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News Slideshows (12/02/2019 15 hours)


  • 1/79   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


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    Press Review


    Steve Bullock   Lisa Page   Brazil and Argentina   Montana Gov   Alissa   Will & Grace   Argentina and Brazil   Master Sword   run for senate   Snow Day   Juan Williams   The Spirit of America   
  • 2/79   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


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  • 3/79   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


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  • 4/79   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


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  • 5/79   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


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  • 6/79   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


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  • 7/79   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


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  • 8/79   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


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  • 9/79   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


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  • 10/79   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


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  • 11/79   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


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  • 12/79   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


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  • 13/79   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


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  • 14/79   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named.  Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does.  At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


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  • 15/79   PHOTOS: Fluorescent turtle embryo wins forty-fifth annual Nikon Small World Competition

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.


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  • 16/79   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


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  • 17/79   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


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  • 18/79   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


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  • 19/79   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


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  • 20/79   Robotics for Education - ST Robotics Readies Engineering Students for Robotics Careers
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    ST Robotics software and hardware solutions are providing students with hands-on robotics training. Most recently, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology purchased four more ST R12 industrial robots, for a total of 12 ST Robotics' five and six-axis industry-standard robots now being used in their college classrooms.

    ST Robotics software and hardware solutions are providing students with hands-on robotics training. Most recently, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology purchased four more ST R12 industrial robots, for a total of 12 ST Robotics' five and six-axis industry-standard robots now being used in their college classrooms.


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  • 21/79   McDermott to Access $350 Million Tranche B Financing Under Superpriority Senior Secured Credit Facility
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    McDermott International, Inc. (NYSE:MDR) ("McDermott" or the "Company") announced today that it has been granted access to the second tranche ("Tranche B") of the $1.7 billion superpriority senior secured credit facility (the "Agreement") announced on October 21, 2019. Tranche B provides McDermott with a $250 million Term Loan Facility and a $100 million Letter of Credit Facility. The Company expects to utilize the amounts available under Tranche B to continue financing working capital and support the issuance of required performance guarantees on new projects.

    McDermott International, Inc. (NYSE:MDR) ("McDermott" or the "Company") announced today that it has been granted access to the second tranche ("Tranche B") of the $1.7 billion superpriority senior secured credit facility (the "Agreement") announced on October 21, 2019. Tranche B provides McDermott with a $250 million Term Loan Facility and a $100 million Letter of Credit Facility. The Company expects to utilize the amounts available under Tranche B to continue financing working capital and support the issuance of required performance guarantees on new projects.


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  • 22/79   CSA Medical, Inc. Announces European Approval for its RejuvenAir® System for COPD Patients with Chronic Bronchitis
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    CSA Medical, Inc., today announced that it has received CE Mark approval for its RejuvenAir® System for the treatment of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) with Chronic Bronchitis (CB). The RejuvenAir System is a revolutionary cryosurgical device which applies Metered Cryospray ("MCS") of liquid nitrogen at -196?C to targeted areas within the lungs through a minimally invasive bronchoscopic procedure. The extreme cold flash freezes damaged surface area lung cells which induces a rejuvenative healing process.

    CSA Medical, Inc., today announced that it has received CE Mark approval for its RejuvenAir® System for the treatment of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) with Chronic Bronchitis (CB). The RejuvenAir System is a revolutionary cryosurgical device which applies Metered Cryospray ("MCS") of liquid nitrogen at -196?C to targeted areas within the lungs through a minimally invasive bronchoscopic procedure. The extreme cold flash freezes damaged surface area lung cells which induces a rejuvenative healing process.


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  • 23/79   Valor Mineral Management Welcomes New Accounting Manager
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today, Valor Mineral Management, LLC ("Valor") a mineral management and advisory firm based in Fort Worth, Midland and Abilene, Texas, announces the addition of Adam Powell, CPA as an Accounting Manager.

    Today, Valor Mineral Management, LLC ("Valor") a mineral management and advisory firm based in Fort Worth, Midland and Abilene, Texas, announces the addition of Adam Powell, CPA as an Accounting Manager.


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  • 24/79   DOLL Inaugurates a New Robot Laboratory to Study Developmental Learning
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The new laboratory, L.A.I.R., Laboratory for Affective and Independent Robotics, is a space where robots can learn by exploring their environment. Long term experiments involving robots with differing capabilities and sizes will inhabit this space where they can interact with each other, and explore how to interact with objects in the laboratory.

    The new laboratory, L.A.I.R., Laboratory for Affective and Independent Robotics, is a space where robots can learn by exploring their environment. Long term experiments involving robots with differing capabilities and sizes will inhabit this space where they can interact with each other, and explore how to interact with objects in the laboratory.


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  • 25/79   Prominent Idaho executives, kids among 9 killed in South Dakota plane crash
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    A plane crash near Chamberlain, South Dakota, killed nine members of an eastern Idaho Falls family visiting South Dakota for a weekend hunting trip.

    A plane crash near Chamberlain, South Dakota, killed nine members of an eastern Idaho Falls family visiting South Dakota for a weekend hunting trip.


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  • 26/79   Chile’s Social Upheaval Has Economic Impact of Mega Quake
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Explore what’s moving the global economy in the new season of the Stephanomics podcast. Subscribe via Apple Podcast, Spotify or Pocket Cast.Chile’s social upheaval has had a bigger impact on the economy than the mega earthquake and tsunami that struck the country in 2010, devastating much of the central region.The Imacec index, a proxy for gross domestic product, tumbled 5.4% in October from the month before, larger than the 4.1% drop in March 2010 that followed the sixth-largest earthquake ever recorded in the world. From a year earlier, the economy contracted 3.4% in October, compared with the 0.5% decline forecast by economists.Violent protests that broke out on Oct. 18 have forced the closure of shops, paralyzed much of the public transport system and led many people to cut short their working hours. Business confidence has nosedived. Chileans wake to almost daily reports of which shops have been looted, ransacked or burnt.“The collapse of economic activity in the second half of October was in the order of 10%,” Sebastian Cerda, head of research at Econsult Capital, told the Pauta Bloomberg radio show. “This is much worse than the collapse after the earthquake.” Chile’s central bank has brought forward its next monetary policy decision by two days to Dec. 4 to provide “timely information” about the economy following weeks of unrest.Chile Brings Forward Rate Decision as Social Unrest Hits EconomyInterest-rate swaps currently show less than 50% chance of another rate cut, after the central bank lowered its key policy rate to 1.75% in prior months.The earthquake and ensuing tsunami at the end of February 2010 cut electricity to 93% of the population, killed more than 500 people, and was felt over 1,000 kilometers away in southern Peru. At magnitude 8.8, it was the sixth largest in history. Still, the economy bounded back in April as the country started to rebuild. That is unlikely to be the case now.“The reality is that we are going to have two quarter of consecutive declines,” Cerda said. October’s month-on-month decline in the Imacec was the biggest since at least 1996, while the year-on-year drop was the largest in a decade.The central bank cited declines in manufacturing as well as a range of services including education, transportation, restaurants and hotels. Excluding mining, economic activity fell 4% in October from a year prior, also the biggest decline on record.(Updates with analyst comment starting in the fourth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Javiera Baeza and Rafael Mendes.To contact the reporters on this story: John Quigley in Lima at jquigley8@bloomberg.net;Philip Sanders in Santiago at psanders@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Walter Brandimarte at wbrandimarte@bloomberg.net, Matthew Malinowski, James AttwoodFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Explore what’s moving the global economy in the new season of the Stephanomics podcast. Subscribe via Apple Podcast, Spotify or Pocket Cast.Chile’s social upheaval has had a bigger impact on the economy than the mega earthquake and tsunami that struck the country in 2010, devastating much of the central region.The Imacec index, a proxy for gross domestic product, tumbled 5.4% in October from the month before, larger than the 4.1% drop in March 2010 that followed the sixth-largest earthquake ever recorded in the world. From a year earlier, the economy contracted 3.4% in October, compared with the 0.5% decline forecast by economists.Violent protests that broke out on Oct. 18 have forced the closure of shops, paralyzed much of the public transport system and led many people to cut short their working hours. Business confidence has nosedived. Chileans wake to almost daily reports of which shops have been looted, ransacked or burnt.“The collapse of economic activity in the second half of October was in the order of 10%,” Sebastian Cerda, head of research at Econsult Capital, told the Pauta Bloomberg radio show. “This is much worse than the collapse after the earthquake.” Chile’s central bank has brought forward its next monetary policy decision by two days to Dec. 4 to provide “timely information” about the economy following weeks of unrest.Chile Brings Forward Rate Decision as Social Unrest Hits EconomyInterest-rate swaps currently show less than 50% chance of another rate cut, after the central bank lowered its key policy rate to 1.75% in prior months.The earthquake and ensuing tsunami at the end of February 2010 cut electricity to 93% of the population, killed more than 500 people, and was felt over 1,000 kilometers away in southern Peru. At magnitude 8.8, it was the sixth largest in history. Still, the economy bounded back in April as the country started to rebuild. That is unlikely to be the case now.“The reality is that we are going to have two quarter of consecutive declines,” Cerda said. October’s month-on-month decline in the Imacec was the biggest since at least 1996, while the year-on-year drop was the largest in a decade.The central bank cited declines in manufacturing as well as a range of services including education, transportation, restaurants and hotels. Excluding mining, economic activity fell 4% in October from a year prior, also the biggest decline on record.(Updates with analyst comment starting in the fourth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Javiera Baeza and Rafael Mendes.To contact the reporters on this story: John Quigley in Lima at jquigley8@bloomberg.net;Philip Sanders in Santiago at psanders@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Walter Brandimarte at wbrandimarte@bloomberg.net, Matthew Malinowski, James AttwoodFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 27/79   Should You Take Comfort From Insider Transactions At Axion Ventures Inc. (CVE:AXV)?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    We've lost count of how many times insiders have accumulated shares in a company that goes on to improve markedly...

