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News Slideshows (11/29/2019 15 hours)


  • 1/79   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


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    Press Review


    Unai Emery   Tornado Warning   Newsweek   Happy Belated Thanksgiving   Freddie Ljungberg   louisa may alcott   Be Prepared   Born 2 Rap   Good Ebening   Yeezy Supply   Bryce Dallas Howard   Coldest Summer Ever   Brad Gobright   Channel 4   
  • 2/79   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


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  • 3/79   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


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  • 4/79   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


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  • 5/79   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


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  • 6/79   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


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  • 7/79   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


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  • 8/79   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


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  • 9/79   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


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  • 10/79   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


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  • 11/79   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


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  • 12/79   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


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  • 13/79   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


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  • 14/79   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named.  Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does.  At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


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  • 15/79   PHOTOS: Fluorescent turtle embryo wins forty-fifth annual Nikon Small World Competition

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.


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  • 16/79   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


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  • 17/79   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


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  • 18/79   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


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  • 19/79   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


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  • 20/79   LEAD PLAINTIFF DEADLINE: Johnson Fistel, LLP Encourages Investors to Contact the Firm
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Johnson Fistel, LLP announces that class action lawsuits have been commenced on behalf of shareholders of the publicly-traded companies listed below. The Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 permits any investor who purchased a common stock during the Class Period to seek appointment as lead plaintiff. A lead plaintiff acts on behalf of all other class members in directing the litigation. The lead plaintiff can select a law firm of its choice. An investor's ability to share in any potential future recovery is not dependent upon serving as lead plaintiff. If you wish to serve as lead plaintiff, you must move the Court no later than the dates listed below. If you wish to discuss this action or have any questions concerning this notice or your rights or interests, please contact Jim Baker (jimb@johnsonfistel.com) at 619-814-4471. If emailing, please include a phone number.

    Johnson Fistel, LLP announces that class action lawsuits have been commenced on behalf of shareholders of the publicly-traded companies listed below. The Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 permits any investor who purchased a common stock during the Class Period to seek appointment as lead plaintiff. A lead plaintiff acts on behalf of all other class members in directing the litigation. The lead plaintiff can select a law firm of its choice. An investor's ability to share in any potential future recovery is not dependent upon serving as lead plaintiff. If you wish to serve as lead plaintiff, you must move the Court no later than the dates listed below. If you wish to discuss this action or have any questions concerning this notice or your rights or interests, please contact Jim Baker (jimb@johnsonfistel.com) at 619-814-4471. If emailing, please include a phone number.


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  • 21/79   The World Market for Walnuts, Forecast to 2024 - Global Market Projected to Record a CAGR of 6% During 2019-2024
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The "Walnut Market - Growth, Trends, and Forecast (2019 - 2024)" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.

    The "Walnut Market - Growth, Trends, and Forecast (2019 - 2024)" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.


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  • 22/79   Indian gold buying ticks up on price drop; demand lags in other hubs
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    BENGALURU/MUMBAI (Reuters) - Gold was sold at a premium this week in India as a dip in prices prompted purchases of the precious metal, while demand was soft in other Asian hubs as interest for the metal waned going into the year-end season.  Dealers were charging a premium of up to $1.5 an ounce over official domestic prices this week, compared with a discount of $3 last week.  The domestic price includes a 12.5% import tax and 3% sales tax.

    BENGALURU/MUMBAI (Reuters) - Gold was sold at a premium this week in India as a dip in prices prompted purchases of the precious metal, while demand was soft in other Asian hubs as interest for the metal waned going into the year-end season. Dealers were charging a premium of up to $1.5 an ounce over official domestic prices this week, compared with a discount of $3 last week. The domestic price includes a 12.5% import tax and 3% sales tax.


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  • 23/79   Does Southern Silver Exploration Corp. (CVE:SSV) Have A Particularly Volatile Share Price?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    If you're interested in Southern Silver Exploration Corp. (CVE:SSV), then you might want to consider its beta (a...

    If you're interested in Southern Silver Exploration Corp. (CVE:SSV), then you might want to consider its beta (a...


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  • 24/79   Iraq PM says will resign after bloody protests
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Iraq's embattled premier announced Friday he will resign in keeping with the wishes of the country's top Shiite cleric, after nearly two months of anti-government protests that have cost more than 400 lives.  Adel Abdel Mahdi's written statement was greeted with cheers and blaring music across Baghdad's iconic Tahrir (Liberation) Square, where crowds have amassed since early October against a ruling class deemed corrupt and inefficient.  'I will submit to the esteemed parliament a formal letter requesting my resignation from the premiership,' Abdel Mahdi wrote, just hours after Grand Ayatollah Ali Sistani called in his weekly sermon on parliament to replace the cabinet.

    Iraq's embattled premier announced Friday he will resign in keeping with the wishes of the country's top Shiite cleric, after nearly two months of anti-government protests that have cost more than 400 lives. Adel Abdel Mahdi's written statement was greeted with cheers and blaring music across Baghdad's iconic Tahrir (Liberation) Square, where crowds have amassed since early October against a ruling class deemed corrupt and inefficient. 'I will submit to the esteemed parliament a formal letter requesting my resignation from the premiership,' Abdel Mahdi wrote, just hours after Grand Ayatollah Ali Sistani called in his weekly sermon on parliament to replace the cabinet.


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  • 25/79   [Updated] 9 great Black Friday deals for the techy car enthusiast in your life
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    If you're not hip to the Instant Pot revolution, you're already behind the times.  The Instant Pot is a pressure cooker, slow cooker, rice cooker, steamer, sauté, yogurt maker, and warmer.  You can step up your culinary game right now by picking up the number one selling Instant Pot on Amazon right here for just $49.00, 51% off the original purchase price.

    If you're not hip to the Instant Pot revolution, you're already behind the times. The Instant Pot is a pressure cooker, slow cooker, rice cooker, steamer, sauté, yogurt maker, and warmer. You can step up your culinary game right now by picking up the number one selling Instant Pot on Amazon right here for just $49.00, 51% off the original purchase price.


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  • 26/79   Calculating The Fair Value Of Taro Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (NYSE:TARO)
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    In this article we are going to estimate the intrinsic value of Taro Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (NYSE:TARO) by...

    In this article we are going to estimate the intrinsic value of Taro Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (NYSE:TARO) by...


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  • 27/79   Wall Street set to slip after U.S. law on Hong Kong rekindles trade fears
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The legislation knocked global stocks off near-record highs on Thursday, when U.S. markets were closed for Thanksgiving Day.  'It is definitely a concern that the signing of the Hong Kong bill will be seen as an impediment to an agreement,' said Rick Meckler, partner at Cherry Lane Investments in New Vernon, New Jersey.

    The legislation knocked global stocks off near-record highs on Thursday, when U.S. markets were closed for Thanksgiving Day. 'It is definitely a concern that the signing of the Hong Kong bill will be seen as an impediment to an agreement,' said Rick Meckler, partner at Cherry Lane Investments in New Vernon, New Jersey.


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  • 28/79   Chile’s Peso Pares Gains as Unrest Limits Impact of Intervention
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Explore what’s moving the global economy in the new season of the Stephanomics podcast. Subscribe via Apple Podcast, Spotify or Pocket Cast.Chile’s peso pared early gains as the central bank’s offer to sell as much as a quarter of its entire dollar reserves to prop up the currency had a limited impact.The peso was trading at 820.57 per dollar at 10:36 a.m. in Santiago, up 0.9%, after strengthening to as much as 797.39 per dollar earlier.The central bank said after the market close Thursday that it will sell as much as $10 billion on the spot market and provide as much as $10 billion of currency hedges. It is the first direct intervention in the market since 2011 and comes after the peso hit record lows for two consecutive days.Chile has been hit by the worst social unrest in decades, forcing the closure of shops, paralyzing much of the public transport system and leading many people to cut short their working hours. The government has estimated the damage to state property alone at $1 billion. Political parties have failed to unanimously condemn the violence, at a time that the government faces accusations of human rights abuses. In the meantime, the looting continues.“An intervention without a political agreement causes these movements,” said Jaime Achondo, head trader at financial services firm Fynsa. “You need an agreement for this intervention to be effective.”At the close yesterday, the peso had weakened 13% against the dollar in a month as the unrest ithreatens to stall economic growth. Manufacturing tumbled 5.8% in October from the year earlier, even though the troubles didn’t start until Oct. 18.The central bank has $39.7 billion in foreign currency reserves to finance the dollar sales. Those reserves have been little changed for the past seven years.The intervention comes two weeks after the bank said it is monitoring the situation in the currency market and then announced a $4 billion short-term dollar swaps and repo program to improve liquidity after a spike in short-term dollar interest rates.Due to the unrest and to provide more information to the market, the central bank has brought forward its next rate decision by two days to Dec. 4. The quarterly monetary report, which includes estimates for growth and investment, will be on Dec. 5 as opposed to Dec. 9.Interest-rate swaps are now discounting that the central bank will keep its key policy rate unchanged at 1.75%, while one week ago swaps were discounting a 25 basis-point cut in the next six months.Other Latin American currencies have also been weakening amid the political turmoil, with the Colombian peso dropping to a record low on each of the past two days. The Brazilian real closed Wednesday at a record low of 4.26 per dollar, even after the central bank intervened in the market four times this week.(Updates with latest prices and analyst comment.)To contact the reporters on this story: Philip Sanders in Santiago at psanders@bloomberg.net;Eduardo Thomson in Santiago at ethomson1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Daniel Cancel at dcancel@bloomberg.net, ;Julia Leite at jleite3@bloomberg.net, Philip Sanders, Sebastian BoydFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Explore what’s moving the global economy in the new season of the Stephanomics podcast. Subscribe via Apple Podcast, Spotify or Pocket Cast.Chile’s peso pared early gains as the central bank’s offer to sell as much as a quarter of its entire dollar reserves to prop up the currency had a limited impact.The peso was trading at 820.57 per dollar at 10:36 a.m. in Santiago, up 0.9%, after strengthening to as much as 797.39 per dollar earlier.The central bank said after the market close Thursday that it will sell as much as $10 billion on the spot market and provide as much as $10 billion of currency hedges. It is the first direct intervention in the market since 2011 and comes after the peso hit record lows for two consecutive days.Chile has been hit by the worst social unrest in decades, forcing the closure of shops, paralyzing much of the public transport system and leading many people to cut short their working hours. The government has estimated the damage to state property alone at $1 billion. Political parties have failed to unanimously condemn the violence, at a time that the government faces accusations of human rights abuses. In the meantime, the looting continues.“An intervention without a political agreement causes these movements,” said Jaime Achondo, head trader at financial services firm Fynsa. “You need an agreement for this intervention to be effective.”At the close yesterday, the peso had weakened 13% against the dollar in a month as the unrest ithreatens to stall economic growth. Manufacturing tumbled 5.8% in October from the year earlier, even though the troubles didn’t start until Oct. 18.The central bank has $39.7 billion in foreign currency reserves to finance the dollar sales. Those reserves have been little changed for the past seven years.The intervention comes two weeks after the bank said it is monitoring the situation in the currency market and then announced a $4 billion short-term dollar swaps and repo program to improve liquidity after a spike in short-term dollar interest rates.Due to the unrest and to provide more information to the market, the central bank has brought forward its next rate decision by two days to Dec. 4. The quarterly monetary report, which includes estimates for growth and investment, will be on Dec. 5 as opposed to Dec. 9.Interest-rate swaps are now discounting that the central bank will keep its key policy rate unchanged at 1.75%, while one week ago swaps were discounting a 25 basis-point cut in the next six months.Other Latin American currencies have also been weakening amid the political turmoil, with the Colombian peso dropping to a record low on each of the past two days. The Brazilian real closed Wednesday at a record low of 4.26 per dollar, even after the central bank intervened in the market four times this week.(Updates with latest prices and analyst comment.)To contact the reporters on this story: Philip Sanders in Santiago at psanders@bloomberg.net;Eduardo Thomson in Santiago at ethomson1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Daniel Cancel at dcancel@bloomberg.net, ;Julia Leite at jleite3@bloomberg.net, Philip Sanders, Sebastian BoydFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 29/79   Can Sandspring Resources (CVE:SSP) Afford To Invest In Growth?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    We can readily understand why investors are attracted to unprofitable companies. For example, biotech and mining...

    We can readily understand why investors are attracted to unprofitable companies. For example, biotech and mining...


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  • 30/79   Trustco Group Holdings Ltd to Webcast Live at VirtualInvestorConferences.com December 4th
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Trustco Group Holdings Ltd (TSCHY), based in Windhoek, Namibia, focused on Financial Services and Resources, today announced that Quinton Z van Rooyen, Group Deputy CEO, will present live at VirtualInvestorConferences.com on December 4th.

    Trustco Group Holdings Ltd (TSCHY), based in Windhoek, Namibia, focused on Financial Services and Resources, today announced that Quinton Z van Rooyen, Group Deputy CEO, will present live at VirtualInvestorConferences.com on December 4th.


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  • 31/79   'I'll miss Juncker's kisses,' Britain's departing EU Commissioner says
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    On his final day in the office, Britain's commissioner to the European Union said he would miss the occasional kiss from his boss Jean-Claude Juncker.  'I don't regret it, this was always going to happen, this is the logical outworking of the referendum,' European Commissioner Julian King told Reuters amid cardboard boxes and Union Jack cushions waiting to be packed.  'I will miss warm hugs and the occasional kisses from my boss,' King said of Commission President Juncker, known for kissing on the cheek colleagues and world leaders alike, including U.S. President Donald Trump.

    On his final day in the office, Britain's commissioner to the European Union said he would miss the occasional kiss from his boss Jean-Claude Juncker. 'I don't regret it, this was always going to happen, this is the logical outworking of the referendum,' European Commissioner Julian King told Reuters amid cardboard boxes and Union Jack cushions waiting to be packed. 'I will miss warm hugs and the occasional kisses from my boss,' King said of Commission President Juncker, known for kissing on the cheek colleagues and world leaders alike, including U.S. President Donald Trump.


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  • 32/79   Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Knowledge Award 2019 Laureates: Education and Knowledge Key for Positive Disruption
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Day one of the sixth Knowledge Summit concluded with a panel discussion with the winners of the Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Knowledge Award.

    Day one of the sixth Knowledge Summit concluded with a panel discussion with the winners of the Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Knowledge Award.


