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News Slideshows (12/02/2019 03 hours)


  • 1/79   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


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    Press Review


    Chargers   Eagles   Mike Williams   Raiders   Carr   Chiefs   Matt Luke   Roby   NFC East   Steve Belichick   Van Noy   Kyle Allen   Justin Tucker   Casey Hayward   Desanto   Darwin Thompson   Fangio   Mursel   Joe Sestak   McManus   Sutton   Mike Tomlin   The Shield   Pepperoni   Andy Reid   Lisa Page   Joe Haden   AFC West   Gase   Anthony Lynn   Kyler Murray   Kai Forbath   
  • 2/79   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


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  • 3/79   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


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  • 4/79   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


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  • 5/79   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


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  • 6/79   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


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  • 7/79   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


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  • 8/79   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


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  • 9/79   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


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  • 10/79   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


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  • 11/79   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


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  • 12/79   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


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  • 13/79   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


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  • 14/79   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named.  Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does.  At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


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  • 15/79   PHOTOS: Fluorescent turtle embryo wins forty-fifth annual Nikon Small World Competition

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.


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  • 16/79   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


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  • 17/79   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


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  • 18/79   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


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  • 19/79   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


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  • 20/79   China's November factory activity unexpectedly expands at quickest pace in almost three years: Caixin PMI
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    China's factory activity unexpectedly expanded at the quickest pace in almost three years in November, with solid increases in output and new orders, a private business survey showed on Monday.  The Caixin/Markit Manufacturing Purchasing Managers' Index (PMI) index rose to 51.8 in November from 51.7 in the previous month.  Zhengsheng Zhong, director of macroeconomic analysis at CEBM Group, noted both domestic and overseas demand rose in November.

    China's factory activity unexpectedly expanded at the quickest pace in almost three years in November, with solid increases in output and new orders, a private business survey showed on Monday. The Caixin/Markit Manufacturing Purchasing Managers' Index (PMI) index rose to 51.8 in November from 51.7 in the previous month. Zhengsheng Zhong, director of macroeconomic analysis at CEBM Group, noted both domestic and overseas demand rose in November.


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  • 21/79   Fukushima melted fuel removal begins 2021, end state unknown
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Japan’s economy and industry ministry proposed a revision Monday to its decades-long road map to clean up the radioactive mess at the Fukushima nuclear power plant, which was wrecked by a massive earthquake and tsunami in 2011.  Nearly nine years after the accident, the decommissioning of the plant, where three reactors melted, remains largely an uncertainty.  The revised road map, to be formally approved later this month, lacks details on how the complex should look at the end but maintains a 30- to 40-year target to finish.

    Japan’s economy and industry ministry proposed a revision Monday to its decades-long road map to clean up the radioactive mess at the Fukushima nuclear power plant, which was wrecked by a massive earthquake and tsunami in 2011. Nearly nine years after the accident, the decommissioning of the plant, where three reactors melted, remains largely an uncertainty. The revised road map, to be formally approved later this month, lacks details on how the complex should look at the end but maintains a 30- to 40-year target to finish.


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  • 22/79   The best early Cyber Monday Amazon deals you can get now
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The best early Cyber Monday deals you can get at Amazon, on everything from TVs to laptops to home decor.

    The best early Cyber Monday deals you can get at Amazon, on everything from TVs to laptops to home decor.


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  • 23/79   Stocks Rise, Bonds Slide After China Industry Data: Markets Wrap
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Financial markets started December with a risk-on mood in Asia following a better-than-expected reading on Chinese manufacturing that added to evidence the global economy is turning a corner.Japanese stocks led equity gains across the region, while S&P 500 Index futures edged up. Ten-year Treasury yields climbed to 1.8%, and their Japanese counterparts ticked up closer toward zero. The yen retreated. Sentiment could still be kept somewhat in check by the continuing lack of closure on a U.S.-China trade deal. China’s Global Times underscored that its government wants tariffs to be rolled back as part of “phase one.”The so-called official China manufacturing purchasing-manager index exceeded all estimates in a Bloomberg survey, and suggested an acceleration in activity in November. A second gauge is due Monday.“This improvement in the manufacturing PMI is important because we can say with more certainty, than at the beginning of the year, that China’s macro outlook is indeed stabilizing,” said Aninda Mitra, senior sovereign analyst at BNY Mellon Investment Management.Also looming on the data front this week are readings on American manufacturing and employment. Meantime, Black Friday hit a record $7.4 billion in U.S. online sales.Hong Kong shares had modest gains at the open, even after clashes between protesters and police resumed over the weekend. Elsewhere, oil prices recouped some of their 5%-plus sell-off on Friday.Here are some key events coming up this week:U.S. ISM manufacturing and construction spending on Monday.Saudi Aramco’s initial public offering is scheduled to be priced on Thursday.Friday brings the U.S. jobs report, where estimates are for nonfarm payrolls to rise by 190,000 in November.These are the main moves in markets:StocksJapan’s Topix index added 0.9% as of 10:25 a.m. in Tokyo.South Korea’s Kospi climbed 0.3%.The Shanghai Composite rose 0.1%.Hong Kong’s Hang Seng Index gained 0.5%.Futures on the S&P 500 rose 0.3%. The underlying gauge slipped 0.4% on Friday.Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 Index advanced 0.6%.CurrenciesThe yen dipped 0.2% to 109.68 per dollar.The offshore yuan held at 7.0286 per dollar.The pound slid 0.1% to $1.2915.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries climbed three basis points to 1.81%.Australia’s 10-year yield rose four basis points to 1.07%.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude rose 1.8% to $56.16 a barrel.Gold slipped 0.2% to $1,460.60 an ounce.To contact the reporter on this story: Adam Haigh in Sydney at ahaigh1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Christopher Anstey at canstey@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Financial markets started December with a risk-on mood in Asia following a better-than-expected reading on Chinese manufacturing that added to evidence the global economy is turning a corner.Japanese stocks led equity gains across the region, while S&P 500 Index futures edged up. Ten-year Treasury yields climbed to 1.8%, and their Japanese counterparts ticked up closer toward zero. The yen retreated. Sentiment could still be kept somewhat in check by the continuing lack of closure on a U.S.-China trade deal. China’s Global Times underscored that its government wants tariffs to be rolled back as part of “phase one.”The so-called official China manufacturing purchasing-manager index exceeded all estimates in a Bloomberg survey, and suggested an acceleration in activity in November. A second gauge is due Monday.“This improvement in the manufacturing PMI is important because we can say with more certainty, than at the beginning of the year, that China’s macro outlook is indeed stabilizing,” said Aninda Mitra, senior sovereign analyst at BNY Mellon Investment Management.Also looming on the data front this week are readings on American manufacturing and employment. Meantime, Black Friday hit a record $7.4 billion in U.S. online sales.Hong Kong shares had modest gains at the open, even after clashes between protesters and police resumed over the weekend. Elsewhere, oil prices recouped some of their 5%-plus sell-off on Friday.Here are some key events coming up this week:U.S. ISM manufacturing and construction spending on Monday.Saudi Aramco’s initial public offering is scheduled to be priced on Thursday.Friday brings the U.S. jobs report, where estimates are for nonfarm payrolls to rise by 190,000 in November.These are the main moves in markets:StocksJapan’s Topix index added 0.9% as of 10:25 a.m. in Tokyo.South Korea’s Kospi climbed 0.3%.The Shanghai Composite rose 0.1%.Hong Kong’s Hang Seng Index gained 0.5%.Futures on the S&P 500 rose 0.3%. The underlying gauge slipped 0.4% on Friday.Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 Index advanced 0.6%.CurrenciesThe yen dipped 0.2% to 109.68 per dollar.The offshore yuan held at 7.0286 per dollar.The pound slid 0.1% to $1.2915.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries climbed three basis points to 1.81%.Australia’s 10-year yield rose four basis points to 1.07%.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude rose 1.8% to $56.16 a barrel.Gold slipped 0.2% to $1,460.60 an ounce.To contact the reporter on this story: Adam Haigh in Sydney at ahaigh1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Christopher Anstey at canstey@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 24/79   World AIDS Day 2019: 37.9M people worldwide were living with HIV at the end of 2018
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    What's the difference between HIV and AIDS? Is there a cure? A vaccine? Frequently asked questions, answered, for World AIDS Day.

    What's the difference between HIV and AIDS? Is there a cure? A vaccine? Frequently asked questions, answered, for World AIDS Day.


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  • 25/79   Record M&A in Singapore Property Managers Amid Red-Hot Rally
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Underpinned by a global hunt for yield, Singapore’s real estate investment trusts are having a bumper year in deal-making as well as fundraising. The mantra that bigger is better will continue to drive capital market activity in the sector, analysts say.Singapore-listed REITs have forked out $16.9 billion to purchase assets this year, already triple the previous peak reached in 2014. The sector has also raised a record amount in follow-on share sales, riding an 18% gain in the FTSE Singapore REIT Index, which is more than four times the rise in the broad benchmark in the city-state.The mergers and acquisitions have created some of the largest REITs in the region. The allure of being big: the entity would find it easier to get a place in global benchmarks and portfolios, raise funds for expansion and tackle competition. For those reasons, expanded companies are better investments for stock buyers.“REITs are going to be a go-to sector for the next year as consolidation will add another reason to buy alongside yields,” said Jin Rui Oh, a Singapore-based director at United First Partners. The enlarged entities would get better market value, analyst coverage and potential index inclusion, he added.Singapore REITs will deliver 12% to 15% returns over the next year and the deals will continue, said Oh, who specializes in trading special situations created by mergers and acquisitions.REITs will continue to lure investors amid interest-rate cuts by global central banks, which has already led to more than $12 trillion of negative-yielding debt. The chase for yield has also made Singapore REITs more expensive, with the sector’s estimated dividend yield at 5.36%, almost one percentage point below the level at the beginning of the year.M&A JuggernautIn the largest deal this year, CapitaLand Ltd. spent S$6 billion ($4.4 billion) to purchase two real estate units from Temasek Holdings Pte.In April, OUE Commercial REIT agreed to buy OUE Hospitality Trust to create one of Singapore’s 10 biggest REITs. Then in July, Ascott Residence Trust and Ascendas Hospitality Trust agreed to create the largest hospitality trust in the Asia-Pacific region, with S$7.6 billion of assets.The latest deal to emerge involves Frasers Logistics & Industrial Trust, which agreed to buy Frasers Commercial Trust in a S$1.5 billion transaction, according to a statement Monday.Analysts at United First and CLSA expect more deals in the coming year, especially among commercial and industrial REITs. “They are emboldened by the success,” United First’s Oh said.To help facilitate the deal spree, Singapore’s central bank is considering looser debt rules that could spur more acquisitions by property managers.Size MattersFor bigger real estate trusts, one of the most sought-after gauges to be part of is the 307-member FTSE EPRA/NAREIT Global REIT Index. That usually means a boost in profile, liquidity and valuations.The gauge saw three additions from Singapore this year -- Frasers Logistics & Industrial Trust, Frasers Centrepoint Trust and Keppel DC REIT -- taking the total number of the city’s REITs in the index to 17. That’s the most in Asia outside Japan, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. All three have outperformed the Singapore index for REITs this year.To finance acquisitions, Singapore REITs have raised a record $2.8 billion in secondary share sales and $2.2 billion in initial public offerings in 2019, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Most of these issues were oversubscribed and priced near the the top end of the range.“M&As will extend the rally and solidify Singapore’s position as a REIT hub in Asia,” Oh said.(Adds details on an M&A deal in ninth paragraph)\--With assistance from Zhen Hao Toh.To contact the reporters on this story: Abhishek Vishnoi in Singapore at avishnoi4@bloomberg.net;Ishika Mookerjee in Singapore at imookerjee@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Lianting Tu at ltu4@bloomberg.net, Shamim AdamFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Underpinned by a global hunt for yield, Singapore’s real estate investment trusts are having a bumper year in deal-making as well as fundraising. The mantra that bigger is better will continue to drive capital market activity in the sector, analysts say.Singapore-listed REITs have forked out $16.9 billion to purchase assets this year, already triple the previous peak reached in 2014. The sector has also raised a record amount in follow-on share sales, riding an 18% gain in the FTSE Singapore REIT Index, which is more than four times the rise in the broad benchmark in the city-state.The mergers and acquisitions have created some of the largest REITs in the region. The allure of being big: the entity would find it easier to get a place in global benchmarks and portfolios, raise funds for expansion and tackle competition. For those reasons, expanded companies are better investments for stock buyers.“REITs are going to be a go-to sector for the next year as consolidation will add another reason to buy alongside yields,” said Jin Rui Oh, a Singapore-based director at United First Partners. The enlarged entities would get better market value, analyst coverage and potential index inclusion, he added.Singapore REITs will deliver 12% to 15% returns over the next year and the deals will continue, said Oh, who specializes in trading special situations created by mergers and acquisitions.REITs will continue to lure investors amid interest-rate cuts by global central banks, which has already led to more than $12 trillion of negative-yielding debt. The chase for yield has also made Singapore REITs more expensive, with the sector’s estimated dividend yield at 5.36%, almost one percentage point below the level at the beginning of the year.M&A JuggernautIn the largest deal this year, CapitaLand Ltd. spent S$6 billion ($4.4 billion) to purchase two real estate units from Temasek Holdings Pte.In April, OUE Commercial REIT agreed to buy OUE Hospitality Trust to create one of Singapore’s 10 biggest REITs. Then in July, Ascott Residence Trust and Ascendas Hospitality Trust agreed to create the largest hospitality trust in the Asia-Pacific region, with S$7.6 billion of assets.The latest deal to emerge involves Frasers Logistics & Industrial Trust, which agreed to buy Frasers Commercial Trust in a S$1.5 billion transaction, according to a statement Monday.Analysts at United First and CLSA expect more deals in the coming year, especially among commercial and industrial REITs. “They are emboldened by the success,” United First’s Oh said.To help facilitate the deal spree, Singapore’s central bank is considering looser debt rules that could spur more acquisitions by property managers.Size MattersFor bigger real estate trusts, one of the most sought-after gauges to be part of is the 307-member FTSE EPRA/NAREIT Global REIT Index. That usually means a boost in profile, liquidity and valuations.The gauge saw three additions from Singapore this year -- Frasers Logistics & Industrial Trust, Frasers Centrepoint Trust and Keppel DC REIT -- taking the total number of the city’s REITs in the index to 17. That’s the most in Asia outside Japan, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. All three have outperformed the Singapore index for REITs this year.To finance acquisitions, Singapore REITs have raised a record $2.8 billion in secondary share sales and $2.2 billion in initial public offerings in 2019, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Most of these issues were oversubscribed and priced near the the top end of the range.“M&As will extend the rally and solidify Singapore’s position as a REIT hub in Asia,” Oh said.(Adds details on an M&A deal in ninth paragraph)\--With assistance from Zhen Hao Toh.To contact the reporters on this story: Abhishek Vishnoi in Singapore at avishnoi4@bloomberg.net;Ishika Mookerjee in Singapore at imookerjee@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Lianting Tu at ltu4@bloomberg.net, Shamim AdamFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 26/79   Innovent Presents Co-developed Cancer-Fighting Tyvyt(R) (Sintilimab Injection) at CIIE 2019 with Eli Lilly
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Innovent Biologics (01801.HK), a multinational biopharmaceutical company, and Eli Lilly and Company presented their co-developed Tyvyt® (generic name: sintilimab injection), a fully human anti-programmed cell death protein 1 (anti-PD-1) monoclonal antibody at CIIE 2019. The medicine works to block the interaction of PD-1 with its ligands (PD-L1 and PL-L2) and consequently help patients restore the endogenous anti-tumour T-cell response. The new medical breakthrough, the result of the cooperation between the two companies, provides global patients with a more effective, safer treatment solution to fight cancer.

    Innovent Biologics (01801.HK), a multinational biopharmaceutical company, and Eli Lilly and Company presented their co-developed Tyvyt® (generic name: sintilimab injection), a fully human anti-programmed cell death protein 1 (anti-PD-1) monoclonal antibody at CIIE 2019. The medicine works to block the interaction of PD-1 with its ligands (PD-L1 and PL-L2) and consequently help patients restore the endogenous anti-tumour T-cell response. The new medical breakthrough, the result of the cooperation between the two companies, provides global patients with a more effective, safer treatment solution to fight cancer.


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  • 27/79   U.S.-China trade deal 'stalled because of Hong Kong legislation': Axios
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The deal was stalled also because time was needed to allow Chinese President Xi Jinping's domestic politics to calm, the report added, citing the unnamed source.  China's Foreign Ministry said on Thursday that legislation signed by Trump on Wednesday backing protesters in Hong Kong was a serious interference in Chinese affairs.

    The deal was stalled also because time was needed to allow Chinese President Xi Jinping's domestic politics to calm, the report added, citing the unnamed source. China's Foreign Ministry said on Thursday that legislation signed by Trump on Wednesday backing protesters in Hong Kong was a serious interference in Chinese affairs.