    We've lost count of how many times insiders have accumulated shares in a company that goes on to improve markedly...


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  • 28/79   Global Aviation MRO Software Market Outlook 2019-2024: Analysis on Both Cloud-based & On-premises Deployment
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The "Aviation Maintenance, Repair, and Overhaul (MRO) Software Market - Growth, Trends, and Forecast (2019 - 2024)" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.

    The "Aviation Maintenance, Repair, and Overhaul (MRO) Software Market - Growth, Trends, and Forecast (2019 - 2024)" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.


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  • 29/79   Catalyst Provides Update on its Superior Offer to Acquire Hudson's Bay Company for $11 per Common Share in Cash
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The Catalyst Capital Group Inc., on behalf of investment funds managed by it, ("Catalyst") today provided an update on its offer to acquire all of the issued and outstanding shares of Hudson's Bay Company (TSX: HBC) ("HBC" or the "Company") for cash consideration of $11.00 per common share (a "Common Share").

    The Catalyst Capital Group Inc., on behalf of investment funds managed by it, ("Catalyst") today provided an update on its offer to acquire all of the issued and outstanding shares of Hudson's Bay Company (TSX: HBC) ("HBC" or the "Company") for cash consideration of $11.00 per common share (a "Common Share").


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  • 30/79   Serco Awarded New $95 Million Contract to Support U.S. Military Personnel Transition to Civilian Careers
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Serco Inc., a provider of professional, technology and management services, announced today the Company has been awarded a new contract to deliver services to the Department of Labor Veterans' Employment and Training Services Transition Assistance Program (DOL VETS TAP) for career training and counselling services to transitioning military Service Members. The contract has a one-year base period plus four 12-month option periods and is valued at $95 million, if all options are exercised.

    Serco Inc., a provider of professional, technology and management services, announced today the Company has been awarded a new contract to deliver services to the Department of Labor Veterans' Employment and Training Services Transition Assistance Program (DOL VETS TAP) for career training and counselling services to transitioning military Service Members. The contract has a one-year base period plus four 12-month option periods and is valued at $95 million, if all options are exercised.


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  • 31/79   MCIS Multichoice Insurance Services launches MCIS Flexible Travel Insurance Plan
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Multichoice Insurance Services (MCIS) in collaboration with Seven Corners Inc. has launched MCIS Flexible Travel Insurance, an international travel insurance plan with customizable medical benefits, optional emergency services and benefit enhancements for people traveling outside their home country. Local health insurance may not follow travelers when they are abroad, and the MCIS Flexible Travel Insurance plan addresses this gap in coverage.

    Multichoice Insurance Services (MCIS) in collaboration with Seven Corners Inc. has launched MCIS Flexible Travel Insurance, an international travel insurance plan with customizable medical benefits, optional emergency services and benefit enhancements for people traveling outside their home country. Local health insurance may not follow travelers when they are abroad, and the MCIS Flexible Travel Insurance plan addresses this gap in coverage.


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  • 32/79   Eco-Products® Unveils Compostable Utensils for Cutlerease™ Single-Unit Dispenser
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Eco-Products®, a Novolex™ brand, announced today the introduction of a line of compostable utensils for use in Cutlerease, a new dispenser that offers customers one fork, knife or spoon at a time.

    Eco-Products®, a Novolex™ brand, announced today the introduction of a line of compostable utensils for use in Cutlerease, a new dispenser that offers customers one fork, knife or spoon at a time.


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  • 33/79   If You Had Bought Q-Free (OB:QFR) Stock Five Years Ago, You'd Be Sitting On A 46% Loss, Today
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Ideally, your overall portfolio should beat the market average. But even the best stock picker will only win with some...

    Ideally, your overall portfolio should beat the market average. But even the best stock picker will only win with some...


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  • 34/79   Free Unless Sold: The New Online Auto Auction House for the Modern Enthusiast
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Cyber Monday marked the official launch of Awesome Joe Auctions™, the new online auction house for the modern enthusiast that offers a collection of modified, motorsport, classic, exotic, and other commodity autos for collectors, racers, and hobbyists.

    Cyber Monday marked the official launch of Awesome Joe Auctions™, the new online auction house for the modern enthusiast that offers a collection of modified, motorsport, classic, exotic, and other commodity autos for collectors, racers, and hobbyists.


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  • 35/79   Why You Should Like Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.’s (NYSE:APD) ROCE
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today we'll evaluate Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (NYSE:APD) to determine whether it could have potential as an...

    Today we'll evaluate Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (NYSE:APD) to determine whether it could have potential as an...


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  • 36/79   Maverix Metals to Acquire Royalty Portfolio from Kinross Gold
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Maverix Metals Inc. (the "Company" or "Maverix") (NYSE American: MMX, TSX: MMX) is pleased to announce that it has entered into a definitive agreement (the "Agreement") to acquire a portfolio of 25 precious metals royalties (the "Royalty Portfolio") from Kinross Gold Corporation ("Kinross").

    Maverix Metals Inc. (the "Company" or "Maverix") (NYSE American: MMX, TSX: MMX) is pleased to announce that it has entered into a definitive agreement (the "Agreement") to acquire a portfolio of 25 precious metals royalties (the "Royalty Portfolio") from Kinross Gold Corporation ("Kinross").


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  • 37/79   Automotive Motors Market to Reach $49.20 Bn, Globally, by 2026 at 5.9% CAGR: Allied Market Research
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Allied Market Research published a report, titled, "Automotive Motors Market by Type (DC Brushed Motors, Brushless DC Motors, Stepper Motors, and Traction Motors), Vehicle Type (Passenger Cars, Light Commercial Vehicles, Heavy Commercial Vehicles, BEV, PHEV, and HEV), and Application (Performance, Comfort & Convenience, and Safety & Security): Global Opportunity Analysis and Industry Forecast, 2019-2026." According to the report, the global automotive motors industry was pegged at $31.01 billion in 2018, and is estimated to reach $49.20 billion by 2026, growing at a CAGR of 5.9% from 2019 to 2026.

    Allied Market Research published a report, titled, "Automotive Motors Market by Type (DC Brushed Motors, Brushless DC Motors, Stepper Motors, and Traction Motors), Vehicle Type (Passenger Cars, Light Commercial Vehicles, Heavy Commercial Vehicles, BEV, PHEV, and HEV), and Application (Performance, Comfort & Convenience, and Safety & Security): Global Opportunity Analysis and Industry Forecast, 2019-2026." According to the report, the global automotive motors industry was pegged at $31.01 billion in 2018, and is estimated to reach $49.20 billion by 2026, growing at a CAGR of 5.9% from 2019 to 2026.


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  • 38/79   Ameresco (NYSE:AMRC) Shareholders Have Enjoyed An Impressive 174% Share Price Gain
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The worst result, after buying shares in a company (assuming no leverage), would be if you lose all the money you put...

    The worst result, after buying shares in a company (assuming no leverage), would be if you lose all the money you put...


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  • 39/79   Should We Worry About HOCHTIEF Aktiengesellschaft's (ETR:HOT) P/E Ratio?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today, we'll introduce the concept of the P/E ratio for those who are learning about investing. We'll look at HOCHTIEF...

    Today, we'll introduce the concept of the P/E ratio for those who are learning about investing. We'll look at HOCHTIEF...


