lee in Seoul at jlee2352@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Daniel Ten Kate at dtenkate@bloomberg.net, Jon Herskovitz, Muneeza NaqviFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- North Korea fired two short-range ballistic missiles and could be planning even bigger moves, stepping up pressure as it threatens to walk away from sputtering nuclear talks unless President Donald Trump offers up concessions by year end.The two missiles were fired in rapid succession from North Korea’s east coast Thursday, traveling a distance of about 380 kilometers (240 miles) and reaching a height of about 100 kms, Japanese Defense Minister Taro Kono told reporters. South Korea’s Defense Ministry provided similar data on the flights and called the launches “regrettable.”There may be more to come with the brisk movement of vehicles detected this month near an ICBM launch site, South Korea’s JoongAng Ilbo newspaper reported, citing an unidentified South Korean official. The movement appears to be associated with an engine test and South Korea is keeping a close eye on the situation, it said.The latest test came two years to the date since leader Kim Jong Un’s regime last test-fired an intercontinental ballistic missile capable of hitting all of the U.S. Kim put a brief freeze on testing after that and then resumed firing with a vengeance from May, sending off about two dozen missiles -- almost all of them short-range ballistic missiles.“Kim considers Trump as his political hostage and sees himself in a position to dictate the terms of the deal by demonstrating his capability to influence Trump’s chance for re-election,” said Chun Yungwoo, South Korea’s former chief envoy to international nuclear disarmament talks with North Korea.Kim Jong Un Bolsters Nuclear Threat to U.S. as Trump Talks StallNorth Korea released photos of the Thursday test. Kim, who has been on hand for many of the operations this year, attended the launch and “expressed great satisfaction over the results of the test-fire,” the country’s official Korean Central News Agency reported Friday.The missiles tested appear to be North Korea’s KN-25, a solid-fuel rocket designed to fired off in rapid succession from a mobile launcher that typically holds about four tubes. A series of shorter-range missile launches in recent months has improved North Korea’s ability to make solid-fuel ballistic missiles that are easier to move, hide and fire than many of its liquid-fuel versions.“These tests help improve their solid-fuel motors and not only is it good for their short-range systems, it would likely make their long-range missiles quicker and more powerful,” said Melissa Hanham, a weapons expert and deputy director of the Open Nuclear Network.Kim’s testing freeze ushered in unprecedented diplomacy with Trump, leading to historic meetings in Singapore, Vietnam and the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas. But Kim and Trump have little to show for their negotiations, with the U.S. and North Korea unable to agree on what they mean by denuclearization.Since the talks have started, Kim has been busy churning out fissile material for bombs and developing new missile technology that could make the next big launch of an ICBM even more concerning to Pentagon military planners, weapons experts have said.Trump has brushed off North Korea’s missile tests, which Japan and others say violate United Nations Security Council resolutions, signaling to Kim that he can continue developing his weapons program as long as he doesn’t fire off another ICBM.Kim has given Trump until the end of the year to ease up on sanctions choking his state’s paltry economy. In recent weeks his top cadres have been quoted in official media as expressing frustration by what they saw as U.S. inflexibility. The Trump team has said North Korea can only get rewards when it completely gives up nuclear arms -- a move Pyongyang has said would be tantamount to political suicide.“We, without being given anything, gave things the U.S. president can brag about but the U.S. side has not yet taken any corresponding step,” a spokesman for the State Affairs Commission headed by Kim said earlier this month. He added that the U.S. will face a “greater threat” if it does nothing.\--With assistance from Shinhye Kang and Sophie Jackman.To contact the reporters on this story: Jon Herskovitz in Tokyo at jherskovitz@bloomberg.net;Jihye Lee in Seoul at jlee2352@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Daniel Ten Kate at dtenkate@bloomberg.net, Jon Herskovitz, Muneeza NaqviFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 62/79   Assad approves $9.2 bln budget
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Syria's President Bashar al-Assad on Thursday approved a $9.2-billion budget for his war-torn country, official media reported.  The 2020 budget, approved by Syria's parliament before being signed off by Assad, sees the country's deficit rise by 54 percent compared to the current budget, acccording to pro-government newspaper Al-Watan.  The country's devastating eight-year war has inflicted damage estimated by the United Nations last year at some $400 billion.

    Syria's President Bashar al-Assad on Thursday approved a $9.2-billion budget for his war-torn country, official media reported. The 2020 budget, approved by Syria's parliament before being signed off by Assad, sees the country's deficit rise by 54 percent compared to the current budget, acccording to pro-government newspaper Al-Watan. The country's devastating eight-year war has inflicted damage estimated by the United Nations last year at some $400 billion.


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  • 63/79   Ilhan Omar's Republican opponent in Twitter ban over 'hanging' posts
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    * Danielle Stella post featured ‘stick figure hanging from gallows’  * Republican aiming to unseat Omar charged with felony theftIlhan Omar introduces Bernie Sanders at a rally in Minneapolis earlier this month. Photograph: Evan Frost/APA campaign account for Danielle Stella, a pro-Trump Republican candidate for Congress, was banned from Twitter after it published a violent comment about the Democrat she hopes to unseat next year, Minnesota representative Ilhan Omar.Stella’s campaign Twitter account, @2020MNCongress, featured at least two posts involving the idea of Omar being hanged, according to the Washington Times, which broke the story of her suspension.embedThe tweets concerned an unsubstantiated allegation that Omar – one of the first Muslim women elected to Congress – shared sensitive information with Qatar, which then wound up with Iran.A spokesperson for Omar previously told the Jerusalem Post of the claim: “Since the day she was elected, Saudi Arabian trolls and mouthpieces have targeted Omar with misinformation and conspiracy theories.”An initial tweet from Stella’s campaign account reportedly said: “If it is proven [Omar] passed sensitive info to Iran, she should be tried for treason and hanged.”The Washington Times said the account “subsequently tweeted the link to an article that aggregated her remark, accompanied by a crude depiction of a stick figure hanging from gallows”.The @2020MNCongress account cannot be viewed. Text on the page reads “account suspended” and “Twitter suspends accounts which violate the Twitter Rules”.In a statement, Twitter told the Guardian: “The account was permanently suspended for repeated violations of the Twitter Rules.”Stella said in a statement: “My suspension for advocating for the enforcement of federal code proves Twitter will always side with and fight to protect terrorists, traitors, pedophiles and rapists.”The Guardian revealed that Stella has been arrested twice this year over accusations that she shoplifted some $2,300 in goods from Target and $40 in items from a grocery, Stella has maintained her innocence.She has made claims about Omar before, claiming she broke the law by telling immigrants how to avoid authorities. Lawmakers who don’t “uphold the rule of law”, Stella said, should be kicked out of office.A spokesperson for Omar did not immediately respond to a request for comment.Since winning election to Congress last year, Omar has attracted rightwing attacks and fringe conspiracy theories as well as outright threats of violence. The congresswoman said this April she faced an increase in death threats after Trump accused her of downplaying September 11.On 19 November, New York man Patrick Carlineo pleaded guilty in relation to calling Omar’s office and telling a staffer: “Why are you working for her, she’s a [expletive] terrorist. Somebody ought to put a bullet in her skull. Back in the day, our forefathers would have put a bullet in her [expletive].”Omar, who came to the US as a Somali refugee, appealed for “compassion”.“As someone who fled a war zone, I know how destabilizing acts of political violence can be,” she said in a letter to the judge. “That his threat of violence relied on hateful stereotypes about my faith only made it more dangerous … it was a threat against an entire religion, at a time of rising hate crime against religious minorities in our country.”She added: “We must ask: who are we as a nation if we respond to acts of political retribution with retribution ourselves? The answer to hate is not more hate; it is compassion.”