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  • 28/79   Palm Oil’s Scorching Rally About to Burn Its Top Customer
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Palm oil’s meteoric rally in the past few weeks will almost certainly come with a cost -- shrinking sales to its largest customer.India, the world’s biggest buyer, will shift some purchases to other edible oils this winter after palm’s surge of about 30% from last month’s low. Palm’s discount to top rival soybean oil has contracted to the smallest in almost a decade, reducing its traditional appeal as a cheaper vegetable oil.“Higher prices are a deterrent for buyers,” said Gnanasekar Thiagarajan, head of trading and hedging strategies at Kaleesuwari Intercontinental. “The Indian market was flush with oil before this rally started heating up. That’s why there’s no rush to buy.”While India typically reduces its imports of palm oil during the three months starting December, a bigger than usual decline in sales to the South Asian nation could dent palm’s rally. India mainly imports palm from Indonesia and Malaysia, the world’s largest producers.Palm oil prices have surged since July on expectations Indonesia will boost biodiesel consumption, with benchmark futures in Kuala Lumpur outperforming soybean oil traded in Chicago and the Bloomberg Commodity Index. Futures capped their best weekly advance since 2016 in the five days to Nov. 22.Indian imports may slump about 15% in the three months from Dec. 1 compared with a year earlier, according to Thiagarajan. Sathia Varqa, owner of Palm Oil Analytics, and G. G. Patel, managing partner of GGN Research, estimate that purchases will drop by 7.5% to 2.2 million tons.The South Asian nation, which imports about 70% of its edible oil, usually cuts back on palm in winter because the cold solidifies the oil and turns it cloudy. Users tend to switch to other oils that look transparent and don’t crystallize.Spread ContractsThough palm is still cheaper than soybean oil, its spread has narrowed to about $18 a ton from $150 in October. That shrinking discount to soyoil is likely to prompt buyers to switch over, Palm Oil Analytics’ Varqa said.Still, those desperate for palm will have little choice but to buy at higher prices. Some companies postponed purchases amid a spat between India and Malaysia last month and were caught off-guard by the rally, said Rajesh Modi, a trader at Sprint Exim Pte in Singapore. Buyers wishing to re-stock will want to do so before export levies in Malaysia and Indonesia kick in next year, he said.“They’re waiting for prices to fall and then will buy hand-to-mouth,” Modi said. “For two months they held back aggressively and just bought only minimum levels. Now they don’t have much stock and don’t have a choice.”(Updates palm oil’s spread to soyoil in 8th graph)\--With assistance from Pratik Parija.To contact the reporters on this story: Atul Prakash in New Delhi at aprakash51@bloomberg.net;Anuradha Raghu in Kuala Lumpur at araghu3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Anna Kitanaka at akitanaka@bloomberg.net, Atul Prakash, James PooleFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Palm oil’s meteoric rally in the past few weeks will almost certainly come with a cost -- shrinking sales to its largest customer.India, the world’s biggest buyer, will shift some purchases to other edible oils this winter after palm’s surge of about 30% from last month’s low. Palm’s discount to top rival soybean oil has contracted to the smallest in almost a decade, reducing its traditional appeal as a cheaper vegetable oil.“Higher prices are a deterrent for buyers,” said Gnanasekar Thiagarajan, head of trading and hedging strategies at Kaleesuwari Intercontinental. “The Indian market was flush with oil before this rally started heating up. That’s why there’s no rush to buy.”While India typically reduces its imports of palm oil during the three months starting December, a bigger than usual decline in sales to the South Asian nation could dent palm’s rally. India mainly imports palm from Indonesia and Malaysia, the world’s largest producers.Palm oil prices have surged since July on expectations Indonesia will boost biodiesel consumption, with benchmark futures in Kuala Lumpur outperforming soybean oil traded in Chicago and the Bloomberg Commodity Index. Futures capped their best weekly advance since 2016 in the five days to Nov. 22.Indian imports may slump about 15% in the three months from Dec. 1 compared with a year earlier, according to Thiagarajan. Sathia Varqa, owner of Palm Oil Analytics, and G. G. Patel, managing partner of GGN Research, estimate that purchases will drop by 7.5% to 2.2 million tons.The South Asian nation, which imports about 70% of its edible oil, usually cuts back on palm in winter because the cold solidifies the oil and turns it cloudy. Users tend to switch to other oils that look transparent and don’t crystallize.Spread ContractsThough palm is still cheaper than soybean oil, its spread has narrowed to about $18 a ton from $150 in October. That shrinking discount to soyoil is likely to prompt buyers to switch over, Palm Oil Analytics’ Varqa said.Still, those desperate for palm will have little choice but to buy at higher prices. Some companies postponed purchases amid a spat between India and Malaysia last month and were caught off-guard by the rally, said Rajesh Modi, a trader at Sprint Exim Pte in Singapore. Buyers wishing to re-stock will want to do so before export levies in Malaysia and Indonesia kick in next year, he said.“They’re waiting for prices to fall and then will buy hand-to-mouth,” Modi said. “For two months they held back aggressively and just bought only minimum levels. Now they don’t have much stock and don’t have a choice.”(Updates palm oil’s spread to soyoil in 8th graph)\--With assistance from Pratik Parija.To contact the reporters on this story: Atul Prakash in New Delhi at aprakash51@bloomberg.net;Anuradha Raghu in Kuala Lumpur at araghu3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Anna Kitanaka at akitanaka@bloomberg.net, Atul Prakash, James PooleFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 29/79   Jiuye SCM Awarded 'King of Smart Logistics' at WISE 2019 with "Shared Service Center" One-stop Global Cold Chain Service
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Jiuye Supply Chain Management ("Jiuye SCM" or "the Company"), China's leading fresh supply chain service provider, has been awarded "King of Smart Logistics" at WISE 2019, held from Nov. 26 to 27 in Beijing by a leading Chinese technology and business news portal listed on Nasdaq in 2019. Zhang Bing, Jiuye SCM's founder and CEO, delivered a speech at the conference, announcing the company's plan to build a global one-site platform and Shared Service Center, to centralize and streamline its fresh cold chain management solution for global suppliers to deliver to homes and tables across China.

    Jiuye Supply Chain Management ("Jiuye SCM" or "the Company"), China's leading fresh supply chain service provider, has been awarded "King of Smart Logistics" at WISE 2019, held from Nov. 26 to 27 in Beijing by a leading Chinese technology and business news portal listed on Nasdaq in 2019. Zhang Bing, Jiuye SCM's founder and CEO, delivered a speech at the conference, announcing the company's plan to build a global one-site platform and Shared Service Center, to centralize and streamline its fresh cold chain management solution for global suppliers to deliver to homes and tables across China.


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  • 30/79   Jiuye SCM Awarded 'King of Smart Logistics' at WISE 2019 with "Shared Service Center" One-stop Global Cold Chain Service
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Jiuye Supply Chain Management ("Jiuye SCM" or "the Company"), China's leading fresh supply chain service provider, has been awarded "King of Smart Logistics" at WISE 2019, held from Nov. 26 to 27 in Beijing by a leading Chinese technology and business news portal listed on Nasdaq in 2019. Zhang Bing, Jiuye SCM's founder and CEO, delivered a speech at the conference, announcing the company's plan to build a global one-site platform and Shared Service Center, to centralize and streamline its fresh cold chain management solution for global suppliers to deliver to homes and tables across China.

    Jiuye Supply Chain Management ("Jiuye SCM" or "the Company"), China's leading fresh supply chain service provider, has been awarded "King of Smart Logistics" at WISE 2019, held from Nov. 26 to 27 in Beijing by a leading Chinese technology and business news portal listed on Nasdaq in 2019. Zhang Bing, Jiuye SCM's founder and CEO, delivered a speech at the conference, announcing the company's plan to build a global one-site platform and Shared Service Center, to centralize and streamline its fresh cold chain management solution for global suppliers to deliver to homes and tables across China.


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  • 31/79   CITIC Telecom International Holdings Limited (HKG:1883) Delivered A Better ROE Than Its Industry
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    While some investors are already well versed in financial metrics (hat tip), this article is for those who would like...

    While some investors are already well versed in financial metrics (hat tip), this article is for those who would like...


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  • 32/79   It Might Not Be A Great Idea To Buy Singapore Press Holdings Limited (SGX:T39) For Its Next Dividend
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Regular readers will know that we love our dividends at Simply Wall St, which is why it's exciting to see Singapore...

    Regular readers will know that we love our dividends at Simply Wall St, which is why it's exciting to see Singapore...


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  • 33/79   Surface Pro Cyber Monday Deals 2019: Surface Pro X, 7, 6, Surface Go & Book Deals Reviewed by Retail Egg
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    In search of the best Surface deals for Cyber Monday 2019? Deals researchers at Retail Egg have found the best savings on Surface Pro, Surface Go and Surface Book laptop convertibles. Links to the best live deals are listed below.

    In search of the best Surface deals for Cyber Monday 2019? Deals researchers at Retail Egg have found the best savings on Surface Pro, Surface Go and Surface Book laptop convertibles. Links to the best live deals are listed below.


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  • 34/79   US Supreme Court to take up gun control case
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The US Supreme Court will address gun control on Monday for the first time in nearly 10 years with a majority of justices seen as supporting the rights of people who own firearms.  'But it has not said very much about how courts should evaluate the constitutionality of other gun laws, such as restrictions on assault weapons, high capacity magazines, and concealed carrying,' said Joseph Blocher, a professor of law at Duke University in North Carolina.  In addressing this case, the court might take the opportunity to clarify how courts can decide whether gun restrictions are legal or not.

    The US Supreme Court will address gun control on Monday for the first time in nearly 10 years with a majority of justices seen as supporting the rights of people who own firearms. 'But it has not said very much about how courts should evaluate the constitutionality of other gun laws, such as restrictions on assault weapons, high capacity magazines, and concealed carrying,' said Joseph Blocher, a professor of law at Duke University in North Carolina. In addressing this case, the court might take the opportunity to clarify how courts can decide whether gun restrictions are legal or not.


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  • 35/79   Global shares tick up as hopes for Sino-U.S. breakthrough stay intact
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Global shares ticked up on Monday and oil rebounded after a big fall late last week, as investors clung to hopes Beijing and Washington could reach a compromise in trade talks although increasing tensions over Hong Kong unsettled market confidence.  MSCI's index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan  was up 0.17%, reclaiming some of its one-percent-plus loss on Friday while Japan's Nikkei  rose 0.85%.  MSCI's broadest gauge of world shares, all-country world index , ticked up 0.07% and stood within reach of its all-time peak hit in January 2018.

    Global shares ticked up on Monday and oil rebounded after a big fall late last week, as investors clung to hopes Beijing and Washington could reach a compromise in trade talks although increasing tensions over Hong Kong unsettled market confidence. MSCI's index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan was up 0.17%, reclaiming some of its one-percent-plus loss on Friday while Japan's Nikkei rose 0.85%. MSCI's broadest gauge of world shares, all-country world index , ticked up 0.07% and stood within reach of its all-time peak hit in January 2018.


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  • 36/79   Why We Like Jiangsu Expressway Company Limited’s (HKG:177) 11% Return On Capital Employed
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today we'll evaluate Jiangsu Expressway Company Limited (HKG:177) to determine whether it could have potential as an...

    Today we'll evaluate Jiangsu Expressway Company Limited (HKG:177) to determine whether it could have potential as an...


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  • 37/79   Oil Rebounds as Iraq Signals Deeper Cuts Ahead of OPEC+ Meeting
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Oil rebounded from the biggest weekly loss since early October after Iraq signaled OPEC and its allies will consider deeper production cuts at its meeting later this week, contrary to indications from the group.Futures surged as much as 1.9% in New York after plunging 5.1% on Friday, the largest loss in more than two months. The reduction could be about 400,000 barrels a day, Iraq’s oil minister Thamir Ghadhban told reporters in Baghdad on Sunday, adding that the nation complied with its commitments to lowering output last month. A gauge of China’s manufacturing sector jumped unexpectedly in November, suggesting a recovery in activity.Oil capped a second monthly gain in November on signs Beijing and Washington are close to an initial trade deal, even after the U.S. passed legislation expressing support for Hong Kong protesters. Saudi Arabia will probably indicate to the the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and its allies at the meeting in Vienna that it’s no longer willing to compensate for other members’ non-compliance, according to people familiar.West Texas Intermediate for January delivery rose $1.05 to $56.22 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange as of 9:07 a.m. Singapore time. Prices lost 5.1% to close at $55.17 on Friday. There was no settlement Thursday due to the holiday in the U.S. and all transactions were booked on Friday.Brent for February settlement advanced 85 cents, or 1.4%, to $61.34 a barrel on London’s ICE Futures Europe Exchange. The January contract expired Friday after dropping 2.3%. The global benchmark crude traded at a $5.20 premium to WTI for the same month.\--With assistance from James Thornhill.To contact the reporter on this story: Heesu Lee in Seoul at hlee425@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Serene Cheong at scheong20@bloomberg.net, Ben Sharples, Andrew JanesFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Oil rebounded from the biggest weekly loss since early October after Iraq signaled OPEC and its allies will consider deeper production cuts at its meeting later this week, contrary to indications from the group.Futures surged as much as 1.9% in New York after plunging 5.1% on Friday, the largest loss in more than two months. The reduction could be about 400,000 barrels a day, Iraq’s oil minister Thamir Ghadhban told reporters in Baghdad on Sunday, adding that the nation complied with its commitments to lowering output last month. A gauge of China’s manufacturing sector jumped unexpectedly in November, suggesting a recovery in activity.Oil capped a second monthly gain in November on signs Beijing and Washington are close to an initial trade deal, even after the U.S. passed legislation expressing support for Hong Kong protesters. Saudi Arabia will probably indicate to the the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and its allies at the meeting in Vienna that it’s no longer willing to compensate for other members’ non-compliance, according to people familiar.West Texas Intermediate for January delivery rose $1.05 to $56.22 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange as of 9:07 a.m. Singapore time. Prices lost 5.1% to close at $55.17 on Friday. There was no settlement Thursday due to the holiday in the U.S. and all transactions were booked on Friday.Brent for February settlement advanced 85 cents, or 1.4%, to $61.34 a barrel on London’s ICE Futures Europe Exchange. The January contract expired Friday after dropping 2.3%. The global benchmark crude traded at a $5.20 premium to WTI for the same month.\--With assistance from James Thornhill.To contact the reporter on this story: Heesu Lee in Seoul at hlee425@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Serene Cheong at scheong20@bloomberg.net, Ben Sharples, Andrew JanesFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 38/79   Investors Who Bought Chong Kin Group Holdings (HKG:1609) Shares Three Years Ago Are Now Up 627%
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    It hasn't been the best quarter for Chong Kin Group Holdings Limited (HKG:1609) shareholders, since the share price...

    It hasn't been the best quarter for Chong Kin Group Holdings Limited (HKG:1609) shareholders, since the share price...


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  • 39/79   The best credit cards of 2019
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Our experts reviewed the credit cards on the market. If you're looking for travel rewards, 0% APR, or cards for college students, we have your answer.

    Our experts reviewed the credit cards on the market. If you're looking for travel rewards, 0% APR, or cards for college students, we have your answer.


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  • 40/79   Netanyahu's Iran Strategy Is a Total Failure
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Seen today, Netanyahu’s decade-long reign has left Israel more isolated than ever before in its struggle against an Iranian regime that perceives the Jewish state as its main regional enemy.

    Seen today, Netanyahu’s decade-long reign has left Israel more isolated than ever before in its struggle against an Iranian regime that perceives the Jewish state as its main regional enemy.


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  • 41/79   Amid Heroism in London, Gnawing Fear of a Simmering Terrorism Threat
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    LONDON -- It was midafternoon when Mike Finnerty, who sells cheese at his Borough Market shop just south of London Bridge, realized that something was wrong. An unusual flow of people had suddenly gathered in front of his stall, he said, and they seemed "alarmed."What he did not know was that a man dressed in black and armed with knives had gone on a murderous rampage in a grand meeting venue called Fishmongers' Hall on the opposite side of the bridge, just north of the Thames River. But Finnerty sensed the danger Friday, he would later tell the BBC and write on Twitter.So he and another employee rushed some customers -- a couple from Vancouver and a young American man -- into a cheese refrigerator and locked the door. Then he called the police.The "operator said it was an attack and not to move," he wrote. He said he could hear shouting outside the door, but he and the group huddled together in "pretty close quarters."Susan Vinn, 57, was smoking outside her office adjacent to Fishmongers' Hall about 2 p.m., when she saw people running over the bridge. And Craig Heathcote, a filmmaker, was walking there when, he told the British broadcaster Sky News, someone said:"Get out of the way. Someone's got a knife."Saturday, Britain grappled with the aftermath of another terrorist attack in the heart of London just as the Islamic State group claimed responsibility. Two people were killed and at least three were wounded in Friday's attack.In a statement, the Islamic State group said the assailant had carried out the attack in its name and added that he had done so "in response to calls to target coalition countries." The phrasing indicates that the attacker was inspired by group's ideology and refers to a speech by a former spokesman, who urged followers to carry out attacks in any way they could, including stabbing.This attack, police said, had been carried out by a man wearing a fake bomb vest, a former prisoner who had been convicted of terrorism offenses in 2012. Authorities identified the suspect as Usman Khan, 28, of Stafford, England, who was released from prison last year, apparently after agreeing to wear an electronic tag.He was part of a gang that plotted in 2010 to plant explosives in the toilets of the London Stock Exchange, authorities said, and possibly attack other British landmarks and prominent figures like Boris Johnson, then the mayor of London.The rampage Friday, near the same bridge where a terrorist attack by a group men in June 2017 left eight people dead and dozens injured, raised questions about the efficacy of Britain's prison rehabilitation system and about the release from prison of Khan, despite warnings from the judge at his trial about the threats he still posed.In his judgment, Lord Justice Brian Leveson said there was "no doubt that anyone convicted of this type of offense could legitimately be considered dangerous."In February 2012, Khan was given an indeterminate sentence, with a minimum term of eight years, but the Court of Appeal replaced it in 2013 with a 16-year fixed-term sentence. He was released in half the time.The attack occurred two weeks before a pivotal general election, and Johnson, now prime minister, is under pressure. He told reporters Saturday that he wanted to "toughen up" sentences."I have long argued that it is a mistake to allow serious and violent criminals to come out of prison early," Johnson said.Saturday, the Parole Board, which carries out risk assessments on prisoners to determine whether they can be safely released, said in a statement that it had not reviewed his case. Khan appeared to have been released automatically, "on license" -- meaning under certain conditions -- "without ever being referred to the board," it said.On Sunday, the Ministry of Justice said it had began an urgent review of the license conditions of convicted terrorists released from prison.Along with questions about the case came praise for the bystanders who had charged the suspect as he made his way along the bridge. One man wielded a fire extinguisher, video footage on social media showed. Another brandished an ornamental whale tusk that had been torn from the wall of Fishmongers' Hall, according to local reports.The assailant was wrestled to the ground in the street outside the grand hall. A man wearing a suit and tie can be seen removing a knife and walking away from the suspect. He was later identified as an off-duty member of the transport police.Thomas Gray, a tour company manager, told reporters that he saw one of the knives taped to Khan's hands."I stamped on his left wrist while someone else smacked his hand on the ground and then kicked one of the knives away," Gray told Sky News. "I went to pick up the knife when I heard a cop say, 'He has got a bomb.'"The bomb turned out to be fake. Footage showed officers, guns drawn, pulling bystanders off Khan. Then, Khan was shot and killed by the police.The trauma of the encounter, which played out as workers looked down from huge office windows and as onlookers shared video of the chaos, led Vinn to ask: "Why London Bridge anyway? It's horrible, I don't get it."She said that for a country that has experienced terrorist attack after terrorist attack since 2017: "It's become ambient. It makes you worried about your safety on a day-to-day basis, especially here, around London Bridge."Mayor Sadiq Khan of London praised the bravery of bystanders. "What's remarkable about the images we've seen," he said, "is the breathtaking heroism of members of the public who literally ran toward danger, not knowing what confronted them."The assault threw into stark relief the risks in attempting to rehabilitate those convicted or suspected of terrorism.Saturday, Chris Phillips, a former head of the country's National Counter Terrorism Security Office, said Britain was releasing people while they were still radicalized."We're playing Russian roulette with people's lives, letting convicted, known, radicalized jihadi criminals walk about our streets," he told the Press Association news agency.David Videcette, a former anti-terrorism detective and author, added that Britain must "look at sentencing and rehabilitation, as we have a huge problem with terrorist prisoners that are being released, and with those that want to come back from Syria."Khan was attending an event for former prisoners and their mentors in a prison education program, Learning Together, set up by Cambridge University. He was believed to have been invited to share his experiences as a former prisoner."We believe that the attack began inside before he left the building and proceeded onto London Bridge," said Neil Basu, assistant commissioner of the Metropolitan Police.One of those who rushed to aid victims, according to news reports, was a man convicted of murder who had been on day release.Among those killed, according to BBC and news site Cambridge Live, was a Cambridge graduate, Jack Merritt, the course coordinator of Learning Together. The police did not immediately confirm his identity. But a man who said he was Merritt's father, David, posted the news on Twitter before deleting it."My son, Jack, who was killed in this attack, would not wish his death to be used as the pretext for more draconian sentences or for detaining people unnecessarily," the post read. "R.I.P. Jack: you were a beautiful spirit who always took the side of the underdog."Saturday, three people remained hospitalized, and one person who been critically wounded was in stable condition, the National Health Service said in a statement.The attack came only weeks after the British government lowered its terror threat warning level to substantial from severe as Britons had begun growing cautiously accustomed to a life less frequently disrupted by deadly episodes.In 2017, when London Bridge and the nearby Borough Market were the subject of an attack, there was also a suicide bombing at the Manchester Arena, an attack on Westminster Bridge and at the gates of Parliament and an assault at a north London mosque.For a government seeking reelection in two weeks' time, the issue is sensitive. Before the 2017 general election, the opposition Labour Party had linked terror attacks to police cuts made by a Conservative-led government.On Saturday, Brandon Lewis, the security minister, did not say whether he considered the attack to be a failure by the authorities, but he sought to rebut suggestions that cuts to the police had played a role. He told Sky News that both funding and the number of officers devoted to counterterrorism had "consistently increased since 2015."Videcette, the former anti-terrorism detective, said that many lower-level offenders were now up for release and to monitor them, the authorities had to keep close watch on those with whom they associate. The problem, he said, was "if they don't reconnect with the individuals we expect them to" and opt instead for a low-tech, lone attack."There is a real danger," he said, "with those who have not reached the pinnacle of what they are going to be but aspire to be a well-known terrorist, or perhaps aspire to be martyred by a police officer in a terror attack."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company