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  • 40/79   Amid Heroism in London, Gnawing Fear of a Simmering Terrorism Threat
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    LONDON -- It was midafternoon when Mike Finnerty, who sells cheese at his Borough Market shop just south of London Bridge, realized that something was wrong. An unusual flow of people had suddenly gathered in front of his stall, he said, and they seemed "alarmed."What he did not know was that a man dressed in black and armed with knives had gone on a murderous rampage in a grand meeting venue called Fishmongers' Hall on the opposite side of the bridge, just north of the Thames River. But Finnerty sensed the danger Friday, he would later tell the BBC and write on Twitter.So he and another employee rushed some customers -- a couple from Vancouver and a young American man -- into a cheese refrigerator and locked the door. Then he called the police.The "operator said it was an attack and not to move," he wrote. He said he could hear shouting outside the door, but he and the group huddled together in "pretty close quarters."Susan Vinn, 57, was smoking outside her office adjacent to Fishmongers' Hall about 2 p.m., when she saw people running over the bridge. And Craig Heathcote, a filmmaker, was walking there when, he told the British broadcaster Sky News, someone said:"Get out of the way. Someone's got a knife."Saturday, Britain grappled with the aftermath of another terrorist attack in the heart of London just as the Islamic State group claimed responsibility. Two people were killed and at least three were wounded in Friday's attack.In a statement, the Islamic State group said the assailant had carried out the attack in its name and added that he had done so "in response to calls to target coalition countries." The phrasing indicates that the attacker was inspired by group's ideology and refers to a speech by a former spokesman, who urged followers to carry out attacks in any way they could, including stabbing.This attack, police said, had been carried out by a man wearing a fake bomb vest, a former prisoner who had been convicted of terrorism offenses in 2012. Authorities identified the suspect as Usman Khan, 28, of Stafford, England, who was released from prison last year, apparently after agreeing to wear an electronic tag.He was part of a gang that plotted in 2010 to plant explosives in the toilets of the London Stock Exchange, authorities said, and possibly attack other British landmarks and prominent figures like Boris Johnson, then the mayor of London.The rampage Friday, near the same bridge where a terrorist attack by a group men in June 2017 left eight people dead and dozens injured, raised questions about the efficacy of Britain's prison rehabilitation system and about the release from prison of Khan, despite warnings from the judge at his trial about the threats he still posed.In his judgment, Lord Justice Brian Leveson said there was "no doubt that anyone convicted of this type of offense could legitimately be considered dangerous."In February 2012, Khan was given an indeterminate sentence, with a minimum term of eight years, but the Court of Appeal replaced it in 2013 with a 16-year fixed-term sentence. He was released in half the time.The attack occurred two weeks before a pivotal general election, and Johnson, now prime minister, is under pressure. He told reporters Saturday that he wanted to "toughen up" sentences."I have long argued that it is a mistake to allow serious and violent criminals to come out of prison early," Johnson said.Saturday, the Parole Board, which carries out risk assessments on prisoners to determine whether they can be safely released, said in a statement that it had not reviewed his case. Khan appeared to have been released automatically, "on license" -- meaning under certain conditions -- "without ever being referred to the board," it said.On Sunday, the Ministry of Justice said it had began an urgent review of the license conditions of convicted terrorists released from prison.Along with questions about the case came praise for the bystanders who had charged the suspect as he made his way along the bridge. One man wielded a fire extinguisher, video footage on social media showed. Another brandished an ornamental whale tusk that had been torn from the wall of Fishmongers' Hall, according to local reports.The assailant was wrestled to the ground in the street outside the grand hall. A man wearing a suit and tie can be seen removing a knife and walking away from the suspect. He was later identified as an off-duty member of the transport police.Thomas Gray, a tour company manager, told reporters that he saw one of the knives taped to Khan's hands."I stamped on his left wrist while someone else smacked his hand on the ground and then kicked one of the knives away," Gray told Sky News. "I went to pick up the knife when I heard a cop say, 'He has got a bomb.'"The bomb turned out to be fake. Footage showed officers, guns drawn, pulling bystanders off Khan. Then, Khan was shot and killed by the police.The trauma of the encounter, which played out as workers looked down from huge office windows and as onlookers shared video of the chaos, led Vinn to ask: "Why London Bridge anyway? It's horrible, I don't get it."She said that for a country that has experienced terrorist attack after terrorist attack since 2017: "It's become ambient. It makes you worried about your safety on a day-to-day basis, especially here, around London Bridge."Mayor Sadiq Khan of London praised the bravery of bystanders. "What's remarkable about the images we've seen," he said, "is the breathtaking heroism of members of the public who literally ran toward danger, not knowing what confronted them."The assault threw into stark relief the risks in attempting to rehabilitate those convicted or suspected of terrorism.Saturday, Chris Phillips, a former head of the country's National Counter Terrorism Security Office, said Britain was releasing people while they were still radicalized."We're playing Russian roulette with people's lives, letting convicted, known, radicalized jihadi criminals walk about our streets," he told the Press Association news agency.David Videcette, a former anti-terrorism detective and author, added that Britain must "look at sentencing and rehabilitation, as we have a huge problem with terrorist prisoners that are being released, and with those that want to come back from Syria."Khan was attending an event for former prisoners and their mentors in a prison education program, Learning Together, set up by Cambridge University. He was believed to have been invited to share his experiences as a former prisoner."We believe that the attack began inside before he left the building and proceeded onto London Bridge," said Neil Basu, assistant commissioner of the Metropolitan Police.One of those who rushed to aid victims, according to news reports, was a man convicted of murder who had been on day release.Among those killed, according to BBC and news site Cambridge Live, was a Cambridge graduate, Jack Merritt, the course coordinator of Learning Together. The police did not immediately confirm his identity. But a man who said he was Merritt's father, David, posted the news on Twitter before deleting it."My son, Jack, who was killed in this attack, would not wish his death to be used as the pretext for more draconian sentences or for detaining people unnecessarily," the post read. "R.I.P. Jack: you were a beautiful spirit who always took the side of the underdog."Saturday, three people remained hospitalized, and one person who been critically wounded was in stable condition, the National Health Service said in a statement.The attack came only weeks after the British government lowered its terror threat warning level to substantial from severe as Britons had begun growing cautiously accustomed to a life less frequently disrupted by deadly episodes.In 2017, when London Bridge and the nearby Borough Market were the subject of an attack, there was also a suicide bombing at the Manchester Arena, an attack on Westminster Bridge and at the gates of Parliament and an assault at a north London mosque.For a government seeking reelection in two weeks' time, the issue is sensitive. Before the 2017 general election, the opposition Labour Party had linked terror attacks to police cuts made by a Conservative-led government.On Saturday, Brandon Lewis, the security minister, did not say whether he considered the attack to be a failure by the authorities, but he sought to rebut suggestions that cuts to the police had played a role. He told Sky News that both funding and the number of officers devoted to counterterrorism had "consistently increased since 2015."Videcette, the former anti-terrorism detective, said that many lower-level offenders were now up for release and to monitor them, the authorities had to keep close watch on those with whom they associate. The problem, he said, was "if they don't reconnect with the individuals we expect them to" and opt instead for a low-tech, lone attack."There is a real danger," he said, "with those who have not reached the pinnacle of what they are going to be but aspire to be a well-known terrorist, or perhaps aspire to be martyred by a police officer in a terror attack."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company