    * Danielle Stella post featured ‘stick figure hanging from gallows’ * Republican aiming to unseat Omar charged with felony theftIlhan Omar introduces Bernie Sanders at a rally in Minneapolis earlier this month. Photograph: Evan Frost/APA campaign account for Danielle Stella, a pro-Trump Republican candidate for Congress, was banned from Twitter after it published a violent comment about the Democrat she hopes to unseat next year, Minnesota representative Ilhan Omar.Stella’s campaign Twitter account, @2020MNCongress, featured at least two posts involving the idea of Omar being hanged, according to the Washington Times, which broke the story of her suspension.embedThe tweets concerned an unsubstantiated allegation that Omar – one of the first Muslim women elected to Congress – shared sensitive information with Qatar, which then wound up with Iran.A spokesperson for Omar previously told the Jerusalem Post of the claim: “Since the day she was elected, Saudi Arabian trolls and mouthpieces have targeted Omar with misinformation and conspiracy theories.”An initial tweet from Stella’s campaign account reportedly said: “If it is proven [Omar] passed sensitive info to Iran, she should be tried for treason and hanged.”The Washington Times said the account “subsequently tweeted the link to an article that aggregated her remark, accompanied by a crude depiction of a stick figure hanging from gallows”.The @2020MNCongress account cannot be viewed. Text on the page reads “account suspended” and “Twitter suspends accounts which violate the Twitter Rules”.In a statement, Twitter told the Guardian: “The account was permanently suspended for repeated violations of the Twitter Rules.”Stella said in a statement: “My suspension for advocating for the enforcement of federal code proves Twitter will always side with and fight to protect terrorists, traitors, pedophiles and rapists.”The Guardian revealed that Stella has been arrested twice this year over accusations that she shoplifted some $2,300 in goods from Target and $40 in items from a grocery, Stella has maintained her innocence.She has made claims about Omar before, claiming she broke the law by telling immigrants how to avoid authorities. Lawmakers who don’t “uphold the rule of law”, Stella said, should be kicked out of office.A spokesperson for Omar did not immediately respond to a request for comment.Since winning election to Congress last year, Omar has attracted rightwing attacks and fringe conspiracy theories as well as outright threats of violence. The congresswoman said this April she faced an increase in death threats after Trump accused her of downplaying September 11.On 19 November, New York man Patrick Carlineo pleaded guilty in relation to calling Omar’s office and telling a staffer: “Why are you working for her, she’s a [expletive] terrorist. Somebody ought to put a bullet in her skull. Back in the day, our forefathers would have put a bullet in her [expletive].”Omar, who came to the US as a Somali refugee, appealed for “compassion”.“As someone who fled a war zone, I know how destabilizing acts of political violence can be,” she said in a letter to the judge. “That his threat of violence relied on hateful stereotypes about my faith only made it more dangerous … it was a threat against an entire religion, at a time of rising hate crime against religious minorities in our country.”She added: “We must ask: who are we as a nation if we respond to acts of political retribution with retribution ourselves? The answer to hate is not more hate; it is compassion.”