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  • 33/79   Oil Set for Fourth Weekly Advance Ahead of Key OPEC+ Meeting
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Oil headed for a fourth weekly gain, the longest winning streak since April, before a key OPEC+ meeting next week that will set the path for future production cuts.Futures held steady near $58 a barrel in New York as the U.S. Thanksgiving holiday reduced trading volumes. Saudi Arabia is likely to signal at the Vienna gathering that it’s no longer willing to compensate for the non-compliance of other members, according to people familiar with the kingdom’s thinking. OPEC and its allies are expected to extend the current supply pact, rather than deepen reductions, a Bloomberg survey shows.Oil is set for a second monthly gain on optimism Beijing and Washington are close to an initial trade deal, even after the U.S. passed legislation expressing support for Hong Kong protesters, prompting a rebuke from China. An OPEC advisory committee, which analyzes the market before ministerial meetings and sometimes makes policy recommendations, didn’t discuss deeper cuts, according to delegates that asked not to be named.“The move higher in oil has stalled, with growing noise over what OPEC+ may do when they meet in Vienna,” ING analysts Warren Patterson and Wenyu Yao wrote in a report. “Unfortunately for the bulls, the noise so far is not the most constructive.”West Texas Intermediate for January delivery slipped 14 cents to $57.97 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange as of 8:24 a.m. local time. There was no settlement Thursday due to the U.S. holiday and all transactions will be booked Friday.Brent for January settlement, which expires Friday, dropped 0.7% to $63.42 a barrel on the London-based ICE Futures Europe Exchange. The global benchmark crude traded at a $5.67 premium to WTI.See also: Ships Stuck Waiting for Fuel at Asian Hub on Rule-Shift ScrambleSaudi Arabia has largely turned a blind eye over the past year to cheaters within the OPEC+ alliance, cutting its own output more than agreed to offset over-production from the likes of Iraq and Russia. Ministers from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and its partners will meet in Vienna from Dec. 5 to 6 to decide on policy going forward.\--With assistance from James Thornhill and Ann Koh.To contact the reporter on this story: Alex Longley in London at alongley@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Serene Cheong at scheong20@bloomberg.net, Amanda Jordan, Rakteem KatakeyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Oil headed for a fourth weekly gain, the longest winning streak since April, before a key OPEC+ meeting next week that will set the path for future production cuts.Futures held steady near $58 a barrel in New York as the U.S. Thanksgiving holiday reduced trading volumes. Saudi Arabia is likely to signal at the Vienna gathering that it’s no longer willing to compensate for the non-compliance of other members, according to people familiar with the kingdom’s thinking. OPEC and its allies are expected to extend the current supply pact, rather than deepen reductions, a Bloomberg survey shows.Oil is set for a second monthly gain on optimism Beijing and Washington are close to an initial trade deal, even after the U.S. passed legislation expressing support for Hong Kong protesters, prompting a rebuke from China. An OPEC advisory committee, which analyzes the market before ministerial meetings and sometimes makes policy recommendations, didn’t discuss deeper cuts, according to delegates that asked not to be named.“The move higher in oil has stalled, with growing noise over what OPEC+ may do when they meet in Vienna,” ING analysts Warren Patterson and Wenyu Yao wrote in a report. “Unfortunately for the bulls, the noise so far is not the most constructive.”West Texas Intermediate for January delivery slipped 14 cents to $57.97 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange as of 8:24 a.m. local time. There was no settlement Thursday due to the U.S. holiday and all transactions will be booked Friday.Brent for January settlement, which expires Friday, dropped 0.7% to $63.42 a barrel on the London-based ICE Futures Europe Exchange. The global benchmark crude traded at a $5.67 premium to WTI.See also: Ships Stuck Waiting for Fuel at Asian Hub on Rule-Shift ScrambleSaudi Arabia has largely turned a blind eye over the past year to cheaters within the OPEC+ alliance, cutting its own output more than agreed to offset over-production from the likes of Iraq and Russia. Ministers from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and its partners will meet in Vienna from Dec. 5 to 6 to decide on policy going forward.\--With assistance from James Thornhill and Ann Koh.To contact the reporter on this story: Alex Longley in London at alongley@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Serene Cheong at scheong20@bloomberg.net, Amanda Jordan, Rakteem KatakeyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 34/79   U.S. Futures Slip as Stocks Struggle, Bonds Drift: Markets Wrap
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Want the lowdown on European markets? In your inbox before the open, every day. Sign up here.U.S. equity futures fell with stocks in Asia while European shares struggled for traction, signaling a lackluster finale to the third straight month of gains for global benchmarks. The dollar turned higher.Contracts on the S&P 500, Nasdaq 100 and Dow Jones Industrial Average all edged lower, auguring a weak opening on Wall Street, where markets will resume after the Thanksgiving break. On the Stoxx Europe 600 Index, declines in mining and construction shares offset increases in technology and personal products. A major Asia benchmark headed for its biggest one-day drop since August, led by a 2% fall in Hong Kong shares.U.S. Treasuries drifted as they returned to trading post-holiday. The Chilean peso fluctuated close to its record low after the nation’s central bank said it will intervene.Investors are hungry for evidence of progress on a Sino-U.S. trade deal, with the next batch of American tariffs on Chinese goods due to begin Dec. 15 and additional tension building over Hong Kong. China’s foreign ministry warned again of unspecified retaliation for U.S. President Donald Trump’s signing of legislation that expresses support for protesters in Hong Kong.“Markets are on a sort of ‘wait and hold’ in terms of that phase-one trade deal,” David Riley, chief investment strategist at BlueBay Asset Management, told Bloomberg TV. “If there is a skinny deal, that will allow markets and risk assets to grind higher even if there is no real prospect of a phase two or subsequent detailed negotiation occurring this side of U.S. presidential elections.”Elsewhere, West Texas-grade oil traded around $58 a barrel. The won closed lower in normal trading hours after the Bank of Korea kept its policy rate unchanged, as expected.These are the main moves in markets:StocksFutures on the S&P 500 Index declined 0.2% as of 8:26 a.m. New York time.The Stoxx Europe 600 Index increased 0.1%.Hong Kong’s Hang Seng Index decreased 2%.The MSCI Asia Pacific Index sank 0.9%.The MSCI All-Country World Index declined 0.2%.CurrenciesThe Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index gained 0.1%.The British pound fell 0.2% to $1.2888.The euro declined 0.2% to $1.0987.The Japanese yen dipped 0.1% to 109.62 per dollar.Bitcoin jumped 0.5% to $7,606.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries increased less than one basis point to 1.77%.Germany’s 10-year yield declined one basis point to -0.37%.Italy’s 10-year yield climbed one basis point to 1.244%.Japan’s 10-year yield advanced one basis point to -0.073%.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude futures declined 0.2% to $57.97 a barrel.Iron ore futures fell 0.8% to $83.55 per metric ton.Gold dipped 0.1% to $1,455.03 an ounce.Copper futures decreased 1.1% to $2.67 a pound.\--With assistance from Cormac Mullen and Adam Haigh.To contact the reporter on this story: Todd White in Madrid at twhite2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sam Potter at spotter33@bloomberg.net, Yakob PeterseilFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Want the lowdown on European markets? In your inbox before the open, every day. Sign up here.U.S. equity futures fell with stocks in Asia while European shares struggled for traction, signaling a lackluster finale to the third straight month of gains for global benchmarks. The dollar turned higher.Contracts on the S&P 500, Nasdaq 100 and Dow Jones Industrial Average all edged lower, auguring a weak opening on Wall Street, where markets will resume after the Thanksgiving break. On the Stoxx Europe 600 Index, declines in mining and construction shares offset increases in technology and personal products. A major Asia benchmark headed for its biggest one-day drop since August, led by a 2% fall in Hong Kong shares.U.S. Treasuries drifted as they returned to trading post-holiday. The Chilean peso fluctuated close to its record low after the nation’s central bank said it will intervene.Investors are hungry for evidence of progress on a Sino-U.S. trade deal, with the next batch of American tariffs on Chinese goods due to begin Dec. 15 and additional tension building over Hong Kong. China’s foreign ministry warned again of unspecified retaliation for U.S. President Donald Trump’s signing of legislation that expresses support for protesters in Hong Kong.“Markets are on a sort of ‘wait and hold’ in terms of that phase-one trade deal,” David Riley, chief investment strategist at BlueBay Asset Management, told Bloomberg TV. “If there is a skinny deal, that will allow markets and risk assets to grind higher even if there is no real prospect of a phase two or subsequent detailed negotiation occurring this side of U.S. presidential elections.”Elsewhere, West Texas-grade oil traded around $58 a barrel. The won closed lower in normal trading hours after the Bank of Korea kept its policy rate unchanged, as expected.These are the main moves in markets:StocksFutures on the S&P 500 Index declined 0.2% as of 8:26 a.m. New York time.The Stoxx Europe 600 Index increased 0.1%.Hong Kong’s Hang Seng Index decreased 2%.The MSCI Asia Pacific Index sank 0.9%.The MSCI All-Country World Index declined 0.2%.CurrenciesThe Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index gained 0.1%.The British pound fell 0.2% to $1.2888.The euro declined 0.2% to $1.0987.The Japanese yen dipped 0.1% to 109.62 per dollar.Bitcoin jumped 0.5% to $7,606.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries increased less than one basis point to 1.77%.Germany’s 10-year yield declined one basis point to -0.37%.Italy’s 10-year yield climbed one basis point to 1.244%.Japan’s 10-year yield advanced one basis point to -0.073%.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude futures declined 0.2% to $57.97 a barrel.Iron ore futures fell 0.8% to $83.55 per metric ton.Gold dipped 0.1% to $1,455.03 an ounce.Copper futures decreased 1.1% to $2.67 a pound.\--With assistance from Cormac Mullen and Adam Haigh.To contact the reporter on this story: Todd White in Madrid at twhite2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sam Potter at spotter33@bloomberg.net, Yakob PeterseilFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 35/79   Top S.African travel agent, insurance ditch troubled SAA
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Beleaguered national airline South African Airways -- still smarting from a recent strike -- was dealt another blow Friday when two major travel industry players stopped issuing its tickets and withdrew insurance cover.  One of the country’s largest travel agency, Flight Centre Travel Group, said it will no longer sell SAA tickets while travel insurance business Travel Insurance Consultants (TIC) stopped providing supplier insolvency benefits to the airline's passengers.  Flight Centre said in an announcement to its customers that its preferred travel insurance provider, TIC and its underwriter, Santam, were no longer willing to cover SAA due to 'doubts concerning the long-term viability of the airline'.

    Beleaguered national airline South African Airways -- still smarting from a recent strike -- was dealt another blow Friday when two major travel industry players stopped issuing its tickets and withdrew insurance cover. One of the country’s largest travel agency, Flight Centre Travel Group, said it will no longer sell SAA tickets while travel insurance business Travel Insurance Consultants (TIC) stopped providing supplier insolvency benefits to the airline's passengers. Flight Centre said in an announcement to its customers that its preferred travel insurance provider, TIC and its underwriter, Santam, were no longer willing to cover SAA due to 'doubts concerning the long-term viability of the airline'.


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  • 36/79   ?Children Have Unique Bedtime Needs
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Kids need more sleep than adults, as much as 10 to 13 hours a night, according to experts. Do not buy a mattress without considering what your child requires to get a good night's sleep.

    Kids need more sleep than adults, as much as 10 to 13 hours a night, according to experts. Do not buy a mattress without considering what your child requires to get a good night's sleep.


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  • 37/79   Canada’s Economy Slows in Third Quarter Even as Demand Jumps
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Canada’s economy slowed sharply in the third quarter, as a drop in exports and draw down in business inventories masked a rebound in domestic demand.Gross domestic product grew at an annualized pace of 1.3% in the three months ended September, in line with economist estimates, Statistics Canada reported Friday. That was down from a revised 3.5% pace in the previous quarter that was largely seen as unsustainable. The period also ended as expected, with a monthly expansion of 0.1% in September.While the slowdown last quarter marks a return to sluggish growth for the Canadian economy, the details of the report should provide some optimism about underlying strength domestically, even in the face of a weak trade sector, aided by a relatively robust jobs market and a rebound in housing.Residential investment increased at an annualized pace of 13.3% in the third quarter, the fastest since 2012. Growth in household consumption picked up to an annualized pace of 1.6% in the third quarter, from 0.5% the previous quarter.Non-residential business investment also surprised -- given the global trade uncertainties -- with spending on non-residential structures and machinery up 9.5%. That fully recouped a drop in the second quarter.The end result was a 3.2% increase in overall domestic demand, fully rebounding from a very weak second quarter when consumption slowed and investment contracted. These underlying details should give Bank of Canada policy makers pause about cutting rates to counter an expected slowdown.Swaps trading suggests investors are placing a two-thirds chance of a rate cut in the first half of next year. The Canadian dollar pared losses after the report, and was trading at C$1.33 per U.S. dollar at 8:39 a.m. in Toronto trading.The “hearty” gains in final domestic demand will “for now reinforce the Bank of Canada’s view that they have rates low enough to offset the drag from weak external markets,” Avery Shenfeld, chief economist at Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, said in a note to investors. “Overall, a mixed bag, but perhaps a bit better than it looks in the headline given the strength in domestic demand.”The Bank of Canada, whose next rate decision is Dec. 4, had forecast growth of 1.3% annualized for the third and fourth quarters this year, before the expansion picks up a bit in 2020.RevisionsAnother bit of good news was upward historical revisions by Statistics Canada to gross domestic product that showed the economy was slightly larger than initially estimated last year. This suggests there was less slack in the economy than previously thought, one less reason for the Bank of Canada to cut.The biggest drag on the economy in the third quarter was a draw down in inventories by business to meet demand, instead of raising production. That’s the second straight draw down in inventories, and may still reflect concerns about the outlook.At the same time, fewer inventories will ease worries that stockpiles had grown too large, posing a risk to future growth.Exports dropped at an annualized pace of 1.5% in the third quarter, falling for a third time in the past four quarters.Households also seem to be repairing their balance sheets, with the country’s savings rate jumping to the highest since 2015 in the third quarter.“The rebound in capex is a pleasant surprise but we doubt it can be sustained,” said Jimmy Jean, a strategist in the fixed-income group at Desjardins Capital Markets in Montreal. “What this implies is that the BoC will remain on alert for further deterioration, both globally and domestically.'’ \--With assistance from Erik Hertzberg.To contact the reporter on this story: Theophilos Argitis in Ottawa at targitis@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Theophilos Argitis at targitis@bloomberg.net, Chris FournierFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Canada’s economy slowed sharply in the third quarter, as a drop in exports and draw down in business inventories masked a rebound in domestic demand.Gross domestic product grew at an annualized pace of 1.3% in the three months ended September, in line with economist estimates, Statistics Canada reported Friday. That was down from a revised 3.5% pace in the previous quarter that was largely seen as unsustainable. The period also ended as expected, with a monthly expansion of 0.1% in September.While the slowdown last quarter marks a return to sluggish growth for the Canadian economy, the details of the report should provide some optimism about underlying strength domestically, even in the face of a weak trade sector, aided by a relatively robust jobs market and a rebound in housing.Residential investment increased at an annualized pace of 13.3% in the third quarter, the fastest since 2012. Growth in household consumption picked up to an annualized pace of 1.6% in the third quarter, from 0.5% the previous quarter.Non-residential business investment also surprised -- given the global trade uncertainties -- with spending on non-residential structures and machinery up 9.5%. That fully recouped a drop in the second quarter.The end result was a 3.2% increase in overall domestic demand, fully rebounding from a very weak second quarter when consumption slowed and investment contracted. These underlying details should give Bank of Canada policy makers pause about cutting rates to counter an expected slowdown.Swaps trading suggests investors are placing a two-thirds chance of a rate cut in the first half of next year. The Canadian dollar pared losses after the report, and was trading at C$1.33 per U.S. dollar at 8:39 a.m. in Toronto trading.The “hearty” gains in final domestic demand will “for now reinforce the Bank of Canada’s view that they have rates low enough to offset the drag from weak external markets,” Avery Shenfeld, chief economist at Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, said in a note to investors. “Overall, a mixed bag, but perhaps a bit better than it looks in the headline given the strength in domestic demand.”The Bank of Canada, whose next rate decision is Dec. 4, had forecast growth of 1.3% annualized for the third and fourth quarters this year, before the expansion picks up a bit in 2020.RevisionsAnother bit of good news was upward historical revisions by Statistics Canada to gross domestic product that showed the economy was slightly larger than initially estimated last year. This suggests there was less slack in the economy than previously thought, one less reason for the Bank of Canada to cut.The biggest drag on the economy in the third quarter was a draw down in inventories by business to meet demand, instead of raising production. That’s the second straight draw down in inventories, and may still reflect concerns about the outlook.At the same time, fewer inventories will ease worries that stockpiles had grown too large, posing a risk to future growth.Exports dropped at an annualized pace of 1.5% in the third quarter, falling for a third time in the past four quarters.Households also seem to be repairing their balance sheets, with the country’s savings rate jumping to the highest since 2015 in the third quarter.“The rebound in capex is a pleasant surprise but we doubt it can be sustained,” said Jimmy Jean, a strategist in the fixed-income group at Desjardins Capital Markets in Montreal. “What this implies is that the BoC will remain on alert for further deterioration, both globally and domestically.'’ \--With assistance from Erik Hertzberg.To contact the reporter on this story: Theophilos Argitis in Ottawa at targitis@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Theophilos Argitis at targitis@bloomberg.net, Chris FournierFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 38/79   Northern Vertex Reports First Fiscal Quarter 2020 Financial Results
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Northern Vertex Mining Corp. (TSX.V:NEE) (the "Company") is pleased to announce its strongest quarter to date with revenue of $14.6 million, earnings from mine operations before depreciation and depletion of $3.8 million and cash provided by operating activities of $3.3 million. All amounts are in US dollars unless otherwise noted.