    LONDON -- It was midafternoon when Mike Finnerty, who sells cheese at his Borough Market shop just south of London Bridge, realized that something was wrong. An unusual flow of people had suddenly gathered in front of his stall, he said, and they seemed "alarmed."What he did not know was that a man dressed in black and armed with knives had gone on a murderous rampage in a grand meeting venue called Fishmongers' Hall on the opposite side of the bridge, just north of the Thames River. But Finnerty sensed the danger Friday, he would later tell the BBC and write on Twitter.So he and another employee rushed some customers -- a couple from Vancouver and a young American man -- into a cheese refrigerator and locked the door. Then he called the police.The "operator said it was an attack and not to move," he wrote. He said he could hear shouting outside the door, but he and the group huddled together in "pretty close quarters."Susan Vinn, 57, was smoking outside her office adjacent to Fishmongers' Hall about 2 p.m., when she saw people running over the bridge. And Craig Heathcote, a filmmaker, was walking there when, he told the British broadcaster Sky News, someone said:"Get out of the way. Someone's got a knife."Saturday, Britain grappled with the aftermath of another terrorist attack in the heart of London just as the Islamic State group claimed responsibility. Two people were killed and at least three were wounded in Friday's attack.In a statement, the Islamic State group said the assailant had carried out the attack in its name and added that he had done so "in response to calls to target coalition countries." The phrasing indicates that the attacker was inspired by group's ideology and refers to a speech by a former spokesman, who urged followers to carry out attacks in any way they could, including stabbing.This attack, police said, had been carried out by a man wearing a fake bomb vest, a former prisoner who had been convicted of terrorism offenses in 2012. Authorities identified the suspect as Usman Khan, 28, of Stafford, England, who was released from prison last year, apparently after agreeing to wear an electronic tag.He was part of a gang that plotted in 2010 to plant explosives in the toilets of the London Stock Exchange, authorities said, and possibly attack other British landmarks and prominent figures like Boris Johnson, then the mayor of London.The rampage Friday, near the same bridge where a terrorist attack by a group men in June 2017 left eight people dead and dozens injured, raised questions about the efficacy of Britain's prison rehabilitation system and about the release from prison of Khan, despite warnings from the judge at his trial about the threats he still posed.In his judgment, Lord Justice Brian Leveson said there was "no doubt that anyone convicted of this type of offense could legitimately be considered dangerous."In February 2012, Khan was given an indeterminate sentence, with a minimum term of eight years, but the Court of Appeal replaced it in 2013 with a 16-year fixed-term sentence. He was released in half the time.The attack occurred two weeks before a pivotal general election, and Johnson, now prime minister, is under pressure. He told reporters Saturday that he wanted to "toughen up" sentences."I have long argued that it is a mistake to allow serious and violent criminals to come out of prison early," Johnson said.Saturday, the Parole Board, which carries out risk assessments on prisoners to determine whether they can be safely released, said in a statement that it had not reviewed his case. Khan appeared to have been released automatically, "on license" -- meaning under certain conditions -- "without ever being referred to the board," it said.On Sunday, the Ministry of Justice said it had began an urgent review of the license conditions of convicted terrorists released from prison.Along with questions about the case came praise for the bystanders who had charged the suspect as he made his way along the bridge. One man wielded a fire extinguisher, video footage on social media showed. Another brandished an ornamental whale tusk that had been torn from the wall of Fishmongers' Hall, according to local reports.The assailant was wrestled to the ground in the street outside the grand hall. A man wearing a suit and tie can be seen removing a knife and walking away from the suspect. He was later identified as an off-duty member of the transport police.Thomas Gray, a tour company manager, told reporters that he saw one of the knives taped to Khan's hands."I stamped on his left wrist while someone else smacked his hand on the ground and then kicked one of the knives away," Gray told Sky News. "I went to pick up the knife when I heard a cop say, 'He has got a bomb.'"The bomb turned out to be fake. Footage showed officers, guns drawn, pulling bystanders off Khan. Then, Khan was shot and killed by the police.The trauma of the encounter, which played out as workers looked down from huge office windows and as onlookers shared video of the chaos, led Vinn to ask: "Why London Bridge anyway? It's horrible, I don't get it."She said that for a country that has experienced terrorist attack after terrorist attack since 2017: "It's become ambient. It makes you worried about your safety on a day-to-day basis, especially here, around London Bridge."Mayor Sadiq Khan of London praised the bravery of bystanders. "What's remarkable about the images we've seen," he said, "is the breathtaking heroism of members of the public who literally ran toward danger, not knowing what confronted them."The assault threw into stark relief the risks in attempting to rehabilitate those convicted or suspected of terrorism.Saturday, Chris Phillips, a former head of the country's National Counter Terrorism Security Office, said Britain was releasing people while they were still radicalized."We're playing Russian roulette with people's lives, letting convicted, known, radicalized jihadi criminals walk about our streets," he told the Press Association news agency.David Videcette, a former anti-terrorism detective and author, added that Britain must "look at sentencing and rehabilitation, as we have a huge problem with terrorist prisoners that are being released, and with those that want to come back from Syria."Khan was attending an event for former prisoners and their mentors in a prison education program, Learning Together, set up by Cambridge University. He was believed to have been invited to share his experiences as a former prisoner."We believe that the attack began inside before he left the building and proceeded onto London Bridge," said Neil Basu, assistant commissioner of the Metropolitan Police.One of those who rushed to aid victims, according to news reports, was a man convicted of murder who had been on day release.Among those killed, according to BBC and news site Cambridge Live, was a Cambridge graduate, Jack Merritt, the course coordinator of Learning Together. The police did not immediately confirm his identity. But a man who said he was Merritt's father, David, posted the news on Twitter before deleting it."My son, Jack, who was killed in this attack, would not wish his death to be used as the pretext for more draconian sentences or for detaining people unnecessarily," the post read. "R.I.P. Jack: you were a beautiful spirit who always took the side of the underdog."Saturday, three people remained hospitalized, and one person who been critically wounded was in stable condition, the National Health Service said in a statement.The attack came only weeks after the British government lowered its terror threat warning level to substantial from severe as Britons had begun growing cautiously accustomed to a life less frequently disrupted by deadly episodes.In 2017, when London Bridge and the nearby Borough Market were the subject of an attack, there was also a suicide bombing at the Manchester Arena, an attack on Westminster Bridge and at the gates of Parliament and an assault at a north London mosque.For a government seeking reelection in two weeks' time, the issue is sensitive. Before the 2017 general election, the opposition Labour Party had linked terror attacks to police cuts made by a Conservative-led government.On Saturday, Brandon Lewis, the security minister, did not say whether he considered the attack to be a failure by the authorities, but he sought to rebut suggestions that cuts to the police had played a role. He told Sky News that both funding and the number of officers devoted to counterterrorism had "consistently increased since 2015."Videcette, the former anti-terrorism detective, said that many lower-level offenders were now up for release and to monitor them, the authorities had to keep close watch on those with whom they associate. The problem, he said, was "if they don't reconnect with the individuals we expect them to" and opt instead for a low-tech, lone attack."There is a real danger," he said, "with those who have not reached the pinnacle of what they are going to be but aspire to be a well-known terrorist, or perhaps aspire to be martyred by a police officer in a terror attack."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company


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  • 41/79   'Crucial witness' in Hard Rock Hotel collapse is deported by ICE
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A metal worker considered a "crucial witness" in the collapse at the Hard Rock Hotel construction site in New Orleans last month was deported Friday to his native Honduras.Lawyers for Delmer Joel Ramirez Palma said the 38-year-old may have been targeted for deportation because he voiced concerns about the project - a claim immigration officials have denied.

    A metal worker considered a "crucial witness" in the collapse at the Hard Rock Hotel construction site in New Orleans last month was deported Friday to his native Honduras.Lawyers for Delmer Joel Ramirez Palma said the 38-year-old may have been targeted for deportation because he voiced concerns about the project - a claim immigration officials have denied.


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  • 42/79   Top Republican wants extra witnesses at Judiciary impeachment hearing
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The White House is unlikely to send legal representation to the first impeachment hearing by the Judiciary Committee

    The White House is unlikely to send legal representation to the first impeachment hearing by the Judiciary Committee


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  • 43/79   Chick-fil-A faces rightwing backlash after cutting ties to Christian groups
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Ted Cruz and Mike Huckabee condemn restaurant chain that also donated to civil rights group Southern Poverty Law CenterTed Cruz said the restaurant had ‘badly lost its way’. Photograph: Manuel Balce Ceneta/APLeading US conservatives have turned on the fast-food restaurant chain Chick-fil-A after the company decided to cut its ties to two Christian groups that have long opposed same-sex marriage.To compound rightwingers’ fury, it has also emerged via tax filings that Chick-fil-A donated to the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), a civil rights advocacy organization, in 2017. The SPLC has a lengthy record of supporting LGBTQ+ and abortion rights.Chick-fil-A, previously best known for its chicken sandwiches, was embraced by conservatives due to its foundation’s funding of the Salvation Army and the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, which oppose same-sex marriage.This adoration has now turned sour, however.The restaurant has “badly lost its way”, tweeted the Republican senator Ted Cruz, a prominent religious conservative. “Millions of Christians have been proud of ChickFilA’s courageous stands for religious liberty. To fund those who hate your customers is just sad.”The former Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee, another devout Republican, accused Chick-fil-A of having “surrendered to anti-Christian hate groups”.Having been boycotted by protesters who accused it of discrimination against the LGBTQ+ community, Chick-fil-A now faces the prospect of being shunned by some of its most enthusiastic former backers.“It’s time for Christians to find a fast-food alternative to Chick-fil-A,” said Tony Perkins, president of the conservative Family Research Council organization. “Not only has Chick-fil-A abandoned donations to Christian groups including the Salvation Army, it has donated to one of the most extreme anti-Christian groups in America.”A spokeswoman for Chick-fil-A said the company had fulfilled its obligations to the two Christian organizations and would now focus its donations to “education, homelessness and hunger”.