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  • 64/79   Johnson Says There’ll Be No U.S. Trade Deal if It Includes the NHS
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, follow us @Brexit and subscribe to our podcast.Boris Johnson is heading for a 68-seat majority in the House of Commons, a mandate not seen since the height of the Margaret Thatcher years, according to the most hotly-anticipated poll of the election campaign. A margin that size would allow him to ratify his Brexit deal ahead of the Jan. 31 deadline, and potentially give him some breathing space to compromise in subsequent trade negotiations with the European Union.The Prime Minister, who refused to attend a TV debate on climate change with other party leaders on Thursday evening, said he would walk away from a U.S. trade deal after Brexit if President Donald Trump insists on keeping the National Health Service on the table.Must Read: U.K. Election: The Key Party PromisesFor more on the election visit ELEC.Key Developments:YouGov: Conservatives on course for 43% (359 seats), Labour 32% (211 seats), Liberal Democrats 14% (13 seats), SNP 3% (43 seats), Brexit Party 3% (0 seats)Pound rises as much as 0.2% in London before paring gainsJohnson tells ITV the election is still “a very tight race” and there’s a risk of a hung ParliamentThe Institute for Fiscal Studies said neither Conservatives nor Labour have credible spending plansLabour Leader Jeremy Corbyn, SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon and other party leaders debated climate change in a TV debate. Johnson didn’t show up and hosts Channel 4 turned away Michael Gove, who had been sent as a substitute.Still ‘a Very Tight Race,’ Johnson Says (8 p.m.)Boris Johnson insisted in an interview with ITV that the election is still “a very tight race” in spite of polls showing his Conservatives winning a comfortable majority.“There is a genuine risk that there could be a Corbyn, Sturgeon coalition,” he said.Johnson: No U.S. Deal if NHS Included (7:15 p.m.)Boris Johnson insisted the National Health Service will not be on the table in trade talks with the U.S. after Brexit and said he would walk away if President Donald Trump insists on keeping it in the negotiations.“Goodbye, we’d say see you then, that would be it,” Johnson said when asked how he would respond if Trump insists on discussing U.S. access to the state funded health system. “There’s be no point in continuing the conversation.”Labour said on Wednesday that Johnson’s Tories have been involved in secret talks with the U.S. and produced documents which they said showed the two sides have already discussed access for U.S. corporations and pharmaceutical companies to the service.“The NHS is one of the greatest things about British society, it’s loved and admired around the world. Why would you do something as stupid as that,” Johnson said in an interview with ITV.Read More: Corbyn Accuses U.K. Tories of Secret NHS Talks With the U.S.Labour Donations Beat Tories in 2nd Week (3 p.m.)Donations to the Labour Party topped those to the Conservatives in the second week of the election campaign. In the week of Nov. 13-19, Labour reaped 3.49 million pounds ($4.5 million), compared to 2.97 million pounds for the Conservatives, according to a statement from the Electoral Commission. The Brexit Party was given 2.25 million pounds and the Liberal Democrats 251,000 pounds, the commission said.The Electoral Commission release, which only details donations of more than 7,500 pounds, includes a 2 million-pound gift for the Brexit Party from Christopher Harborne, a businessman. Most of Labour’s total in the official data came from Unite, the labor union, which donated 3 million pounds, but the party said Wednesday it had also been given more than 2.5 million pounds in small donations in the month since the election was called -- 98% of it in amounts of 100 pounds or less.It’s a turnaround from the first week of the campaign, when the Tory total of 5.7 million pounds eclipsed Labour’s 218,500 pounds and the Liberal Democrats’ 275,000 pounds.Liberal Democrats Step Up Attack on Johnson (12 p.m.)Liberal Democrat Leader Jo Swinson said Prime Minister Boris Johnson is driven by a “sense of Etonian entitlement” rather than any “burning desire to make people’s lives better,” as she seeks to position her party as the only one that can take seats off the Conservatives.In a speech titled “The Problem with Boris Johnson,” Swinson said most people are in politics “for the right reasons” and suggested the prime minister doesn’t care about ordinary people. “Boris Johnson only cares about Boris Johnson and he will do whatever it takes, sacrifice whatever or whoever is needed to get what he wants,” Swinson said.The problem for Swinson is that polls show her message is not cutting through with voters. According to the latest YouGov projection, the Liberal Democrats are on course to gain just one extra seat in the Dec. 12 vote.Javid Says He’s ‘Confident’ on Policy Costings (12 p.m.)Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid said he’s “confident” about the costings and funding for the Conservative Party’s manifesto pledges, after the influential Institute for Fiscal Studies think tank accused both Labour and the Tories (see 10 a.m.) of lacking credibility on their spending plans.“We have been very clear with our spending commitments in this election,” Javid told reporters during a campaign visit to Darlington, according to the Press Association. “We have a very detailed costings document -- the most detailed I would say that any party has published in any British election -- so I’m very confident about that.”Javid also attacked Labour’s plans, saying they would trigger a loss of confidence in the U.K. economy.IFS Says Tory, Labour Spending Plans Not Credible (10 a.m.)The Institute for Fiscal Studies offered a damning analysis of both the Conservatives’ and Labour’s election pledges, and warned voters to expect higher taxes than either party has outlined.Boris Johnson’s Conservatives and Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour have outlined vastly different offerings for voters. While Corbyn is promising a generational shift in public spending along with sweeping nationalization plans, the ruling party is presenting a more fiscally conservative approach, offering themselves up as the responsible alternative to Labour’s radical ideas.But according to the IFS, neither party has a “properly credible prospectus.” In its assessment, the Tories will end up spending more than planned, and so will have to raise taxes or borrow more, and Labour won’t be able to deliver on the investment plans on the scale it imagines. In the longer term, Labour would also need to raise more funding, and the IFS says it would have to hike income taxes on more than just the top 5% of earners.Read more: Think Tank Criticizes Fiscal Plans of Both Major PartiesLabour’s ‘Red Wall’ Problem (9:30 a.m.)Wednesday night’s YouGov poll showed Labour winning no new seats and watching the crumbling of its so-called red wall of districts in the north of England -- examples include Bishop Auckland, Great Grimsby and Bolsover -- which are traditionally Labour, but also strongly in favor of Brexit and now forecast to fall to the Tories.So far, Corbyn’s party has focused on trying to ensure it doesn’t lose votes to the pro-EU Liberal Democrats, and its policy to hold a second referendum on Brexit reflects that. But the YouGov poll shows Labour must now find a way to win support back from the Tories among voters committed to leaving the bloc. It’s likely that the party will shift its message in the coming days.But there’s plenty of uncertainty in the YouGov forecast. Of the predicted Conservative gains, 30 were by less than 5%. And the poll itself could change behavior. By offering a seat-by-seat prediction, it could enable voters who oppose Brexit or the Conservatives to see how best to vote against Johnson.Read more: Key Poll Predicts Big Majority for Johnson to Deliver BrexitHancock: Patents, Drugs Off Table in U.S. Talks (Earlier)Health Secretary Matt Hancock used his broadcast round to hit back at Labour’s accusations (see Labour’s Gardiner earlier) that a Conservative government would allow the National Health Service to be used as a negotiating chip in U.S. trade talks.“We do want a trade deal with the U.S. and we have been absolutely clear that the NHS will not be part of it,” Hancock told BBC radio. “We are crystal clear that it isn’t an area on which we’re prepared to give ground.”He also said drug pricing will not be on the table during the negotiations, and ruled out discussions on changes to drug-patent rules.“Why would we give the Americans more money for drugs when I spend my time battling to get drugs onto the NHS at a price the NHS can afford?” he said. “The point of trade deals is to get prices down, not to have prices up.”Labour Keeps Up NHS Attack Line (Earlier)Labour’s trade spokesman Barry Gardiner warned that Boris Johnson’s approach to a U.S. trade deal would lead to further privatization on the National Health Service. His comments continued Labour’s attack lines from Wednesday, when the opposition party published government accounts of meetings between British and American trade officials.Gardiner told BBC radio that the documents showed officials discussed longer patents to protect drug makers and, he said, illustrated how U.S. companies might get full market access to the U.K. health service.“The potential cost of that to the NHS would just pull the guts out of the services that we were able to provide for people and force further privatization,” he said. “This is how you destroy the health service from within. You force people to go private by not being able any longer to provide a full comprehensive range of services.”Parties Likely to Break New Fiscal Rules (Earlier)U.K. Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid and his opposition rival John McDonnell are on course to break the fiscal rules they announced less than a month ago, according to research claims by the Resolution Foundation.Even a tiny downgrade to the economic outlook could force a Tory government to raise taxes, return to austerity or abandon its new rules, the London-based think tank said. A Labour government would find itself in a similar position and have to row back on several big manifesto commitments.Earlier:Key Poll Predicts Big Majority for Johnson to Deliver BrexitU.K. Election: The Key Party PromisesU.K. Parties Given Little Chance of Achieving New Fiscal RulesIs Corbyn an Anti-Semite? It No Longer Matters: Therese Raphael\--With assistance from Jessica Shankleman, Robert Hutton and Fergal O'Brien.To contact the reporters on this story: Alex Morales in London at amorales2@bloomberg.net;Andrew Atkinson in London at a.atkinson@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Stuart Biggs, Mark WilliamsFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, follow us @Brexit and subscribe to our podcast.Boris Johnson is heading for a 68-seat majority in the House of Commons, a mandate not seen since the height of the Margaret Thatcher years, according to the most hotly-anticipated poll of the election campaign. A margin that size would allow him to ratify his Brexit deal ahead of the Jan. 31 deadline, and potentially give him some breathing space to compromise in subsequent trade negotiations with the European Union.The Prime Minister, who refused to attend a TV debate on climate change with other party leaders on Thursday evening, said he would walk away from a U.S. trade deal after Brexit if President Donald Trump insists on keeping the National Health Service on the table.Must Read: U.K. Election: The Key Party PromisesFor more on the election visit ELEC.Key Developments:YouGov: Conservatives on course for 43% (359 seats), Labour 32% (211 seats), Liberal Democrats 14% (13 seats), SNP 3% (43 seats), Brexit Party 3% (0 seats)Pound rises as much as 0.2% in London before paring gainsJohnson tells ITV the election is still “a very tight race” and there’s a risk of a hung ParliamentThe Institute for Fiscal Studies said neither Conservatives nor Labour have credible spending plansLabour Leader Jeremy Corbyn, SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon and other party leaders debated climate change in a TV debate. Johnson didn’t show up and hosts Channel 4 turned away Michael Gove, who had been sent as a substitute.Still ‘a Very Tight Race,’ Johnson Says (8 p.m.)Boris Johnson insisted in an interview with ITV that the election is still “a very tight race” in spite of polls showing his Conservatives winning a comfortable majority.“There is a genuine risk that there could be a Corbyn, Sturgeon coalition,” he said.Johnson: No U.S. Deal if NHS Included (7:15 p.m.)Boris Johnson insisted the National Health Service will not be on the table in trade talks with the U.S. after Brexit and said he would walk away if President Donald Trump insists on keeping it in the negotiations.“Goodbye, we’d say see you then, that would be it,” Johnson said when asked how he would respond if Trump insists on discussing U.S. access to the state funded health system. “There’s be no point in continuing the conversation.”Labour said on Wednesday that Johnson’s Tories have been involved in secret talks with the U.S. and produced documents which they said showed the two sides have already discussed access for U.S. corporations and pharmaceutical companies to the service.“The NHS is one of the greatest things about British society, it’s loved and admired around the world. Why would you do something as stupid as that,” Johnson said in an interview with ITV.Read More: Corbyn Accuses U.K. Tories of Secret NHS Talks With the U.S.Labour Donations Beat Tories in 2nd Week (3 p.m.)Donations to the Labour Party topped those to the Conservatives in the second week of the election campaign. In the week of Nov. 13-19, Labour reaped 3.49 million pounds ($4.5 million), compared to 2.97 million pounds for the Conservatives, according to a statement from the Electoral Commission. The Brexit Party was given 2.25 million pounds and the Liberal Democrats 251,000 pounds, the commission said.The Electoral Commission release, which only details donations of more than 7,500 pounds, includes a 2 million-pound gift for the Brexit Party from Christopher Harborne, a businessman. Most of Labour’s total in the official data came from Unite, the labor union, which donated 3 million pounds, but the party said Wednesday it had also been given more than 2.5 million pounds in small donations in the month since the election was called -- 98% of it in amounts of 100 pounds or less.It’s a turnaround from the first week of the campaign, when the Tory total of 5.7 million pounds eclipsed Labour’s 218,500 pounds and the Liberal Democrats’ 275,000 pounds.Liberal Democrats Step Up Attack on Johnson (12 p.m.)Liberal Democrat Leader Jo Swinson said Prime Minister Boris Johnson is driven by a “sense of Etonian entitlement” rather than any “burning desire to make people’s lives better,” as she seeks to position her party as the only one that can take seats off the Conservatives.In a speech titled “The Problem with Boris Johnson,” Swinson said most people are in politics “for the right reasons” and suggested the prime minister doesn’t care about ordinary people. “Boris Johnson only cares about Boris Johnson and he will do whatever it takes, sacrifice whatever or whoever is needed to get what he wants,” Swinson said.The problem for Swinson is that polls show her message is not cutting through with voters. According to the latest YouGov projection, the Liberal Democrats are on course to gain just one extra seat in the Dec. 12 vote.Javid Says He’s ‘Confident’ on Policy Costings (12 p.m.)Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid said he’s “confident” about the costings and funding for the Conservative Party’s manifesto pledges, after the influential Institute for Fiscal Studies think tank accused both Labour and the Tories (see 10 a.m.) of lacking credibility on their spending plans.“We have been very clear with our spending commitments in this election,” Javid told reporters during a campaign visit to Darlington, according to the Press Association. “We have a very detailed costings document -- the most detailed I would say that any party has published in any British election -- so I’m very confident about that.”Javid also attacked Labour’s plans, saying they would trigger a loss of confidence in the U.K. economy.IFS Says Tory, Labour Spending Plans Not Credible (10 a.m.)The Institute for Fiscal Studies offered a damning analysis of both the Conservatives’ and Labour’s election pledges, and warned voters to expect higher taxes than either party has outlined.Boris Johnson’s Conservatives and Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour have outlined vastly different offerings for voters. While Corbyn is promising a generational shift in public spending along with sweeping nationalization plans, the ruling party is presenting a more fiscally conservative approach, offering themselves up as the responsible alternative to Labour’s radical ideas.But according to the IFS, neither party has a “properly credible prospectus.” In its assessment, the Tories will end up spending more than planned, and so will have to raise taxes or borrow more, and Labour won’t be able to deliver on the investment plans on the scale it imagines. In the longer term, Labour would also need to raise more funding, and the IFS says it would have to hike income taxes on more than just the top 5% of earners.Read more: Think Tank Criticizes Fiscal Plans of Both Major PartiesLabour’s ‘Red Wall’ Problem (9:30 a.m.)Wednesday night’s YouGov poll showed Labour winning no new seats and watching the crumbling of its so-called red wall of districts in the north of England -- examples include Bishop Auckland, Great Grimsby and Bolsover -- which are traditionally Labour, but also strongly in favor of Brexit and now forecast to fall to the Tories.So far, Corbyn’s party has focused on trying to ensure it doesn’t lose votes to the pro-EU Liberal Democrats, and its policy to hold a second referendum on Brexit reflects that. But the YouGov poll shows Labour must now find a way to win support back from the Tories among voters committed to leaving the bloc. It’s likely that the party will shift its message in the coming days.But there’s plenty of uncertainty in the YouGov forecast. Of the predicted Conservative gains, 30 were by less than 5%. And the poll itself could change behavior. By offering a seat-by-seat prediction, it could enable voters who oppose Brexit or the Conservatives to see how best to vote against Johnson.Read more: Key Poll Predicts Big Majority for Johnson to Deliver BrexitHancock: Patents, Drugs Off Table in U.S. Talks (Earlier)Health Secretary Matt Hancock used his broadcast round to hit back at Labour’s accusations (see Labour’s Gardiner earlier) that a Conservative government would allow the National Health Service to be used as a negotiating chip in U.S. trade talks.“We do want a trade deal with the U.S. and we have been absolutely clear that the NHS will not be part of it,” Hancock told BBC radio. “We are crystal clear that it isn’t an area on which we’re prepared to give ground.”He also said drug pricing will not be on the table during the negotiations, and ruled out discussions on changes to drug-patent rules.“Why would we give the Americans more money for drugs when I spend my time battling to get drugs onto the NHS at a price the NHS can afford?” he said. “The point of trade deals is to get prices down, not to have prices up.”Labour Keeps Up NHS Attack Line (Earlier)Labour’s trade spokesman Barry Gardiner warned that Boris Johnson’s approach to a U.S. trade deal would lead to further privatization on the National Health Service. His comments continued Labour’s attack lines from Wednesday, when the opposition party published government accounts of meetings between British and American trade officials.Gardiner told BBC radio that the documents showed officials discussed longer patents to protect drug makers and, he said, illustrated how U.S. companies might get full market access to the U.K. health service.“The potential cost of that to the NHS would just pull the guts out of the services that we were able to provide for people and force further privatization,” he said. “This is how you destroy the health service from within. You force people to go private by not being able any longer to provide a full comprehensive range of services.”Parties Likely to Break New Fiscal Rules (Earlier)U.K. Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid and his opposition rival John McDonnell are on course to break the fiscal rules they announced less than a month ago, according to research claims by the Resolution Foundation.Even a tiny downgrade to the economic outlook could force a Tory government to raise taxes, return to austerity or abandon its new rules, the London-based think tank said. A Labour government would find itself in a similar position and have to row back on several big manifesto commitments.Earlier:Key Poll Predicts Big Majority for Johnson to Deliver BrexitU.K. Election: The Key Party PromisesU.K. Parties Given Little Chance of Achieving New Fiscal RulesIs Corbyn an Anti-Semite? It No Longer Matters: Therese Raphael\--With assistance from Jessica Shankleman, Robert Hutton and Fergal O'Brien.To contact the reporters on this story: Alex Morales in London at amorales2@bloomberg.net;Andrew Atkinson in London at a.atkinson@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Stuart Biggs, Mark WilliamsFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 65/79   Bolivia to renew Israel ties after rupture under Morales
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Bolivia said Thursday it will restore diplomatic ties with Israel, a decade after then-President Evo Morales severed relations because of an Israeli military offensive in Gaza.  The renewal of ties with Israel was announced by interim Foreign Minister Karen Longaric as part of an overhaul of Bolivia’s foreign policy following Morales’ resignation this month.  Many Israeli tourists visited Bolivia before Morales cut off relations with Israel, and the hope is that they will return, Longaric said.