    Northern Vertex Mining Corp. (TSX.V:NEE) (the "Company") is pleased to announce its strongest quarter to date with revenue of $14.6 million, earnings from mine operations before depreciation and depletion of $3.8 million and cash provided by operating activities of $3.3 million. All amounts are in US dollars unless otherwise noted.


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  • 39/79   Bachoco Will Invest In Processed Swine Business In Mexico
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Industrias Bachoco S.A.B. de C.V. ("Bachoco" or "the Company") (NYSE: IBA; BMV: Bachoco), leading producer and processor of poultry and other food products, announced today that an agreement has been reached on investing in the company Sonora Agropecuaria S.A. de C.V. "SASA", a swine processing and distributor company with operations in the states of Sonora and Jalisco.

    Industrias Bachoco S.A.B. de C.V. ("Bachoco" or "the Company") (NYSE: IBA; BMV: Bachoco), leading producer and processor of poultry and other food products, announced today that an agreement has been reached on investing in the company Sonora Agropecuaria S.A. de C.V. "SASA", a swine processing and distributor company with operations in the states of Sonora and Jalisco.


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  • 40/79   Not much for Trump to be thankful for in latest impeachment news
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    While House Democrats concluded their public hearings last Thursday in the impeachment inquiry of Donald Trump, a flurry of new developments and disclosures this week appeared to increase the odds that he will become the third U.S. president to face a trial in the Senate that could (although most likely won’t) end with his removal from office.

    While House Democrats concluded their public hearings last Thursday in the impeachment inquiry of Donald Trump, a flurry of new developments and disclosures this week appeared to increase the odds that he will become the third U.S. president to face a trial in the Senate that could (although most likely won’t) end with his removal from office.


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  • 41/79   Dutch prosecutors charge isolated farm father with sex abuse
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A Dutch father accused of holding six of his children against their will on an isolated farm for nine years is now also suspected of sexually abusing two of his other children, prosecutors said Thursday.  The abuse allegations add a grim new element to a case that is shrouded in mystery and garnered huge attention across the Netherlands.  The 67-year-old father and a 58-year-old man, who is reportedly an Austrian national and rented the farm to the family, are suspected of illegal deprivation of liberty and abuse for their alleged detention of six young adults on a farm in the rural farming village of Ruinerwold.

    A Dutch father accused of holding six of his children against their will on an isolated farm for nine years is now also suspected of sexually abusing two of his other children, prosecutors said Thursday. The abuse allegations add a grim new element to a case that is shrouded in mystery and garnered huge attention across the Netherlands. The 67-year-old father and a 58-year-old man, who is reportedly an Austrian national and rented the farm to the family, are suspected of illegal deprivation of liberty and abuse for their alleged detention of six young adults on a farm in the rural farming village of Ruinerwold.


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  • 42/79   ICE arrests 90 more foreign students at fake university created by DHS in Michigan
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Since January, ICE has arrested about 250 students who were enrolled at a fake university in Michigan created to lure in students.

    Since January, ICE has arrested about 250 students who were enrolled at a fake university in Michigan created to lure in students.


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  • 43/79   Hotpot vs bread: the culinary symbols of Hong Kong's political divide
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A humble loaf of bread has become a new symbol for Hong Kong's pro-democracy protesters who have embraced a slew of colourful and sometimes surreal memes as they push the Beijing-backed government for reforms.  Activists have begun bringing loaves of 'Life Bread' -- a local brand beloved by Hong Kongers -- to demonstrations, or leaving them next to protest walls after a video of a police officer taunting protesters went viral.  The footage was shot last week during a siege by police of Polytechnic University where a tense stand-off unfolded between riot officers and hundreds of activists who barricaded themselves inside.

    A humble loaf of bread has become a new symbol for Hong Kong's pro-democracy protesters who have embraced a slew of colourful and sometimes surreal memes as they push the Beijing-backed government for reforms. Activists have begun bringing loaves of 'Life Bread' -- a local brand beloved by Hong Kongers -- to demonstrations, or leaving them next to protest walls after a video of a police officer taunting protesters went viral. The footage was shot last week during a siege by police of Polytechnic University where a tense stand-off unfolded between riot officers and hundreds of activists who barricaded themselves inside.


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  • 44/79   Forty years on, New Zealand apologizes for Antarctic plane disaster
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern apologized on Thursday for the then-government's handling of a plane crash in Antarctica 40 years ago that took the lives of 257 people in the country's worst peacetime disaster.  On 28 November 1979, Air New Zealand flight 901 was on a sightseeing tour from Auckland when it crashed into the side of Mount Erebus, a 3,794 meter (12,448 ft) volcano near the U.S. Antarctic research base of McMurdo Station.  Originally the crash was blamed on the pilots, but following a public outcry, a Royal Commission of Inquiry was set up to investigate the disaster.

    New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern apologized on Thursday for the then-government's handling of a plane crash in Antarctica 40 years ago that took the lives of 257 people in the country's worst peacetime disaster. On 28 November 1979, Air New Zealand flight 901 was on a sightseeing tour from Auckland when it crashed into the side of Mount Erebus, a 3,794 meter (12,448 ft) volcano near the U.S. Antarctic research base of McMurdo Station. Originally the crash was blamed on the pilots, but following a public outcry, a Royal Commission of Inquiry was set up to investigate the disaster.


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  • 45/79   Kamala Harris aide bolts to Bloomberg campaign
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Kelly Mehlenbacher was among a group of aides who resigned amid the latest round of layoffs by the Harris campaign.

    Kelly Mehlenbacher was among a group of aides who resigned amid the latest round of layoffs by the Harris campaign.


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  • 46/79   No F-35, But a Real Killer: Don't Underestimate China's J-20 Stealth Fighter
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Just because it isn't as powerful as an F-22 or F-35, doesn't mean it isn't a tough plane.

    Just because it isn't as powerful as an F-22 or F-35, doesn't mean it isn't a tough plane.


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  • 47/79   Russia says it showed nuclear missile system to U.S. inspectors
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Russia's Ministry of Defense said on Tuesday it had shown the country's new Avangard nuclear missile system to U.S. inspectors for the first time, a development that Moscow said showed a key arms control treaty was still effective.

    Russia's Ministry of Defense said on Tuesday it had shown the country's new Avangard nuclear missile system to U.S. inspectors for the first time, a development that Moscow said showed a key arms control treaty was still effective.


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  • 48/79   Founders wanted a powerful president
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Many on the left have made it their mission to hinder and undermine Trump's government: Opposing view

    Many on the left have made it their mission to hinder and undermine Trump's government: Opposing view


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  • 49/79   Trump peddles 'war on Thanksgiving' that he probably heard about on Fox News
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Like the so-called war on Christmas, the rhetorical assault on Thanksgiving is being led by the president’s favorite cable news network.

    Like the so-called war on Christmas, the rhetorical assault on Thanksgiving is being led by the president’s favorite cable news network.


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  • 50/79   A network of cables at the bottom of the ocean is helping scientists detect earthquakes
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The cables detected a new fault system near the San Andreas Fault, which runs along the California coast.

    The cables detected a new fault system near the San Andreas Fault, which runs along the California coast.


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  • 51/79   18,000-year-old puppy discovered in Siberia could be missing link between dogs and wolves
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    An 18,000-year-old puppy unearthed in Siberia could prove to be the missing link between dogs and wolves, scientists believe.  The puppy was discovered perfectly preserved by permafrost near Yakutsk, eastern Siberia last summer and carbon dating has revealed it has been frozen for around 18,000 years.   Researchers at the Centre for Palaeogenetics in Stockholm, Sweden announced this week that extensive DNA tests have so far been unable to confirm whether the animal was a dog or a wolf.  The experts believe this may be because the canine comes from the period when dogs were domesticated and hope the creature will prove crucial to uncovering when exactly the evolution began.   "It's normally relatively easy to tell the difference between the two," researcher David Stanton told CNN. Dogor was so well-preserved because he was found in a tunnel that was dug into the permafrost "We have a lot of data from it already, and with that amount of data, you'd expect to tell if it was one or the other. The fact that we can't might suggest that it's from a population that was ancestral to both - to dogs and wolves". A 2017 study published in the journal Nature Communications suggested that modern dogs were domesticated from a single wolf population 20,000 to 40,000 years ago but tests on this specimen could offer further clues as to the precise period. "We don't know exactly when dogs were domesticated, but it may have been from about that time. We are interested in whether it is in fact a dog or a wolf, or perhaps it's something halfway between the two," Mr Stanton added. Scientists believe some modern dogs descended from just one wolf population that lived continuously in Europe for thousands of years.  If confirmed to be a dog, scientists believe it will be the earliest confirmed "It seems that dogs were domesticated from a lineage of wolves that went  extinct," said Mr Stanton. "So that's why it's such a difficult problem to work on to understand where and when dogs were domesticated." The researchers' genome analysis has revealed that the puppy was a male so the scientists, after discussing with their Russian colleagues, have named the puppy 'Dogor'. The name means "friend" in Yakutian - as well as referencing the question "dog or wolf?" The scientists hope that further genome data tests on the creature will reveal more about Dogor's origins. Photographs released by the Centre for Palaeogenetics show the puppy in an almost perfect condition, with its nose, whiskers and teeth remarkably intact. Dogor can be seen almost completely covered in fur except for an exposed rib cage.  Dogor was discovered in a remote part of north-east Siberia and is so well-preserved because it was found in a tunnel that was dug into the permafrost. He was later sent to Oxford University's Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit for dating, which revealed that the corpse dated back at least 18,000 years, meaning Dogor would have lived during the last Ice Age. He is being kept in Russia while, in Sweden, Mr Stanton and his colleague Love Dalen study his rib bone.

    An 18,000-year-old puppy unearthed in Siberia could prove to be the missing link between dogs and wolves, scientists believe.  The puppy was discovered perfectly preserved by permafrost near Yakutsk, eastern Siberia last summer and carbon dating has revealed it has been frozen for around 18,000 years.   Researchers at the Centre for Palaeogenetics in Stockholm, Sweden announced this week that extensive DNA tests have so far been unable to confirm whether the animal was a dog or a wolf.  The experts believe this may be because the canine comes from the period when dogs were domesticated and hope the creature will prove crucial to uncovering when exactly the evolution began.   "It's normally relatively easy to tell the difference between the two," researcher David Stanton told CNN. Dogor was so well-preserved because he was found in a tunnel that was dug into the permafrost "We have a lot of data from it already, and with that amount of data, you'd expect to tell if it was one or the other. The fact that we can't might suggest that it's from a population that was ancestral to both - to dogs and wolves". A 2017 study published in the journal Nature Communications suggested that modern dogs were domesticated from a single wolf population 20,000 to 40,000 years ago but tests on this specimen could offer further clues as to the precise period. "We don't know exactly when dogs were domesticated, but it may have been from about that time. We are interested in whether it is in fact a dog or a wolf, or perhaps it's something halfway between the two," Mr Stanton added. Scientists believe some modern dogs descended from just one wolf population that lived continuously in Europe for thousands of years.  If confirmed to be a dog, scientists believe it will be the earliest confirmed "It seems that dogs were domesticated from a lineage of wolves that went  extinct," said Mr Stanton. "So that's why it's such a difficult problem to work on to understand where and when dogs were domesticated." The researchers' genome analysis has revealed that the puppy was a male so the scientists, after discussing with their Russian colleagues, have named the puppy 'Dogor'. The name means "friend" in Yakutian - as well as referencing the question "dog or wolf?" The scientists hope that further genome data tests on the creature will reveal more about Dogor's origins. Photographs released by the Centre for Palaeogenetics show the puppy in an almost perfect condition, with its nose, whiskers and teeth remarkably intact. Dogor can be seen almost completely covered in fur except for an exposed rib cage.  Dogor was discovered in a remote part of north-east Siberia and is so well-preserved because it was found in a tunnel that was dug into the permafrost. He was later sent to Oxford University's Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit for dating, which revealed that the corpse dated back at least 18,000 years, meaning Dogor would have lived during the last Ice Age. He is being kept in Russia while, in Sweden, Mr Stanton and his colleague Love Dalen study his rib bone.


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  • 52/79   European parliament declares 'climate emergency'
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The European Parliament voted on Thursday to declare a 'climate and environment emergency' in a symbolic gesture just ahead of the latest UN global crisis summit.  The legislature, sitting in Strasbourg, backed the motion by a comfortable 429 to 225 majority, increasing pressure on EU capitals and the European Commission to take more drastic action.  The motion urges the commission 'to ensure that all relevant legislative and budgetary proposals are fully aligned with the objective of limiting global warming to under 1.5 degrees C (35.7 degrees Fahrenheit)'.

    The European Parliament voted on Thursday to declare a 'climate and environment emergency' in a symbolic gesture just ahead of the latest UN global crisis summit. The legislature, sitting in Strasbourg, backed the motion by a comfortable 429 to 225 majority, increasing pressure on EU capitals and the European Commission to take more drastic action. The motion urges the commission 'to ensure that all relevant legislative and budgetary proposals are fully aligned with the objective of limiting global warming to under 1.5 degrees C (35.7 degrees Fahrenheit)'.


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  • 53/79   The human species will likely destroy itself long before the sun kills everyone on Earth, a Harvard scientists says
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Scientist Avi Loeb wrote that we should colonize space to survive the sun's future expansion. But humanity might wipe itself out before then, he said.

    Scientist Avi Loeb wrote that we should colonize space to survive the sun's future expansion. But humanity might wipe itself out before then, he said.


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  • 54/79   NASA’s in the market for quick taxi rides to and from International Space Station
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    NASA already has committed billions of dollars to procuring regularly scheduled rides to and from the International Space Station from commercial space taxi operators — but now it says it's interested in buying short-term trips as well. The proposed arrangement, detailed on Tuesday, is aimed at giving a boost to the commercialization of space operations in low Earth orbit, as well as to NASA's drive to send astronauts to the moon by 2024. It also makes the line dividing government-funded and privately funded space efforts even fuzzier. SpaceX and Boeing are both building spacecraft to serve as taxis to the… Read More

    NASA already has committed billions of dollars to procuring regularly scheduled rides to and from the International Space Station from commercial space taxi operators — but now it says it's interested in buying short-term trips as well. The proposed arrangement, detailed on Tuesday, is aimed at giving a boost to the commercialization of space operations in low Earth orbit, as well as to NASA's drive to send astronauts to the moon by 2024. It also makes the line dividing government-funded and privately funded space efforts even fuzzier. SpaceX and Boeing are both building spacecraft to serve as taxis to the… Read More


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  • 55/79   A stunning animation by a planetary scientist shows how huge our solar system is — and why that makes it so hard to depict
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The planets are so far apart, and the sun is so big, that you wouldn't be able to see anything in an accurate model of the solar system.