    LONDON -- It was midafternoon when Mike Finnerty, who sells cheese at his Borough Market shop just south of London Bridge, realized that something was wrong. An unusual flow of people had suddenly gathered in front of his stall, he said, and they seemed "alarmed."What he did not know was that a man dressed in black and armed with knives had gone on a murderous rampage in a grand meeting venue called Fishmongers' Hall on the opposite side of the bridge, just north of the Thames River. But Finnerty sensed the danger Friday, he would later tell the BBC and write on Twitter.So he and another employee rushed some customers -- a couple from Vancouver and a young American man -- into a cheese refrigerator and locked the door. Then he called the police.The "operator said it was an attack and not to move," he wrote. He said he could hear shouting outside the door, but he and the group huddled together in "pretty close quarters."Susan Vinn, 57, was smoking outside her office adjacent to Fishmongers' Hall about 2 p.m., when she saw people running over the bridge. And Craig Heathcote, a filmmaker, was walking there when, he told the British broadcaster Sky News, someone said:"Get out of the way. Someone's got a knife."Saturday, Britain grappled with the aftermath of another terrorist attack in the heart of London just as the Islamic State group claimed responsibility. Two people were killed and at least three were wounded in Friday's attack.In a statement, the Islamic State group said the assailant had carried out the attack in its name and added that he had done so "in response to calls to target coalition countries." The phrasing indicates that the attacker was inspired by group's ideology and refers to a speech by a former spokesman, who urged followers to carry out attacks in any way they could, including stabbing.This attack, police said, had been carried out by a man wearing a fake bomb vest, a former prisoner who had been convicted of terrorism offenses in 2012. Authorities identified the suspect as Usman Khan, 28, of Stafford, England, who was released from prison last year, apparently after agreeing to wear an electronic tag.He was part of a gang that plotted in 2010 to plant explosives in the toilets of the London Stock Exchange, authorities said, and possibly attack other British landmarks and prominent figures like Boris Johnson, then the mayor of London.The rampage Friday, near the same bridge where a terrorist attack by a group men in June 2017 left eight people dead and dozens injured, raised questions about the efficacy of Britain's prison rehabilitation system and about the release from prison of Khan, despite warnings from the judge at his trial about the threats he still posed.In his judgment, Lord Justice Brian Leveson said there was "no doubt that anyone convicted of this type of offense could legitimately be considered dangerous."In February 2012, Khan was given an indeterminate sentence, with a minimum term of eight years, but the Court of Appeal replaced it in 2013 with a 16-year fixed-term sentence. He was released in half the time.The attack occurred two weeks before a pivotal general election, and Johnson, now prime minister, is under pressure. He told reporters Saturday that he wanted to "toughen up" sentences."I have long argued that it is a mistake to allow serious and violent criminals to come out of prison early," Johnson said.Saturday, the Parole Board, which carries out risk assessments on prisoners to determine whether they can be safely released, said in a statement that it had not reviewed his case. Khan appeared to have been released automatically, "on license" -- meaning under certain conditions -- "without ever being referred to the board," it said.On Sunday, the Ministry of Justice said it had began an urgent review of the license conditions of convicted terrorists released from prison.Along with questions about the case came praise for the bystanders who had charged the suspect as he made his way along the bridge. One man wielded a fire extinguisher, video footage on social media showed. Another brandished an ornamental whale tusk that had been torn from the wall of Fishmongers' Hall, according to local reports.The assailant was wrestled to the ground in the street outside the grand hall. A man wearing a suit and tie can be seen removing a knife and walking away from the suspect. He was later identified as an off-duty member of the transport police.Thomas Gray, a tour company manager, told reporters that he saw one of the knives taped to Khan's hands."I stamped on his left wrist while someone else smacked his hand on the ground and then kicked one of the knives away," Gray told Sky News. "I went to pick up the knife when I heard a cop say, 'He has got a bomb.'"The bomb turned out to be fake. Footage showed officers, guns drawn, pulling bystanders off Khan. Then, Khan was shot and killed by the police.The trauma of the encounter, which played out as workers looked down from huge office windows and as onlookers shared video of the chaos, led Vinn to ask: "Why London Bridge anyway? It's horrible, I don't get it."She said that for a country that has experienced terrorist attack after terrorist attack since 2017: "It's become ambient. It makes you worried about your safety on a day-to-day basis, especially here, around London Bridge."Mayor Sadiq Khan of London praised the bravery of bystanders. "What's remarkable about the images we've seen," he said, "is the breathtaking heroism of members of the public who literally ran toward danger, not knowing what confronted them."The assault threw into stark relief the risks in attempting to rehabilitate those convicted or suspected of terrorism.Saturday, Chris Phillips, a former head of the country's National Counter Terrorism Security Office, said Britain was releasing people while they were still radicalized."We're playing Russian roulette with people's lives, letting convicted, known, radicalized jihadi criminals walk about our streets," he told the Press Association news agency.David Videcette, a former anti-terrorism detective and author, added that Britain must "look at sentencing and rehabilitation, as we have a huge problem with terrorist prisoners that are being released, and with those that want to come back from Syria."Khan was attending an event for former prisoners and their mentors in a prison education program, Learning Together, set up by Cambridge University. He was believed to have been invited to share his experiences as a former prisoner."We believe that the attack began inside before he left the building and proceeded onto London Bridge," said Neil Basu, assistant commissioner of the Metropolitan Police.One of those who rushed to aid victims, according to news reports, was a man convicted of murder who had been on day release.Among those killed, according to BBC and news site Cambridge Live, was a Cambridge graduate, Jack Merritt, the course coordinator of Learning Together. The police did not immediately confirm his identity. But a man who said he was Merritt's father, David, posted the news on Twitter before deleting it."My son, Jack, who was killed in this attack, would not wish his death to be used as the pretext for more draconian sentences or for detaining people unnecessarily," the post read. "R.I.P. Jack: you were a beautiful spirit who always took the side of the underdog."Saturday, three people remained hospitalized, and one person who been critically wounded was in stable condition, the National Health Service said in a statement.The attack came only weeks after the British government lowered its terror threat warning level to substantial from severe as Britons had begun growing cautiously accustomed to a life less frequently disrupted by deadly episodes.In 2017, when London Bridge and the nearby Borough Market were the subject of an attack, there was also a suicide bombing at the Manchester Arena, an attack on Westminster Bridge and at the gates of Parliament and an assault at a north London mosque.For a government seeking reelection in two weeks' time, the issue is sensitive. Before the 2017 general election, the opposition Labour Party had linked terror attacks to police cuts made by a Conservative-led government.On Saturday, Brandon Lewis, the security minister, did not say whether he considered the attack to be a failure by the authorities, but he sought to rebut suggestions that cuts to the police had played a role. He told Sky News that both funding and the number of officers devoted to counterterrorism had "consistently increased since 2015."Videcette, the former anti-terrorism detective, said that many lower-level offenders were now up for release and to monitor them, the authorities had to keep close watch on those with whom they associate. The problem, he said, was "if they don't reconnect with the individuals we expect them to" and opt instead for a low-tech, lone attack."There is a real danger," he said, "with those who have not reached the pinnacle of what they are going to be but aspire to be a well-known terrorist, or perhaps aspire to be martyred by a police officer in a terror attack."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company


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  • 42/79   'Crucial witness' in Hard Rock Hotel collapse is deported by ICE
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A metal worker considered a "crucial witness" in the collapse at the Hard Rock Hotel construction site in New Orleans last month was deported Friday to his native Honduras.Lawyers for Delmer Joel Ramirez Palma said the 38-year-old may have been targeted for deportation because he voiced concerns about the project - a claim immigration officials have denied.

    A metal worker considered a "crucial witness" in the collapse at the Hard Rock Hotel construction site in New Orleans last month was deported Friday to his native Honduras.Lawyers for Delmer Joel Ramirez Palma said the 38-year-old may have been targeted for deportation because he voiced concerns about the project - a claim immigration officials have denied.


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  • 43/79   Morales victim of 'coup,' says AMLO during first-term celebration
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The leftist president, nicknamed AMLO, celebrated his first year in office with a speech to throngs of supporters in Mexico City.  While detailing the ongoing fight against corruption and budget and tax policies, Lopez Obrador touched on Mexico's foreign policy by recalling his government's decision to accept Morales as an asylum seeker while discussing Mexico's foreign policy.

    The leftist president, nicknamed AMLO, celebrated his first year in office with a speech to throngs of supporters in Mexico City. While detailing the ongoing fight against corruption and budget and tax policies, Lopez Obrador touched on Mexico's foreign policy by recalling his government's decision to accept Morales as an asylum seeker while discussing Mexico's foreign policy.


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  • 44/79   2 children dead, 1 missing in Arizona creek flooding; search continues
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Two adults and four other children were rescued near Tonto National Forest in Arizona. Two of three missing children were found dead Saturday.

    Two adults and four other children were rescued near Tonto National Forest in Arizona. Two of three missing children were found dead Saturday.


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  • 45/79   U.S. Rebukes Zambia for Jailing Two Men for Homosexuality
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- The U.S. ambassador to Zambia said a high court ruling sentencing two men to 15 years in prison for homosexuality was horrifying.Ambassador Daniel Foote urged the government to reconsider laws that punish minority groups.“I was personally horrified to read yesterday about the sentencing of two men, who had a consensual relationship, which hurt absolutely no one, to 15 years imprisonment,” he said in an emailed statement Friday. “Decisions like this oppressive sentencing do untold damage to Zambia’s international reputation by demonstrating that human rights in Zambia” are “not a universal guarantee.”The constitution stipulates that the southern African nation is Christian, and laws dating back to Britain’s colonial rule of the country that ended in 1964 forbid gay sex.“This is the will of the Zambian people, we have to be with the people by abiding by the law,” Chanda Kasolo, permanent secretary in the ministry of information, said by phone. “We respect the opinion of the American ambassador. We have to do things the way the people want.”The sentencing of the men was particularly disturbing given that “government officials can steal millions of public dollars without prosecution,” Foote said. He didn’t give detail on which officials allegedly steal funds.“Zambia takes great exception to the remarks,” both on the court ruling and about government officials, Foreign Affairs Minister Joseph Malanji said in a video distributed on social-media websites. The minister will present a formal démarche to Washington by Monday, he said.Zambia is ranked 105 out of 180 countries tracked by Transparency International’s Corruption Perceptions Index for 2018.(Updates with comment from foreign affairs ministry in final paragraph.)\--With assistance from Vernon Wessels.To contact the reporters on this story: Taonga Clifford Mitimingi in Lusaka at tmitimingi@bloomberg.net;Matthew Hill in Maputo at mhill58@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Antony Sguazzin at asguazzin@bloomberg.net, Gordon Bell, Helen RobertsonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- The U.S. ambassador to Zambia said a high court ruling sentencing two men to 15 years in prison for homosexuality was horrifying.Ambassador Daniel Foote urged the government to reconsider laws that punish minority groups.“I was personally horrified to read yesterday about the sentencing of two men, who had a consensual relationship, which hurt absolutely no one, to 15 years imprisonment,” he said in an emailed statement Friday. “Decisions like this oppressive sentencing do untold damage to Zambia’s international reputation by demonstrating that human rights in Zambia” are “not a universal guarantee.”The constitution stipulates that the southern African nation is Christian, and laws dating back to Britain’s colonial rule of the country that ended in 1964 forbid gay sex.“This is the will of the Zambian people, we have to be with the people by abiding by the law,” Chanda Kasolo, permanent secretary in the ministry of information, said by phone. “We respect the opinion of the American ambassador. We have to do things the way the people want.”The sentencing of the men was particularly disturbing given that “government officials can steal millions of public dollars without prosecution,” Foote said. He didn’t give detail on which officials allegedly steal funds.“Zambia takes great exception to the remarks,” both on the court ruling and about government officials, Foreign Affairs Minister Joseph Malanji said in a video distributed on social-media websites. The minister will present a formal démarche to Washington by Monday, he said.Zambia is ranked 105 out of 180 countries tracked by Transparency International’s Corruption Perceptions Index for 2018.(Updates with comment from foreign affairs ministry in final paragraph.)\--With assistance from Vernon Wessels.To contact the reporters on this story: Taonga Clifford Mitimingi in Lusaka at tmitimingi@bloomberg.net;Matthew Hill in Maputo at mhill58@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Antony Sguazzin at asguazzin@bloomberg.net, Gordon Bell, Helen RobertsonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 46/79   Australian Taliban captive says guards were 'lovely people'
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    An Australian lecturer held hostage by the Taliban has said some of his guards were "lovely people" as he disclosed American special forces launched six unsuccessful rescue bids to free him. Timothy Weeks spent more than three years locked up, often in the dark and underground, after he and his colleague Kevin King were seized in Kabul. In his first public appearance since he was freed in a prisoner swap, the 50-year-old said he believed US Navy SEAL teams had launched repeated rescue missions, sometimes missing their targets only by hours. In one incident, he was bundled into a tunnel beneath his prison as fighting erupted above. His captors told him they were under attack by Islamic State group, but he said he now believes it was a US raid. "I believe they were right outside our door,” he told a press conference. “The moment that we got into the tunnels, we were 1 or 2 meters underground and there was a huge bang at the front door. And our guards went up and there was a lot of machine-gun fire. They pushed me over the top into the tunnels and I fell backwards and rolled and knocked myself unconscious." Timothy Weeks, top, and American Kevin King, appeared in a June 2017 hostage video Mr Weeks and Mr King were freed in return for three senior Taliban commanders last month. While he thanked Donald Trump and Australian prime minister Scott Morrison for his release, he praised the compassion of some of his captors. "I don't hate them at all," he said. "And some of them, I have great respect for, and great love for, almost. Some of them were so compassionate and such lovely, lovely people. And it really led me to think about ... how did they end up like this?" He added: "I know a lot of people don't admit this, but for me, they were soldiers. And soldiers obey the commands of their commanders. (They) don't get a choice." Mr Weeks, from Wagga Wagga in New South Wales had been working at the American University of Afghanistan for only three weeks when he was taken in August 2016. Mr King remained in hospital, Mr Weeks said. The 63-year-old had appeared dangerously frail in hostage videos. The two men were frequently moved and were held captive in both Afghanistan and Pakistan he said. He learned pashto, the language of southern Afghanistan, during his captivity so he could talk to his guards. His ordeal had had "a profound and unimaginable effect on me," he told reporters. He had always had hope that he would be freed, but at the same time, there were occasions when he felt his death was close, he said. "At times I felt as if my death was imminent and that I would never return to see those that I love again but by the will of God I am here, I am alive and I am safe and I am free.” The sight of two US Black Hawk helicopters at the site of the hostage handover had been an enormous relief. "From the moment I sighted both Black Hawk helicopters and was placed in the hands of special forces, I knew my long and tortuous ordeal had come to an end," he said. The two captives were swapped for senior Taliban commanders held by the Afghan government in an exchange designed to build trust and revive talks to find a political settlement to the country's conflict. Mr Trump last week visited Afghanistan to spend Thanksgiving with US troops and said talks were back on.