    Bolivia said Thursday it will restore diplomatic ties with Israel, a decade after then-President Evo Morales severed relations because of an Israeli military offensive in Gaza. The renewal of ties with Israel was announced by interim Foreign Minister Karen Longaric as part of an overhaul of Bolivia’s foreign policy following Morales’ resignation this month. Many Israeli tourists visited Bolivia before Morales cut off relations with Israel, and the hope is that they will return, Longaric said.


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  • 66/79   Saudi laws continue to hold women back from travel despite MBS reforms
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Scanning the departures board at Riyadh’s international airport, Eman tried to find her gate as she struggled with an oversized suitcase. She had travelled countless times before but always with her father, who had taken care of everything. It was the first time the 26-year-old had flown alone and she was finding it all a bit daunting. “My father didn’t like me going on trips without him or my brother, and I had always respected his wishes,” Eman, who asked that her surname not be published, told the Telegraph. “He was worried about what I would do if I had too much independence.” Under Saudi Arabia’s guardianship system, women had to rely on the permission of male relatives to leave the country and, in some cases, even to leave the home. But a royal decree issued in August ruled that women over the age of 21 could travel abroad and apply for a passport without a guardian's permission. Eman felt emboldened by the decree to tell her father that she would be travelling alone this time for a business meeting in Beirut, where she hoped to find new clients for her fledgling beauty company. A Saudi woman displays her new driving license, at the General Department of Traffic in the capital, Riyadh, after the kingdom lifts the ban on women driving in June last year Credit: AP “He wants my business to succeed, but he is still a bit old-fashioned,” she said. “The guardianship laws are partly about protecting women, but I think part of it is has always been about control.” Things have been changing quickly in the ultra-conservative kingdom as the young Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman pushes to modernise the country.  In less than a year, MBS, as he has become known, has dropped Saudi’s draconian ban on women driving, done away with the “hai’a” which policed their dress and sanctioned mixed gender gatherings. But despite the reforms, women in Saudi told the Telegraph that the country’s laws continue to work against them to prevent them from travelling. Male guardians can still file cases of filial "disobedience", a crime which can lead to forcible return to their male guardian’s home or imprisonment in a women’s shelter. Rahaf Mohammed al-Qunun (C) accompanied by Canadian Minister of Foreign Affairs Chryistia Freeland (R), arrives at Toronto Pearson International Airport after escaping her "abusive" family   Credit: Reuters A legal provision known as "taghayyub" in Arabic, meaning “absent”, could also be invoked if a woman runs away from home without permission. Just this month it was reported that Princess Basmah Bint Saud Bin Abdul Aziz, the youngest daughter of deposed King Saud, was arrested trying to board a flight from the city of Jeddah to Geneva. The princess’ US lawyer said that following her detention the 55-year-old, who had campaigned for women's rights among other issues, “just fell off the radar” and has not been heard from since. “Even if they get to the airport with their documents and there is no physical restriction on their travel, women’s fathers or husbands could call up airport officials and tell them that they had been ‘disobedient’,” Ms Begum said. “There are still many parts of the law that continue to work against women.” Ms Begum said the decision marked a big step towards dismantling the guardianship system, but cautioned that women’s rights were yet to be fully enshrined. “They decree does not appear to positively affirm women’s right to travel abroad, as is their right under international law, and because it is not specific in its wording there are loopholes,” she said. Dua (L) and Dalal (R) al-Showaiki used Twitter to document their escape from their family from Turkey In another example, divorced mothers also spoke of how they feared they would not be able to travel with their children. More often than not in Saudi men win primary custody in a divorce, meaning mothers are required to get the permission of the father to fly with their children. One woman, who holds dual Saudi-Canadian citizenship, said she wanted to her two children to see her parents in Ottawa but her ex-husband had not given her permission for them to go. The royal court decision followed a series of high-profile cases of Saudi women attempting to flee the kingdom. Critics say they likely put pressure on a crown prince increasingly concerned about his image abroad, which has already been dented by the mass arrest of women’s rights activists and the brutal murder of dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi last year. Eighteen-year-old Rahaf Mohammed al-Qunun barricaded herself in a hotel room in Bangkok in January claiming she had been imprisoned and abused by her father back in Saudi and wanted to claim asylum. A few months later, sisters Dua, 22, and Dalal al-Showaiki, 20, escaped during a family holiday in Turkey, claiming they too had suffered at the hands of their father and were being forced into arranged marriages. The rights of women have been held back not only by the country’s laws, but by its deep religious conservatism. In Saudi’s male-dominant culture, men largely have ultimate authority over women and many are resistant to the reforms. Jawhara, 30, a housewife from Riyadh told this paper during a recent visit that she was lucky to have a supportive husband, but said there were many more women that do not. Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman has led the reforms to modernise Saudi but has also faced criticism for the mass arrest of women's rights activists Credit: AFP “I think modern families like mine will allow their daughters, sisters, mothers and wives to travel freely, but you must keep in mind the reserved parts of society which makes up a significant chunk of the country,” she said, not wishing to give her full name. “While change from the top matters there must also be change within the society itself. Women will continue to try to escape as long as they're treated like second-class citizens and I am glad they now have the means to.” The number of Saudis seeking asylum abroad has increased sevenfold in recent years. Saudis made at least 815 asylum claims worldwide in 2017, which includes both men and women, compared with 195 in 2012, according to the United Nations Refugee Agency's database. Rights group say this can be partly attributed to the opening up of social media in the kingdom, which has exposed women to freedoms experienced in the West. Toby Cadman, a British human rights lawyer who is helping Dua and Dalal’s claim for asylum, told the Telegraph that he has been contacted by more than 10 Saudi women asking for help, several of which since the August decree. “I had one recently who was the daughter of a Saudi diplomat in Africa. The woman was unmarried and in her 30s, so still considered to be under the protection of her father,” said Mr Cadman, co-founder of law firm Guernica 37. “She was effectively being kept under lock and key in the compound.” Mr Cadman gave her the advice to try to escape, but her father had her passport and she was too afraid of the punishment she would receive if she was caught. “For her, and many others like her, it made little difference that the laws had changed,” he said. In the case of Dua and Dalal, whose situation became public after they launched a Twitter campaign asking for help, the sisters’ parents have gone to some lengths to bring them home. The father, whom they describe as controlling and abusive, asked the Saudi embassy to help facilitate their return. Staff told the sisters to come to the consulate to collect new passports, which Mr Cadman believes was a rouse. Mr Cadman said there were common themes in all the cases: men fearing a loss of control over the women under their “guardianship” and familial honour. “The new decree makes almost no difference at all to the average woman in Saudi,” he said. “It cannot just be a change in the law, it needs to be a change in the mindset, a change in thinking. That will take some time.” Additional reporting by Nadia al-Faour