    The planets are so far apart, and the sun is so big, that you wouldn't be able to see anything in an accurate model of the solar system.


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  • 56/79   Expedition Titan uses mixed reality to turn Saturn’s mysterious moon into a thrill ride
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    It's doubtful anyone alive today will get to ride through the ice volcanoes of Saturn's largest moon — but you can do the next best thing at Seattle's Pacific Science Center, thanks to a mixed-reality experience called Expedition Titan. The walk-through production is the latest showcase for Hyperspace XR, a startup-in-residence that's pioneering the frontiers of mixed reality at the science center. That frontier is associated with other labels of immersive experiences, including virtual reality (MR), extended reality (XR) and augmented reality (AR). Hyperspace XR's brand of mixed reality involves creating a real-world environment — complete with walls, doorways and… Read More

    It's doubtful anyone alive today will get to ride through the ice volcanoes of Saturn's largest moon — but you can do the next best thing at Seattle's Pacific Science Center, thanks to a mixed-reality experience called Expedition Titan. The walk-through production is the latest showcase for Hyperspace XR, a startup-in-residence that's pioneering the frontiers of mixed reality at the science center. That frontier is associated with other labels of immersive experiences, including virtual reality (MR), extended reality (XR) and augmented reality (AR). Hyperspace XR's brand of mixed reality involves creating a real-world environment — complete with walls, doorways and… Read More


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  • 57/79   'Functionally Extinct': Do Dire Claims About Koalas Help or Hurt Them?
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    There is no doubt that the fires tearing across eastern Australia have been hurting koalas.With large areas of their crucial habitat ravaged, it is unclear what the future holds for a species that was already under threat before this round of bush fires. Some koalas have been rescued -- singed and dehydrated -- from the wild. And with blazes still burning, it is hard to know how many have been killed.But in describing the plight of these animals, is it possible to go too far?The phrase "functionally extinct" made the rounds in news articles and on social media over the weekend. The term refers to a species that no longer plays a role in an ecosystem or that is on its way to extinction, possibly irremovably.That provoked a visceral reaction from readers who wondered if the fuzzy marsupials, a national symbol of Australia, will be gone forever.In fact, koalas are not extinct. And some scientists warned that exaggeration can hurt, rather than help, conservation efforts."What is particularly frustrating about the term 'functional extinction' is it indicates a population that is basically past the point of no return, so it means that nothing really can be done," said Jacquelyn Gill, an associate professor at the University of Maine's Climate Change Institute and School of Biology and Ecology."That might seem like scientists quibbling over terms or trying to argue for nerdy levels of precision, but a strong statement like that should mean something," she said.Are koalas going extinct soon?Koalas could go extinct. The International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List, the authority on the conservation status of the world's species, says the koala population is declining and vulnerable -- but not endangered.There could be hundreds of thousands of koalas, but nailing down a number has proved impossible. Estimates range wildly, and every region is different. In some places, scientists say, koalas' numbers have declined by up to 80%.Noah Greenwald, the endangered species director at the Center for Biological Diversity, said there might have been around 300,000 koalas in Australia in 2016. But things may have changed since then -- especially given the recent fires."They're in a lot of trouble, and they need our care and our help if they're going to survive," he said.Koalas evolved to exist alongside wildfires, but the animals are facing new threats from human development, which has dislocated local populations and impaired their ability to survive fires, as well as climate change.Where did that phrase come from?On social media, many people who shared an article that used the term "functionally extinct" to describe koalas pointed to an article that appeared in Forbes on Saturday. That article, written by a senior contributor to the publication, was about the effects of the recent fires, but it appeared to cite a statement that was issued in May.The first person cited in the article was Deborah Tabart, the head of the Australian Koala Foundation.The foundation, a nonprofit conservation organization based in Brisbane, said in a statement May 10 that it believed koalas "may be functionally extinct in the entire landscape of Australia." The statement also said that the organization believed there were no more than 80,000 koalas left in the country.The organization doubled down on its use of the phrase in a different statement last month. But while the bush fires raged this month, Tabart said in another statement that "it is difficult for the Australian Koala Foundation to make any meaningful comments regarding the current Australian bush fires until the fires are over and people on the ground have evaluated the situation."The Forbes article Saturday also noted that "some researchers call into question" whether koalas were functionally extinct, "noting how difficult it is to measure total koala populations and that populations could be a much larger than estimated by the AKF."On Monday, another contributor to Forbes criticized the use of the phrase "functionally extinct" to describe koalas.The writer of the Saturday article, Trevor Nace, said in an email that "the use of the term 'functionally extinct' was Tabart's term, not mine, and was reported on by me, along with alternate views from experts."On Monday afternoon, Forbes removed the phrase "functionally extinct" from the headline and changed the beginning of the article to put less emphasis on the term.The tumult over a turn of phraseIn an interview, Tabart defended her use of the term and said that the threat of the end of a species should galvanize action, not discourage it."I want this fight," she added. "Bring it on."She said that she defined functional extinction as a situation in which a species would be gone by the third generation, and that she based her population estimates on extensive research, including land and tree surveys across eastern Australia. The data is available on her organization's website."I have driven to pretty much every part of the country," she said. "I absolutely know that there's not one koala population that's safe. I don't care what anyone says. I have been there. I've seen it. I've written about it. I've been dedicated to this job for 31 years."But Greenwald said he thought the term could have negative effects. "I think it's premature to call them functionally extinct," he said. "That would almost suggest that we give up hope, and I don't think it's at that point yet."Gill said there was a lot of space between a dire situation and a point of no return -- space for people to understand and to act."My main concern is that trust is one of our biggest assets when it comes to the scientific community and the conservation community," she added. "And I don't want to see that squandered."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company

    There is no doubt that the fires tearing across eastern Australia have been hurting koalas.With large areas of their crucial habitat ravaged, it is unclear what the future holds for a species that was already under threat before this round of bush fires. Some koalas have been rescued -- singed and dehydrated -- from the wild. And with blazes still burning, it is hard to know how many have been killed.But in describing the plight of these animals, is it possible to go too far?The phrase "functionally extinct" made the rounds in news articles and on social media over the weekend. The term refers to a species that no longer plays a role in an ecosystem or that is on its way to extinction, possibly irremovably.That provoked a visceral reaction from readers who wondered if the fuzzy marsupials, a national symbol of Australia, will be gone forever.In fact, koalas are not extinct. And some scientists warned that exaggeration can hurt, rather than help, conservation efforts."What is particularly frustrating about the term 'functional extinction' is it indicates a population that is basically past the point of no return, so it means that nothing really can be done," said Jacquelyn Gill, an associate professor at the University of Maine's Climate Change Institute and School of Biology and Ecology."That might seem like scientists quibbling over terms or trying to argue for nerdy levels of precision, but a strong statement like that should mean something," she said.Are koalas going extinct soon?Koalas could go extinct. The International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List, the authority on the conservation status of the world's species, says the koala population is declining and vulnerable -- but not endangered.There could be hundreds of thousands of koalas, but nailing down a number has proved impossible. Estimates range wildly, and every region is different. In some places, scientists say, koalas' numbers have declined by up to 80%.Noah Greenwald, the endangered species director at the Center for Biological Diversity, said there might have been around 300,000 koalas in Australia in 2016. But things may have changed since then -- especially given the recent fires."They're in a lot of trouble, and they need our care and our help if they're going to survive," he said.Koalas evolved to exist alongside wildfires, but the animals are facing new threats from human development, which has dislocated local populations and impaired their ability to survive fires, as well as climate change.Where did that phrase come from?On social media, many people who shared an article that used the term "functionally extinct" to describe koalas pointed to an article that appeared in Forbes on Saturday. That article, written by a senior contributor to the publication, was about the effects of the recent fires, but it appeared to cite a statement that was issued in May.The first person cited in the article was Deborah Tabart, the head of the Australian Koala Foundation.The foundation, a nonprofit conservation organization based in Brisbane, said in a statement May 10 that it believed koalas "may be functionally extinct in the entire landscape of Australia." The statement also said that the organization believed there were no more than 80,000 koalas left in the country.The organization doubled down on its use of the phrase in a different statement last month. But while the bush fires raged this month, Tabart said in another statement that "it is difficult for the Australian Koala Foundation to make any meaningful comments regarding the current Australian bush fires until the fires are over and people on the ground have evaluated the situation."The Forbes article Saturday also noted that "some researchers call into question" whether koalas were functionally extinct, "noting how difficult it is to measure total koala populations and that populations could be a much larger than estimated by the AKF."On Monday, another contributor to Forbes criticized the use of the phrase "functionally extinct" to describe koalas.The writer of the Saturday article, Trevor Nace, said in an email that "the use of the term 'functionally extinct' was Tabart's term, not mine, and was reported on by me, along with alternate views from experts."On Monday afternoon, Forbes removed the phrase "functionally extinct" from the headline and changed the beginning of the article to put less emphasis on the term.The tumult over a turn of phraseIn an interview, Tabart defended her use of the term and said that the threat of the end of a species should galvanize action, not discourage it."I want this fight," she added. "Bring it on."She said that she defined functional extinction as a situation in which a species would be gone by the third generation, and that she based her population estimates on extensive research, including land and tree surveys across eastern Australia. The data is available on her organization's website."I have driven to pretty much every part of the country," she said. "I absolutely know that there's not one koala population that's safe. I don't care what anyone says. I have been there. I've seen it. I've written about it. I've been dedicated to this job for 31 years."But Greenwald said he thought the term could have negative effects. "I think it's premature to call them functionally extinct," he said. "That would almost suggest that we give up hope, and I don't think it's at that point yet."Gill said there was a lot of space between a dire situation and a point of no return -- space for people to understand and to act."My main concern is that trust is one of our biggest assets when it comes to the scientific community and the conservation community," she added. "And I don't want to see that squandered."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company


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  • 58/79   Scientists Created Fake Rhino Horn. But Should We Use It?
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    In Africa, 892 rhinos were poached for their horns in 2018, down from a high of 1,349 killed in 2015. The decline in deaths is encouraging, but conservationists agree that poaching still poses a dire threat to Africa's rhino population, which hovers around 24,500 animals.Now, in the hopes of driving down the value of rhino horn and reducing poaching even more, scientists have created a convincing artificial rhino horn made from horsehair."We're not trying to supplant boots-on-the-ground, vigilant customs officials and protection of rhino habitat," said Fritz Vollrath, a biologist at the University of Oxford and senior author of the study, published in Scientific Reports. "But these measures alone so far have not been sufficient to save the rhino, so what we're doing here is bringing out a really good fake."The product that Vollrath and colleagues at Fudan University in China have produced looks identical to rhino horn under a microscope. It has a similar chemical signature and behaves like rhino horn when cut or shaved. It even smells the same when burned.With such properties, Vollrath believes his artificial horn could be used to covertly flood the market with a cheap, convincing replacement, reducing the demand that leads to rhinos being slaughtered.A number of experts pushed back, however, saying such a product is unnecessary and even dangerous.Some wealthy elites in China and Vietnam continue to give rhino horn as gifts and, in Vietnam, bring it to parties as a hangover preventive. In China, it's also carved into jewelry and ornate cups, and collected for speculation purposes."What we've seen is that most rhino horn is now being used for status symbols," said Olivia Swaak-Goldman, executive director of the Wildlife Justice Commission, a nonprofit organization that investigates wildlife trafficking networks.Status depends on rhino horn's exclusivity, high price and rarity, things that Vollrath believes his artificial horn could undermine.Rhino horn, as Vollrath puts it, is "nothing but a tuft of nose hair stuck together with glue that comes out of the animal's nose glands." He and his colleagues chose horsehair as a basis for their fake rhino horn because horses are a close relative of rhinos. They cleaned and tightly bundled the hair, then bound it together with a mixture of liquefied silk, which stood in for the collagen found in rhino horn, as well as cellulose, which represented the plant material that gets rubbed in as rhinos sharpen their horns.Pembient, a Seattle-based bioengineering company, is exploring the development of 3D-printed rhino horn. Matthew Markus, Pembient's chief executive, said he would be open to testing the new horsehair formula.But his company has also faced pushback from conservationists.Critics say that fake rhino horn risks stimulating demand for real horn and that it would complicate policing. "There's already scarce resources for wildlife crime, and we don't want to make it even more difficult for law enforcement," said Swaak-Goldman, who works with governments and law enforcement agencies.Peter Knights, chief executive of WildAid, a nonprofit organization dedicated to ending illegal wildlife trade, added that the market in Vietnam was already flooded with convincing fakes, like water buffalo horn, which accounts for up to 90% of what's sold as rhino horn.Frederick Chen, an economist at Wake Forest University, said that there was more than one way to flood a market, however. "Conservation groups tend to clump different strategies under one roof and have a knee-jerk reaction that they have to reject them all," he said. "But the dangers they point out don't apply to all strategies."Chen agreed that introducing a product marketed as an artificial alternative would risk driving up demand for real rhino horn. But covertly introducing a product that passes as real rhino horn but later reveals itself to have some undesirable defect -- horns that deteriorate after purchase, for example, or horns that, when consumed, trigger a stomachache -- could ultimately undermine demand. "If you introduce quality uncertainty into the market, you are trying to create confusion and essentially destroy the rhino horn market," he said.For now, these ideas remain in the realm of theory, and much of that theory goes against real-world evidence suggesting what might happen if the market was flooded with fake horn, said Solomon Hsiang, an economist at the University of California, Berkeley. Hsiang cautioned, for example, that experiments trying to undermine black markets in elephant ivory by selling legal ivory backfired and ultimately led to increased poaching.Engineering fake rhino horn "seems like an elaborate technological approach that is not without potentially serious risk," Hsiang said, when a much simpler strategy would be to focus on targeted demand reduction.According to Lynn Johnson, founder of Nature Needs More, a nonprofit organization that aims to reduce wildlife demand and supply, demand reduction campaigns should focus on top rhino horn users, who are usually wealthy, elite men.Johnson interviewed 20 such individuals in Vietnam and found that they did not fall for fakes: They take measures to ensure their purchase is genuine, including working with a trusted supply chain and requesting the rhino's tail as proof of provenance.They also told her that they view rhino horn as a luxury product that confers prestige. A 2018 study involving 30 Vietnamese rhino horn buyers found that most no longer believed it could cure cancer, a newfangled use that became popular around a decade ago, but they still sought it out as a symbolic final gesture to comfort terminally ill relatives.Belief in rhino horn's traditional medical properties also seems to be on the decline. A survey of 400 people in Vietnam carried out by WildAid in 2016 revealed that 23% thought rhino horn had medicinal value, down from 69% in 2014.But as long as influential people continue to hold rhino horn in high regard, Johnson says that younger and less successful people will also continue to see it as something desirable. "As soon as people can afford the real thing, they'll buy it," she said.Changing the minds of top users, something Johnson and her colleagues are trying to do, is therefore key to quashing demand, she said."I'm a scientist, but you have to know when science won't help," she said. "Calls for fake rhino horn just shows that there's a lack of understanding about the true commercial nature and consumer desire of current demand."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company