    An Australian lecturer held hostage by the Taliban has said some of his guards were "lovely people" as he disclosed American special forces launched six unsuccessful rescue bids to free him. Timothy Weeks spent more than three years locked up, often in the dark and underground, after he and his colleague Kevin King were seized in Kabul. In his first public appearance since he was freed in a prisoner swap, the 50-year-old said he believed US Navy SEAL teams had launched repeated rescue missions, sometimes missing their targets only by hours. In one incident, he was bundled into a tunnel beneath his prison as fighting erupted above. His captors told him they were under attack by Islamic State group, but he said he now believes it was a US raid. "I believe they were right outside our door,” he told a press conference. “The moment that we got into the tunnels, we were 1 or 2 meters underground and there was a huge bang at the front door. And our guards went up and there was a lot of machine-gun fire. They pushed me over the top into the tunnels and I fell backwards and rolled and knocked myself unconscious." Timothy Weeks, top, and American Kevin King, appeared in a June 2017 hostage video Mr Weeks and Mr King were freed in return for three senior Taliban commanders last month. While he thanked Donald Trump and Australian prime minister Scott Morrison for his release, he praised the compassion of some of his captors. "I don't hate them at all," he said. "And some of them, I have great respect for, and great love for, almost. Some of them were so compassionate and such lovely, lovely people. And it really led me to think about ... how did they end up like this?" He added: "I know a lot of people don't admit this, but for me, they were soldiers. And soldiers obey the commands of their commanders. (They) don't get a choice." Mr Weeks, from Wagga Wagga in New South Wales had been working at the American University of Afghanistan for only three weeks when he was taken in August 2016. Mr King remained in hospital, Mr Weeks said. The 63-year-old had appeared dangerously frail in hostage videos. The two men were frequently moved and were held captive in both Afghanistan and Pakistan he said. He learned pashto, the language of southern Afghanistan, during his captivity so he could talk to his guards. His ordeal had had "a profound and unimaginable effect on me," he told reporters. He had always had hope that he would be freed, but at the same time, there were occasions when he felt his death was close, he said. "At times I felt as if my death was imminent and that I would never return to see those that I love again but by the will of God I am here, I am alive and I am safe and I am free.” The sight of two US Black Hawk helicopters at the site of the hostage handover had been an enormous relief. "From the moment I sighted both Black Hawk helicopters and was placed in the hands of special forces, I knew my long and tortuous ordeal had come to an end," he said. The two captives were swapped for senior Taliban commanders held by the Afghan government in an exchange designed to build trust and revive talks to find a political settlement to the country's conflict. Mr Trump last week visited Afghanistan to spend Thanksgiving with US troops and said talks were back on.


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  • 47/79   24 killed in Tunisia when bus plummets off hill
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A bus plummeted off a hill in Tunisia on Sunday morning, killing 24 passengers who were on an excursion in the country’s north, government officials said.  The regional bus, which was carrying 43 people and belonged to a private local company, veered off a winding road after the driver failed to maneuver a sharp turn and crashed at the bottom of a ravine, the Interior Ministry said.  Local media showed images of an overturned, crumpled bus with smashed windows at the foot of a hill.

    A bus plummeted off a hill in Tunisia on Sunday morning, killing 24 passengers who were on an excursion in the country’s north, government officials said. The regional bus, which was carrying 43 people and belonged to a private local company, veered off a winding road after the driver failed to maneuver a sharp turn and crashed at the bottom of a ravine, the Interior Ministry said. Local media showed images of an overturned, crumpled bus with smashed windows at the foot of a hill.


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  • 48/79   Saying ‘OK Boomer’ At Work Is Considered Age Discrimination – but Millennial Put-Downs are OK?
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The Politics of Insulting Your Colleagues

    The Politics of Insulting Your Colleagues


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  • 49/79   Bystanders Subdued the Alleged London Bridge Attacker. One of Them Was Reportedly a Polish Immigrant Armed Only With a Narwhal Tusk
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    He grabbed a Narwhal tusk off the wall of Fishmongers’ Hall and ran at the alleged terrorist

    He grabbed a Narwhal tusk off the wall of Fishmongers’ Hall and ran at the alleged terrorist


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  • 50/79   Damaged coral reefs could be restored using underwater loudspeakers
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Scientists played vibrant sounds of healthy coral to attract young fish - a practice that could be used to revive coral reefs globally

    Scientists played vibrant sounds of healthy coral to attract young fish - a practice that could be used to revive coral reefs globally


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  • 51/79   Scientists praise stronger beers as ‘very, very healthy’ thanks to gut-friendly bacteria
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Certain beers could be considered “very healthy” thanks to the amount of gut-friendly bacteria they contain, according to scientists specialising in gut health.Professor Eric Claassen, who works at Amsterdam University, explained that strong Belgian beers, including Hoegaarden, Westmalle Tripel and Echt Kriekenbier, are rich in probiotic microbes that offer a range of health benefits.

    Certain beers could be considered “very healthy” thanks to the amount of gut-friendly bacteria they contain, according to scientists specialising in gut health.Professor Eric Claassen, who works at Amsterdam University, explained that strong Belgian beers, including Hoegaarden, Westmalle Tripel and Echt Kriekenbier, are rich in probiotic microbes that offer a range of health benefits.


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  • 52/79   Life expectancy in the US keeps going down, and a new study says America's worsening inequality could be to blame
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    According to new research, the average American's life expectancy has once again gone down, despite the nation's billion-dollar health care system.

    According to new research, the average American's life expectancy has once again gone down, despite the nation's billion-dollar health care system.


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  • 53/79   The Sinister Scientist Behind the CIA’s Mind-Control Mayhem
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Photo Illustration by Elizabeth Brockway/The Daily Beast/APStephen Kinzer has written books about civil wars, terror attacks, and bloody coups, but his latest might be his most alarming. “I’m still in shock,” Kinzer says of what he learned about the appalling experiments conducted by a government scientist most Americans have never heard of. “I can’t believe that this happened.”These aren’t the words of an author trying to fire up the hype machine. Though the events recounted in Kinzer’s Poisoner in Chief: Sidney Gottlieb and the CIA Search for Mind Control took place a half-century ago, they’re scandalous in a way that transcends time.For much of his 22-year CIA career, Gottlieb ran mind-control projects designed to help America defeat Communism. In the ’50s and ’60s, Kinzer writes, Gottlieb “directed the application of unknowable quantities and varieties of drugs into” countless people, searching for the narcotic recipe that might allow him to mold his human test subjects’ thoughts and actions.Gottlieb and a network of medical professionals gave LSD and other drugs to prisoners, hospital patients, government employees, and others—many of whom had no idea they were being dosed. A CIA staffer died in highly suspicious fashion after Gottlieb had his drink spiked with LSD. Meanwhile, when his bosses considered killing a foreign leader, Gottlieb developed custom-made poisons. Numerous people were harmed by Gottlieb’s work, but because he destroyed his files on the eve of his 1973 retirement, it’s hard to quantify the carnage he wrought.Perilous Discoveries: The Unintended Consequences of Scientific SecrecyThe broad outlines of Gottlieb’s story have been public for years. Major newspapers ran obituaries when he died in 1999. In 2017, he was portrayed by actor Tim Blake Nelson in Errol Morris’ Wormwood. But Kinzer’s book, the first proper Gottlieb biography, includes fascinating new facts about the end of his career and fresh details about disturbing episodes he orchestrated. Poisoner in Chief describes Gottlieb’s little-known participation in torture sessions at U.S. military sites in foreign countries and reports that in at least one case a doctor who worked with Gottlieb gave LSD to children. Gottlieb was “the Josef Mengele of the United States,” Kinzer, a former New York Times reporter and the author of many books, told me in a recent interview.How did Gottlieb, the Bronx-born son of Hungarian Jews, become a man who would earn comparisons to a ghoulish Nazi doctor?After getting a doctorate in biochemistry from the California Institute of Technology, Gottlieb joined the CIA in 1951, a time of fear and uncertainty. Just six years after the end of World War II, American troops were fighting in Korea. Washington was increasingly worried about what many believed was the existential threat posed by the Soviet Union. Gottlieb was on the job for a few weeks, Kinzer writes, when he was tapped “to invigorate” what would be known as the Artichoke project.Artichoke—the name was essentially meaningless; it might’ve been a CIA boss’ favorite vegetable—gave Gottlieb broad license to carry out mind control projects. Kinzer cites a CIA memo that describes the mission: “the investigation of drug effects on ego control and volitional activities, i.e., can willfully suppressed information be elicited through drugs affecting higher nervous systems? If so, which agents are better for this purpose?”The CIA aimed to create truth serum to use on prisoners and other compounds that would help wipe away memories of events that would cause trouble for the agency. If all went as planned, intelligence officers would have the ability to program people to carry out missions like those later seen in Richard Condon’s novel The Manchurian Candidate and the subsequent movie.Artichoke projects often amounted to “medical torture,” Kinzer writes. Inspired in part by brutal experiments conducted by the Japanese military and the Nazis in the ’40s, Artichoke included the “dosing (of) unwilling patients with potent drugs, subjecting them to extremes of temperature and sound (and) strapping them to electroshock machines.” Artichoke squads worked with impunity at American military sites in Europe and Asia. Such projects were closely guarded secrets, but Poisoner in Chief contains details that will be new to most readers.For instance, Kinzer notes that when “Artichoke scientists came up with a new drug or other technique they wished to test… they asked the CIA station in South Korea to supply a batch [of] ‘expendable’ subjects.” A related CIA memo said the subjects were needed for the testing of an unnamed but “important new technique,” adding, “Technique does not, not require disposal problems after application.” This is ambiguous language, but it suggests that the CIA knew that in some cases, human test subjects might be killed in the process.Gottlieb oversaw a scientific unit at Maryland’s Camp Detrick (since renamed Fort Detrick), where chemists researched the effects of LSD, heroin, and other drugs, sometimes trying the substances themselves. But he was not just a creature of the lab. “We know that he participated in torture sessions in East Asia,” Kinzer says, speaking from his home in Massachusetts. “We know that he made repeated visits to Germany, which, like Japan, was under U.S. occupation, so he didn’t have to obey any laws. And he was also active in other parts of Europe.”In time, Gottlieb became intimately familiar with LSD’s mind-altering effects. He admitted that he’d used the drug more than 200 times. “When I look at the variety of the projects that he was involved in,” Kinzer says, “from hypnotism to electroshock to parapsychology to handwriting analysis, I begin to think that maybe it was while he was on LSD that he was thinking, ‘I got another idea.’”By 1953, Kinzer writes, “Artichoke had become one of the most violently abusive projects ever sponsored by an agency of the United States government.” That year, Allen Dulles, one of Gottlieb’s ardent backers, got the CIA’s top job. The new boss, Kinzer writes, was among Washington’s leading mind control proponents: “Dulles never recoiled from the most extreme implications of ‘brain warfare.’” Dulles wanted “to intensify and systematize” the work done under Artichoke, Kinzer adds, and he tapped Gottlieb to head a new program: MK-ULTRA, named for the “ultra-sensitive” activities it was expected to carry out.With a generous budget and an “effectively unlimited supply” of LSD—the pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly manufactured the hallucinogenic drug for the CIA—Gottlieb became perhaps “the most powerful unknown American of the 20th century,” Kinzer says.A key MK-ULTRA initiative involved medical professionals who agreed to administer drugs to their patients—often without the patients’ knowledge or consent. For instance, when Gottlieb wanted to know how much LSD a body could withstand, he got in touch with Harris Isbell, a researcher at a Lexington, Kentucky addiction center who had made his curiosity about LSD known in a letter to the CIA.Working with a group of men who “were not told what sort of drug they would be fed or what its effects might be,” Kinzer writes, Isbell administered large doses of LSD. He reported that the men experienced anxiety, hallucinations, and “choking.” As always with CIA projects of this kind, it’s tough to say how much damage was done. But Kinzer writes that at least one patient did speak out, saying that “for the rest of his life he suffered from delusions, paranoia, panic attacks, and suicidal impulses.”Another keen CIA collaborator chaired the pharmacology department at Emory University. “As subjects,” Kinzer writes, Dr. Carl Pfeiffer “used inmates at the federal prison in Atlanta and at a juvenile detention center in Bordentown, New Jersey,” administering depressants and hallucinogens in volumes that resulted in seizures and hallucinations that lasted for days. One of Pfeiffer’s subjects was James “Whitey” Bulger, who later became a notorious Boston gangland killer. Bulger said that as a young inmate, he was given LSD daily for more than a year.Another doctor—a New York allergist named Harold Abramson, who got an $85,000 MK-ULTRA stipend—“developed a special curiosity about the impact of mind-altering drugs on children,” Kinzer writes. “He closely monitored experiments, including one in which 12 ‘pre-puberty’ boys were fed psilocybin, and another in which 14 children between the ages of six and 11, diagnosed as schizophrenic, were given 100 micrograms of LSD each day for six weeks.”In Manhattan, meanwhile, Gottlieb helped set up a CIA safe house, where, with the hands-on help of a local narcotics cop, “unsuspecting citizens would be lured and surreptitiously drugged,” their behavior monitored via surveillance equipment in an adjoining apartment.It was around this time that Gottlieb attended a retreat with some other CIA men. The colleagues began drinking, and a few minutes later, Kinzer writes, “Gottlieb asked if anyone was feeling odd. Several said they were. Gottlieb then told them that their drinks had been spiked with LSD.” The incident triggered an emotional crisis in one of the men, a scientist named Frank Olson. Days later, Olson plunged to his death from the window of a Manhattan hotel. As seen in Morris’ film Wormwood, there’s compelling circumstantial evidence that Olson was murdered because the CIA feared he would divulge one of the secret projects he’d worked on.One of Gottlieb’s most remarkable duties involved adversarial foreign heads of state. According to colleagues, he prepared “a pre-poisoned tube of toothpaste” meant for Congolese Prime Minister Patrice Lumumba (it went unused) and ran a scientific team that considered a bizarre plot to disgrace Fidel Castro. Believing that the Cuban leader’s charisma was linked to his facial hair, Gottlieb wanted to have thallium salts sprinkled in his boots. “His beard would then fall out,” Kinzer writes, “leaving him open to ridicule and overthrow.” This, of course, never came to pass.By 1963, MK-ULTRA’s final year, Gottlieb and his colleagues “were forced to face their cosmic failure,” Kinzer writes. “Their research had shown them that mind control is a myth—that seizing another person’s mind and reprogramming it is impossible.”Nonetheless, Kinzer believes that Gottlieb left a deeply lamentable imprint on the modern CIA. He says there’s “a direct line between Sidney Gottlieb’s work and techniques that U.S. agents taught to Latin American security services in the 1960s and ’70s—these techniques were also used in Vietnam—and then later on to the techniques of torture and so-called extreme interrogation that were used at Abu Ghraib and Guantanamo.”Though Gottlieb’s decision to destroy his files means that there’s much we’ll never know, Kinzer appears to be the first journalist to directly tie his departure from the CIA to the scandal that ended Richard Nixon’s presidency. Gottlieb’s team, he reports, “prepared false identity papers for two of” the men who broke into the Democratic National Committee’s offices in the Watergate complex. The break-in set off a chain of events that result in the ouster of CIA Director Richard Helms. “Helms,” Kinzer explains, “was Gottlieb’s number one promoter and enabler and sponsor for 20 years.” Nixon fired Helms in February 1973. Gottlieb retired four months later.After the CIA, Gottlieb took steps to reinvent himself. The long-married father of four joined an arts council in his Virginia town, acted in local holiday plays and worked with children who had speech problems. “It definitely seems from the recollections of people that knew him in his last 20 years that he was a very gentle soul, kind of an eco-hippy,” Kinzer says. “Nobody had any idea of what he had done in the past, but he was tormented by it.”Gottlieb died in March 1999, and when a cause of death wasn’t announced, at least two observers came to believe that he killed himself to derail intensifying legal inquiries into his actions. Eric Olson—Frank’s son—and Sidney Bender, a lawyer for a man who says his life was ruined by a Gottlieb dosing, had both tried to hold Gottlieb to account while he was alive. Instead, Kinzer writes, “they drank a toast to the death of a man they considered a monster.” Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