    Scanning the departures board at Riyadh’s international airport, Eman tried to find her gate as she struggled with an oversized suitcase. She had travelled countless times before but always with her father, who had taken care of everything. It was the first time the 26-year-old had flown alone and she was finding it all a bit daunting. “My father didn’t like me going on trips without him or my brother, and I had always respected his wishes,” Eman, who asked that her surname not be published, told the Telegraph. “He was worried about what I would do if I had too much independence.” Under Saudi Arabia’s guardianship system, women had to rely on the permission of male relatives to leave the country and, in some cases, even to leave the home. But a royal decree issued in August ruled that women over the age of 21 could travel abroad and apply for a passport without a guardian's permission. Eman felt emboldened by the decree to tell her father that she would be travelling alone this time for a business meeting in Beirut, where she hoped to find new clients for her fledgling beauty company. A Saudi woman displays her new driving license, at the General Department of Traffic in the capital, Riyadh, after the kingdom lifts the ban on women driving in June last year Credit: AP “He wants my business to succeed, but he is still a bit old-fashioned,” she said. “The guardianship laws are partly about protecting women, but I think part of it is has always been about control.” Things have been changing quickly in the ultra-conservative kingdom as the young Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman pushes to modernise the country.  In less than a year, MBS, as he has become known, has dropped Saudi’s draconian ban on women driving, done away with the “hai’a” which policed their dress and sanctioned mixed gender gatherings. But despite the reforms, women in Saudi told the Telegraph that the country’s laws continue to work against them to prevent them from travelling. Male guardians can still file cases of filial "disobedience", a crime which can lead to forcible return to their male guardian’s home or imprisonment in a women’s shelter. Rahaf Mohammed al-Qunun (C) accompanied by Canadian Minister of Foreign Affairs Chryistia Freeland (R), arrives at Toronto Pearson International Airport after escaping her "abusive" family   Credit: Reuters A legal provision known as "taghayyub" in Arabic, meaning “absent”, could also be invoked if a woman runs away from home without permission. Just this month it was reported that Princess Basmah Bint Saud Bin Abdul Aziz, the youngest daughter of deposed King Saud, was arrested trying to board a flight from the city of Jeddah to Geneva. The princess’ US lawyer said that following her detention the 55-year-old, who had campaigned for women's rights among other issues, “just fell off the radar” and has not been heard from since. “Even if they get to the airport with their documents and there is no physical restriction on their travel, women’s fathers or husbands could call up airport officials and tell them that they had been ‘disobedient’,” Ms Begum said. “There are still many parts of the law that continue to work against women.” Ms Begum said the decision marked a big step towards dismantling the guardianship system, but cautioned that women’s rights were yet to be fully enshrined. “They decree does not appear to positively affirm women’s right to travel abroad, as is their right under international law, and because it is not specific in its wording there are loopholes,” she said. Dua (L) and Dalal (R) al-Showaiki used Twitter to document their escape from their family from Turkey In another example, divorced mothers also spoke of how they feared they would not be able to travel with their children. More often than not in Saudi men win primary custody in a divorce, meaning mothers are required to get the permission of the father to fly with their children. One woman, who holds dual Saudi-Canadian citizenship, said she wanted to her two children to see her parents in Ottawa but her ex-husband had not given her permission for them to go. The royal court decision followed a series of high-profile cases of Saudi women attempting to flee the kingdom. Critics say they likely put pressure on a crown prince increasingly concerned about his image abroad, which has already been dented by the mass arrest of women’s rights activists and the brutal murder of dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi last year. Eighteen-year-old Rahaf Mohammed al-Qunun barricaded herself in a hotel room in Bangkok in January claiming she had been imprisoned and abused by her father back in Saudi and wanted to claim asylum. A few months later, sisters Dua, 22, and Dalal al-Showaiki, 20, escaped during a family holiday in Turkey, claiming they too had suffered at the hands of their father and were being forced into arranged marriages. The rights of women have been held back not only by the country’s laws, but by its deep religious conservatism. In Saudi’s male-dominant culture, men largely have ultimate authority over women and many are resistant to the reforms. Jawhara, 30, a housewife from Riyadh told this paper during a recent visit that she was lucky to have a supportive husband, but said there were many more women that do not. Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman has led the reforms to modernise Saudi but has also faced criticism for the mass arrest of women's rights activists Credit: AFP “I think modern families like mine will allow their daughters, sisters, mothers and wives to travel freely, but you must keep in mind the reserved parts of society which makes up a significant chunk of the country,” she said, not wishing to give her full name. “While change from the top matters there must also be change within the society itself. Women will continue to try to escape as long as they're treated like second-class citizens and I am glad they now have the means to.” The number of Saudis seeking asylum abroad has increased sevenfold in recent years. Saudis made at least 815 asylum claims worldwide in 2017, which includes both men and women, compared with 195 in 2012, according to the United Nations Refugee Agency's database. Rights group say this can be partly attributed to the opening up of social media in the kingdom, which has exposed women to freedoms experienced in the West. Toby Cadman, a British human rights lawyer who is helping Dua and Dalal’s claim for asylum, told the Telegraph that he has been contacted by more than 10 Saudi women asking for help, several of which since the August decree. “I had one recently who was the daughter of a Saudi diplomat in Africa. The woman was unmarried and in her 30s, so still considered to be under the protection of her father,” said Mr Cadman, co-founder of law firm Guernica 37. “She was effectively being kept under lock and key in the compound.” Mr Cadman gave her the advice to try to escape, but her father had her passport and she was too afraid of the punishment she would receive if she was caught. “For her, and many others like her, it made little difference that the laws had changed,” he said. In the case of Dua and Dalal, whose situation became public after they launched a Twitter campaign asking for help, the sisters’ parents have gone to some lengths to bring them home. The father, whom they describe as controlling and abusive, asked the Saudi embassy to help facilitate their return. Staff told the sisters to come to the consulate to collect new passports, which Mr Cadman believes was a rouse. Mr Cadman said there were common themes in all the cases: men fearing a loss of control over the women under their “guardianship” and familial honour. “The new decree makes almost no difference at all to the average woman in Saudi,” he said. “It cannot just be a change in the law, it needs to be a change in the mindset, a change in thinking. That will take some time.” Additional reporting by Nadia al-Faour


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  • 67/79   Emmanuel Macron left isolated as Nato allies dismiss his claim organisation is 'brain dead'
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Emmanuel Macron was left isolated by the leaders of other Nato countries on Thursday after he defended his claim that the organisation was “brain dead”. The French President’s stark appraisal of the transatlantic alliance was given short shrift by EU allies who want to bind Nato countries closer together in the face of threats from Russia and other aggressors. Ahead of a Nato meeting on the outskirts of London next week which will be attended by President Donald Trump and the leaders of the other 28 member countries, President Macron claimed his remarks served as a “wake-up call” to spur the alliance into redefining its strategic goals and asking “who’s the enemy?” But The Daily Telegraph understands that Mr Macron’s comments received no support in a Nato foreign ministers’ meeting in Brussels last week, with Germany his harshest critic. EU leaders believe Europe needs still to rely heavily on Nato for its defence. European countries are keen to present a united front in the face of criticism of Nato from Mr Trump, who announced yesterday that he will reduce America’s contribution to the Nato budget. Foreign Office sources suggested Mr Macron was trying to play to a domestic audience, as he is expected to urge allies to participate more in fighting the spread of Islamic fundamentalism in the Sahel region of West Africa following the deaths of 13 French soldiers in a helicopter collision. French President Emmanuel Macron said Nato must define its strategic priorities after meeting alliance Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg  Credit:  Chesnot/ Getty Images Europe "The questions I have asked are open questions, that we haven't solved yet,” said the French president after a meeting in Paris with Nato's secretary-general, Jens Stoltenberg. "Peace in Europe, the post-INF (Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces Treaty) situation, the relationship with Russia, the Turkey issue, who's the enemy?,” he asked. “As long as these questions are not resolved, let's not negotiate about cost-sharing and burden-sharing, or this that." "So we maybe needed a wake-up call. I'm glad it was delivered, and I'm glad everyone now thinks we should rather think about our strategic goals," said Mr Macron. In this month’s the Economist, the French president warned that a lack of American willingness to defend its members had placed Europe "on the edge of the precipice”. "I’d argue that we should reassess the reality of what Nato is in the light of the commitment of the United States," he said, pointing to its unexpected troop withdrawal from north-eastern Syria last month, forsaking its Kurdish allies. The Telegraph understands that President Macron's comments were widely felt by members attending the Nato Foreign Minister's meeting in Brussels last week to be mainly for a domestic audience and would not undermine the residual strength of the alliance..  On Thursday, Nato's chief said that "in uncertain times, we need strong multilateral institutions like Nato," and that he had "good and open discussions" with the French president. He praised France's role in Mali against an Islamist insurgency and where it suffered its worst military loss in almost 40 years this week when two helicopters collided. France is to undertake a review of its operation in the Sahel after 13 soldiers died in a helicopter crash in Mali this week Credit: DICOD/HANDOUT/EPA-EFE/REX Britain has provided helicopters and around 100 security personnel to help France's 4,500-member Barkhane force in West Africa, and the US provides intelligence support. But Paris, which is acting "on behalf of everyone”, will launch an in-depth review of its involvement with "all options on the table", said Mr Macron. "A bigger engagement by its allies is obviously something that would be quite positive," he said. US president Donald Trump has repeatedly accused European Nato members of failing to meet commitments to spend at least two percent of GDP on defence. By way of response, Mr Macron said that "our common enemy is the terrorism that has struck us all”. "If some people want to see an example of what they term 'cost-sharing', they can come Monday to the ceremony France is organising" for the 13 soldiers killed in the Mali accident. "There they will see the cost.” US President Donald Trump has berated Nato members for failing to meet their defence spending commitments Credit:  UPI / Barcroft Media The US on Thursday announced it is to cut its contribution to Nato’s operating budget with Germany meeting the shortfall. Washington was previously the biggest contributor, paying about 22 per cent. Now the US and Germany will both pay roughly 16 per cent. Mr Macron also defended French attempts to renew ties with Russian President Vladimir Putin, which has riled EU leaders, calling for a "lucid, robust and demanding dialogue". Russia has called on the US and other countries to declare a moratorium on the deployment of short and mid-range nuclear missiles in Europe after a treaty banning such a move formally ended in August. Mr Macron said that while France had "absolutely not accepted" the proposal, “we shouldn't just brush it off". "Let's be serious, this is the security of Europe we're talking about," he said, adding that Europe must be involved in talks on any new pact.