    In Africa, 892 rhinos were poached for their horns in 2018, down from a high of 1,349 killed in 2015. The decline in deaths is encouraging, but conservationists agree that poaching still poses a dire threat to Africa's rhino population, which hovers around 24,500 animals.Now, in the hopes of driving down the value of rhino horn and reducing poaching even more, scientists have created a convincing artificial rhino horn made from horsehair."We're not trying to supplant boots-on-the-ground, vigilant customs officials and protection of rhino habitat," said Fritz Vollrath, a biologist at the University of Oxford and senior author of the study, published in Scientific Reports. "But these measures alone so far have not been sufficient to save the rhino, so what we're doing here is bringing out a really good fake."The product that Vollrath and colleagues at Fudan University in China have produced looks identical to rhino horn under a microscope. It has a similar chemical signature and behaves like rhino horn when cut or shaved. It even smells the same when burned.With such properties, Vollrath believes his artificial horn could be used to covertly flood the market with a cheap, convincing replacement, reducing the demand that leads to rhinos being slaughtered.A number of experts pushed back, however, saying such a product is unnecessary and even dangerous.Some wealthy elites in China and Vietnam continue to give rhino horn as gifts and, in Vietnam, bring it to parties as a hangover preventive. In China, it's also carved into jewelry and ornate cups, and collected for speculation purposes."What we've seen is that most rhino horn is now being used for status symbols," said Olivia Swaak-Goldman, executive director of the Wildlife Justice Commission, a nonprofit organization that investigates wildlife trafficking networks.Status depends on rhino horn's exclusivity, high price and rarity, things that Vollrath believes his artificial horn could undermine.Rhino horn, as Vollrath puts it, is "nothing but a tuft of nose hair stuck together with glue that comes out of the animal's nose glands." He and his colleagues chose horsehair as a basis for their fake rhino horn because horses are a close relative of rhinos. They cleaned and tightly bundled the hair, then bound it together with a mixture of liquefied silk, which stood in for the collagen found in rhino horn, as well as cellulose, which represented the plant material that gets rubbed in as rhinos sharpen their horns.Pembient, a Seattle-based bioengineering company, is exploring the development of 3D-printed rhino horn. Matthew Markus, Pembient's chief executive, said he would be open to testing the new horsehair formula.But his company has also faced pushback from conservationists.Critics say that fake rhino horn risks stimulating demand for real horn and that it would complicate policing. "There's already scarce resources for wildlife crime, and we don't want to make it even more difficult for law enforcement," said Swaak-Goldman, who works with governments and law enforcement agencies.Peter Knights, chief executive of WildAid, a nonprofit organization dedicated to ending illegal wildlife trade, added that the market in Vietnam was already flooded with convincing fakes, like water buffalo horn, which accounts for up to 90% of what's sold as rhino horn.Frederick Chen, an economist at Wake Forest University, said that there was more than one way to flood a market, however. "Conservation groups tend to clump different strategies under one roof and have a knee-jerk reaction that they have to reject them all," he said. "But the dangers they point out don't apply to all strategies."Chen agreed that introducing a product marketed as an artificial alternative would risk driving up demand for real rhino horn. But covertly introducing a product that passes as real rhino horn but later reveals itself to have some undesirable defect -- horns that deteriorate after purchase, for example, or horns that, when consumed, trigger a stomachache -- could ultimately undermine demand. "If you introduce quality uncertainty into the market, you are trying to create confusion and essentially destroy the rhino horn market," he said.For now, these ideas remain in the realm of theory, and much of that theory goes against real-world evidence suggesting what might happen if the market was flooded with fake horn, said Solomon Hsiang, an economist at the University of California, Berkeley. Hsiang cautioned, for example, that experiments trying to undermine black markets in elephant ivory by selling legal ivory backfired and ultimately led to increased poaching.Engineering fake rhino horn "seems like an elaborate technological approach that is not without potentially serious risk," Hsiang said, when a much simpler strategy would be to focus on targeted demand reduction.According to Lynn Johnson, founder of Nature Needs More, a nonprofit organization that aims to reduce wildlife demand and supply, demand reduction campaigns should focus on top rhino horn users, who are usually wealthy, elite men.Johnson interviewed 20 such individuals in Vietnam and found that they did not fall for fakes: They take measures to ensure their purchase is genuine, including working with a trusted supply chain and requesting the rhino's tail as proof of provenance.They also told her that they view rhino horn as a luxury product that confers prestige. A 2018 study involving 30 Vietnamese rhino horn buyers found that most no longer believed it could cure cancer, a newfangled use that became popular around a decade ago, but they still sought it out as a symbolic final gesture to comfort terminally ill relatives.Belief in rhino horn's traditional medical properties also seems to be on the decline. A survey of 400 people in Vietnam carried out by WildAid in 2016 revealed that 23% thought rhino horn had medicinal value, down from 69% in 2014.But as long as influential people continue to hold rhino horn in high regard, Johnson says that younger and less successful people will also continue to see it as something desirable. "As soon as people can afford the real thing, they'll buy it," she said.Changing the minds of top users, something Johnson and her colleagues are trying to do, is therefore key to quashing demand, she said."I'm a scientist, but you have to know when science won't help," she said. "Calls for fake rhino horn just shows that there's a lack of understanding about the true commercial nature and consumer desire of current demand."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company


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  • 59/79   Archaeologists discovered a catacomb filled with mummified lion cubs, crocodiles, and cobras in an ancient Egyptian city of the dead
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Egyptologists discovered an ancient city of the dead in Saqqara. The grave site recently revealed dozens of mummified creatures, including lion cubs.

    Egyptologists discovered an ancient city of the dead in Saqqara. The grave site recently revealed dozens of mummified creatures, including lion cubs.