    Photo Illustration by Elizabeth Brockway/The Daily Beast/APStephen Kinzer has written books about civil wars, terror attacks, and bloody coups, but his latest might be his most alarming. “I’m still in shock,” Kinzer says of what he learned about the appalling experiments conducted by a government scientist most Americans have never heard of. “I can’t believe that this happened.”These aren’t the words of an author trying to fire up the hype machine. Though the events recounted in Kinzer’s Poisoner in Chief: Sidney Gottlieb and the CIA Search for Mind Control took place a half-century ago, they’re scandalous in a way that transcends time.For much of his 22-year CIA career, Gottlieb ran mind-control projects designed to help America defeat Communism. In the ’50s and ’60s, Kinzer writes, Gottlieb “directed the application of unknowable quantities and varieties of drugs into” countless people, searching for the narcotic recipe that might allow him to mold his human test subjects’ thoughts and actions.Gottlieb and a network of medical professionals gave LSD and other drugs to prisoners, hospital patients, government employees, and others—many of whom had no idea they were being dosed. A CIA staffer died in highly suspicious fashion after Gottlieb had his drink spiked with LSD. Meanwhile, when his bosses considered killing a foreign leader, Gottlieb developed custom-made poisons. Numerous people were harmed by Gottlieb’s work, but because he destroyed his files on the eve of his 1973 retirement, it’s hard to quantify the carnage he wrought.Perilous Discoveries: The Unintended Consequences of Scientific SecrecyThe broad outlines of Gottlieb’s story have been public for years. Major newspapers ran obituaries when he died in 1999. In 2017, he was portrayed by actor Tim Blake Nelson in Errol Morris’ Wormwood. But Kinzer’s book, the first proper Gottlieb biography, includes fascinating new facts about the end of his career and fresh details about disturbing episodes he orchestrated. Poisoner in Chief describes Gottlieb’s little-known participation in torture sessions at U.S. military sites in foreign countries and reports that in at least one case a doctor who worked with Gottlieb gave LSD to children. Gottlieb was “the Josef Mengele of the United States,” Kinzer, a former New York Times reporter and the author of many books, told me in a recent interview.How did Gottlieb, the Bronx-born son of Hungarian Jews, become a man who would earn comparisons to a ghoulish Nazi doctor?After getting a doctorate in biochemistry from the California Institute of Technology, Gottlieb joined the CIA in 1951, a time of fear and uncertainty. Just six years after the end of World War II, American troops were fighting in Korea. Washington was increasingly worried about what many believed was the existential threat posed by the Soviet Union. Gottlieb was on the job for a few weeks, Kinzer writes, when he was tapped “to invigorate” what would be known as the Artichoke project.Artichoke—the name was essentially meaningless; it might’ve been a CIA boss’ favorite vegetable—gave Gottlieb broad license to carry out mind control projects. Kinzer cites a CIA memo that describes the mission: “the investigation of drug effects on ego control and volitional activities, i.e., can willfully suppressed information be elicited through drugs affecting higher nervous systems? If so, which agents are better for this purpose?”The CIA aimed to create truth serum to use on prisoners and other compounds that would help wipe away memories of events that would cause trouble for the agency. If all went as planned, intelligence officers would have the ability to program people to carry out missions like those later seen in Richard Condon’s novel The Manchurian Candidate and the subsequent movie.Artichoke projects often amounted to “medical torture,” Kinzer writes. Inspired in part by brutal experiments conducted by the Japanese military and the Nazis in the ’40s, Artichoke included the “dosing (of) unwilling patients with potent drugs, subjecting them to extremes of temperature and sound (and) strapping them to electroshock machines.” Artichoke squads worked with impunity at American military sites in Europe and Asia. Such projects were closely guarded secrets, but Poisoner in Chief contains details that will be new to most readers.For instance, Kinzer notes that when “Artichoke scientists came up with a new drug or other technique they wished to test… they asked the CIA station in South Korea to supply a batch [of] ‘expendable’ subjects.” A related CIA memo said the subjects were needed for the testing of an unnamed but “important new technique,” adding, “Technique does not, not require disposal problems after application.” This is ambiguous language, but it suggests that the CIA knew that in some cases, human test subjects might be killed in the process.Gottlieb oversaw a scientific unit at Maryland’s Camp Detrick (since renamed Fort Detrick), where chemists researched the effects of LSD, heroin, and other drugs, sometimes trying the substances themselves. But he was not just a creature of the lab. “We know that he participated in torture sessions in East Asia,” Kinzer says, speaking from his home in Massachusetts. “We know that he made repeated visits to Germany, which, like Japan, was under U.S. occupation, so he didn’t have to obey any laws. And he was also active in other parts of Europe.”In time, Gottlieb became intimately familiar with LSD’s mind-altering effects. He admitted that he’d used the drug more than 200 times. “When I look at the variety of the projects that he was involved in,” Kinzer says, “from hypnotism to electroshock to parapsychology to handwriting analysis, I begin to think that maybe it was while he was on LSD that he was thinking, ‘I got another idea.’”By 1953, Kinzer writes, “Artichoke had become one of the most violently abusive projects ever sponsored by an agency of the United States government.” That year, Allen Dulles, one of Gottlieb’s ardent backers, got the CIA’s top job. The new boss, Kinzer writes, was among Washington’s leading mind control proponents: “Dulles never recoiled from the most extreme implications of ‘brain warfare.’” Dulles wanted “to intensify and systematize” the work done under Artichoke, Kinzer adds, and he tapped Gottlieb to head a new program: MK-ULTRA, named for the “ultra-sensitive” activities it was expected to carry out.With a generous budget and an “effectively unlimited supply” of LSD—the pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly manufactured the hallucinogenic drug for the CIA—Gottlieb became perhaps “the most powerful unknown American of the 20th century,” Kinzer says.A key MK-ULTRA initiative involved medical professionals who agreed to administer drugs to their patients—often without the patients’ knowledge or consent. For instance, when Gottlieb wanted to know how much LSD a body could withstand, he got in touch with Harris Isbell, a researcher at a Lexington, Kentucky addiction center who had made his curiosity about LSD known in a letter to the CIA.Working with a group of men who “were not told what sort of drug they would be fed or what its effects might be,” Kinzer writes, Isbell administered large doses of LSD. He reported that the men experienced anxiety, hallucinations, and “choking.” As always with CIA projects of this kind, it’s tough to say how much damage was done. But Kinzer writes that at least one patient did speak out, saying that “for the rest of his life he suffered from delusions, paranoia, panic attacks, and suicidal impulses.”Another keen CIA collaborator chaired the pharmacology department at Emory University. “As subjects,” Kinzer writes, Dr. Carl Pfeiffer “used inmates at the federal prison in Atlanta and at a juvenile detention center in Bordentown, New Jersey,” administering depressants and hallucinogens in volumes that resulted in seizures and hallucinations that lasted for days. One of Pfeiffer’s subjects was James “Whitey” Bulger, who later became a notorious Boston gangland killer. Bulger said that as a young inmate, he was given LSD daily for more than a year.Another doctor—a New York allergist named Harold Abramson, who got an $85,000 MK-ULTRA stipend—“developed a special curiosity about the impact of mind-altering drugs on children,” Kinzer writes. “He closely monitored experiments, including one in which 12 ‘pre-puberty’ boys were fed psilocybin, and another in which 14 children between the ages of six and 11, diagnosed as schizophrenic, were given 100 micrograms of LSD each day for six weeks.”In Manhattan, meanwhile, Gottlieb helped set up a CIA safe house, where, with the hands-on help of a local narcotics cop, “unsuspecting citizens would be lured and surreptitiously drugged,” their behavior monitored via surveillance equipment in an adjoining apartment.It was around this time that Gottlieb attended a retreat with some other CIA men. The colleagues began drinking, and a few minutes later, Kinzer writes, “Gottlieb asked if anyone was feeling odd. Several said they were. Gottlieb then told them that their drinks had been spiked with LSD.” The incident triggered an emotional crisis in one of the men, a scientist named Frank Olson. Days later, Olson plunged to his death from the window of a Manhattan hotel. As seen in Morris’ film Wormwood, there’s compelling circumstantial evidence that Olson was murdered because the CIA feared he would divulge one of the secret projects he’d worked on.One of Gottlieb’s most remarkable duties involved adversarial foreign heads of state. According to colleagues, he prepared “a pre-poisoned tube of toothpaste” meant for Congolese Prime Minister Patrice Lumumba (it went unused) and ran a scientific team that considered a bizarre plot to disgrace Fidel Castro. Believing that the Cuban leader’s charisma was linked to his facial hair, Gottlieb wanted to have thallium salts sprinkled in his boots. “His beard would then fall out,” Kinzer writes, “leaving him open to ridicule and overthrow.” This, of course, never came to pass.By 1963, MK-ULTRA’s final year, Gottlieb and his colleagues “were forced to face their cosmic failure,” Kinzer writes. “Their research had shown them that mind control is a myth—that seizing another person’s mind and reprogramming it is impossible.”Nonetheless, Kinzer believes that Gottlieb left a deeply lamentable imprint on the modern CIA. He says there’s “a direct line between Sidney Gottlieb’s work and techniques that U.S. agents taught to Latin American security services in the 1960s and ’70s—these techniques were also used in Vietnam—and then later on to the techniques of torture and so-called extreme interrogation that were used at Abu Ghraib and Guantanamo.”Though Gottlieb’s decision to destroy his files means that there’s much we’ll never know, Kinzer appears to be the first journalist to directly tie his departure from the CIA to the scandal that ended Richard Nixon’s presidency. Gottlieb’s team, he reports, “prepared false identity papers for two of” the men who broke into the Democratic National Committee’s offices in the Watergate complex. The break-in set off a chain of events that result in the ouster of CIA Director Richard Helms. “Helms,” Kinzer explains, “was Gottlieb’s number one promoter and enabler and sponsor for 20 years.” Nixon fired Helms in February 1973. Gottlieb retired four months later.After the CIA, Gottlieb took steps to reinvent himself. The long-married father of four joined an arts council in his Virginia town, acted in local holiday plays and worked with children who had speech problems. “It definitely seems from the recollections of people that knew him in his last 20 years that he was a very gentle soul, kind of an eco-hippy,” Kinzer says. “Nobody had any idea of what he had done in the past, but he was tormented by it.”Gottlieb died in March 1999, and when a cause of death wasn’t announced, at least two observers came to believe that he killed himself to derail intensifying legal inquiries into his actions. Eric Olson—Frank’s son—and Sidney Bender, a lawyer for a man who says his life was ruined by a Gottlieb dosing, had both tried to hold Gottlieb to account while he was alive. Instead, Kinzer writes, “they drank a toast to the death of a man they considered a monster.” Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


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  • 54/79   Science warnings, US retreat add urgency to UN climate talks
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Mass protests, a last-minute venue change and talk of climate tipping points are adding some unplanned drama to this year’s international talks on tackling global warming.  Delegates from almost 200 countries had hoped to put the finishing touches to the rules governing the 2015 Paris accord, ironing out a few wrinkles left over from last year’s conference in Katowice, Poland, and setting the scene for a major review of their efforts in 2020.  Next, President Donald Trump served formal notice that the United States was quitting the Paris accord, delivering a symbolic blow to one of his predecessor’s signature achievements.

    Mass protests, a last-minute venue change and talk of climate tipping points are adding some unplanned drama to this year’s international talks on tackling global warming. Delegates from almost 200 countries had hoped to put the finishing touches to the rules governing the 2015 Paris accord, ironing out a few wrinkles left over from last year’s conference in Katowice, Poland, and setting the scene for a major review of their efforts in 2020. Next, President Donald Trump served formal notice that the United States was quitting the Paris accord, delivering a symbolic blow to one of his predecessor’s signature achievements.


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  • 55/79   The Suburbs Are Kicking the Animals Out. Enter the Animal Rescue Squad.
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    ATLANTA -- In a small suburban park on a muggy morning a few months ago, a woman in elbow-length gloves was armed with a net, a loaf of bread and a tall cardboard box, all in hopes of catching an elusive goose.The goose, whose left leg was tightly wound in fishing line, walked with a pronounced hobble; as it swam, the leg dragged listlessly in the water. Yet despite its condition, animal instinct prevailed. The goose simply refused to be caught.Cindy Rooker, the would-be captor, hoped to retrieve the recalcitrant Canada goose, tuck it into the cardboard box she had brought, and drive it to a wildlife rehabilitation center a few hours away in South Carolina, where the bird would receive medical attention.But after several attempts, Rooker knew it was time to call it a day. Birds are easily stressed, and waterfowl have an inconvenient and frustrating knack for flying right into the center of a pond. Also, she didn't bring a kayak this time.A police officer who lives in Canton, Georgia, Rooker, 56, volunteers for the Wildlife Resources and Education Network (WREN). She started working with the organization at the beginning of the summer, and has since completed about 10 transports, crisscrossing the northern half of the state with the likes of orphaned baby opossums and injured hawks in the cab of her Nissan pickup truck.WREN connects people like Rooker -- committed animal lovers in the Southeast with spare time, spare gas money and an empty back seat -- with wildlife rehabbers and veterinary clinics that lack the resources to transport an animal on their own.In other words, Rooker and her fellow transporters are Mother Nature's unpaid Uber drivers.Robert Jones, an animal lover whose other pursuits include military history and small-business consulting, started WREN with Liz Crandall in 2016. The two met at the Southeastern Raptor Center at Auburn University, where Crandall worked and Jones volunteered and, later, interned.They formed WREN as a wildlife educational initiative, but with time, sharpened their focus largely on transportation after seeing the same challenge day after day: More people seemed to be stumbling upon injured wildlife every passing year, but few wanted to transport the animals to rehabbers themselves."It's a really large gap," said Jones, 34, who now lives in Jonesborough, Tennessee, and is the executive director of the Tilted Tavern Animal Sanctuary. Nonprofits like the raptor center don't always have the resources or staff to send someone out to fetch an animal, especially one that's hours away.That's where WREN -- and a handful of similar organizations, like the Connecticut Emergency Animal Response Service -- step in.When I first spoke with Crandall, 46, by phone, she had just finished up "a fawn call" (which, at least in this instance, is not a pun). Crandall, who is the assistant director of the Tilted Tavern Animal Sanctuary, said that she fields roughly a dozen calls a day and manages a handful of transports each week, often across state lines.That number is increasing each year, for reasons both dismal and hopeful: While humans are pushing into wildlife territory more and more, some of them are also becoming more aware of, and attuned to, the wildlife in their backyards."I think people are more conscientious," Crandall said. "They want to help more."WREN uses Slack to communicate to its volunteers and manage logistics, like making sure each transporter has an appropriate container for the animal (typically a cardboard box or a lidded Rubbermaid bin with holes for oxygen).Driving a captured animal requires total silence in the car -- no phone conversations, no podcasts or music -- sometimes for hours on end."It takes a lot for people to commit to something where they'll get a call maybe once a month, or maybe every day," Crandall said. Working with nature has inherent challenges and frustrations. It requires patience and flexibility, not to mention thick skin: Not every case has a happy ending.One of the organizations WREN works with is the Chattahoochee Nature Center, where Kathryn Dudeck works as wildlife director. Dudeck said that the center fields 400 to 500 phone calls a month, and takes in more than 650 animals for rehab each year.Those cases range from natural causes, like nestlings blown out of their nests in a hurricane, to injury explicitly at the hands of humans: an owl with buckshot in its wings, a red-tailed hawk hit by a car. "Needless to say, Mother Nature didn't invent the vehicle or the gun," Dudeck said. "So, we have a moral obligation to assist."David Crawford is the founder of Animal Help Now, a 911-like website and smartphone app that links people to wildlife rehabbers and transporters like WREN. App usage has increased every year since its inception in 2012, he said."As we expand and build new roads and build new suburbs, you have a lot more interaction with animals," he said. Then, he added, there is climate change: more destructive hurricanes will yield more injuries and habitat destruction; prolonged droughts, raging forest fires and searing heat waves will continue to push desperate animals further into human habitats."People are going to be interacting with wildlife a lot more than they are right now," said Crawford. He estimates that by the end of 2019, Animal Help Now will have been used in 40,000 wildlife emergencies across the country.A week after the first attempt, Rooker was back at Laurel Park. This time, there was a scrum of additional helpers, including Crandall, along with two kayaks. There were, however, no geese.Just before the group split off to search nearby ponds for the flock, Darcell Patterson, a sneaker-shod woman, intercepted the volunteers. Patterson, 66, has walked around the park every day for the last four years, she said, and brings dried food pellets with her to "establish rapport" with the resident ducks and geese.She matter-of-factly informed the group that the injured goose is named Gary, and that his leg has been wrapped in that line for a couple of years. Gary, it seems, can survive on his own, and has not yet been ostracized from his avian comrades.Crandall decided to let Gary be for now, knowing he was under Patterson's watchful eye. As long as the bird can still fly, walk and eat, Crandall explained, the stress of relocation isn't justifiable yet."Gary's got friends in high places," Patterson said.While it wasn't the Disney-worthy victory that the volunteers may have had in mind this go-round, it was still a victory by their standards."Sometimes letting wild be wild is the right thing to do," Jones said. "You teach people what situations need our intervention, and what situations don't."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company

    ATLANTA -- In a small suburban park on a muggy morning a few months ago, a woman in elbow-length gloves was armed with a net, a loaf of bread and a tall cardboard box, all in hopes of catching an elusive goose.The goose, whose left leg was tightly wound in fishing line, walked with a pronounced hobble; as it swam, the leg dragged listlessly in the water. Yet despite its condition, animal instinct prevailed. The goose simply refused to be caught.Cindy Rooker, the would-be captor, hoped to retrieve the recalcitrant Canada goose, tuck it into the cardboard box she had brought, and drive it to a wildlife rehabilitation center a few hours away in South Carolina, where the bird would receive medical attention.But after several attempts, Rooker knew it was time to call it a day. Birds are easily stressed, and waterfowl have an inconvenient and frustrating knack for flying right into the center of a pond. Also, she didn't bring a kayak this time.A police officer who lives in Canton, Georgia, Rooker, 56, volunteers for the Wildlife Resources and Education Network (WREN). She started working with the organization at the beginning of the summer, and has since completed about 10 transports, crisscrossing the northern half of the state with the likes of orphaned baby opossums and injured hawks in the cab of her Nissan pickup truck.WREN connects people like Rooker -- committed animal lovers in the Southeast with spare time, spare gas money and an empty back seat -- with wildlife rehabbers and veterinary clinics that lack the resources to transport an animal on their own.In other words, Rooker and her fellow transporters are Mother Nature's unpaid Uber drivers.Robert Jones, an animal lover whose other pursuits include military history and small-business consulting, started WREN with Liz Crandall in 2016. The two met at the Southeastern Raptor Center at Auburn University, where Crandall worked and Jones volunteered and, later, interned.They formed WREN as a wildlife educational initiative, but with time, sharpened their focus largely on transportation after seeing the same challenge day after day: More people seemed to be stumbling upon injured wildlife every passing year, but few wanted to transport the animals to rehabbers themselves."It's a really large gap," said Jones, 34, who now lives in Jonesborough, Tennessee, and is the executive director of the Tilted Tavern Animal Sanctuary. Nonprofits like the raptor center don't always have the resources or staff to send someone out to fetch an animal, especially one that's hours away.That's where WREN -- and a handful of similar organizations, like the Connecticut Emergency Animal Response Service -- step in.When I first spoke with Crandall, 46, by phone, she had just finished up "a fawn call" (which, at least in this instance, is not a pun). Crandall, who is the assistant director of the Tilted Tavern Animal Sanctuary, said that she fields roughly a dozen calls a day and manages a handful of transports each week, often across state lines.That number is increasing each year, for reasons both dismal and hopeful: While humans are pushing into wildlife territory more and more, some of them are also becoming more aware of, and attuned to, the wildlife in their backyards."I think people are more conscientious," Crandall said. "They want to help more."WREN uses Slack to communicate to its volunteers and manage logistics, like making sure each transporter has an appropriate container for the animal (typically a cardboard box or a lidded Rubbermaid bin with holes for oxygen).Driving a captured animal requires total silence in the car -- no phone conversations, no podcasts or music -- sometimes for hours on end."It takes a lot for people to commit to something where they'll get a call maybe once a month, or maybe every day," Crandall said. Working with nature has inherent challenges and frustrations. It requires patience and flexibility, not to mention thick skin: Not every case has a happy ending.One of the organizations WREN works with is the Chattahoochee Nature Center, where Kathryn Dudeck works as wildlife director. Dudeck said that the center fields 400 to 500 phone calls a month, and takes in more than 650 animals for rehab each year.Those cases range from natural causes, like nestlings blown out of their nests in a hurricane, to injury explicitly at the hands of humans: an owl with buckshot in its wings, a red-tailed hawk hit by a car. "Needless to say, Mother Nature didn't invent the vehicle or the gun," Dudeck said. "So, we have a moral obligation to assist."David Crawford is the founder of Animal Help Now, a 911-like website and smartphone app that links people to wildlife rehabbers and transporters like WREN. App usage has increased every year since its inception in 2012, he said."As we expand and build new roads and build new suburbs, you have a lot more interaction with animals," he said. Then, he added, there is climate change: more destructive hurricanes will yield more injuries and habitat destruction; prolonged droughts, raging forest fires and searing heat waves will continue to push desperate animals further into human habitats."People are going to be interacting with wildlife a lot more than they are right now," said Crawford. He estimates that by the end of 2019, Animal Help Now will have been used in 40,000 wildlife emergencies across the country.A week after the first attempt, Rooker was back at Laurel Park. This time, there was a scrum of additional helpers, including Crandall, along with two kayaks. There were, however, no geese.Just before the group split off to search nearby ponds for the flock, Darcell Patterson, a sneaker-shod woman, intercepted the volunteers. Patterson, 66, has walked around the park every day for the last four years, she said, and brings dried food pellets with her to "establish rapport" with the resident ducks and geese.She matter-of-factly informed the group that the injured goose is named Gary, and that his leg has been wrapped in that line for a couple of years. Gary, it seems, can survive on his own, and has not yet been ostracized from his avian comrades.Crandall decided to let Gary be for now, knowing he was under Patterson's watchful eye. As long as the bird can still fly, walk and eat, Crandall explained, the stress of relocation isn't justifiable yet."Gary's got friends in high places," Patterson said.While it wasn't the Disney-worthy victory that the volunteers may have had in mind this go-round, it was still a victory by their standards."Sometimes letting wild be wild is the right thing to do," Jones said. "You teach people what situations need our intervention, and what situations don't."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company