    Emmanuel Macron was left isolated by the leaders of other Nato countries on Thursday after he defended his claim that the organisation was “brain dead”. The French President’s stark appraisal of the transatlantic alliance was given short shrift by EU allies who want to bind Nato countries closer together in the face of threats from Russia and other aggressors. Ahead of a Nato meeting on the outskirts of London next week which will be attended by President Donald Trump and the leaders of the other 28 member countries, President Macron claimed his remarks served as a “wake-up call” to spur the alliance into redefining its strategic goals and asking “who’s the enemy?” But The Daily Telegraph understands that Mr Macron’s comments received no support in a Nato foreign ministers’ meeting in Brussels last week, with Germany his harshest critic. EU leaders believe Europe needs still to rely heavily on Nato for its defence. European countries are keen to present a united front in the face of criticism of Nato from Mr Trump, who announced yesterday that he will reduce America’s contribution to the Nato budget. Foreign Office sources suggested Mr Macron was trying to play to a domestic audience, as he is expected to urge allies to participate more in fighting the spread of Islamic fundamentalism in the Sahel region of West Africa following the deaths of 13 French soldiers in a helicopter collision. French President Emmanuel Macron said Nato must define its strategic priorities after meeting alliance Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg  Credit:  Chesnot/ Getty Images Europe "The questions I have asked are open questions, that we haven't solved yet,” said the French president after a meeting in Paris with Nato's secretary-general, Jens Stoltenberg. "Peace in Europe, the post-INF (Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces Treaty) situation, the relationship with Russia, the Turkey issue, who's the enemy?,” he asked. “As long as these questions are not resolved, let's not negotiate about cost-sharing and burden-sharing, or this that." "So we maybe needed a wake-up call. I'm glad it was delivered, and I'm glad everyone now thinks we should rather think about our strategic goals," said Mr Macron. In this month’s the Economist, the French president warned that a lack of American willingness to defend its members had placed Europe "on the edge of the precipice”. "I’d argue that we should reassess the reality of what Nato is in the light of the commitment of the United States," he said, pointing to its unexpected troop withdrawal from north-eastern Syria last month, forsaking its Kurdish allies. The Telegraph understands that President Macron's comments were widely felt by members attending the Nato Foreign Minister's meeting in Brussels last week to be mainly for a domestic audience and would not undermine the residual strength of the alliance..  On Thursday, Nato's chief said that "in uncertain times, we need strong multilateral institutions like Nato," and that he had "good and open discussions" with the French president. He praised France's role in Mali against an Islamist insurgency and where it suffered its worst military loss in almost 40 years this week when two helicopters collided. France is to undertake a review of its operation in the Sahel after 13 soldiers died in a helicopter crash in Mali this week Credit: DICOD/HANDOUT/EPA-EFE/REX Britain has provided helicopters and around 100 security personnel to help France's 4,500-member Barkhane force in West Africa, and the US provides intelligence support. But Paris, which is acting "on behalf of everyone”, will launch an in-depth review of its involvement with "all options on the table", said Mr Macron. "A bigger engagement by its allies is obviously something that would be quite positive," he said. US president Donald Trump has repeatedly accused European Nato members of failing to meet commitments to spend at least two percent of GDP on defence. By way of response, Mr Macron said that "our common enemy is the terrorism that has struck us all”. "If some people want to see an example of what they term 'cost-sharing', they can come Monday to the ceremony France is organising" for the 13 soldiers killed in the Mali accident. "There they will see the cost.” US President Donald Trump has berated Nato members for failing to meet their defence spending commitments Credit:  UPI / Barcroft Media The US on Thursday announced it is to cut its contribution to Nato’s operating budget with Germany meeting the shortfall. Washington was previously the biggest contributor, paying about 22 per cent. Now the US and Germany will both pay roughly 16 per cent. Mr Macron also defended French attempts to renew ties with Russian President Vladimir Putin, which has riled EU leaders, calling for a "lucid, robust and demanding dialogue". Russia has called on the US and other countries to declare a moratorium on the deployment of short and mid-range nuclear missiles in Europe after a treaty banning such a move formally ended in August. Mr Macron said that while France had "absolutely not accepted" the proposal, “we shouldn't just brush it off". "Let's be serious, this is the security of Europe we're talking about," he said, adding that Europe must be involved in talks on any new pact.