    Ted Cruz and Mike Huckabee condemn restaurant chain that also donated to civil rights group Southern Poverty Law CenterTed Cruz said the restaurant had ‘badly lost its way’. Photograph: Manuel Balce Ceneta/APLeading US conservatives have turned on the fast-food restaurant chain Chick-fil-A after the company decided to cut its ties to two Christian groups that have long opposed same-sex marriage.To compound rightwingers’ fury, it has also emerged via tax filings that Chick-fil-A donated to the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), a civil rights advocacy organization, in 2017. The SPLC has a lengthy record of supporting LGBTQ+ and abortion rights.Chick-fil-A, previously best known for its chicken sandwiches, was embraced by conservatives due to its foundation’s funding of the Salvation Army and the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, which oppose same-sex marriage.This adoration has now turned sour, however.The restaurant has “badly lost its way”, tweeted the Republican senator Ted Cruz, a prominent religious conservative. “Millions of Christians have been proud of ChickFilA’s courageous stands for religious liberty. To fund those who hate your customers is just sad.”The former Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee, another devout Republican, accused Chick-fil-A of having “surrendered to anti-Christian hate groups”.Having been boycotted by protesters who accused it of discrimination against the LGBTQ+ community, Chick-fil-A now faces the prospect of being shunned by some of its most enthusiastic former backers.“It’s time for Christians to find a fast-food alternative to Chick-fil-A,” said Tony Perkins, president of the conservative Family Research Council organization. “Not only has Chick-fil-A abandoned donations to Christian groups including the Salvation Army, it has donated to one of the most extreme anti-Christian groups in America.”A spokeswoman for Chick-fil-A said the company had fulfilled its obligations to the two Christian organizations and would now focus its donations to “education, homelessness and hunger”.


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  • 44/79   Detained Huawei executive spends Canada bail reading and painting as two Canadians denied lawyer in China
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Meng Wangzhou, the chief financial officer of Chinese phone company Huawei currently on bail in Canada as the US seeks to extradite her, has revealed that she spends her days reading, talking to colleagues and painting. US prosecutors say Ms Meng is linked to fraud that allowed Huawei to evade sanctions against Iran, and are attempting to have her moved to the US to face trial. She was arrested in Vancouver on 1 December 2018, one year before she published a ‘thank you’ message to supporters on Huawei’s website on Sunday. Ms Meng wrote that life on bail passed “so slow that I have enough time to read a book from cover to cover. "I can take the time to discuss minutiae with my colleagues or to carefully complete an oil painting.” The Huawei executive, whose detainment sparked a diplomatic row between Canada and China, is able to travel around Vancouver relatively freely outside her 11pm-6am curfew. She has been living in a £3.5 million, six-bedroom house, one of multiple properties she owns in the city. “While my personal freedoms have been limited, my soul still seeks to be free,” she wrote. “Amidst these setbacks, I've found light in the life around me… if a busy life has eaten away at my time, then hardship has in turn drawn it back out.” Business consultant Michael Spavor is one of two Canadians arrested by China after Ms Meng was detained Credit: WANG ZHAO/AFP/Getty Images Ms Meng’s lifestyle is in sharp contrast to that of two Canadians who were detained in China shortly after her arrest, in a move many saw as hostage diplomacy-style retaliation by Beijing. Michael Spavor, a consultant specialising in North Korea relations, and Michael Kovrig, an NGO worker and former diplomat, have been in a Chinese detention centre for a year. Last May they were charged with spying. The two men, who Justin Trudeau, the Canadian Prime Minister, said were being held in “arbitrary detention” for “political goals”, have reportedly been interrogated and held in rooms lit by artificial lighting 24 hours a day. They have reportedly been prevented from meeting with lawyers and family, and not allowed to go outdoors. In July Mr Kovrig’s reading glasses were allegedly confiscated by officials keeping watch over him. Ms Meng suggested that she enjoyed a more positive relationship with her guards. “After a whole night of heavy snow, the security company's staff were so considerate that they shoveled a path for my elderly mother, filling our hearts with warmth in this cold winter,” she wrote.

    Meng Wangzhou, the chief financial officer of Chinese phone company Huawei currently on bail in Canada as the US seeks to extradite her, has revealed that she spends her days reading, talking to colleagues and painting. US prosecutors say Ms Meng is linked to fraud that allowed Huawei to evade sanctions against Iran, and are attempting to have her moved to the US to face trial. She was arrested in Vancouver on 1 December 2018, one year before she published a ‘thank you’ message to supporters on Huawei’s website on Sunday. Ms Meng wrote that life on bail passed “so slow that I have enough time to read a book from cover to cover. "I can take the time to discuss minutiae with my colleagues or to carefully complete an oil painting.” The Huawei executive, whose detainment sparked a diplomatic row between Canada and China, is able to travel around Vancouver relatively freely outside her 11pm-6am curfew. She has been living in a £3.5 million, six-bedroom house, one of multiple properties she owns in the city. “While my personal freedoms have been limited, my soul still seeks to be free,” she wrote. “Amidst these setbacks, I've found light in the life around me… if a busy life has eaten away at my time, then hardship has in turn drawn it back out.” Business consultant Michael Spavor is one of two Canadians arrested by China after Ms Meng was detained Credit: WANG ZHAO/AFP/Getty Images Ms Meng’s lifestyle is in sharp contrast to that of two Canadians who were detained in China shortly after her arrest, in a move many saw as hostage diplomacy-style retaliation by Beijing. Michael Spavor, a consultant specialising in North Korea relations, and Michael Kovrig, an NGO worker and former diplomat, have been in a Chinese detention centre for a year. Last May they were charged with spying. The two men, who Justin Trudeau, the Canadian Prime Minister, said were being held in “arbitrary detention” for “political goals”, have reportedly been interrogated and held in rooms lit by artificial lighting 24 hours a day. They have reportedly been prevented from meeting with lawyers and family, and not allowed to go outdoors. In July Mr Kovrig’s reading glasses were allegedly confiscated by officials keeping watch over him. Ms Meng suggested that she enjoyed a more positive relationship with her guards. “After a whole night of heavy snow, the security company's staff were so considerate that they shoveled a path for my elderly mother, filling our hearts with warmth in this cold winter,” she wrote.


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  • 45/79   Search continues for missing 6-year-old girl after vehicle swept away in creek
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The search continues for Willa Rawlings, a six-year old girl who remains missing after a vehicle had been swept away while attempting to cross the swollen Tonto Creek on Friday.Nine members of an Arizona family had come together for a Thanksgiving celebration, The Associated Press reported. The holiday ended in tragedy when they had attempted to cross Tonto Creek, which had been swollen by runoff from the storm that hit the area on Thanksgiving. Their military-style truck- occupied by two adults and seven children- was swept up by the torrent on Friday afternoon, according to the Gila County Sheriff's Office.Daniel Rawlings and four children had escaped the car to an island, where they were rescued by Maricopa County Sheriff's Office and Arizona Department of Public Safety helicopters. Lacey Rawlings had also escaped the car and was rescued from the shore.Three children had stayed in the car, according to the AP. When authorities discovered the truck, however, it was empty. Two of the Rawlings' four children were among the missing.Colby Rawlings, their 5-year-old son, and Austin Rawlings, their 5-year-old niece, were found dead on Saturday about 600 to 1,000 yards from the site of the attempted crossing.More than 100 volunteers flocked to the Tonto Basin early Sunday to help search for the Rawlings' daughter, according to the Arizona Republic."We want to bring her home safely to her family," Lt. Virgil Dodd of the Gila County Sheriff's Office told "She needs to come home today, and we're going to do that today."Earlier that morning, the Sheriff's Office had posted on Facebook that the Bar X Crossing across Tonto Creek had been closed along with a few other routes."It had been showery in the region most of the day Thursday, with some heavier downpours in times in spots," AccuWeather Meteorologist Jake Sojda said. "In arid mountainous regions like what is found in the Tonto Basin it doesn't take much for small streams and dry creek beds to become raging torrents as any rain quickly runs into these waterways rather than soaking into the ground. Even downpours well away from the creek could have caused a flash flood to surge down the creek."    The water level of Tonto Creek near Roosevelt, Arizona, had risen to about 6 ft. by 4 p.m. PST on Nov. 29, 2019. (Image/NWS)    "Thursday night a steady and at times very heavy rain moved into the region. It looks like the heaviest rain moved into the region between around 4 a.m. and 8 a.m. PST Friday morning," Sojda said. "The Phoenix metro area generally recorded about an inch of rainfall, but in the mountainous areas to the east, rainfall amounts more on the order of 3-4 inches likely fell, leading to these mountain creeks and streams to turn into raging torrents of water."The closure of the crossings comes after the system that crossed the American Southwest on Thanksgiving Day wreaked havoc on travel as a deluge of rain flooded roads.