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  • 56/79   Blue Origin’s expansion plans rush ahead at its Seattle-area HQ — and in Los Angeles
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    KENT, Wash. — Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin space venture is rapidly expanding on several fronts, ranging from its headquarters facility south of Seattle to a new beachhead in the Los Angeles area — within the orbit of its main competitor, Elon Musk's SpaceX. Just three and a half years ago, Blue Origin's workforce amounted to 600 employees, and even then, Bezos said his company's 300,000-square-foot office and production facility in Kent was "busting out of the seams." Now the employee count is at around 2,500, heading toward 3,500 in the next year. That's according to a report from… Read More

    KENT, Wash. — Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin space venture is rapidly expanding on several fronts, ranging from its headquarters facility south of Seattle to a new beachhead in the Los Angeles area — within the orbit of its main competitor, Elon Musk's SpaceX. Just three and a half years ago, Blue Origin's workforce amounted to 600 employees, and even then, Bezos said his company's 300,000-square-foot office and production facility in Kent was "busting out of the seams." Now the employee count is at around 2,500, heading toward 3,500 in the next year. That's according to a report from… Read More


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  • 57/79   NASA's plans for the 2020s include landing humans on the Moon, detecting quakes on Mars, and defending Earth from deadly asteroids
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    One year ago, NASA announced it would send astronauts back to the moon. Since then, new spacecraft and telescopes have filled its plans for the 2020s.

    One year ago, NASA announced it would send astronauts back to the moon. Since then, new spacecraft and telescopes have filled its plans for the 2020s.


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  • 58/79   A network of cables at the bottom of the ocean is helping scientists detect earthquakes
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The cables detected a new fault system near the San Andreas Fault, which runs along the California coast.

    The cables detected a new fault system near the San Andreas Fault, which runs along the California coast.


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  • 59/79   The human species will likely destroy itself long before the sun kills everyone on Earth, a Harvard scientists says
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Scientist Avi Loeb wrote that we should colonize space to survive the sun's future expansion. But humanity might wipe itself out before then, he said.

    Scientist Avi Loeb wrote that we should colonize space to survive the sun's future expansion. But humanity might wipe itself out before then, he said.


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  • 60/79   Tear Gas Fired as Protesters Return to Streets: Hong Kong Update
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Police fired tear gas as thousands of black-clad protesters marched in Hong Kong’s tourist district Tsim Sha Tsui on Sunday, as tensions re-emerged after the euphoria of pro-democracy victories at district elections last weekend.Protesters also marched to the U.S. consulate in a rally to express gratitude after President Donald Trump signed legislation last week expressing support for the demonstrators. Late Saturday, a group of protesters blocked roads and set fire to a subway station entrance.Here’s the latest (all times local):MTR to add train captains (5:30 a.m.)The city’s subway operator says some sections of its network will need more train captains to ensure there aren’t objects hindering the operation of trains. Some traffic lights were damaged that may affect its Light Rail services.Police in riot gear line streets (2 a.m.)Police in riot gear were still seen lining some streets even as the crowd dispersed.Police disperse crowds in Whampoa (11 p.m.)Police also fired tear gas in nearby Whampoa, where bricks were hurled at them. A passer-by was attacked, roads were blocked and stores were vandalized in the area.Tear gas fired in Tsim Sha Tsui (5:45 p.m.)Police fired tear gas and used pepper spray as thousands of protesters marched in Hong Kong’s busy tourist district of Tsim Sha Tsui. The police said in a statement that tear gas was fired in response to protesters throwing bricks at officers.March to U.S. consulate (Sunday, 1:30 p.m.)Thousands of protesters carrying U.S. flags and banners marched peacefully to the consulate. In a separate rally Sunday, demonstrators headed to Polytechnic University and the Cross-Harbour Tunnel.China accuses UN Human Rights Head of meddling (late Saturday)China said it “strongly” opposed an op-ed by United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet, accusing her of meddling in the country’s affairs and emboldening Hong Kong protesters to commit violence.Bachelet urged the Hong Kong government to conduct a “proper independent and impartial judge-led investigation” into reports of excessive use of force by police, according to an opinion piece in the South China Morning Post on Saturday. She also urged Carrie Lam’s government to “prioritize a long-overdue process” of meaningful and inclusive dialogue with the people of Hong Kong.China said Bachelet and her office should “stop making irresponsible comments, and refrain from interfering by any means in the internal affairs” of Hong Kong.“The Central Government will continue to firmly support the Chief Executive in governing the Hong Kong SAR in accordance with law, support the Hong Kong police in strictly enforcing law, and support the Hong Kong judicial organs in bringing violent criminals to justice according to law,” China’s UN mission in Geneva said in the statement.Tensions rise again (11 p.m.)About 200 protesters blocked roads, closed an exit at the Prince Edward MTR station and set fire to an entrance of Mong Kok MTR station late Saturday, the South China Morning Post reported. Police fired at least one round of tear gas, it said.Foreign nationals arrested in China (6 p.m.)China arrested two overseas nationals for their alleged involvement in the Hong Kong protest movement, state newspaper Southern Daily reported, citing information from the national security agency. Taiwan citizen Lee Meng-chu and Lee Henley Hu Xiang of Belize were arrested by the national security authorities in the southern Guangdong province, the local paper said.The Taiwanese was suspected of spying and leaking Chinese state secrets, while the other person was accused of funding criminal activities that endanger national security, the paper said. Prosecutors have approved the arrests in both cases and are going through legal procedures, it said.Protesters return (Saturday, 2 p.m.)Hundreds of secondary-school students and elderly people rallied in a park in the city center in support of Hong Kong’s ongoing protests and against police use of tear gas. A number of people addressed the crowd before a band played on a makeshift stage in front of background poster that said: The elderly and the young hold hands and we walk together with you.1,377 arrested in relation to PolyU (4:54 p.m.)Hong Kong police have arrested 1,377 people who left the then-besieged PolyU campus or were in the vicinity, the force’s Chief Superintendent Kwok Ka-chuen said at a daily briefing. More than 300 people under age 18 had their information taken down when they left the campus, he said, adding that he was “pleased” the episode at the school was coming to an end and that he hoped it could be a “turning point” for the city’s unrest, as it was resolved peacefullyPolice have now made 5,890 protest-related arrests since rallies began on June 9, he said.Hong Kong insurance sales to China slip (3:32 p.m.)Insurance sales in the financial hub to mainland customers declined in the third quarter as the protests halted visits to the city. Their purchases of insurance and related investment policies declined 18% to HK$9.7 billion ($1.2 billion) from a year earlier, according to figures from Hong Kong’s Insurance Authority. That year-on-year drop was the biggest since the start of last year, weighing on insurance giants such as Prudential Plc and AIA Group Ltd.Hong Kong is a hot market to buy insurance for mainland customers since it offers a wider array of investment products and access to foreign currencies. Since rules stipulate that customers need to finalize contracts in person, sales have been pummeled as many prospective Chinese customers have avoided the former British colony.PolyU siege ends (Friday 12:51 p.m.)Police said they lifted their blockade on PolyU after officers cleared the campus. Chow Yat-ming, the city’s assistant police commissioner, said he believed PolyU could be handed back to university management after dangerous items that remained on campus were removed.Firemen and a police safety team did a final sweep of the campus in the morning after searching every level of each building to handle hazardous items and collect evidence the day before. The police said they seized items including 3,989 petrol bombs, 1,339 explosive items and 601 bottles of corrosive liquids.\--With assistance from Zheping Huang and Aaron Mc Nicholas.To contact the reporters on this story: Karen Leigh in Hong Kong at kleigh4@bloomberg.net;Natalie Lung in Hong Kong at flung6@bloomberg.net;Manuel Baigorri in Hong Kong at mbaigorri@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Shamim Adam at sadam2@bloomberg.net, Tony CzuczkaFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Police fired tear gas as thousands of black-clad protesters marched in Hong Kong’s tourist district Tsim Sha Tsui on Sunday, as tensions re-emerged after the euphoria of pro-democracy victories at district elections last weekend.Protesters also marched to the U.S. consulate in a rally to express gratitude after President Donald Trump signed legislation last week expressing support for the demonstrators. Late Saturday, a group of protesters blocked roads and set fire to a subway station entrance.Here’s the latest (all times local):MTR to add train captains (5:30 a.m.)The city’s subway operator says some sections of its network will need more train captains to ensure there aren’t objects hindering the operation of trains. Some traffic lights were damaged that may affect its Light Rail services.Police in riot gear line streets (2 a.m.)Police in riot gear were still seen lining some streets even as the crowd dispersed.Police disperse crowds in Whampoa (11 p.m.)Police also fired tear gas in nearby Whampoa, where bricks were hurled at them. A passer-by was attacked, roads were blocked and stores were vandalized in the area.Tear gas fired in Tsim Sha Tsui (5:45 p.m.)Police fired tear gas and used pepper spray as thousands of protesters marched in Hong Kong’s busy tourist district of Tsim Sha Tsui. The police said in a statement that tear gas was fired in response to protesters throwing bricks at officers.March to U.S. consulate (Sunday, 1:30 p.m.)Thousands of protesters carrying U.S. flags and banners marched peacefully to the consulate. In a separate rally Sunday, demonstrators headed to Polytechnic University and the Cross-Harbour Tunnel.China accuses UN Human Rights Head of meddling (late Saturday)China said it “strongly” opposed an op-ed by United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet, accusing her of meddling in the country’s affairs and emboldening Hong Kong protesters to commit violence.Bachelet urged the Hong Kong government to conduct a “proper independent and impartial judge-led investigation” into reports of excessive use of force by police, according to an opinion piece in the South China Morning Post on Saturday. She also urged Carrie Lam’s government to “prioritize a long-overdue process” of meaningful and inclusive dialogue with the people of Hong Kong.China said Bachelet and her office should “stop making irresponsible comments, and refrain from interfering by any means in the internal affairs” of Hong Kong.“The Central Government will continue to firmly support the Chief Executive in governing the Hong Kong SAR in accordance with law, support the Hong Kong police in strictly enforcing law, and support the Hong Kong judicial organs in bringing violent criminals to justice according to law,” China’s UN mission in Geneva said in the statement.Tensions rise again (11 p.m.)About 200 protesters blocked roads, closed an exit at the Prince Edward MTR station and set fire to an entrance of Mong Kok MTR station late Saturday, the South China Morning Post reported. Police fired at least one round of tear gas, it said.Foreign nationals arrested in China (6 p.m.)China arrested two overseas nationals for their alleged involvement in the Hong Kong protest movement, state newspaper Southern Daily reported, citing information from the national security agency. Taiwan citizen Lee Meng-chu and Lee Henley Hu Xiang of Belize were arrested by the national security authorities in the southern Guangdong province, the local paper said.The Taiwanese was suspected of spying and leaking Chinese state secrets, while the other person was accused of funding criminal activities that endanger national security, the paper said. Prosecutors have approved the arrests in both cases and are going through legal procedures, it said.Protesters return (Saturday, 2 p.m.)Hundreds of secondary-school students and elderly people rallied in a park in the city center in support of Hong Kong’s ongoing protests and against police use of tear gas. A number of people addressed the crowd before a band played on a makeshift stage in front of background poster that said: The elderly and the young hold hands and we walk together with you.1,377 arrested in relation to PolyU (4:54 p.m.)Hong Kong police have arrested 1,377 people who left the then-besieged PolyU campus or were in the vicinity, the force’s Chief Superintendent Kwok Ka-chuen said at a daily briefing. More than 300 people under age 18 had their information taken down when they left the campus, he said, adding that he was “pleased” the episode at the school was coming to an end and that he hoped it could be a “turning point” for the city’s unrest, as it was resolved peacefullyPolice have now made 5,890 protest-related arrests since rallies began on June 9, he said.Hong Kong insurance sales to China slip (3:32 p.m.)Insurance sales in the financial hub to mainland customers declined in the third quarter as the protests halted visits to the city. Their purchases of insurance and related investment policies declined 18% to HK$9.7 billion ($1.2 billion) from a year earlier, according to figures from Hong Kong’s Insurance Authority. That year-on-year drop was the biggest since the start of last year, weighing on insurance giants such as Prudential Plc and AIA Group Ltd.Hong Kong is a hot market to buy insurance for mainland customers since it offers a wider array of investment products and access to foreign currencies. Since rules stipulate that customers need to finalize contracts in person, sales have been pummeled as many prospective Chinese customers have avoided the former British colony.PolyU siege ends (Friday 12:51 p.m.)Police said they lifted their blockade on PolyU after officers cleared the campus. Chow Yat-ming, the city’s assistant police commissioner, said he believed PolyU could be handed back to university management after dangerous items that remained on campus were removed.Firemen and a police safety team did a final sweep of the campus in the morning after searching every level of each building to handle hazardous items and collect evidence the day before. The police said they seized items including 3,989 petrol bombs, 1,339 explosive items and 601 bottles of corrosive liquids.\--With assistance from Zheping Huang and Aaron Mc Nicholas.To contact the reporters on this story: Karen Leigh in Hong Kong at kleigh4@bloomberg.net;Natalie Lung in Hong Kong at flung6@bloomberg.net;Manuel Baigorri in Hong Kong at mbaigorri@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Shamim Adam at sadam2@bloomberg.net, Tony CzuczkaFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 61/79   Belgian Carnival town renounces UNESCO title over racism row
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The famed Belgian Carnival town of Aalst wants to renounce its place on the U.N. cultural heritage list, saying it is sick of widespread complaints that this spring’s edition contained blatant anti-Semitism.  Town officials say the float objected to, with stereotypical depictions of hook-nosed Jews sitting on piles of money, was trying to make a joke and they contend no one should try to muzzle humor of any kind during the three-day Carnival.  UNESCO, Jewish groups and the European Union have condemned the float as anti-Semitic, with the EU saying it conjured up visions of the 1930s.

    The famed Belgian Carnival town of Aalst wants to renounce its place on the U.N. cultural heritage list, saying it is sick of widespread complaints that this spring’s edition contained blatant anti-Semitism. Town officials say the float objected to, with stereotypical depictions of hook-nosed Jews sitting on piles of money, was trying to make a joke and they contend no one should try to muzzle humor of any kind during the three-day Carnival. UNESCO, Jewish groups and the European Union have condemned the float as anti-Semitic, with the EU saying it conjured up visions of the 1930s.


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  • 62/79   NBC's Chuck Todd Scolds GOP Senator For Pushing Russian Talking Points
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The "Meet The Press" host told Louisiana Sen. John Kennedy that Vladimir Putin is "selling" the same claims.

    The "Meet The Press" host told Louisiana Sen. John Kennedy that Vladimir Putin is "selling" the same claims.