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  • 68/79   Brexit Bulletin: Brutal Verdict
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Days to General Election: 14(Bloomberg) -- Sign up here to get the Brexit Bulletin in your inbox every weekday.What’s Happening? Boris Johnson’s resounding poll lead piles on the misery for Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn.Voters, be warned: A leading U.K. think tank offered a damning analysis of both the Conservative and Labour election pledges, cautioning that Briton should expect higher taxes post-election than either party has outlined.In a brutal assessment of both manifestos for the Dec. 12 vote, the Institute for Fiscal Studies said that “neither is a properly credible prospectus.” The two parties offer vastly different options for voters — you can explore the competing plans right here.Corbyn is promising a generational shift in public spending along with sweeping nationalization plans, while Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Conservatives are presenting a more prudent approach, offering themselves up as the responsible alternative to Labour’s radical ideas.All this came the morning after a much-anticipated poll put the Conservatives on track to win their biggest majority in more than three decades. The YouGov survey, which used a technique that stood up well in 2017, suggested the Tories would win 359 of the 650 seats in Parliament. That would be a gain of 42 on the last election, and a majority of 68. Labour would drop more than 50 seats to 211, the survey showed. There were caveats in the gloom for Labour: YouGov pointed to 30 seats it sees swinging to the Tories where the current margin is still less than 5%. Corbyn has two weeks to shift the momentum in those areas, which voted to leave the European Union and where he’s losing votes to Johnson’s pro-Brexit message.Today’s Must-ReadsParty leaders (minus Johnson) will debate climate change on Channel 4 this evening. Slow news outlet Tortoise looks at what the manifestos say about the path to net-zero emissions. Is Jeremy Corbyn an antisemite? It no longer matters, Therese Raphael argues for Bloomberg Opinion. Labour’s Brexit plan is far more attractive than Boris Johnson’s, Martin Wolf writes in the Financial Times. “But do I trust Mr Corbyn’s Labour with my country? No.”Brexit in BriefChanging Tack | Labour will change its approach in Leave-voting areas in a bid to win over people who are skeptical about its Brexit policy, the BBC reports. The strategy will focus on trying to convince voters that Labour support for a new referendum is not a bid to remain in the EU “by the back door,” the BBC said.Ghost of Columns Past | The prime minister came under fire for remarks made in columns published earlier in his career. Writing in the Spectator in 1995 he called single mothers “uppity and irresponsible” and working class men “feckless and hopeless.” The Guardian reported that in 1999 he wrote a diary piece in the Independent describing young people’s interest in money as “almost Nigerian.”Sixteen-Year Low | Net migration to the U.K. from the EU fell to its lowest level since 2003 in the year through June, preliminary Office for National Statistics estimates published on Thursday show.Bouncing Back? | U.K. house prices increased at their fastest pace in more than a year this month, according to Nationwide Building Society. Values rose 0.5% in November from October, the biggest advance since July 2018. U.K. housing activity has been undermined by the ongoing Brexit process since the 2016 referendum.Cash Boost | Labour brought in £3.49 million ($4.5 million) in donations of more than £7,500 from Nov. 13-19, the Electoral Commission said. That compared to £2.97 million for the Conservatives, £2.25 million for the Brexit Party and £251,000 for the Liberal Democrats.Winning Streak | The pound headed for a fourth month of gains against the euro, reflecting growing confidence in the market that the Conservative Party will be able to secure a majority. Sterling traded at €1.1735 on Thursday afternoon, meaning one euro costs about 85 pence.Want to keep up with Brexit?You can follow us @Brexit on Twitter, and listen to Bloomberg Westminster every weekday. It’s live at midday on Bloomberg Radio and is available as a podcast too. Share the Brexit Bulletin: Colleagues, friends and family can sign up here. For full EU coverage, try the Brussels Edition.For even more: Subscribe to Bloomberg All Access for our unmatched global news coverage and two in-depth daily newsletters, The Bloomberg Open and The Bloomberg Close.To contact the authors of this story: Fergal O'Brien in Zurich at fobrien@bloomberg.netAndrew Atkinson in London at a.atkinson@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Adam Blenford at ablenford@bloomberg.net, Chris KayFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    Days to General Election: 14(Bloomberg) -- Sign up here to get the Brexit Bulletin in your inbox every weekday.What’s Happening? Boris Johnson’s resounding poll lead piles on the misery for Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn.Voters, be warned: A leading U.K. think tank offered a damning analysis of both the Conservative and Labour election pledges, cautioning that Briton should expect higher taxes post-election than either party has outlined.In a brutal assessment of both manifestos for the Dec. 12 vote, the Institute for Fiscal Studies said that “neither is a properly credible prospectus.” The two parties offer vastly different options for voters — you can explore the competing plans right here.Corbyn is promising a generational shift in public spending along with sweeping nationalization plans, while Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Conservatives are presenting a more prudent approach, offering themselves up as the responsible alternative to Labour’s radical ideas.All this came the morning after a much-anticipated poll put the Conservatives on track to win their biggest majority in more than three decades. The YouGov survey, which used a technique that stood up well in 2017, suggested the Tories would win 359 of the 650 seats in Parliament. That would be a gain of 42 on the last election, and a majority of 68. Labour would drop more than 50 seats to 211, the survey showed. There were caveats in the gloom for Labour: YouGov pointed to 30 seats it sees swinging to the Tories where the current margin is still less than 5%. Corbyn has two weeks to shift the momentum in those areas, which voted to leave the European Union and where he’s losing votes to Johnson’s pro-Brexit message.Today’s Must-ReadsParty leaders (minus Johnson) will debate climate change on Channel 4 this evening. Slow news outlet Tortoise looks at what the manifestos say about the path to net-zero emissions. Is Jeremy Corbyn an antisemite? It no longer matters, Therese Raphael argues for Bloomberg Opinion. Labour’s Brexit plan is far more attractive than Boris Johnson’s, Martin Wolf writes in the Financial Times. “But do I trust Mr Corbyn’s Labour with my country? No.”Brexit in BriefChanging Tack | Labour will change its approach in Leave-voting areas in a bid to win over people who are skeptical about its Brexit policy, the BBC reports. The strategy will focus on trying to convince voters that Labour support for a new referendum is not a bid to remain in the EU “by the back door,” the BBC said.Ghost of Columns Past | The prime minister came under fire for remarks made in columns published earlier in his career. Writing in the Spectator in 1995 he called single mothers “uppity and irresponsible” and working class men “feckless and hopeless.” The Guardian reported that in 1999 he wrote a diary piece in the Independent describing young people’s interest in money as “almost Nigerian.”Sixteen-Year Low | Net migration to the U.K. from the EU fell to its lowest level since 2003 in the year through June, preliminary Office for National Statistics estimates published on Thursday show.Bouncing Back? | U.K. house prices increased at their fastest pace in more than a year this month, according to Nationwide Building Society. Values rose 0.5% in November from October, the biggest advance since July 2018. U.K. housing activity has been undermined by the ongoing Brexit process since the 2016 referendum.Cash Boost | Labour brought in £3.49 million ($4.5 million) in donations of more than £7,500 from Nov. 13-19, the Electoral Commission said. That compared to £2.97 million for the Conservatives, £2.25 million for the Brexit Party and £251,000 for the Liberal Democrats.Winning Streak | The pound headed for a fourth month of gains against the euro, reflecting growing confidence in the market that the Conservative Party will be able to secure a majority. Sterling traded at €1.1735 on Thursday afternoon, meaning one euro costs about 85 pence.Want to keep up with Brexit?You can follow us @Brexit on Twitter, and listen to Bloomberg Westminster every weekday. It’s live at midday on Bloomberg Radio and is available as a podcast too. Share the Brexit Bulletin: Colleagues, friends and family can sign up here. For full EU coverage, try the Brussels Edition.For even more: Subscribe to Bloomberg All Access for our unmatched global news coverage and two in-depth daily newsletters, The Bloomberg Open and The Bloomberg Close.To contact the authors of this story: Fergal O'Brien in Zurich at fobrien@bloomberg.netAndrew Atkinson in London at a.atkinson@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Adam Blenford at ablenford@bloomberg.net, Chris KayFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 69/79   Seoul says North Korea has fired 2 short-range projectiles
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The recent North Korea activities could indicate it wants to show what would happen if Washington fails to meet a year-end deadline.

    The recent North Korea activities could indicate it wants to show what would happen if Washington fails to meet a year-end deadline.


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  • 70/79   Trump turns 'very routine' physical into attack on media
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    President Trump lashed out at the media Tuesday over reporting about his sudden trip to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center last weekend.

    President Trump lashed out at the media Tuesday over reporting about his sudden trip to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center last weekend.


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  • 71/79   5 Turkey Cooking Tips Will Guarantee You Have the Perfect Bird This Holidays
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    There's no need to wing it at Thanksgiving this year.

    There's no need to wing it at Thanksgiving this year.


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  • 72/79   9 Easy Ways to Make Your Jack-o'-Lanterns Last Longer
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    A little bleach goes a long way.

    A little bleach goes a long way.


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  • 73/79   Is It Time for a Medication Reconciliation?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    More than half of adult Americans regularly take at least one prescription drug, according to a recent Consumer Reports nationally representative survey. And for those who take any medication on ...

    More than half of adult Americans regularly take at least one prescription drug, according to a recent Consumer Reports nationally representative survey. And for those who take any medication on ...


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  • 74/79   Brown-Bag Lunches for Kids With Food Allergies
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...


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  • 75/79   What to Feed Your Family When the Power Goes Out
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...


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  • 76/79   Try These Healthy Snack Ideas for Kids
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...

    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...


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  • 77/79   The 9 Best Jobs for Teachers To Make Some Cash During the Summer Break
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.


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  • 78/79   How to Spot and Avoid Algal Blooms
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...


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  • 79/79   Get These 4 Vaccines for College
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If your child is a college student—or soon to be one—making sure he or she is fully vaccinated is critically important, especially for those who will be living in a dorm or other shared space. Th...

    If your child is a college student—or soon to be one—making sure he or she is fully vaccinated is critically important, especially for those who will be living in a dorm or other shared space. Th...


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