    The search continues for Willa Rawlings, a six-year old girl who remains missing after a vehicle had been swept away while attempting to cross the swollen Tonto Creek on Friday.Nine members of an Arizona family had come together for a Thanksgiving celebration, The Associated Press reported. The holiday ended in tragedy when they had attempted to cross Tonto Creek, which had been swollen by runoff from the storm that hit the area on Thanksgiving. Their military-style truck- occupied by two adults and seven children- was swept up by the torrent on Friday afternoon, according to the Gila County Sheriff's Office.Daniel Rawlings and four children had escaped the car to an island, where they were rescued by Maricopa County Sheriff's Office and Arizona Department of Public Safety helicopters. Lacey Rawlings had also escaped the car and was rescued from the shore.Three children had stayed in the car, according to the AP. When authorities discovered the truck, however, it was empty. Two of the Rawlings' four children were among the missing.Colby Rawlings, their 5-year-old son, and Austin Rawlings, their 5-year-old niece, were found dead on Saturday about 600 to 1,000 yards from the site of the attempted crossing.More than 100 volunteers flocked to the Tonto Basin early Sunday to help search for the Rawlings' daughter, according to the Arizona Republic."We want to bring her home safely to her family," Lt. Virgil Dodd of the Gila County Sheriff's Office told "She needs to come home today, and we're going to do that today."Earlier that morning, the Sheriff's Office had posted on Facebook that the Bar X Crossing across Tonto Creek had been closed along with a few other routes."It had been showery in the region most of the day Thursday, with some heavier downpours in times in spots," AccuWeather Meteorologist Jake Sojda said. "In arid mountainous regions like what is found in the Tonto Basin it doesn't take much for small streams and dry creek beds to become raging torrents as any rain quickly runs into these waterways rather than soaking into the ground. Even downpours well away from the creek could have caused a flash flood to surge down the creek." The water level of Tonto Creek near Roosevelt, Arizona, had risen to about 6 ft. by 4 p.m. PST on Nov. 29, 2019. (Image/NWS) "Thursday night a steady and at times very heavy rain moved into the region. It looks like the heaviest rain moved into the region between around 4 a.m. and 8 a.m. PST Friday morning," Sojda said. "The Phoenix metro area generally recorded about an inch of rainfall, but in the mountainous areas to the east, rainfall amounts more on the order of 3-4 inches likely fell, leading to these mountain creeks and streams to turn into raging torrents of water."The closure of the crossings comes after the system that crossed the American Southwest on Thanksgiving Day wreaked havoc on travel as a deluge of rain flooded roads.


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  • 46/79   Saudi Arabia takes over G20 presidency from Japan
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Saudi Arabia became the first Arab nation Sunday to take over the G20 presidency as it seeks to bounce back onto the world stage following global uproar over its human rights record.  The oil-rich kingdom has promoted a liberalisation drive, including granting greater rights to women, but faced strong criticism over a crackdown on dissent and the murder last year of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.  The G20 presidency, which Saudi Arabia takes over from Japan, will see it host world leaders for a global summit in its capital next November 21-22.

    Saudi Arabia became the first Arab nation Sunday to take over the G20 presidency as it seeks to bounce back onto the world stage following global uproar over its human rights record. The oil-rich kingdom has promoted a liberalisation drive, including granting greater rights to women, but faced strong criticism over a crackdown on dissent and the murder last year of journalist Jamal Khashoggi. The G20 presidency, which Saudi Arabia takes over from Japan, will see it host world leaders for a global summit in its capital next November 21-22.


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  • 47/79   Former 'DWTS' dancer says a Utah teacher berated the son he's adopting over having 2 dads
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Former 'DWTS' dancer says family was hurt by a Utah teacher who said "men living together is a sin" after his son said he's grateful to be adopted.

    Former 'DWTS' dancer says family was hurt by a Utah teacher who said "men living together is a sin" after his son said he's grateful to be adopted.


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  • 48/79   London Bridge victim's father said his death shouldn't be used to justify 'draconian sentences,' as Conservatives call for tougher punishment
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab was questioned about Tory plans to toughen sentencing after David Merritt criticised "detaining people unnecessarily."

    Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab was questioned about Tory plans to toughen sentencing after David Merritt criticised "detaining people unnecessarily."


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  • 49/79   White House says it won't participate in impeachment hearing
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    In the letter, White House counsel accused Nadler of intentionally scheduling the hearing to interfere with Trump's trip to the NATO summit in London later this week.

    In the letter, White House counsel accused Nadler of intentionally scheduling the hearing to interfere with Trump's trip to the NATO summit in London later this week.


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  • 50/79   Could a Buried Ocean on Jupiter’s Moon Point to Life Beyond Earth?
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    GettyThere’s water on Europa, one of 79 moons orbiting Jupiter, NASA just confirmed. And where there’s water, there could be life, according to the space agency.The discovery, which NASA scientists announced in a November paper in the journal Nature, is the latest in a series of findings that point to some form of life possibly sharing the cosmos with Earth’s own beings.Scientists are increasingly convinced that our planet’s microbes, plants, insects, fish, birds, lizards and apes aren’t the only living things in the universe.But we won’t know for sure unless we investigate every potential sign of life. And that’s where NASA, Congress, and the Trump administration keep dropping the ball. It could be more than a decade before NASA launches a mission to travel the roughly 400 million miles to Europa and sample its water.Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei discovered Europa, by way of telescope, way back in 1610. A series of probes began visiting the moon starting in the 1970s. NASA’s Galileo probe orbited Jupiter between 1995 and 2003 and repeatedly scanned Europa with its sensors. In the 2000s scientists began pointing the Hubble space telescope at the smooth, brown-white moon. That’s when they first saw signs of “plumes”—watery geysers periodically jetting up from Europa’s icy crust. NASA revealed the plumes in 2013. Three years later, agency scientists began a yearlong survey of Europa using a telescope at the Keck Observatory in Hawaii.On April 26, 2016, they observed around 2,000 tons of water vapor in the sky over Europa. That’s not really a lot of H2O by galactic standards. Europa’s plumes could be “rare localized events,” the scientists conceded. But they still might point to life on the frigid moon.All the probes and scans since the 1970s “have amassed enough additional information about Europa to make it a high-priority target of investigation in NASA’s search for life,” the space agency stated on Nov. 18.“What makes this moon so alluring is the possibility that it may possess all of the ingredients necessary for life,” NASA continued. “Scientists have evidence that one of these ingredients, liquid water, is present under the icy surface and may sometimes erupt into space in huge geysers.”The problem is, the only mission to Europa that NASA is working on doesn’t include the best equipment for investigating the possibility of life. “If your job is to look for life beyond Earth, if your quest is to show that there’s life on worlds other than our own, this Europan spritz is a magnificent opportunity,” Seth Shostak, an astronomer with the California-based SETI Institute, told The Daily Beast. The SETI Institute searches for extraterrestrial life, primarily by listening for alien radio broadcasts. “All that may be required to find aliens—albeit, microscopic ones—is to launch a spacecraft towards Jupiter, swing around Europa and robotically grab some of the water vapor the moon shoots your way,” Shostak added. “By either bringing that frozen water back to Earth, or simply examining it with an on-board microscope, we might find some life within—just as we could find bacteria by carefully looking at the water droplets from a sneeze. It may be the quickest way to show that life is everywhere.”But NASA’s only new Europa probe, Clipper, is set to launch in 2025 without any ability to scoop up Europa’s water. For that, it would need a robotic lander that could actually descend to the moon’s surface, bottle up some samples then boost back into orbit. Without a lander, the $4-billion Clipper is limited to conducting remote scans.There once was a plan to outfit Clipper with a lander. But it was risky. “It is most challenging at Europa due to the temporal nature of the plumes and the high-radiation environment under which the samples have to be collected and the instruments have to gain information,” Dirk Schulze-Makuch, an astronomer at Technical University Berlin, told The Daily Beast.The lander scheme had just one champion in Congress, Houston-area Republican representative John Culberson. “He was somewhat single-handedly setting the congressional budget to have a Europa lander,” Matthew Siegler, an astronomer with the Planetary Science Institute in Arizona, told The Daily Beast.But Culberson, an 18-year veteran of the House of Representatives, lost his re-election bid in 2018. Funding for the lander dwindled in the 2019 budget. “The money clearly is not going to be there,” Siegler said. Spokespersons for the House science committee didn’t respond to The Daily Beast’s requests for comment.It’s unlikely NASA will make a hard push for more money for Clipper. “You could place the blame of that on the moon, where the current administration is advocating money be spent,” Siegler noted, referring to Earth’s own moon. The Trump administration is desperate to land astronauts on Earth’s moon by 2024, the final full year of a possible second term for Trump. The moon mission involves several new spacecraft and could end up costing $30 billion. NASA’s entire annual budget has been around $20 billion in recent years. A NASA spokesperson didn’t respond to a request for comment.  It’s possible that, once the Trump-inspired moon mania fades, NASA could mount a fresh mission to Europa—one with a water-collecting lander. Siegler guessed that could happen around 2035, at the soonest. Of course, by the 2030s, an additional Europa mission might be competing with manned missions to Mars. It might also run afoul of a possible mission to Enceladus, a moon of Saturn that also appears to be capable of supporting life.“It’s worth noting that Europa is, in some sense, in competition with Enceladus, which also has geysers from an underground ocean,” Shostak said. “Maybe even more than Europa.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