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  • 63/79   Hong Kong Unrest Rages on as Police Clash With Protesters
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Clouds of tear gas returned to Hong Kong over the weekend as police and protesters clashed, signaling pro-democracy rallies are set to drag on after demonstrators got a boost from an election win and support from the U.S. Congress.Tensions rose in the former British colony -- a special administrative region of China since 1997 -- as thousands of black-clad protesters marched in the busy tourist district of Tsim Sha Tsui on Sunday afternoon. Unrest had been brewing since late Saturday, when a group blocked roads and set fire to a subway station entrance.The violence took a pause with the elections a week earlier, as Hong Kong residents handed an overwhelming victory to pro-democracy candidates in a vote for local district councils on Nov. 24. While the officials they elected represent what’s considered as the lowest rung of the government, the win was a stunning repudiation of the city’s Beijing-backed government. Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam didn’t make any new concessions to protesters after the poll, a move that could have fueled the anger seen over the weekend.At the Tsim Sha Tsui event, police said smoke grenades were hurled by what it labeled “rioters” to cause fear and panic among demonstrators, prompting law enforcement action that included tear gas to disperse the crowd. Bricks were thrown at police officers in the area, as well as in nearby Whampoa, where shops were also vandalized. One passerby was attacked, police said.Earlier in the day, people carrying U.S. flags and banners marched to the U.S. consulate in a peaceful rally to express gratitude after President Donald Trump signed legislation last week in support of the demonstrators. While the crowds have dispersed Sunday night, scores of police officers in riot gear were still seen lining the streets as of 2 a.m. on Monday.MTR Corp., the city’s subway operator, said it expects rail and bus services to resume normally on Monday, with the possibility that some stations and rail sections may close early, especially on weekends. The University station on the East Rail line will remain shut for repairs, and entrances and exits to some stops that had excessive damage from the protests will also not be accessible.Subway stations and even tracks were vandalized during the protests in the past few months, with MTR’s crews rushing through repairs. The stock -- once one of Hong Kong’s safest stock bets -- has lost more than a fifth of its value since its peak this year in July, making it the second-worst performer on Hong Kong’s benchmark Hang Seng Index. The stock is poised to recover quickly when the city’s situation eventually settles, according to Goldman Sachs Group Inc. analysts, who’ve upgraded MTR to buy from neutral.Police ConductMeanwhile, China said it “strongly” opposed an opinion piece by United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet in the South China Morning Post on Saturday, accusing her of meddling in the country’s affairs and emboldening Hong Kong protesters to commit violence.Bachelet urged the city’s government to conduct a “proper independent and impartial judge-led investigation” into reports of excessive use of force by police. She also called on Lam’s administration to “prioritize a long-overdue process” of meaningful and inclusive dialogue with the people of Hong Kong.Hong Kong’s newly appointed police chief, Chris Tang, said an independent probe into the use of force by police would be unjust, the South China Morning Post reported Sunday, citing comments he made in a radio program.China has also arrested two overseas nationals for their alleged involvement in Hong Kong’s protest movement, state newspaper Southern Daily reported, citing information from the national security agency. Taiwanese Lee Meng-chu and Lee Henley Hu Xiang of Belize were arrested by the national security authorities in the southern Guangdong province, the local paper said in two reports published Saturday.(Updates with clashes in fourth paragraph, subway plans for Monday in sixth.)To contact the reporter on this story: Manuel Baigorri in Hong Kong at mbaigorri@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.net, Linus Chua, Tony CzuczkaFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Clouds of tear gas returned to Hong Kong over the weekend as police and protesters clashed, signaling pro-democracy rallies are set to drag on after demonstrators got a boost from an election win and support from the U.S. Congress.Tensions rose in the former British colony -- a special administrative region of China since 1997 -- as thousands of black-clad protesters marched in the busy tourist district of Tsim Sha Tsui on Sunday afternoon. Unrest had been brewing since late Saturday, when a group blocked roads and set fire to a subway station entrance.The violence took a pause with the elections a week earlier, as Hong Kong residents handed an overwhelming victory to pro-democracy candidates in a vote for local district councils on Nov. 24. While the officials they elected represent what’s considered as the lowest rung of the government, the win was a stunning repudiation of the city’s Beijing-backed government. Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam didn’t make any new concessions to protesters after the poll, a move that could have fueled the anger seen over the weekend.At the Tsim Sha Tsui event, police said smoke grenades were hurled by what it labeled “rioters” to cause fear and panic among demonstrators, prompting law enforcement action that included tear gas to disperse the crowd. Bricks were thrown at police officers in the area, as well as in nearby Whampoa, where shops were also vandalized. One passerby was attacked, police said.Earlier in the day, people carrying U.S. flags and banners marched to the U.S. consulate in a peaceful rally to express gratitude after President Donald Trump signed legislation last week in support of the demonstrators. While the crowds have dispersed Sunday night, scores of police officers in riot gear were still seen lining the streets as of 2 a.m. on Monday.MTR Corp., the city’s subway operator, said it expects rail and bus services to resume normally on Monday, with the possibility that some stations and rail sections may close early, especially on weekends. The University station on the East Rail line will remain shut for repairs, and entrances and exits to some stops that had excessive damage from the protests will also not be accessible.Subway stations and even tracks were vandalized during the protests in the past few months, with MTR’s crews rushing through repairs. The stock -- once one of Hong Kong’s safest stock bets -- has lost more than a fifth of its value since its peak this year in July, making it the second-worst performer on Hong Kong’s benchmark Hang Seng Index. The stock is poised to recover quickly when the city’s situation eventually settles, according to Goldman Sachs Group Inc. analysts, who’ve upgraded MTR to buy from neutral.Police ConductMeanwhile, China said it “strongly” opposed an opinion piece by United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet in the South China Morning Post on Saturday, accusing her of meddling in the country’s affairs and emboldening Hong Kong protesters to commit violence.Bachelet urged the city’s government to conduct a “proper independent and impartial judge-led investigation” into reports of excessive use of force by police. She also called on Lam’s administration to “prioritize a long-overdue process” of meaningful and inclusive dialogue with the people of Hong Kong.Hong Kong’s newly appointed police chief, Chris Tang, said an independent probe into the use of force by police would be unjust, the South China Morning Post reported Sunday, citing comments he made in a radio program.China has also arrested two overseas nationals for their alleged involvement in Hong Kong’s protest movement, state newspaper Southern Daily reported, citing information from the national security agency. Taiwanese Lee Meng-chu and Lee Henley Hu Xiang of Belize were arrested by the national security authorities in the southern Guangdong province, the local paper said in two reports published Saturday.(Updates with clashes in fourth paragraph, subway plans for Monday in sixth.)To contact the reporter on this story: Manuel Baigorri in Hong Kong at mbaigorri@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.net, Linus Chua, Tony CzuczkaFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 64/79   Lebanese army separates rival protests near president palace
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Lebanon’s armed forces have deployed near the presidential palace east of Beirut to prevent friction between rival Lebanese protesters as the stalemate over forming a crisis government continues.  Anti-government protesters had called for a rally Sunday outside the Presidential Palace in Baabda to press President Michel Aoun to formally begin the process of forming a new government.  Prime Minister Saad Hariri resigned over a month ago amid nationwide protests accusing the political elite of corruption and mismanagement of the economy.

    Lebanon’s armed forces have deployed near the presidential palace east of Beirut to prevent friction between rival Lebanese protesters as the stalemate over forming a crisis government continues. Anti-government protesters had called for a rally Sunday outside the Presidential Palace in Baabda to press President Michel Aoun to formally begin the process of forming a new government. Prime Minister Saad Hariri resigned over a month ago amid nationwide protests accusing the political elite of corruption and mismanagement of the economy.


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  • 65/79   Merkel's coalition in peril as new leader of SPD calls union 'crap for democracy'
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Germany’s ruling coalition is facing collapse after the new leader of the junior partner to Angela Merkel’s Christian Democratic Union (CDU) branded the parties' long-standing arrangement “crap for democracy”.  The leftist duo of Saskia Esken and Norbert Walter-Borjans won a shock victory to take control of the centre-left Social Democrats (SPD) party on Saturday, defeating a centrist pair led by finance minister Olaf Scholz. Their victory in the membership poll will soon be formalised by party delegates. Speaking to broadcaster ARD, Ms Esken held her cards close to her chest on whether she intends to walk out on the coalition, something that would accelerate the end of Chancellor Merkel’s career. But she made clear that she saw the coalition as damaging her party and German democracy, with both parties having to make compromises that alienated supporters.  “We’ve seen both big parties lose a lot due to the coalition, so we both have an interest in governing in other alliances,” Ms Esken said. The Chancellor could be forced into early retirement Credit: REX The new leadership will set out their plans at the party conference over the coming weekend, where delegates will vote on several decisions key to the country’s immediate future including whether to stay in the coalition until 2021. Ms Esken has suggested she would be willing to stay in the pact but only if the CDU agreed to half a trillion euros in public spending on key infrastructure over the next decade. Such a huge spending package would mean blowing up the centre-right party's hallowed “schwarze null” spending rules, which commit Berlin to maintaining a balanced budget. With Germany’s economy stagnating, a growing chorus of economists and left-wing politicians have called for the government to make use of historically low interest rates and increase investment in roads, rail infrastructure and schools via new debts. But the CDU’s economic council warned the party leadership on Sunday not to “give in to the SPD’s utopian demands only for the sake of staying in power.” Mrs Merkel's would-be successor, Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer, urged the Social Democrats on Sunday to remain part of the government  but ruled out re-negotiating their agreement. “For the CDU it is quite clear: we stand by this coalition,” she said. “We stand by this coalition on the basis that has been negotiated.“ Several CDU heavyweights also made clear they were in no mood to talk, with one dismissing the SPD as being in “self-destruction mode.”  If the SPD walk out, the most likely outcome would be the CDU going it alone as a minority government under Ms Merkel or new elections being called for next year. Such an outcome would mean the end of the veteran Chancellor's rule. The power struggle inside the SPD is set to continue at party conference where moderates, who had to swallow an 8 percent defeat for their candidates, will seek to balance the leftists’ new strength by winning elections for the vacant deputy leader positions. The SPD has been without a leader since June when Andrea Nahles resigned after a poor showing in the European elections and months of desperate polling figures.

    Germany’s ruling coalition is facing collapse after the new leader of the junior partner to Angela Merkel’s Christian Democratic Union (CDU) branded the parties' long-standing arrangement “crap for democracy”.  The leftist duo of Saskia Esken and Norbert Walter-Borjans won a shock victory to take control of the centre-left Social Democrats (SPD) party on Saturday, defeating a centrist pair led by finance minister Olaf Scholz. Their victory in the membership poll will soon be formalised by party delegates. Speaking to broadcaster ARD, Ms Esken held her cards close to her chest on whether she intends to walk out on the coalition, something that would accelerate the end of Chancellor Merkel’s career. But she made clear that she saw the coalition as damaging her party and German democracy, with both parties having to make compromises that alienated supporters.  “We’ve seen both big parties lose a lot due to the coalition, so we both have an interest in governing in other alliances,” Ms Esken said. The Chancellor could be forced into early retirement Credit: REX The new leadership will set out their plans at the party conference over the coming weekend, where delegates will vote on several decisions key to the country’s immediate future including whether to stay in the coalition until 2021. Ms Esken has suggested she would be willing to stay in the pact but only if the CDU agreed to half a trillion euros in public spending on key infrastructure over the next decade. Such a huge spending package would mean blowing up the centre-right party's hallowed “schwarze null” spending rules, which commit Berlin to maintaining a balanced budget. With Germany’s economy stagnating, a growing chorus of economists and left-wing politicians have called for the government to make use of historically low interest rates and increase investment in roads, rail infrastructure and schools via new debts. But the CDU’s economic council warned the party leadership on Sunday not to “give in to the SPD’s utopian demands only for the sake of staying in power.” Mrs Merkel's would-be successor, Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer, urged the Social Democrats on Sunday to remain part of the government  but ruled out re-negotiating their agreement. “For the CDU it is quite clear: we stand by this coalition,” she said. “We stand by this coalition on the basis that has been negotiated.“ Several CDU heavyweights also made clear they were in no mood to talk, with one dismissing the SPD as being in “self-destruction mode.”  If the SPD walk out, the most likely outcome would be the CDU going it alone as a minority government under Ms Merkel or new elections being called for next year. Such an outcome would mean the end of the veteran Chancellor's rule. The power struggle inside the SPD is set to continue at party conference where moderates, who had to swallow an 8 percent defeat for their candidates, will seek to balance the leftists’ new strength by winning elections for the vacant deputy leader positions. The SPD has been without a leader since June when Andrea Nahles resigned after a poor showing in the European elections and months of desperate polling figures.


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  • 66/79   Students Fainting From Hunger in Venezuela's Failing School System
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    BOCA DE UCHIRE, Venezuela -- Hundreds of children filed into their school courtyard to hear a local Catholic bishop lead prayers for their education."We pray for the youths who are on the streets and can't come to school," said Bishop Jorge Quintero, addressing the Augusto D'Aubeterre Lyceum school in the beach town of Boca de Uchire on a steamy morning in October. "There are a lot of them."By the end of the 15-minute ceremony, five children had fainted and two of them were whisked away in an ambulance.The faintings at the primary school have become a regular occurrence because so many students come to class without eating breakfast, or dinner the night before. In other schools, children want to know if there is any food before they decide whether to go at all."You can't educate skeletal and hungry people," said Maira Marin, a teacher and union leader in Boca de Uchire.Venezuela's devastating six-year economic crisis is hollowing out the school system -- once the pride of the oil-rich nation and, for decades, an engine that made the country one of the most upwardly mobile in the region. These schools in the past provided children even in remote areas with a solid shot at the country's best universities, which in turn opened doors to top U.S. schools and a place among Venezuela's elite.Hunger is just one of the many problems chipping away at them now. Millions of Venezuelans have fled the country in recent years, depleting the ranks of students and teachers alike. Many of the educators who remain have been driven from the profession, their wages made nearly worthless by years of relentless hyperinflation. In some places, barely 100 students show up at schools that once taught thousands.The collapse of the education system in Venezuela is not only condemning an entire generation to poverty, but risks setting the country's development back decades and severely stunting its growth potential, experts and teachers say."An entire generation is being left behind," said Luis Bravo, an education researcher at the Central University of Venezuela in Caracas. "Today's education system doesn't allow children to become meaningful members of society."The government stopped publishing education statistics in 2014. But visits to more than a dozen schools in five Venezuelan states and interviews with dozens of teachers and parents indicate that attendance has plummeted this year.Many schools are shuttering in the once-wealthy nation as malnourished children and teachers who earn almost nothing abandon classrooms to scratch out a living on the streets or flee abroad.It is a major embarrassment for the self-proclaimed socialist government, which has long preached social inclusion. The situation is in sharp contrast to countries that Venezuelan leaders have held up as role models -- Cuba and Russia -- both of which have managed to shelter the primary education system from the worst effects of a comparable downturn in the 1990s.Students began skipping school in Venezuela shortly after President Nicolas Maduro came to power in 2013. A fall in the price of the country's main export, crude oil, combined with Maduro's ill-timed effort to double down on price and currency controls sent the economy into a recession from which it has not yet emerged.Some Venezuelan children are staying home because many schools have stopped providing meals or because their parents can no longer afford uniforms, school utensils or bus fares. Others have joined parents in one of the world's biggest displacement crises: About 4 million Venezuelans have fled the country since 2015, according to the United Nations.Thousands of the country's 550,000 teachers did not show up for classes when schools reopened in September, according to the national teachers union, ditching their $8-a-month wages to try their luck abroad or in Venezuela's booming illegal gold mines.In Venezuela's most-populous state, Zulia, up to 60% of about 65,000 teachers have deserted in recent years, according to estimates by Alexander Castro, head of the local teachers union."They tell us that they prefer painting nails for a few dollars than work for a minimum wage," Castro said.To keep schools going, the remaining teachers often teach all of the subjects or combine different school years in one classroom. Nearly all of the one dozen schools visited have slashed working hours; some open for only a day or two a week.In the village of Parmana in Venezuela's central plains, only 4 out of 150 registered students attended school in October. The four students, of varying ages, sat in the same dilapidated classroom without electricity, practicing everything from the alphabet to algebra as the school's sole remaining teacher tried to encourage them with a dejected smile.The rest of the village's children have joined their parents in the fields and fishing boats to help feed their families.In the country's second biggest city of Maracaibo, a sign outside a dilapidated school without electricity recently read: "Please come to classes, even without uniforms." The children ask teachers at the entrance if there is food before deciding whether to come in.Maracaibo's biggest school no longer has any functioning bathrooms. It was designed for 3,000 students; only 100 show up.Half of the teachers didn't return to work after the summer holidays to a school in the town of Santa Barbara outside the capital of Caracas, forcing the principal to enlist parent volunteers to keep the classes going.On the other side of the capital, in the town of Rio Chico, most of the rooms in a local school are boarded up for lack of students and teachers. When the remaining pupils arrive, they first ask the whereabouts of the school's cook, the teachers said.Maduro's mentor and predecessor, Hugo Chavez, made the expansion of public education one of the pillars of his popular "21st Century Socialism" campaign.For a decade until 2013, the country made steady improvements in school enrollment thanks to generous school meals and handouts of food, utensils and cash to parents and children. Chavez built hundreds of new schools.Chavez's populist policies, however, had focused more on the quantity of students in school rather than the quality of the education. Then, as the country's coffers ran dry, his government's educational progress unraveled.As attendance collapsed, Maduro continued to claim his government was focused on education spending despite the "brutal economic war" waged by his enemies."In Venezuela, not one school has closed or will ever close, not one classroom," the president said in a televised address in April. "We will never deny access to education."To boost the ranks of teachers, Maduro in August promised to send thousands of the ruling party's youth members to the classrooms. Education experts say few of these untrained activists will add any pedagogical value or even make it to schools.At the same time, Venezuela's pool of real teachers is drying up. The number of graduates at Venezuela's main teacher training center, the Libertador Experimental Pedagogical University, fell 70% from 2014 to 2018.Venezuelan teachers have been among the worst affected by the country's economic collapse, as gross domestic product shrank by two thirds since 2013 and minimum wages fell to $8 a month.Maduro's de facto dollarization of the economy this year allowed many public employees in Venezuela to supplement their official salaries in nearly worthless local currency by charging in dollars for their services.His backdoor liberalization of Venezuela's controlled economy, however, brought little benefit to teachers in poor communities, where pupils' families have little access to foreign currency.In Boca de Uchire, the Caruto family has stopped sending its nine children to a nearby school when the cafeteria doesn't open."I can't send them to class hungry," said Jose Luis Caruto, a 36-year-old unemployed father of two.His sister, Yuxi Caruto, 17, was the last in the family to drop out from school, discouraged by the unaffordable bus fare. She tried taking up studies again at a local community center, but its teachers stopped showing up after two weeks of classes.She now spends her time taking care of her 1-year-old son."I want to learn to do the math and read and write rapidly. I'm scared that when my son grows and starts asking questions, I won't know how to respond. But right now, we don't even have enough to eat."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company