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  • 60/79   Tories Pledge Tougher Rules on Foreign Takeovers: U.K. Votes
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, follow us @Brexit and subscribe to our podcast.Boris Johnson sought to recapture the spirit of the 2016 referendum as he tries to convince Brexit supporters he still needs their votes even though polls show him on course for election victory next month. He promised tougher rules on foreign takeovers and the provision of state aid to help British companies.Johnson warned against complacency, saying there is still a risk of a coalition government led by Jeremy Corbyn, even after polling analysis suggested the Labour party could lose districts it has held for decades. John McDonnell, the opposition party’s economy spokesman, announced an “investment blitz” in a bid to win back wavering supporters.Earlier the prime minister signaled it would be unhelpful for Donald Trump to intervene in the U.K. election when the U.S. president visits London next week. Johnson cited Barack Obama’s comments during the 2016 referendum campaign as an example of the potential for foreign leaders’ involvement to backfire.Must Read: The Tories Secretly Fear Trump Could Wreck Johnson’s ElectionFor more on the election visit ELEC.Key Developments:Johnson and Michael Gove appear at a press conference in London alongside anti-EU former Labour MP Gisela Stuart in a reprise of the 2016 Brexit referendumStuart urges traditional Labour supporters to vote Conservative to deliver BrexitTories pledge tougher rules on foreign takeovers; Johnson says U.K. must be open to Chinese investment but must strike a “balance” on security concernsLiberal Democrat leader Jo Swinson speaks in Cardiff at 2:30 p.m. on interfaith relations and policingThe BBC holds a 7-way party debate at 7 p.m. -- though Johnson and Corbyn will not take partThere is a 71% chance of a Conservative majority, according to bookmaker LadbrokesCorbyn in Fresh Attack on Billionaires (12:45 p.m.)Jeremy Corbyn opened a new broadside on billionaires opposing his plans for a re-distributive socialist economy after The Daily Mail and General Trust bought the i newspaper in a 50 million pound deal ($64.5 million).“Two billionaire press barons now own half of the top 10 daily newspapers,” Corbyn said in a posting on Twitter. “Remember this when they attack Labour’s plan to make the super-rich pay their fair share.”“We are committed to preserving its distinctive, high quality and politically independent editorial style,” DMGT said in a statement on its acquisition of the i newspaper.Free Trade Group Attacks State Aid Proposals (12:20 p.m.)The Adam Smith Institute, a think tank aimed at promoting free trade which had close links with former Conservative Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, said it was disappointed with Boris Johnson’s plan to change state aid rules and procurement provisions to make it easier to support British companies, calling it a “form of Trumpian protectionism.”“We shouldn’t free ourselves from the European Union in order to just enslave ourselves to the whims of Whitehall,” said Matthew Lesh, head of research at the Adam Smith Institute. “Making a profit is a proof of the value added to society, and there must be no business that is too big to fail.”Tories Pledge Tougher Foreign Takeover Rules (12:05 p.m.)The Conservatives plan to strengthen protections against foreign takeovers of British companies, Cabinet Office Minister Michael Gove said, in answer to a question about Chinese investment in the U.K.“We certainly don’t believe that the current provisions which are in place are robust enough,” Gove said at a press conference. He said he’s undertaken to “strengthen” a unit in his department that examines foreign takeovers, and “strengthen protections in the future.”Speaking alongside him, Boris Johnson agreed, before saying the country must strike a “balance” between “continuing to be open to investment from China” and making sure the U.K. doesn’t do anything “that prejudices our critical national infrastructure, our security, or do anything that would compromise our ability to cooperate with five-eyes security partners.”“Those are the parameters,” Johnson said. “I am very, very far from a Sinophobe. I want to have good relations with China, but there are clear difficulties and clear boundaries that we have to set.”U.K.’s No-Deal Preparations to Continue (12 p.m.)Boris Johnson confirmed the U.K. will continue to make preparations for a disorderly exit from the European Union. “Of course the preparations will remain extant,” he said. “There’s no reason to dismantle them.”He described the preparations which he put in place prior to the Oct. 31 deadline as being “thoroughly useful” in achieving the deal made with the EU, as it convinced Brussels the U.K. was “in earnest” about leaving.Johnson said he is confident of completing a deal with the EU by the end of 2020 and “sees no reason” to extend that deadline, meaning the U.K. crashing out without a deal is still a possibility.State Aid Plan Compatible With EU: Johnson (11:50 a.m.)Taking questions from the press after his speech, Boris Johnson said that “of course” the U.K.’s new state aid rules (see 11:35 a.m.) would be compatible with those of the European Union, dismissing the idea that they could endanger a new free trade deal with the bloc.“Were there to be any issues arising, then as you know, under any big free trade deal, there’s a joint committee to arbitrate on whether some unfair subsidy or dispensation has been made,” Johnson said. “But it would be a committee of sovereign equals.”Johnson later said he believed in competition and in a “level playing field.”Tories Vow to Change Public Procurement (11:40 a.m)The Tories vowed to break away from EU state aid rules that the party said have a “chilling effect” on government support for industry, because of the need to wait for “months or years” for decisions on whether measures by member states are permissible or not.Existing rules “mean that the U.K. government cannot take steps to quickly and effectively help companies that are in danger,” the Conservative Party said in the statement. New rules will be developed in consultation with British businesses, it said.The Tories promised a new state aid system that sets out clear principles when the government will intervene, based on the U.K.’s needs. Ministers will have “more discretion” over decisions, which they will be able to take within “days.” A new government body would be set up to manage the system, the party said.On public procurement, the Tories pledged to ditch “absurdly complex” EU rules with their “pointless tendering requirements.” It also promised “simpler and cheaper” regulations that are “geared towards supporting local business and promoting British business.” The new system will be in place by Jan. 2021.Tories Announce State Aid Plans (11:35 a.m.)The Conservatives unveiled a package of measures that they described as “immediate steps to realize the benefits of Brexit,” including a pledge to overhaul the country’s state aid system to make it “faster and easier for the government to intervene to protect jobs when an industry is in trouble.”A Tory government will also change public procurement policy to support local businesses and promote a “buy British” approach for public bodies that purchase food, in an effort to back farmers, the party said in an email.“People voted to take back control -- and we want to deliver that change,” Johnson said in a statement. “One of the crucial ways we will do that is by improving our rules so that we can back British businesses and unleash their true potential.”Stuart Tells Labour Voters to Back Johnson (11:30 a.m.)Gisela Stuart, the former Labour MP who helped run the Leave campaign in the 2016 Brexit referendum, urged traditional Labour voters to back the Conservatives in what she called the Dec. 12 “Brexit election.”“Voting for Brexit this time does not make me a Tory now or in the future,” Stuart said as she stood alongside Johnson and Michael Gove. “Rather, it is the best option.”Labour Step Up Pressure Over Johnson Comments (10:40 a.m.)Labour criticized Prime Minister Boris Johnson over past remarks he made about single mothers in a column from the 1990s (See 10 a.m.)“Boris Johnson’s refusal to apologize for his hateful comments about single mothers, their children and working class men is an absolute disgrace,” Labour’s education spokeswoman, Angela Rayner, who has herself been a single mother, said in a statement. “He tried to deny what he wrote, but the evidence is there in black and white for us all to see, proving once again that he’s a liar as well as a sexist.”Johnson Signals to Trump to Stay Quiet (10:15 a.m.)Ahead of Donald Trump’s visit to the U.K. next week, Boris Johnson said the two allies “traditionally” do not get involved in each others’ domestic politics -- an apparent signal to the U.S. president not to say anything that could potentially undermine the Conservative Party’s election campaign.“We have very close relationships with the United States at every level of government, but what we don’t do traditionally -- as loving allies and friends -- is get involved in each other’s election campaigns,” Johnson told LBC radio.The comment comes amid Tory party fears of an intervention by the president in the run-up to the Dec. 12 vote. Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn is using Johnson’s links to the president and pursuit of a post-Brexit U.S. trade as a central attack line in the campaign, especially on the potential dangers to Britain’s state-run National Health Service.Johnson pointed out that former President Barack Obama’s intervention in the 2016 Brexit referendum campaign didn’t help the government’s argument for staying in the European Union. Obama’s comments were “not entirely conducive to the good of that cause,” he said.Johnson Under Fire for Controversial Comments (10 a.m.)Boris Johnson said the quotation of comments from his newspaper columns about Muslims, black people and single mothers were a “distortion” of his true views. In a 1995 article republished this week, he blamed single mothers for “producing a generation of ill-raised, ignorant, aggressive and illegitimate children.”“These are 25 year old quotations culled from articles written before I was even in politics,” Johnson said in response to an angry call from a single mother to a phone-in on LBC. “Almost invariably when you look at these articles what the actual piece is saying the opposite of what is claimed.” Johnson also refused to say how many children he has and whether he is involved in all of their lives.The description of single mothers was not the first time Johnson’s comments have attracted condemnation. He has previously come under fire for referring to black people as “piccaninnies” with “watermelon smiles,” while last year he used the terms “bank robber” and “letterbox” to describe Muslim women who wear burqas.Johnson also refused to say whether Jacob Rees-Mogg would still be in his cabinet if he wins the election after the leader of the House of Commons suggested people could have survived the Grenfell Tower fire if they’d shown “common sense” to escape. “I’m not going to get into measuring up the curtains type conversations,” Johnson said.Johnson Defends Tory Plans on NHS (9:40 a.m.)During his Q&A appearance on LBC radio, Boris Johnson was repeatedly challenged on his Conservative Party’s plans for the National Health Service. He acknowledged that a pledge to add 50,000 nurses actually includes persuading 19,000 to stay in the profession -- a discrepancy that opposition parties have said shows the Tories are misleading voters.“I do understand the controversy about this,” Johnson said, referring to the 19,000 figure. “The risk is that they will leave the profession and we’re putting in the funds to ensure they will stay.”Britain’s beloved state-run NHS is a key battleground in the election campaign after Labour accused Johnson of using it as a bargaining chip in talks with the U.S. on a post-Brexit trade deal. The prime minister reiterated on Friday that’s not the case, calling it “Bermuda Triangle stuff” from Corbyn’s party.Johnson was also on the back foot over his widely disputed plan to build 40 new hospitals, with opposition parties arguing the real number is only six. The prime minister was forced to acknowledge that some voters will not regard hospital refurbishments and upgrades as new hospitals. He also said the Conservative manifesto does not include a plan to resolve the crisis in social care because the precise details have not been “thrashed out” -- despite it being a key pledge in his first speech as prime minister.Johnson: Working on ‘About a Dozen’ Trade Deals (9:15 a.m.)Boris Johnson could not give a figure for how many trade deals the U.K. has ready ahead of its departure from the EU. “I can’t give the answer to how many deals are actually formalized,” he said in a phone-in with listeners on LBC radio. “There are a number that are virtually ready to go.”“I imagine we have about a dozen we’re currently working on,” he said, naming China, India, New Zealand and Australia as examples.If his Conservative Party wins a working majority, the U.K. will leave the EU on Jan. 31, Johnson said. A trade deal will also be agreed with the bloc by the end of 2020, he said: “I see no reason to go beyond that deadline,” he told listeners.Williamson Denies Tory Threat to Channel 4 (9 a.m.)Education Secretary Gavin Williamson denied the Conservative Party is threatening to review Channel 4’s broadcasting license following its decision not to allow Cabinet minister Michael Gove to sub in for Boris Johnson in a leaders’ debate on climate change on Thursday.Speaking on BBC radio, Williamson said the party has raised a complaint with the broadcasting regulator Ofcom. The row came after Johnson declined to appear in the debate, sending Gove in his place. Channel 4 refused to allow Gove, who appeared at the venue with his own television crew, to take part -- on the basis that the invitation was to the leaders of the political parties.“The Conservative Party isn’t threatening Channel 4, we’re raising a complaint with Ofcom which is perfectly legitimate,” Williamson said. “Frankly they reduced the quality of the debate that happened yesterday by refusing to let Michael Gove go on.” The Telegraph cited a source in the Tory party it didn’t identify as saying Channel 4’s public broadcasting license is under threat.McDonnell: Johnson ‘Running Scared’ (Earlier)Labour economy spokesman John McDonnell said Boris Johnson is “running scared” from scrutiny after the prime minister refused to attend a leaders debate on climate change on Thursday evening. He has also refused to be interviewed by Andrew Neil, who has the reputation of being one of the BBC’s most forensic interviewers.“The reason he is doing it is because he thinks like, you know, his Bullingdon Club friends, that they’re above the rest of us,” McDonnell said. “Because he knows that Andrew Neil will take him apart. He’s running scared. But even if he does it now, he’s played you because he’s pushing it later and later beyond the postal vote returns.”The Conservatives wrote to OfCom, the media regulator, on Thursday evening to complain that Channel 4, the host of the climate debate, had replaced Johnson with a melting ice sculpture during the debate.Labour is not changing its strategy, McDonnell said, denying reports that the party is switching its focus to leave voting areas after polling showed that it was set to lose seats in its north of England hearltlands.Earlier:The Tories Secretly Fear Trump Could Wreck Johnson’s ElectionU.K. Consumer Confidence Lowest Heading Into Election Since 2010Johnson Warns Against Complacency Over Lead: U.K. Campaign TrailTories Riled After Iceblock Replaces U.K. PM in Climate DebateTo contact the reporters on this story: Greg Ritchie in London at gritchie10@bloomberg.net;Alex Morales in London at amorales2@bloomberg.net;Tim Ross in London at tross54@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Stuart Biggs, Thomas PennyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, follow us @Brexit and subscribe to our podcast.Boris Johnson sought to recapture the spirit of the 2016 referendum as he tries to convince Brexit supporters he still needs their votes even though polls show him on course for election victory next month. He promised tougher rules on foreign takeovers and the provision of state aid to help British companies.Johnson warned against complacency, saying there is still a risk of a coalition government led by Jeremy Corbyn, even after polling analysis suggested the Labour party could lose districts it has held for decades. John McDonnell, the opposition party’s economy spokesman, announced an “investment blitz” in a bid to win back wavering supporters.Earlier the prime minister signaled it would be unhelpful for Donald Trump to intervene in the U.K. election when the U.S. president visits London next week. Johnson cited Barack Obama’s comments during the 2016 referendum campaign as an example of the potential for foreign leaders’ involvement to backfire.Must Read: The Tories Secretly Fear Trump Could Wreck Johnson’s ElectionFor more on the election visit ELEC.Key Developments:Johnson and Michael Gove appear at a press conference in London alongside anti-EU former Labour MP Gisela Stuart in a reprise of the 2016 Brexit referendumStuart urges traditional Labour supporters to vote Conservative to deliver BrexitTories pledge tougher rules on foreign takeovers; Johnson says U.K. must be open to Chinese investment but must strike a “balance” on security concernsLiberal Democrat leader Jo Swinson speaks in Cardiff at 2:30 p.m. on interfaith relations and policingThe BBC holds a 7-way party debate at 7 p.m. -- though Johnson and Corbyn will not take partThere is a 71% chance of a Conservative majority, according to bookmaker LadbrokesCorbyn in Fresh Attack on Billionaires (12:45 p.m.)Jeremy Corbyn opened a new broadside on billionaires opposing his plans for a re-distributive socialist economy after The Daily Mail and General Trust bought the i newspaper in a 50 million pound deal ($64.5 million).“Two billionaire press barons now own half of the top 10 daily newspapers,” Corbyn said in a posting on Twitter. “Remember this when they attack Labour’s plan to make the super-rich pay their fair share.”“We are committed to preserving its distinctive, high quality and politically independent editorial style,” DMGT said in a statement on its acquisition of the i newspaper.Free Trade Group Attacks State Aid Proposals (12:20 p.m.)The Adam Smith Institute, a think tank aimed at promoting free trade which had close links with former Conservative Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, said it was disappointed with Boris Johnson’s plan to change state aid rules and procurement provisions to make it easier to support British companies, calling it a “form of Trumpian protectionism.”“We shouldn’t free ourselves from the European Union in order to just enslave ourselves to the whims of Whitehall,” said Matthew Lesh, head of research at the Adam Smith Institute. “Making a profit is a proof of the value added to society, and there must be no business that is too big to fail.”Tories Pledge Tougher Foreign Takeover Rules (12:05 p.m.)The Conservatives plan to strengthen protections against foreign takeovers of British companies, Cabinet Office Minister Michael Gove said, in answer to a question about Chinese investment in the U.K.“We certainly don’t believe that the current provisions which are in place are robust enough,” Gove said at a press conference. He said he’s undertaken to “strengthen” a unit in his department that examines foreign takeovers, and “strengthen protections in the future.”Speaking alongside him, Boris Johnson agreed, before saying the country must strike a “balance” between “continuing to be open to investment from China” and making sure the U.K. doesn’t do anything “that prejudices our critical national infrastructure, our security, or do anything that would compromise our ability to cooperate with five-eyes security partners.”“Those are the parameters,” Johnson said. “I am very, very far from a Sinophobe. I want to have good relations with China, but there are clear difficulties and clear boundaries that we have to set.”U.K.’s No-Deal Preparations to Continue (12 p.m.)Boris Johnson confirmed the U.K. will continue to make preparations for a disorderly exit from the European Union. “Of course the preparations will remain extant,” he said. “There’s no reason to dismantle them.”He described the preparations which he put in place prior to the Oct. 31 deadline as being “thoroughly useful” in achieving the deal made with the EU, as it convinced Brussels the U.K. was “in earnest” about leaving.Johnson said he is confident of completing a deal with the EU by the end of 2020 and “sees no reason” to extend that deadline, meaning the U.K. crashing out without a deal is still a possibility.State Aid Plan Compatible With EU: Johnson (11:50 a.m.)Taking questions from the press after his speech, Boris Johnson said that “of course” the U.K.’s new state aid rules (see 11:35 a.m.) would be compatible with those of the European Union, dismissing the idea that they could endanger a new free trade deal with the bloc.“Were there to be any issues arising, then as you know, under any big free trade deal, there’s a joint committee to arbitrate on whether some unfair subsidy or dispensation has been made,” Johnson said. “But it would be a committee of sovereign equals.”Johnson later said he believed in competition and in a “level playing field.”Tories Vow to Change Public Procurement (11:40 a.m)The Tories vowed to break away from EU state aid rules that the party said have a “chilling effect” on government support for industry, because of the need to wait for “months or years” for decisions on whether measures by member states are permissible or not.Existing rules “mean that the U.K. government cannot take steps to quickly and effectively help companies that are in danger,” the Conservative Party said in the statement. New rules will be developed in consultation with British businesses, it said.The Tories promised a new state aid system that sets out clear principles when the government will intervene, based on the U.K.’s needs. Ministers will have “more discretion” over decisions, which they will be able to take within “days.” A new government body would be set up to manage the system, the party said.On public procurement, the Tories pledged to ditch “absurdly complex” EU rules with their “pointless tendering requirements.” It also promised “simpler and cheaper” regulations that are “geared towards supporting local business and promoting British business.” The new system will be in place by Jan. 2021.Tories Announce State Aid Plans (11:35 a.m.)The Conservatives unveiled a package of measures that they described as “immediate steps to realize the benefits of Brexit,” including a pledge to overhaul the country’s state aid system to make it “faster and easier for the government to intervene to protect jobs when an industry is in trouble.”A Tory government will also change public procurement policy to support local businesses and promote a “buy British” approach for public bodies that purchase food, in an effort to back farmers, the party said in an email.“People voted to take back control -- and we want to deliver that change,” Johnson said in a statement. “One of the crucial ways we will do that is by improving our rules so that we can back British businesses and unleash their true potential.”Stuart Tells Labour Voters to Back Johnson (11:30 a.m.)Gisela Stuart, the former Labour MP who helped run the Leave campaign in the 2016 Brexit referendum, urged traditional Labour voters to back the Conservatives in what she called the Dec. 12 “Brexit election.”“Voting for Brexit this time does not make me a Tory now or in the future,” Stuart said as she stood alongside Johnson and Michael Gove. “Rather, it is the best option.”Labour Step Up Pressure Over Johnson Comments (10:40 a.m.)Labour criticized Prime Minister Boris Johnson over past remarks he made about single mothers in a column from the 1990s (See 10 a.m.)“Boris Johnson’s refusal to apologize for his hateful comments about single mothers, their children and working class men is an absolute disgrace,” Labour’s education spokeswoman, Angela Rayner, who has herself been a single mother, said in a statement. “He tried to deny what he wrote, but the evidence is there in black and white for us all to see, proving once again that he’s a liar as well as a sexist.”Johnson Signals to Trump to Stay Quiet (10:15 a.m.)Ahead of Donald Trump’s visit to the U.K. next week, Boris Johnson said the two allies “traditionally” do not get involved in each others’ domestic politics -- an apparent signal to the U.S. president not to say anything that could potentially undermine the Conservative Party’s election campaign.“We have very close relationships with the United States at every level of government, but what we don’t do traditionally -- as loving allies and friends -- is get involved in each other’s election campaigns,” Johnson told LBC radio.The comment comes amid Tory party fears of an intervention by the president in the run-up to the Dec. 12 vote. Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn is using Johnson’s links to the president and pursuit of a post-Brexit U.S. trade as a central attack line in the campaign, especially on the potential dangers to Britain’s state-run National Health Service.Johnson pointed out that former President Barack Obama’s intervention in the 2016 Brexit referendum campaign didn’t help the government’s argument for staying in the European Union. Obama’s comments were “not entirely conducive to the good of that cause,” he said.Johnson Under Fire for Controversial Comments (10 a.m.)Boris Johnson said the quotation of comments from his newspaper columns about Muslims, black people and single mothers were a “distortion” of his true views. In a 1995 article republished this week, he blamed single mothers for “producing a generation of ill-raised, ignorant, aggressive and illegitimate children.”“These are 25 year old quotations culled from articles written before I was even in politics,” Johnson said in response to an angry call from a single mother to a phone-in on LBC. “Almost invariably when you look at these articles what the actual piece is saying the opposite of what is claimed.” Johnson also refused to say how many children he has and whether he is involved in all of their lives.The description of single mothers was not the first time Johnson’s comments have attracted condemnation. He has previously come under fire for referring to black people as “piccaninnies” with “watermelon smiles,” while last year he used the terms “bank robber” and “letterbox” to describe Muslim women who wear burqas.Johnson also refused to say whether Jacob Rees-Mogg would still be in his cabinet if he wins the election after the leader of the House of Commons suggested people could have survived the Grenfell Tower fire if they’d shown “common sense” to escape. “I’m not going to get into measuring up the curtains type conversations,” Johnson said.Johnson Defends Tory Plans on NHS (9:40 a.m.)During his Q&A appearance on LBC radio, Boris Johnson was repeatedly challenged on his Conservative Party’s plans for the National Health Service. He acknowledged that a pledge to add 50,000 nurses actually includes persuading 19,000 to stay in the profession -- a discrepancy that opposition parties have said shows the Tories are misleading voters.“I do understand the controversy about this,” Johnson said, referring to the 19,000 figure. “The risk is that they will leave the profession and we’re putting in the funds to ensure they will stay.”Britain’s beloved state-run NHS is a key battleground in the election campaign after Labour accused Johnson of using it as a bargaining chip in talks with the U.S. on a post-Brexit trade deal. The prime minister reiterated on Friday that’s not the case, calling it “Bermuda Triangle stuff” from Corbyn’s party.Johnson was also on the back foot over his widely disputed plan to build 40 new hospitals, with opposition parties arguing the real number is only six. The prime minister was forced to acknowledge that some voters will not regard hospital refurbishments and upgrades as new hospitals. He also said the Conservative manifesto does not include a plan to resolve the crisis in social care because the precise details have not been “thrashed out” -- despite it being a key pledge in his first speech as prime minister.Johnson: Working on ‘About a Dozen’ Trade Deals (9:15 a.m.)Boris Johnson could not give a figure for how many trade deals the U.K. has ready ahead of its departure from the EU. “I can’t give the answer to how many deals are actually formalized,” he said in a phone-in with listeners on LBC radio. “There are a number that are virtually ready to go.”“I imagine we have about a dozen we’re currently working on,” he said, naming China, India, New Zealand and Australia as examples.If his Conservative Party wins a working majority, the U.K. will leave the EU on Jan. 31, Johnson said. A trade deal will also be agreed with the bloc by the end of 2020, he said: “I see no reason to go beyond that deadline,” he told listeners.Williamson Denies Tory Threat to Channel 4 (9 a.m.)Education Secretary Gavin Williamson denied the Conservative Party is threatening to review Channel 4’s broadcasting license following its decision not to allow Cabinet minister Michael Gove to sub in for Boris Johnson in a leaders’ debate on climate change on Thursday.Speaking on BBC radio, Williamson said the party has raised a complaint with the broadcasting regulator Ofcom. The row came after Johnson declined to appear in the debate, sending Gove in his place. Channel 4 refused to allow Gove, who appeared at the venue with his own television crew, to take part -- on the basis that the invitation was to the leaders of the political parties.“The Conservative Party isn’t threatening Channel 4, we’re raising a complaint with Ofcom which is perfectly legitimate,” Williamson said. “Frankly they reduced the quality of the debate that happened yesterday by refusing to let Michael Gove go on.” The Telegraph cited a source in the Tory party it didn’t identify as saying Channel 4’s public broadcasting license is under threat.McDonnell: Johnson ‘Running Scared’ (Earlier)Labour economy spokesman John McDonnell said Boris Johnson is “running scared” from scrutiny after the prime minister refused to attend a leaders debate on climate change on Thursday evening. He has also refused to be interviewed by Andrew Neil, who has the reputation of being one of the BBC’s most forensic interviewers.“The reason he is doing it is because he thinks like, you know, his Bullingdon Club friends, that they’re above the rest of us,” McDonnell said. “Because he knows that Andrew Neil will take him apart. He’s running scared. But even if he does it now, he’s played you because he’s pushing it later and later beyond the postal vote returns.”The Conservatives wrote to OfCom, the media regulator, on Thursday evening to complain that Channel 4, the host of the climate debate, had replaced Johnson with a melting ice sculpture during the debate.Labour is not changing its strategy, McDonnell said, denying reports that the party is switching its focus to leave voting areas after polling showed that it was set to lose seats in its north of England hearltlands.Earlier:The Tories Secretly Fear Trump Could Wreck Johnson’s ElectionU.K. Consumer Confidence Lowest Heading Into Election Since 2010Johnson Warns Against Complacency Over Lead: U.K. Campaign TrailTories Riled After Iceblock Replaces U.K. PM in Climate DebateTo contact the reporters on this story: Greg Ritchie in London at gritchie10@bloomberg.net;Alex Morales in London at amorales2@bloomberg.net;Tim Ross in London at tross54@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Stuart Biggs, Thomas PennyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 61/79   Boris Johnson’s Brexit Vision Takes a Protectionist Turn
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, follow us @Brexit and subscribe to our podcast.Boris Johnson’s plans for Brexit are taking a protectionist turn as he seeks to win votes in the opposition Labour Party’s former industrial heartlands in the Dec. 12 general election.On Friday, the U.K. prime minister announced he would relax state aid rules that he said force governments to wait “months or years” before providing help, boost companies’ defenses against foreign takeovers, and encourage government bodies to buy British.The plans may not only disappoint Brexit’s free-marketeer supporters, they could also make it harder for Johnson to sign a trade agreement with the European Union by the end of 2020. The bloc has strict limits on state aid to prevent unfair competition, and no reason to make an exception for the U.K. or give it an advantage.Johnson, who has pledged to leave the EU by the end of January, needs to reach a trade deal with the bloc by the time the U.K.’s current arrangements expire at the end of next year. The further he strays from EU standards on labor, environment and state aid, the harder it will be for the two sides to reach an agreement.Taking questions from the press after a speech in London, Johnson said that “of course” the state aid rules would be compatible with those of the EU.“Were there to be any issues arising, then as you know, under any big free trade deal, there’s a joint committee to arbitrate on whether some unfair subsidy or dispensation has been made,” Johnson said. “But it would be a committee of sovereign equals.”To contact the reporter on this story: Edward Evans in London at eevans3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Thomas Penny, Stuart BiggsFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, follow us @Brexit and subscribe to our podcast.Boris Johnson’s plans for Brexit are taking a protectionist turn as he seeks to win votes in the opposition Labour Party’s former industrial heartlands in the Dec. 12 general election.On Friday, the U.K. prime minister announced he would relax state aid rules that he said force governments to wait “months or years” before providing help, boost companies’ defenses against foreign takeovers, and encourage government bodies to buy British.The plans may not only disappoint Brexit’s free-marketeer supporters, they could also make it harder for Johnson to sign a trade agreement with the European Union by the end of 2020. The bloc has strict limits on state aid to prevent unfair competition, and no reason to make an exception for the U.K. or give it an advantage.Johnson, who has pledged to leave the EU by the end of January, needs to reach a trade deal with the bloc by the time the U.K.’s current arrangements expire at the end of next year. The further he strays from EU standards on labor, environment and state aid, the harder it will be for the two sides to reach an agreement.Taking questions from the press after a speech in London, Johnson said that “of course” the state aid rules would be compatible with those of the EU.“Were there to be any issues arising, then as you know, under any big free trade deal, there’s a joint committee to arbitrate on whether some unfair subsidy or dispensation has been made,” Johnson said. “But it would be a committee of sovereign equals.”To contact the reporter on this story: Edward Evans in London at eevans3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Thomas Penny, Stuart BiggsFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 62/79   The Latest: Celebrations after Iraqi PM says he’ll resign
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Celebrations have erupted in Iraq’s Tahrir Square, where anti-government protesters have been camped out for nearly two months following an announcement by the Iraqi premier that he would be resigning.  The square in central Baghdad has been the epicenter of protests that began Oct. 17 to decry corruption, poor services and lack of jobs.  Shortly after Prime Minister Adel Abdul-Mahdi announced his intention to resign Friday, protesters in Tahrir broke out in song and dance in celebration.