    GettyThere’s water on Europa, one of 79 moons orbiting Jupiter, NASA just confirmed. And where there’s water, there could be life, according to the space agency.The discovery, which NASA scientists announced in a November paper in the journal Nature, is the latest in a series of findings that point to some form of life possibly sharing the cosmos with Earth’s own beings.Scientists are increasingly convinced that our planet’s microbes, plants, insects, fish, birds, lizards and apes aren’t the only living things in the universe.But we won’t know for sure unless we investigate every potential sign of life. And that’s where NASA, Congress, and the Trump administration keep dropping the ball. It could be more than a decade before NASA launches a mission to travel the roughly 400 million miles to Europa and sample its water.Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei discovered Europa, by way of telescope, way back in 1610. A series of probes began visiting the moon starting in the 1970s. NASA’s Galileo probe orbited Jupiter between 1995 and 2003 and repeatedly scanned Europa with its sensors. In the 2000s scientists began pointing the Hubble space telescope at the smooth, brown-white moon. That’s when they first saw signs of “plumes”—watery geysers periodically jetting up from Europa’s icy crust. NASA revealed the plumes in 2013. Three years later, agency scientists began a yearlong survey of Europa using a telescope at the Keck Observatory in Hawaii.On April 26, 2016, they observed around 2,000 tons of water vapor in the sky over Europa. That’s not really a lot of H2O by galactic standards. Europa’s plumes could be “rare localized events,” the scientists conceded. But they still might point to life on the frigid moon.All the probes and scans since the 1970s “have amassed enough additional information about Europa to make it a high-priority target of investigation in NASA’s search for life,” the space agency stated on Nov. 18.“What makes this moon so alluring is the possibility that it may possess all of the ingredients necessary for life,” NASA continued. “Scientists have evidence that one of these ingredients, liquid water, is present under the icy surface and may sometimes erupt into space in huge geysers.”The problem is, the only mission to Europa that NASA is working on doesn’t include the best equipment for investigating the possibility of life. “If your job is to look for life beyond Earth, if your quest is to show that there’s life on worlds other than our own, this Europan spritz is a magnificent opportunity,” Seth Shostak, an astronomer with the California-based SETI Institute, told The Daily Beast. The SETI Institute searches for extraterrestrial life, primarily by listening for alien radio broadcasts. “All that may be required to find aliens—albeit, microscopic ones—is to launch a spacecraft towards Jupiter, swing around Europa and robotically grab some of the water vapor the moon shoots your way,” Shostak added. “By either bringing that frozen water back to Earth, or simply examining it with an on-board microscope, we might find some life within—just as we could find bacteria by carefully looking at the water droplets from a sneeze. It may be the quickest way to show that life is everywhere.”But NASA’s only new Europa probe, Clipper, is set to launch in 2025 without any ability to scoop up Europa’s water. For that, it would need a robotic lander that could actually descend to the moon’s surface, bottle up some samples then boost back into orbit. Without a lander, the $4-billion Clipper is limited to conducting remote scans.There once was a plan to outfit Clipper with a lander. But it was risky. “It is most challenging at Europa due to the temporal nature of the plumes and the high-radiation environment under which the samples have to be collected and the instruments have to gain information,” Dirk Schulze-Makuch, an astronomer at Technical University Berlin, told The Daily Beast.The lander scheme had just one champion in Congress, Houston-area Republican representative John Culberson. “He was somewhat single-handedly setting the congressional budget to have a Europa lander,” Matthew Siegler, an astronomer with the Planetary Science Institute in Arizona, told The Daily Beast.But Culberson, an 18-year veteran of the House of Representatives, lost his re-election bid in 2018. Funding for the lander dwindled in the 2019 budget. “The money clearly is not going to be there,” Siegler said. Spokespersons for the House science committee didn’t respond to The Daily Beast’s requests for comment.It’s unlikely NASA will make a hard push for more money for Clipper. “You could place the blame of that on the moon, where the current administration is advocating money be spent,” Siegler noted, referring to Earth’s own moon. The Trump administration is desperate to land astronauts on Earth’s moon by 2024, the final full year of a possible second term for Trump. The moon mission involves several new spacecraft and could end up costing $30 billion. NASA’s entire annual budget has been around $20 billion in recent years. A NASA spokesperson didn’t respond to a request for comment.  It’s possible that, once the Trump-inspired moon mania fades, NASA could mount a fresh mission to Europa—one with a water-collecting lander. Siegler guessed that could happen around 2035, at the soonest. Of course, by the 2030s, an additional Europa mission might be competing with manned missions to Mars. It might also run afoul of a possible mission to Enceladus, a moon of Saturn that also appears to be capable of supporting life.“It’s worth noting that Europa is, in some sense, in competition with Enceladus, which also has geysers from an underground ocean,” Shostak said. “Maybe even more than Europa.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


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  • 51/79   The Suburbs Are Kicking the Animals Out. Enter the Animal Rescue Squad.
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    ATLANTA -- In a small suburban park on a muggy morning a few months ago, a woman in elbow-length gloves was armed with a net, a loaf of bread and a tall cardboard box, all in hopes of catching an elusive goose.The goose, whose left leg was tightly wound in fishing line, walked with a pronounced hobble; as it swam, the leg dragged listlessly in the water. Yet despite its condition, animal instinct prevailed. The goose simply refused to be caught.Cindy Rooker, the would-be captor, hoped to retrieve the recalcitrant Canada goose, tuck it into the cardboard box she had brought, and drive it to a wildlife rehabilitation center a few hours away in South Carolina, where the bird would receive medical attention.But after several attempts, Rooker knew it was time to call it a day. Birds are easily stressed, and waterfowl have an inconvenient and frustrating knack for flying right into the center of a pond. Also, she didn't bring a kayak this time.A police officer who lives in Canton, Georgia, Rooker, 56, volunteers for the Wildlife Resources and Education Network (WREN). She started working with the organization at the beginning of the summer, and has since completed about 10 transports, crisscrossing the northern half of the state with the likes of orphaned baby opossums and injured hawks in the cab of her Nissan pickup truck.WREN connects people like Rooker -- committed animal lovers in the Southeast with spare time, spare gas money and an empty back seat -- with wildlife rehabbers and veterinary clinics that lack the resources to transport an animal on their own.In other words, Rooker and her fellow transporters are Mother Nature's unpaid Uber drivers.Robert Jones, an animal lover whose other pursuits include military history and small-business consulting, started WREN with Liz Crandall in 2016. The two met at the Southeastern Raptor Center at Auburn University, where Crandall worked and Jones volunteered and, later, interned.They formed WREN as a wildlife educational initiative, but with time, sharpened their focus largely on transportation after seeing the same challenge day after day: More people seemed to be stumbling upon injured wildlife every passing year, but few wanted to transport the animals to rehabbers themselves."It's a really large gap," said Jones, 34, who now lives in Jonesborough, Tennessee, and is the executive director of the Tilted Tavern Animal Sanctuary. Nonprofits like the raptor center don't always have the resources or staff to send someone out to fetch an animal, especially one that's hours away.That's where WREN -- and a handful of similar organizations, like the Connecticut Emergency Animal Response Service -- step in.When I first spoke with Crandall, 46, by phone, she had just finished up "a fawn call" (which, at least in this instance, is not a pun). Crandall, who is the assistant director of the Tilted Tavern Animal Sanctuary, said that she fields roughly a dozen calls a day and manages a handful of transports each week, often across state lines.That number is increasing each year, for reasons both dismal and hopeful: While humans are pushing into wildlife territory more and more, some of them are also becoming more aware of, and attuned to, the wildlife in their backyards."I think people are more conscientious," Crandall said. "They want to help more."WREN uses Slack to communicate to its volunteers and manage logistics, like making sure each transporter has an appropriate container for the animal (typically a cardboard box or a lidded Rubbermaid bin with holes for oxygen).Driving a captured animal requires total silence in the car -- no phone conversations, no podcasts or music -- sometimes for hours on end."It takes a lot for people to commit to something where they'll get a call maybe once a month, or maybe every day," Crandall said. Working with nature has inherent challenges and frustrations. It requires patience and flexibility, not to mention thick skin: Not every case has a happy ending.One of the organizations WREN works with is the Chattahoochee Nature Center, where Kathryn Dudeck works as wildlife director. Dudeck said that the center fields 400 to 500 phone calls a month, and takes in more than 650 animals for rehab each year.Those cases range from natural causes, like nestlings blown out of their nests in a hurricane, to injury explicitly at the hands of humans: an owl with buckshot in its wings, a red-tailed hawk hit by a car. "Needless to say, Mother Nature didn't invent the vehicle or the gun," Dudeck said. "So, we have a moral obligation to assist."David Crawford is the founder of Animal Help Now, a 911-like website and smartphone app that links people to wildlife rehabbers and transporters like WREN. App usage has increased every year since its inception in 2012, he said."As we expand and build new roads and build new suburbs, you have a lot more interaction with animals," he said. Then, he added, there is climate change: more destructive hurricanes will yield more injuries and habitat destruction; prolonged droughts, raging forest fires and searing heat waves will continue to push desperate animals further into human habitats."People are going to be interacting with wildlife a lot more than they are right now," said Crawford. He estimates that by the end of 2019, Animal Help Now will have been used in 40,000 wildlife emergencies across the country.A week after the first attempt, Rooker was back at Laurel Park. This time, there was a scrum of additional helpers, including Crandall, along with two kayaks. There were, however, no geese.Just before the group split off to search nearby ponds for the flock, Darcell Patterson, a sneaker-shod woman, intercepted the volunteers. Patterson, 66, has walked around the park every day for the last four years, she said, and brings dried food pellets with her to "establish rapport" with the resident ducks and geese.She matter-of-factly informed the group that the injured goose is named Gary, and that his leg has been wrapped in that line for a couple of years. Gary, it seems, can survive on his own, and has not yet been ostracized from his avian comrades.Crandall decided to let Gary be for now, knowing he was under Patterson's watchful eye. As long as the bird can still fly, walk and eat, Crandall explained, the stress of relocation isn't justifiable yet."Gary's got friends in high places," Patterson said.While it wasn't the Disney-worthy victory that the volunteers may have had in mind this go-round, it was still a victory by their standards."Sometimes letting wild be wild is the right thing to do," Jones said. "You teach people what situations need our intervention, and what situations don't."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company