    BOCA DE UCHIRE, Venezuela -- Hundreds of children filed into their school courtyard to hear a local Catholic bishop lead prayers for their education."We pray for the youths who are on the streets and can't come to school," said Bishop Jorge Quintero, addressing the Augusto D'Aubeterre Lyceum school in the beach town of Boca de Uchire on a steamy morning in October. "There are a lot of them."By the end of the 15-minute ceremony, five children had fainted and two of them were whisked away in an ambulance.The faintings at the primary school have become a regular occurrence because so many students come to class without eating breakfast, or dinner the night before. In other schools, children want to know if there is any food before they decide whether to go at all."You can't educate skeletal and hungry people," said Maira Marin, a teacher and union leader in Boca de Uchire.Venezuela's devastating six-year economic crisis is hollowing out the school system -- once the pride of the oil-rich nation and, for decades, an engine that made the country one of the most upwardly mobile in the region. These schools in the past provided children even in remote areas with a solid shot at the country's best universities, which in turn opened doors to top U.S. schools and a place among Venezuela's elite.Hunger is just one of the many problems chipping away at them now. Millions of Venezuelans have fled the country in recent years, depleting the ranks of students and teachers alike. Many of the educators who remain have been driven from the profession, their wages made nearly worthless by years of relentless hyperinflation. In some places, barely 100 students show up at schools that once taught thousands.The collapse of the education system in Venezuela is not only condemning an entire generation to poverty, but risks setting the country's development back decades and severely stunting its growth potential, experts and teachers say."An entire generation is being left behind," said Luis Bravo, an education researcher at the Central University of Venezuela in Caracas. "Today's education system doesn't allow children to become meaningful members of society."The government stopped publishing education statistics in 2014. But visits to more than a dozen schools in five Venezuelan states and interviews with dozens of teachers and parents indicate that attendance has plummeted this year.Many schools are shuttering in the once-wealthy nation as malnourished children and teachers who earn almost nothing abandon classrooms to scratch out a living on the streets or flee abroad.It is a major embarrassment for the self-proclaimed socialist government, which has long preached social inclusion. The situation is in sharp contrast to countries that Venezuelan leaders have held up as role models -- Cuba and Russia -- both of which have managed to shelter the primary education system from the worst effects of a comparable downturn in the 1990s.Students began skipping school in Venezuela shortly after President Nicolas Maduro came to power in 2013. A fall in the price of the country's main export, crude oil, combined with Maduro's ill-timed effort to double down on price and currency controls sent the economy into a recession from which it has not yet emerged.Some Venezuelan children are staying home because many schools have stopped providing meals or because their parents can no longer afford uniforms, school utensils or bus fares. Others have joined parents in one of the world's biggest displacement crises: About 4 million Venezuelans have fled the country since 2015, according to the United Nations.Thousands of the country's 550,000 teachers did not show up for classes when schools reopened in September, according to the national teachers union, ditching their $8-a-month wages to try their luck abroad or in Venezuela's booming illegal gold mines.In Venezuela's most-populous state, Zulia, up to 60% of about 65,000 teachers have deserted in recent years, according to estimates by Alexander Castro, head of the local teachers union."They tell us that they prefer painting nails for a few dollars than work for a minimum wage," Castro said.To keep schools going, the remaining teachers often teach all of the subjects or combine different school years in one classroom. Nearly all of the one dozen schools visited have slashed working hours; some open for only a day or two a week.In the village of Parmana in Venezuela's central plains, only 4 out of 150 registered students attended school in October. The four students, of varying ages, sat in the same dilapidated classroom without electricity, practicing everything from the alphabet to algebra as the school's sole remaining teacher tried to encourage them with a dejected smile.The rest of the village's children have joined their parents in the fields and fishing boats to help feed their families.In the country's second biggest city of Maracaibo, a sign outside a dilapidated school without electricity recently read: "Please come to classes, even without uniforms." The children ask teachers at the entrance if there is food before deciding whether to come in.Maracaibo's biggest school no longer has any functioning bathrooms. It was designed for 3,000 students; only 100 show up.Half of the teachers didn't return to work after the summer holidays to a school in the town of Santa Barbara outside the capital of Caracas, forcing the principal to enlist parent volunteers to keep the classes going.On the other side of the capital, in the town of Rio Chico, most of the rooms in a local school are boarded up for lack of students and teachers. When the remaining pupils arrive, they first ask the whereabouts of the school's cook, the teachers said.Maduro's mentor and predecessor, Hugo Chavez, made the expansion of public education one of the pillars of his popular "21st Century Socialism" campaign.For a decade until 2013, the country made steady improvements in school enrollment thanks to generous school meals and handouts of food, utensils and cash to parents and children. Chavez built hundreds of new schools.Chavez's populist policies, however, had focused more on the quantity of students in school rather than the quality of the education. Then, as the country's coffers ran dry, his government's educational progress unraveled.As attendance collapsed, Maduro continued to claim his government was focused on education spending despite the "brutal economic war" waged by his enemies."In Venezuela, not one school has closed or will ever close, not one classroom," the president said in a televised address in April. "We will never deny access to education."To boost the ranks of teachers, Maduro in August promised to send thousands of the ruling party's youth members to the classrooms. Education experts say few of these untrained activists will add any pedagogical value or even make it to schools.At the same time, Venezuela's pool of real teachers is drying up. The number of graduates at Venezuela's main teacher training center, the Libertador Experimental Pedagogical University, fell 70% from 2014 to 2018.Venezuelan teachers have been among the worst affected by the country's economic collapse, as gross domestic product shrank by two thirds since 2013 and minimum wages fell to $8 a month.Maduro's de facto dollarization of the economy this year allowed many public employees in Venezuela to supplement their official salaries in nearly worthless local currency by charging in dollars for their services.His backdoor liberalization of Venezuela's controlled economy, however, brought little benefit to teachers in poor communities, where pupils' families have little access to foreign currency.In Boca de Uchire, the Caruto family has stopped sending its nine children to a nearby school when the cafeteria doesn't open."I can't send them to class hungry," said Jose Luis Caruto, a 36-year-old unemployed father of two.His sister, Yuxi Caruto, 17, was the last in the family to drop out from school, discouraged by the unaffordable bus fare. She tried taking up studies again at a local community center, but its teachers stopped showing up after two weeks of classes.She now spends her time taking care of her 1-year-old son."I want to learn to do the math and read and write rapidly. I'm scared that when my son grows and starts asking questions, I won't know how to respond. But right now, we don't even have enough to eat."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company


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  • 67/79   Israel plans new settler homes in flashpoint West Bank city
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Israel’s new defense minister has ordered plans for new settler housing in the volatile West Bank city of Hebron.  In a letter sent to defense officials Sunday, pro-settler Defense Minister Naftali Bennett called for “planning processes to be advanced” for new Jewish settler housing.  Enlarging the Jewish population in Hebron is likely to deepen tensions there.

    Israel’s new defense minister has ordered plans for new settler housing in the volatile West Bank city of Hebron. In a letter sent to defense officials Sunday, pro-settler Defense Minister Naftali Bennett called for “planning processes to be advanced” for new Jewish settler housing. Enlarging the Jewish population in Hebron is likely to deepen tensions there.


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  • 68/79   EU’s Von Der Leyen to Pose a Climate Challenge to China, U.S.
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- The European Union will challenge the U.S. and China on climate-change targets as the fight against global warming becomes a major international issue, according to new European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen.The EU is considering a target to bring emission levels down to zero by the middle of this century in its bid to lead the push to reduce greenhouse gases. Von der Leyen will pitch this plan to envoys from more than 200 nations on Monday when she travels to Madrid to take part in the opening of the United Nations climate talks. It will be her first event in the role, in which she started her five-year term on Sunday.“The European Union wants to be the first climate-neutral continent by 2050,” she told reporters on Sunday in Brussels. “Europe is leading in this topic and we know that we have to be ambitious for our planet but also to be a front-runner.”The climate neutrality goal is estimated to require an extra 175 billion euros ($193 billion) to 290 billion euros a year in investment for energy systems and infrastructure from 2030.Von der Leyen set the Green Deal project as a top priority for her tenure. It would affect areas from energy production to transport and agriculture, putting Europe in sync with the objectives of the Paris Agreement to limit the rise in the global temperature.The move would also put the EU ahead of other major emitters, including China, India and Japan, which have yet to translate their voluntary Paris pledges into binding national measures. U.S. President Donald Trump withdrew from the Paris agreement in 2017.The climate policy will be part of the “geopolitical commission” concept von der Leyen intends to pursue to ensure Europe’s voice is heard on the same level as the likes of China and the U.S. The strategy will encourage other countries to follow suit by flagging options like a carbon tariff to be imposed on nations which fall behind.Von der Leyen held several calls on her first day with a number of leaders, including Chinese Premier Li Keqiang.“The good news is that China says that they are aware of climate change,” von der Leyen said. “The fact that China is introducing an emissions trading system shows that it is also a topic that is high on the agenda in China.”More details on the Green Deal are expected on Dec. 11, including a document outlining plans for a Just Transition Fund designed to help the countries impacted the most by the emission-reduction policy.To contact the reporter on this story: Ewa Krukowska in Brussels at ekrukowska@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Reed Landberg at landberg@bloomberg.net, Sam Unsted, James AmottFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- The European Union will challenge the U.S. and China on climate-change targets as the fight against global warming becomes a major international issue, according to new European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen.The EU is considering a target to bring emission levels down to zero by the middle of this century in its bid to lead the push to reduce greenhouse gases. Von der Leyen will pitch this plan to envoys from more than 200 nations on Monday when she travels to Madrid to take part in the opening of the United Nations climate talks. It will be her first event in the role, in which she started her five-year term on Sunday.“The European Union wants to be the first climate-neutral continent by 2050,” she told reporters on Sunday in Brussels. “Europe is leading in this topic and we know that we have to be ambitious for our planet but also to be a front-runner.”The climate neutrality goal is estimated to require an extra 175 billion euros ($193 billion) to 290 billion euros a year in investment for energy systems and infrastructure from 2030.Von der Leyen set the Green Deal project as a top priority for her tenure. It would affect areas from energy production to transport and agriculture, putting Europe in sync with the objectives of the Paris Agreement to limit the rise in the global temperature.The move would also put the EU ahead of other major emitters, including China, India and Japan, which have yet to translate their voluntary Paris pledges into binding national measures. U.S. President Donald Trump withdrew from the Paris agreement in 2017.The climate policy will be part of the “geopolitical commission” concept von der Leyen intends to pursue to ensure Europe’s voice is heard on the same level as the likes of China and the U.S. The strategy will encourage other countries to follow suit by flagging options like a carbon tariff to be imposed on nations which fall behind.Von der Leyen held several calls on her first day with a number of leaders, including Chinese Premier Li Keqiang.“The good news is that China says that they are aware of climate change,” von der Leyen said. “The fact that China is introducing an emissions trading system shows that it is also a topic that is high on the agenda in China.”More details on the Green Deal are expected on Dec. 11, including a document outlining plans for a Just Transition Fund designed to help the countries impacted the most by the emission-reduction policy.To contact the reporter on this story: Ewa Krukowska in Brussels at ekrukowska@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Reed Landberg at landberg@bloomberg.net, Sam Unsted, James AmottFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 69/79   Chuck Todd to GOP Senator: You’re Selling the Same Argument as Putin!
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    A week after claiming that he didn’t know whether Russia or Ukraine was responsible for hacking the DNC server during the 2016 election, Sen. John Kennedy (R-LA) left Meet the Press anchor Chuck Todd astounded when he accused the former president of Ukraine of working for Hillary Clinton’s campaign.At the top of their interview on Sunday, Todd brought up Kennedy’s eventual walk-back of his DNC remarks, asking the Louisiana lawmaker why he backtracked.“Well, Chris Wallace was interviewing me and he asked me a question. I answered it. I thought he had asked me if Ukraine had meddled in the 2016 election,” the Republican senator replied, reiterating previous excuses he had given. “He didn’t, he asked me if Ukraine was responsible for hacking the DNC computer, which is, of course, a form of meddling. I went back and looked at the transcript and I realized Chris was right and I was wrong so I said I was wrong.”The NBC News host went on to note that the main criticism Kennedy has faced in recent days is that he is conflating what Russia and Ukraine did during the 2016 election, stating that Kennedy appears to be doing President Trump’s “dirty work” for him.Kennedy, meanwhile, insisted that there was sufficient evidence that Ukraine meddled in the 2016 election on behalf of Clinton, citing a handful of articles to claim that a number of Ukrainian officials “meddled in the election on social media and otherwise.” “In fact, in December of 2018, a Ukrainian court ruled that Ukrainian officials had violated Ukrainian law by meddling in our election and that was reported in The New York Times,” Kennedy added, referencing a court ruling that the leaking of the so-called “black ledger” on ex-Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort was against the law. (The court has since canceled that ruling.)Todd would eventually confront Kennedy on the U.S. intelligence community recently briefing lawmakers that attempts to frame Ukraine for Russian election meddling was actually “a Russian intelligence propaganda campaign in order to get people like you to say these things about Ukraine," a briefing Kennedy claimed he didn't attend.“When does opinion become fact?” Todd wondered aloud. “Does 17 intelligence services saying it, does every western intelligence ally saying Russia did this—I get sort of confused at what point is it no longer an opinion for you?”After once again noting that a Ukrainian court “smacked down several Ukrainian officials for meddling in our elections,” Kennedy then made a claim that gobsmacked the Meet the Press host.“Russia was very aggressive and they’re much more sophisticated,” the conservative senator declared. “But the fact that Russia was so aggressive does not exclude the fact that President Poroshenko actively worked for Secretary Clinton.”“Actively worked for Secretary Clinton?! My goodness, wait a minute, Senator Kennedy,” Todd shot back. “You now have the president of Ukraine saying he worked for the Democratic nominee for president. C’mon. You realize the only other person selling this argument outside the United States is this man, Vladimir Putin!”The NBC host then highlighted the Russian president recently boasting that “nobody is accusing us anymore of interfering in U.S. election” but instead blaming Ukraine.Todd further pushed back on Kennedy’s assertion, asking him if he believed that Ukrainian officials criticizing Trump during the election over his endorsement of Russia’s annexation of Crimea was equivalent to Russia’s hacking.Kennedy, for his part, said that there would be no harm allowing President Trump to “introduce evidence” that could support these assertions since Trump “has a demonstrated record fighting foreign corruption.”Fox News Host Hits Trump for Attacking Chris Wallace: You’re ‘Not Entitled to Praise’Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

    A week after claiming that he didn’t know whether Russia or Ukraine was responsible for hacking the DNC server during the 2016 election, Sen. John Kennedy (R-LA) left Meet the Press anchor Chuck Todd astounded when he accused the former president of Ukraine of working for Hillary Clinton’s campaign.At the top of their interview on Sunday, Todd brought up Kennedy’s eventual walk-back of his DNC remarks, asking the Louisiana lawmaker why he backtracked.“Well, Chris Wallace was interviewing me and he asked me a question. I answered it. I thought he had asked me if Ukraine had meddled in the 2016 election,” the Republican senator replied, reiterating previous excuses he had given. “He didn’t, he asked me if Ukraine was responsible for hacking the DNC computer, which is, of course, a form of meddling. I went back and looked at the transcript and I realized Chris was right and I was wrong so I said I was wrong.”The NBC News host went on to note that the main criticism Kennedy has faced in recent days is that he is conflating what Russia and Ukraine did during the 2016 election, stating that Kennedy appears to be doing President Trump’s “dirty work” for him.Kennedy, meanwhile, insisted that there was sufficient evidence that Ukraine meddled in the 2016 election on behalf of Clinton, citing a handful of articles to claim that a number of Ukrainian officials “meddled in the election on social media and otherwise.” “In fact, in December of 2018, a Ukrainian court ruled that Ukrainian officials had violated Ukrainian law by meddling in our election and that was reported in The New York Times,” Kennedy added, referencing a court ruling that the leaking of the so-called “black ledger” on ex-Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort was against the law. (The court has since canceled that ruling.)Todd would eventually confront Kennedy on the U.S. intelligence community recently briefing lawmakers that attempts to frame Ukraine for Russian election meddling was actually “a Russian intelligence propaganda campaign in order to get people like you to say these things about Ukraine," a briefing Kennedy claimed he didn't attend.“When does opinion become fact?” Todd wondered aloud. “Does 17 intelligence services saying it, does every western intelligence ally saying Russia did this—I get sort of confused at what point is it no longer an opinion for you?”After once again noting that a Ukrainian court “smacked down several Ukrainian officials for meddling in our elections,” Kennedy then made a claim that gobsmacked the Meet the Press host.“Russia was very aggressive and they’re much more sophisticated,” the conservative senator declared. “But the fact that Russia was so aggressive does not exclude the fact that President Poroshenko actively worked for Secretary Clinton.”“Actively worked for Secretary Clinton?! My goodness, wait a minute, Senator Kennedy,” Todd shot back. “You now have the president of Ukraine saying he worked for the Democratic nominee for president. C’mon. You realize the only other person selling this argument outside the United States is this man, Vladimir Putin!”The NBC host then highlighted the Russian president recently boasting that “nobody is accusing us anymore of interfering in U.S. election” but instead blaming Ukraine.Todd further pushed back on Kennedy’s assertion, asking him if he believed that Ukrainian officials criticizing Trump during the election over his endorsement of Russia’s annexation of Crimea was equivalent to Russia’s hacking.Kennedy, for his part, said that there would be no harm allowing President Trump to “introduce evidence” that could support these assertions since Trump “has a demonstrated record fighting foreign corruption.”Fox News Host Hits Trump for Attacking Chris Wallace: You’re ‘Not Entitled to Praise’Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


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  • 70/79   Trump turns 'very routine' physical into attack on media
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    President Trump lashed out at the media Tuesday over reporting about his sudden trip to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center last weekend.

    President Trump lashed out at the media Tuesday over reporting about his sudden trip to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center last weekend.


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  • 71/79   5 Turkey Cooking Tips Will Guarantee You Have the Perfect Bird This Holidays
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    There's no need to wing it at Thanksgiving this year.

    There's no need to wing it at Thanksgiving this year.


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  • 72/79   9 Easy Ways to Make Your Jack-o'-Lanterns Last Longer
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    A little bleach goes a long way.

    A little bleach goes a long way.


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  • 73/79   Is It Time for a Medication Reconciliation?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    More than half of adult Americans regularly take at least one prescription drug, according to a recent Consumer Reports nationally representative survey. And for those who take any medication on ...

    More than half of adult Americans regularly take at least one prescription drug, according to a recent Consumer Reports nationally representative survey. And for those who take any medication on ...


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  • 74/79   Brown-Bag Lunches for Kids With Food Allergies
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...


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  • 75/79   What to Feed Your Family When the Power Goes Out
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...


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  • 76/79   Try These Healthy Snack Ideas for Kids
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...

    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...


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  • 77/79   The 9 Best Jobs for Teachers To Make Some Cash During the Summer Break
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.


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  • 78/79   How to Spot and Avoid Algal Blooms
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...


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  • 79/79   Get These 4 Vaccines for College
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If your child is a college student—or soon to be one—making sure he or she is fully vaccinated is critically important, especially for those who will be living in a dorm or other shared space. Th...

    If your child is a college student—or soon to be one—making sure he or she is fully vaccinated is critically important, especially for those who will be living in a dorm or other shared space. Th...


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