    Celebrations have erupted in Iraq’s Tahrir Square, where anti-government protesters have been camped out for nearly two months following an announcement by the Iraqi premier that he would be resigning. The square in central Baghdad has been the epicenter of protests that began Oct. 17 to decry corruption, poor services and lack of jobs. Shortly after Prime Minister Adel Abdul-Mahdi announced his intention to resign Friday, protesters in Tahrir broke out in song and dance in celebration.


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  • 63/79   Merkel's Fate Rests With Disgruntled Members of Coalition Partner
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- A week after Angela Merkel’s own party survived a blistering leadership battle, it’s now her allied Social Democrats that threaten to blow up the governing coalition with the election of a new leader.Pummeled by repeated electoral defeats, the SPD has struggled for some time over whether to abandon the coalition with Merkel’s Christian Democratic-led bloc or to limp on in the unloved alliance until elections scheduled for 2021 at the latest.The opposing factions face each other in an election campaign to lead the party, which comes to a close on Friday. The candidates representing the “remainers” are a duo made up of Finance Minister Olaf Scholz and Klara Geywitz. Siding with the “exiters” are Norbert Walter-Borjans, a former state finance chief and left-wing lawmaker Saskia Esken. The result of the vote will be announced Saturday evening and the winner confirmed at a party convention a week later.Germany’s Coalition on the Cusp of Collapse: What’s Next?The crises bedeviling Germany’s ruling parties coincides not only with Merkel’s final phase in office but also with the rise of far-right populists and environmentalist to rival them. Another bout of political uncertainty could hamper Germany’s response in a possible economic crisis as well as its presidency of the European Council in the second half of next year.Centrist, and particularly Socialist parties throughout Europe have been struggling as well. The head of the Austrian Social Democratic party, Pamela Rendi-Wagner, is under pressure after losing an election in which she couldn’t score against a scandal-ridden right wing. Voices asking for her head got louder when she fired dozens of party officials to help stem its growing debt.Scholz and Geywitz have argued that despite the pain of compromise, the party is achieving more from the cabinet bench than it would in opposition. Walter-Borjans and Esken, who favor increased spending and taxing the rich, have championed a restive party base that wants to return the party to its working-class roots.Under the lead of the victorious tandem the party will formally evaluate its alliance with Merkel’s CDU at the Dec. 6-8 convention.Both staying and leaving come with risks. Polling well below the 20.5% support it garnered in 2017, the SPD could see its parliamentary base shrink dramatically in a possible snap election. Sitting tight may simply lead to a further loss in support.The SPD has 13%, half the support garnered by Merkel’s bloc and well behind the 22% for the Greens, according to a YouGov survey from Wednesday.Rather than a straight vote on breaking up the coalition, party leaders may opt to set out conditions for staying, such as a departure from balanced-budget policies, an increased minimum wage, or more spending on social welfare. The CDU-led bloc could enter into a prolonged negotiating process or find itself unable to fulfill the SPD’s conditions.Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer, who temporarily defused critics seeking to sideline her, told party delegates in Leipzig last week that she would refuse to renegotiate the coalition agreement that the two factions completed in March 2018.UnacceptableShould Walter-Borjans and Esken win, demands on Merkel could include a call to scrap fiscal discipline and impose a minimum wage of 12 euros ($13.20) -- almost surely red lines for Merkel’s camp, according to Manfred Guellner, the director at Berlin-based pollster Forsa.“That would be unacceptable for the CDU and the grand coalition would sooner or later break apart,” Guellner said in an interview.Depending on the details of the demands, the coalition could rumble on for weeks or months, even if some of the coalition members run out of patience.“All day long the SPD asks itself ‘do I want all this here’,” Jens Spahn, the 39-year-old CDU health minister and conservative flag-bearer, said in Leipzig. “My simple expectation is that whoever leads the SPD after this convention, that they decide what they want.”Read more:Germany’s Finance Minister Advances to Run-Off for Party ChiefGermany’s Balanced Budget May End Finance Minister’s CareerMerkel Party Leader’s Ultimatum Contains Rebels, For Now(Updates with reference to Austrian Social Democrats in fifth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Arne Delfs and Boris Groendahl.To contact the reporters on this story: Birgit Jennen in Berlin at bjennen1@bloomberg.net;Patrick Donahue in Berlin at pdonahue1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Ben Sills at bsills@bloomberg.net, Raymond ColittFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- A week after Angela Merkel’s own party survived a blistering leadership battle, it’s now her allied Social Democrats that threaten to blow up the governing coalition with the election of a new leader.Pummeled by repeated electoral defeats, the SPD has struggled for some time over whether to abandon the coalition with Merkel’s Christian Democratic-led bloc or to limp on in the unloved alliance until elections scheduled for 2021 at the latest.The opposing factions face each other in an election campaign to lead the party, which comes to a close on Friday. The candidates representing the “remainers” are a duo made up of Finance Minister Olaf Scholz and Klara Geywitz. Siding with the “exiters” are Norbert Walter-Borjans, a former state finance chief and left-wing lawmaker Saskia Esken. The result of the vote will be announced Saturday evening and the winner confirmed at a party convention a week later.Germany’s Coalition on the Cusp of Collapse: What’s Next?The crises bedeviling Germany’s ruling parties coincides not only with Merkel’s final phase in office but also with the rise of far-right populists and environmentalist to rival them. Another bout of political uncertainty could hamper Germany’s response in a possible economic crisis as well as its presidency of the European Council in the second half of next year.Centrist, and particularly Socialist parties throughout Europe have been struggling as well. The head of the Austrian Social Democratic party, Pamela Rendi-Wagner, is under pressure after losing an election in which she couldn’t score against a scandal-ridden right wing. Voices asking for her head got louder when she fired dozens of party officials to help stem its growing debt.Scholz and Geywitz have argued that despite the pain of compromise, the party is achieving more from the cabinet bench than it would in opposition. Walter-Borjans and Esken, who favor increased spending and taxing the rich, have championed a restive party base that wants to return the party to its working-class roots.Under the lead of the victorious tandem the party will formally evaluate its alliance with Merkel’s CDU at the Dec. 6-8 convention.Both staying and leaving come with risks. Polling well below the 20.5% support it garnered in 2017, the SPD could see its parliamentary base shrink dramatically in a possible snap election. Sitting tight may simply lead to a further loss in support.The SPD has 13%, half the support garnered by Merkel’s bloc and well behind the 22% for the Greens, according to a YouGov survey from Wednesday.Rather than a straight vote on breaking up the coalition, party leaders may opt to set out conditions for staying, such as a departure from balanced-budget policies, an increased minimum wage, or more spending on social welfare. The CDU-led bloc could enter into a prolonged negotiating process or find itself unable to fulfill the SPD’s conditions.Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer, who temporarily defused critics seeking to sideline her, told party delegates in Leipzig last week that she would refuse to renegotiate the coalition agreement that the two factions completed in March 2018.UnacceptableShould Walter-Borjans and Esken win, demands on Merkel could include a call to scrap fiscal discipline and impose a minimum wage of 12 euros ($13.20) -- almost surely red lines for Merkel’s camp, according to Manfred Guellner, the director at Berlin-based pollster Forsa.“That would be unacceptable for the CDU and the grand coalition would sooner or later break apart,” Guellner said in an interview.Depending on the details of the demands, the coalition could rumble on for weeks or months, even if some of the coalition members run out of patience.“All day long the SPD asks itself ‘do I want all this here’,” Jens Spahn, the 39-year-old CDU health minister and conservative flag-bearer, said in Leipzig. “My simple expectation is that whoever leads the SPD after this convention, that they decide what they want.”Read more:Germany’s Finance Minister Advances to Run-Off for Party ChiefGermany’s Balanced Budget May End Finance Minister’s CareerMerkel Party Leader’s Ultimatum Contains Rebels, For Now(Updates with reference to Austrian Social Democrats in fifth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Arne Delfs and Boris Groendahl.To contact the reporters on this story: Birgit Jennen in Berlin at bjennen1@bloomberg.net;Patrick Donahue in Berlin at pdonahue1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Ben Sills at bsills@bloomberg.net, Raymond ColittFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 64/79   China Poses a Challenge to the Heart of Europe
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Want to receive this post in your inbox every day? Sign up for the Balance of Power newsletter, and follow Bloomberg Politics on Twitter and Facebook for more.Perhaps best known for its chocolate, fries and beer, Belgium is instead gaining a reputation as a center of espionage, with China a key player.Belgium’s intelligence agency says the country now hosts as many or more spies than during the Cold War. That’s due to its location at the heart of Europe and the fact Brussels is home to the European Union and NATO.Spying is the extreme end of Chinese interference in areas from academia to politics that’s aided by a relaxed attitude to the risks among Belgium’s establishment. The country’s broken political system — it still has no federal government six months after elections — gives regional politicians control over Chinese investments in areas including technology and logistics.The Belgian malaise contrasts with the EU’s more assertive attitude. New commission President Ursula von der Leyen has a clear and realistic view of Beijing, according to a senior EU diplomat who sees the tide turning toward a more united European stance on China.Germany will attempt to foster that unity next year when it hosts the first-ever summit of the EU’s 27 national leaders and President Xi Jinping. For Brussels, 2020 looks like it’s going to be a year of facing up to China’s risks as well as its rewards.Global HeadlinesThanksgiving surprise | Donald Trump made an unannounced visit to Afghanistan to meet with the country’s president and U.S. soldiers, saying that peace talks with the Taliban have resumed amid a push for a cease-fire with the militant group. Trump confirmed he’d like to cut troop levels to about 8,600 from 12,000 now — but without diminishing operational duties.Read more about how Trump's trip was kept a closely guarded secret.Election peril | U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson is leading opinion polls but, as he heads into the final campaign stretch for the Dec. 12 election, he could be facing his biggest danger yet. As Tim Ross reports, Trump’s brief visit to London next week — to mark NATO’s 70th anniversary — has senior Conservatives worried for a whole host of reasons.Leading Europe | Commission chief von der Leyen wants to prepare the EU’s transition to a low-carbon economy and boost Brussels’ geopolitical influence. But as Nikos Chrysoloras and Jonathan Stearns explain, she faces a fragmented European Parliament, an unforgiving global environment and the perennial challenge of securing approval from the bloc’s governments.A week after German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s party survived a blistering leadership battle, her allied Social Democrats are threatening to blow up the coalition with the election of a new leader.Allies at odds | President Recep Tayyip Erdogan could hit up the leaders of France, Germany and the U.K. for money next week to keep housing Syrian refugees in Turkey, when he sees them on the sidelines of the NATO meeting. There will be plenty to talk about — Turkey is at odds with its NATO allies over its recent military offensive in northeastern Syria and its purchase of the Russian S-400 missile defense system.Legacy lost | The rioting in Chile has burned President Sebastian Pinera’s political agenda to the ground. Just 18 months after the billionaire leader took office his flagship policies, including pledges to expand the private pension system, cut taxes for the rich and clamp down on crime have been ditched, reversed or revised under pressure from the biggest street protests in decades.What to WatchHong Kong police have lifted their blockade on a local university — after seizing 3,989 petrol bombs and 1,339 explosives — clearing a campus that had been besieged for nearly two weeks. Italian police arrested 19 far-right extremists suspected of trying to form a new Nazi party, confiscating rifles, crossbows, swords and knives, as well as Nazi flags and photos of Adolf Hitler and Benito Mussolini. Sri Lanka’s new government wants to cancel its predecessor’s $1.1 billion, 99-year lease of a port to a Chinese venture, underscoring the wider controversy dogging Xi’s Belt and Road initiative.Pop quiz, readers (no cheating!). Apple sparked anger this week after some versions of its Maps application began showing what? Send us your answers and tell us how we’re doing or what we’re missing at balancepower@bloomberg.net.And finally … For more than three decades, Amit Shah has been a behind-the-scenes soldier to the cause of India’s Hindu right. Now he’s emerging from the shadows. As Bibhudatta Pradhan writes, Shah’s increasingly public profile — after having helped Prime Minister Narendra Modi secure a second landslide election win — has raised questions about whether he might succeed Modi. \--With assistance from Muneeza Naqvi, Jon Herskovitz and Karen Leigh.To contact the author of this story: Alan Crawford in Berlin at acrawford6@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Winfrey at mwinfrey@bloomberg.net, Kathleen HunterRosalind MathiesonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Want to receive this post in your inbox every day? Sign up for the Balance of Power newsletter, and follow Bloomberg Politics on Twitter and Facebook for more.Perhaps best known for its chocolate, fries and beer, Belgium is instead gaining a reputation as a center of espionage, with China a key player.Belgium’s intelligence agency says the country now hosts as many or more spies than during the Cold War. That’s due to its location at the heart of Europe and the fact Brussels is home to the European Union and NATO.Spying is the extreme end of Chinese interference in areas from academia to politics that’s aided by a relaxed attitude to the risks among Belgium’s establishment. The country’s broken political system — it still has no federal government six months after elections — gives regional politicians control over Chinese investments in areas including technology and logistics.The Belgian malaise contrasts with the EU’s more assertive attitude. New commission President Ursula von der Leyen has a clear and realistic view of Beijing, according to a senior EU diplomat who sees the tide turning toward a more united European stance on China.Germany will attempt to foster that unity next year when it hosts the first-ever summit of the EU’s 27 national leaders and President Xi Jinping. For Brussels, 2020 looks like it’s going to be a year of facing up to China’s risks as well as its rewards.Global HeadlinesThanksgiving surprise | Donald Trump made an unannounced visit to Afghanistan to meet with the country’s president and U.S. soldiers, saying that peace talks with the Taliban have resumed amid a push for a cease-fire with the militant group. Trump confirmed he’d like to cut troop levels to about 8,600 from 12,000 now — but without diminishing operational duties.Read more about how Trump's trip was kept a closely guarded secret.Election peril | U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson is leading opinion polls but, as he heads into the final campaign stretch for the Dec. 12 election, he could be facing his biggest danger yet. As Tim Ross reports, Trump’s brief visit to London next week — to mark NATO’s 70th anniversary — has senior Conservatives worried for a whole host of reasons.Leading Europe | Commission chief von der Leyen wants to prepare the EU’s transition to a low-carbon economy and boost Brussels’ geopolitical influence. But as Nikos Chrysoloras and Jonathan Stearns explain, she faces a fragmented European Parliament, an unforgiving global environment and the perennial challenge of securing approval from the bloc’s governments.A week after German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s party survived a blistering leadership battle, her allied Social Democrats are threatening to blow up the coalition with the election of a new leader.Allies at odds | President Recep Tayyip Erdogan could hit up the leaders of France, Germany and the U.K. for money next week to keep housing Syrian refugees in Turkey, when he sees them on the sidelines of the NATO meeting. There will be plenty to talk about — Turkey is at odds with its NATO allies over its recent military offensive in northeastern Syria and its purchase of the Russian S-400 missile defense system.Legacy lost | The rioting in Chile has burned President Sebastian Pinera’s political agenda to the ground. Just 18 months after the billionaire leader took office his flagship policies, including pledges to expand the private pension system, cut taxes for the rich and clamp down on crime have been ditched, reversed or revised under pressure from the biggest street protests in decades.What to WatchHong Kong police have lifted their blockade on a local university — after seizing 3,989 petrol bombs and 1,339 explosives — clearing a campus that had been besieged for nearly two weeks. Italian police arrested 19 far-right extremists suspected of trying to form a new Nazi party, confiscating rifles, crossbows, swords and knives, as well as Nazi flags and photos of Adolf Hitler and Benito Mussolini. Sri Lanka’s new government wants to cancel its predecessor’s $1.1 billion, 99-year lease of a port to a Chinese venture, underscoring the wider controversy dogging Xi’s Belt and Road initiative.Pop quiz, readers (no cheating!). Apple sparked anger this week after some versions of its Maps application began showing what? Send us your answers and tell us how we’re doing or what we’re missing at balancepower@bloomberg.net.And finally … For more than three decades, Amit Shah has been a behind-the-scenes soldier to the cause of India’s Hindu right. Now he’s emerging from the shadows. As Bibhudatta Pradhan writes, Shah’s increasingly public profile — after having helped Prime Minister Narendra Modi secure a second landslide election win — has raised questions about whether he might succeed Modi. \--With assistance from Muneeza Naqvi, Jon Herskovitz and Karen Leigh.To contact the author of this story: Alan Crawford in Berlin at acrawford6@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Winfrey at mwinfrey@bloomberg.net, Kathleen HunterRosalind MathiesonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 65/79   Iraq’s PM announces he’ll resign amid worsening crisis
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Iraqi Prime Minister Adel Abdul-Mahdi said Friday he would submit his resignation to parliament, a day after more than 40 people were killed by security forces and following calls by Iraq's top Shiite cleric for lawmakers to withdraw support.  Abdul-Mahdi was appointed prime minister just over a year ago as a consensus candidate between political blocs.  Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani said parliament, which elected the government of Prime Minister Adil Abdul-Mahdi, should “reconsider its options” in his weekly Friday sermon delivered in the holy city of Najaf via a representative.

    Iraqi Prime Minister Adel Abdul-Mahdi said Friday he would submit his resignation to parliament, a day after more than 40 people were killed by security forces and following calls by Iraq's top Shiite cleric for lawmakers to withdraw support. Abdul-Mahdi was appointed prime minister just over a year ago as a consensus candidate between political blocs. Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani said parliament, which elected the government of Prime Minister Adil Abdul-Mahdi, should “reconsider its options” in his weekly Friday sermon delivered in the holy city of Najaf via a representative.


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  • 66/79   Vatican returns relic from Jesus’ manger to Holy Land
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Christians on Friday celebrated the return to the Holy Land of a tiny wooden relic they believe was part of Jesus’ manger nearly 1,400 years after it was sent to Rome as a gift to the pope.  The thumb-sized relic was unveiled to worshippers Friday at the Notre Dame church in Jerusalem for a day of celebrations and prayer.  On Saturday, it will be sent to its permanent home at the Franciscan Church of St. Catherine, next to the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem, the West Bank holy site where tradition says Jesus was born.

    Christians on Friday celebrated the return to the Holy Land of a tiny wooden relic they believe was part of Jesus’ manger nearly 1,400 years after it was sent to Rome as a gift to the pope. The thumb-sized relic was unveiled to worshippers Friday at the Notre Dame church in Jerusalem for a day of celebrations and prayer. On Saturday, it will be sent to its permanent home at the Franciscan Church of St. Catherine, next to the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem, the West Bank holy site where tradition says Jesus was born.


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  • 67/79   Green Party manifesto 2019: A summary of key policies
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The Green Party has revealed the details of its general election manifesto, titled If Not Now, When? The party has announced 10 new laws that would be ready to be implemented if co-leaders Sian Berry and Jonathan Bartley won an against-the-odds majority on Dec 12. Here is an at-a-glance look at what is in the 89-page manifesto. Environment The manifesto pledges a £100million-per-year investment plan to deliver a Green New Deal over the next 10 years. It would look to totally overhaul the use of fossil fuels by switching transport and industry to renewable energy sources, while upgrading household heating systems and planting 700 million trees within a decade. The party wants to use the measures to create a net-zero carbon economy by 2030. Brexit The pro-European Union party has re-committed itself to a second referendum and to campaign for Remain. It says staying in the bloc would help "lead the fight against the climate emergency". General Election 2019 | Key questions, answered Crime Restorative justice would be expanded to allow those affected by crimes to meet offenders as part of a bid to cut the prison population by 50%. Misogyny would be made a hate crime under a Green-led administration and the personal use of drugs, including some Class A substances, would be de-criminalised. Heroin would be available on prescription and cannabis clubs would be permitted, allowing marijuana to be grown and consumed by adults. Welfare The Greens would introduce a universal basic income, providing every UK citizen with £89 per week in state funding. It would provide a boost to those in work and leave no-one on benefits worse off, according to the manifesto. Health Party leaders have promised to increase funding for the NHS by at least £6 billion each year until 2030 - a 4.5% increase on the 2018/19 budget. Privatisation in the NHS would also be abolished, while mental health care would be put on an "equal footing" with physical care. Education The party pledges to boost education funding by at least £4 billion per year and to lay down a long-term aim of reducing classes to 20 pupils and below. Ofsted would be replaced with a "collaborative system of assessing" schools and a new law would put onus on teaching children about climate change. In higher education, tuition fees would be scrapped and those who paid £9,000 a year to study would have their debt wiped. General election 2019 | Manifestos

    The Green Party has revealed the details of its general election manifesto, titled If Not Now, When? The party has announced 10 new laws that would be ready to be implemented if co-leaders Sian Berry and Jonathan Bartley won an against-the-odds majority on Dec 12. Here is an at-a-glance look at what is in the 89-page manifesto. Environment The manifesto pledges a £100million-per-year investment plan to deliver a Green New Deal over the next 10 years. It would look to totally overhaul the use of fossil fuels by switching transport and industry to renewable energy sources, while upgrading household heating systems and planting 700 million trees within a decade. The party wants to use the measures to create a net-zero carbon economy by 2030. Brexit The pro-European Union party has re-committed itself to a second referendum and to campaign for Remain. It says staying in the bloc would help "lead the fight against the climate emergency". General Election 2019 | Key questions, answered Crime Restorative justice would be expanded to allow those affected by crimes to meet offenders as part of a bid to cut the prison population by 50%. Misogyny would be made a hate crime under a Green-led administration and the personal use of drugs, including some Class A substances, would be de-criminalised. Heroin would be available on prescription and cannabis clubs would be permitted, allowing marijuana to be grown and consumed by adults. Welfare The Greens would introduce a universal basic income, providing every UK citizen with £89 per week in state funding. It would provide a boost to those in work and leave no-one on benefits worse off, according to the manifesto. Health Party leaders have promised to increase funding for the NHS by at least £6 billion each year until 2030 - a 4.5% increase on the 2018/19 budget. Privatisation in the NHS would also be abolished, while mental health care would be put on an "equal footing" with physical care. Education The party pledges to boost education funding by at least £4 billion per year and to lay down a long-term aim of reducing classes to 20 pupils and below. Ofsted would be replaced with a "collaborative system of assessing" schools and a new law would put onus on teaching children about climate change. In higher education, tuition fees would be scrapped and those who paid £9,000 a year to study would have their debt wiped. General election 2019 | Manifestos


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  • 68/79   Johnson seeks to focus UK election on Brexit, not his flaws
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Prime Minister Boris Johnson struggled Friday to move Britain’s election debate away from questions about his character and onto Brexit, promising to bolster protection for British businesses and farmers once the country has left the European Union.  Johnson tried to brush aside criticism of his past comments about single mothers and his current refusal to submit to the same amount of televised scrutiny as other party leaders.  At a news conference, Johnson claimed Brexit had been “delayed, diluted, denied” by obstructive politicians.

    Prime Minister Boris Johnson struggled Friday to move Britain’s election debate away from questions about his character and onto Brexit, promising to bolster protection for British businesses and farmers once the country has left the European Union. Johnson tried to brush aside criticism of his past comments about single mothers and his current refusal to submit to the same amount of televised scrutiny as other party leaders. At a news conference, Johnson claimed Brexit had been “delayed, diluted, denied” by obstructive politicians.


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  • 69/79   Iraqi protesters regroup after bloody crackdown
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Iraqi protesters regrouped Friday in protest-hit cities in the country's south after a deadly crackdown by authorities killed dozens in one of the bloodiest days in two months of anti-government demonstrations.  Nearly 45 people were killed and hundreds wounded across the south on Thursday, according to medical sources, a day after the torching of Iran's consulate in the shrine city of Najaf.  At least 16 of them died in Najaf, where on Friday a massive funeral procession wound its way through the streets of the holy city, carrying coffins.

    Iraqi protesters regrouped Friday in protest-hit cities in the country's south after a deadly crackdown by authorities killed dozens in one of the bloodiest days in two months of anti-government demonstrations. Nearly 45 people were killed and hundreds wounded across the south on Thursday, according to medical sources, a day after the torching of Iran's consulate in the shrine city of Najaf. At least 16 of them died in Najaf, where on Friday a massive funeral procession wound its way through the streets of the holy city, carrying coffins.


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  • 70/79   Trump turns 'very routine' physical into attack on media
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    President Trump lashed out at the media Tuesday over reporting about his sudden trip to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center last weekend.

    President Trump lashed out at the media Tuesday over reporting about his sudden trip to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center last weekend.


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  • 71/79   5 Turkey Cooking Tips Will Guarantee You Have the Perfect Bird This Holidays
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    There's no need to wing it at Thanksgiving this year.

    There's no need to wing it at Thanksgiving this year.


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  • 72/79   9 Easy Ways to Make Your Jack-o'-Lanterns Last Longer
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    A little bleach goes a long way.

    A little bleach goes a long way.


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  • 73/79   Is It Time for a Medication Reconciliation?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    More than half of adult Americans regularly take at least one prescription drug, according to a recent Consumer Reports nationally representative survey. And for those who take any medication on ...

    More than half of adult Americans regularly take at least one prescription drug, according to a recent Consumer Reports nationally representative survey. And for those who take any medication on ...


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  • 74/79   Brown-Bag Lunches for Kids With Food Allergies
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...


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  • 75/79   What to Feed Your Family When the Power Goes Out
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...


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  • 76/79   Try These Healthy Snack Ideas for Kids
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...

    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...


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  • 77/79   The 9 Best Jobs for Teachers To Make Some Cash During the Summer Break
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.


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  • 78/79   How to Spot and Avoid Algal Blooms
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...


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  • 79/79   Get These 4 Vaccines for College
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If your child is a college student—or soon to be one—making sure he or she is fully vaccinated is critically important, especially for those who will be living in a dorm or other shared space. Th...

    If your child is a college student—or soon to be one—making sure he or she is fully vaccinated is critically important, especially for those who will be living in a dorm or other shared space. Th...


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Voice Sythesis
The Microsoft SAPI 5 ActiveX object is needed.
In the security option of your browser, you must not disable the initialization of non signed ActiveX controls.
You can install and use any English voice compatible with SAPI 5.
(such as the speech component of Microsoft).
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No Voice Title Title and Description
Voice and Output



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