    ATLANTA -- In a small suburban park on a muggy morning a few months ago, a woman in elbow-length gloves was armed with a net, a loaf of bread and a tall cardboard box, all in hopes of catching an elusive goose.The goose, whose left leg was tightly wound in fishing line, walked with a pronounced hobble; as it swam, the leg dragged listlessly in the water. Yet despite its condition, animal instinct prevailed. The goose simply refused to be caught.Cindy Rooker, the would-be captor, hoped to retrieve the recalcitrant Canada goose, tuck it into the cardboard box she had brought, and drive it to a wildlife rehabilitation center a few hours away in South Carolina, where the bird would receive medical attention.But after several attempts, Rooker knew it was time to call it a day. Birds are easily stressed, and waterfowl have an inconvenient and frustrating knack for flying right into the center of a pond. Also, she didn't bring a kayak this time.A police officer who lives in Canton, Georgia, Rooker, 56, volunteers for the Wildlife Resources and Education Network (WREN). She started working with the organization at the beginning of the summer, and has since completed about 10 transports, crisscrossing the northern half of the state with the likes of orphaned baby opossums and injured hawks in the cab of her Nissan pickup truck.WREN connects people like Rooker -- committed animal lovers in the Southeast with spare time, spare gas money and an empty back seat -- with wildlife rehabbers and veterinary clinics that lack the resources to transport an animal on their own.In other words, Rooker and her fellow transporters are Mother Nature's unpaid Uber drivers.Robert Jones, an animal lover whose other pursuits include military history and small-business consulting, started WREN with Liz Crandall in 2016. The two met at the Southeastern Raptor Center at Auburn University, where Crandall worked and Jones volunteered and, later, interned.They formed WREN as a wildlife educational initiative, but with time, sharpened their focus largely on transportation after seeing the same challenge day after day: More people seemed to be stumbling upon injured wildlife every passing year, but few wanted to transport the animals to rehabbers themselves."It's a really large gap," said Jones, 34, who now lives in Jonesborough, Tennessee, and is the executive director of the Tilted Tavern Animal Sanctuary. Nonprofits like the raptor center don't always have the resources or staff to send someone out to fetch an animal, especially one that's hours away.That's where WREN -- and a handful of similar organizations, like the Connecticut Emergency Animal Response Service -- step in.When I first spoke with Crandall, 46, by phone, she had just finished up "a fawn call" (which, at least in this instance, is not a pun). Crandall, who is the assistant director of the Tilted Tavern Animal Sanctuary, said that she fields roughly a dozen calls a day and manages a handful of transports each week, often across state lines.That number is increasing each year, for reasons both dismal and hopeful: While humans are pushing into wildlife territory more and more, some of them are also becoming more aware of, and attuned to, the wildlife in their backyards."I think people are more conscientious," Crandall said. "They want to help more."WREN uses Slack to communicate to its volunteers and manage logistics, like making sure each transporter has an appropriate container for the animal (typically a cardboard box or a lidded Rubbermaid bin with holes for oxygen).Driving a captured animal requires total silence in the car -- no phone conversations, no podcasts or music -- sometimes for hours on end."It takes a lot for people to commit to something where they'll get a call maybe once a month, or maybe every day," Crandall said. Working with nature has inherent challenges and frustrations. It requires patience and flexibility, not to mention thick skin: Not every case has a happy ending.One of the organizations WREN works with is the Chattahoochee Nature Center, where Kathryn Dudeck works as wildlife director. Dudeck said that the center fields 400 to 500 phone calls a month, and takes in more than 650 animals for rehab each year.Those cases range from natural causes, like nestlings blown out of their nests in a hurricane, to injury explicitly at the hands of humans: an owl with buckshot in its wings, a red-tailed hawk hit by a car. "Needless to say, Mother Nature didn't invent the vehicle or the gun," Dudeck said. "So, we have a moral obligation to assist."David Crawford is the founder of Animal Help Now, a 911-like website and smartphone app that links people to wildlife rehabbers and transporters like WREN. App usage has increased every year since its inception in 2012, he said."As we expand and build new roads and build new suburbs, you have a lot more interaction with animals," he said. Then, he added, there is climate change: more destructive hurricanes will yield more injuries and habitat destruction; prolonged droughts, raging forest fires and searing heat waves will continue to push desperate animals further into human habitats."People are going to be interacting with wildlife a lot more than they are right now," said Crawford. He estimates that by the end of 2019, Animal Help Now will have been used in 40,000 wildlife emergencies across the country.A week after the first attempt, Rooker was back at Laurel Park. This time, there was a scrum of additional helpers, including Crandall, along with two kayaks. There were, however, no geese.Just before the group split off to search nearby ponds for the flock, Darcell Patterson, a sneaker-shod woman, intercepted the volunteers. Patterson, 66, has walked around the park every day for the last four years, she said, and brings dried food pellets with her to "establish rapport" with the resident ducks and geese.She matter-of-factly informed the group that the injured goose is named Gary, and that his leg has been wrapped in that line for a couple of years. Gary, it seems, can survive on his own, and has not yet been ostracized from his avian comrades.Crandall decided to let Gary be for now, knowing he was under Patterson's watchful eye. As long as the bird can still fly, walk and eat, Crandall explained, the stress of relocation isn't justifiable yet."Gary's got friends in high places," Patterson said.While it wasn't the Disney-worthy victory that the volunteers may have had in mind this go-round, it was still a victory by their standards."Sometimes letting wild be wild is the right thing to do," Jones said. "You teach people what situations need our intervention, and what situations don't."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company


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  • 52/79   Life expectancy in the US keeps going down, and a new study says America's worsening inequality could be to blame
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    According to new research, the average American's life expectancy has once again gone down, despite the nation's billion-dollar health care system.

    According to new research, the average American's life expectancy has once again gone down, despite the nation's billion-dollar health care system.


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  • 53/79   Blue Origin’s expansion plans rush ahead at its Seattle-area HQ — and in Los Angeles
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    KENT, Wash. — Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin space venture is rapidly expanding on several fronts, ranging from its headquarters facility south of Seattle to a new beachhead in the Los Angeles area — within the orbit of its main competitor, Elon Musk's SpaceX. Just three and a half years ago, Blue Origin's workforce amounted to 600 employees, and even then, Bezos said his company's 300,000-square-foot office and production facility in Kent was "busting out of the seams." Now the employee count is at around 2,500, heading toward 3,500 in the next year. That's according to a report from… Read More

    KENT, Wash. — Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin space venture is rapidly expanding on several fronts, ranging from its headquarters facility south of Seattle to a new beachhead in the Los Angeles area — within the orbit of its main competitor, Elon Musk's SpaceX. Just three and a half years ago, Blue Origin's workforce amounted to 600 employees, and even then, Bezos said his company's 300,000-square-foot office and production facility in Kent was "busting out of the seams." Now the employee count is at around 2,500, heading toward 3,500 in the next year. That's according to a report from… Read More


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  • 54/79   NASA's plans for the 2020s include landing humans on the Moon, detecting quakes on Mars, and defending Earth from deadly asteroids
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    One year ago, NASA announced it would send astronauts back to the moon. Since then, new spacecraft and telescopes have filled its plans for the 2020s.

    One year ago, NASA announced it would send astronauts back to the moon. Since then, new spacecraft and telescopes have filled its plans for the 2020s.


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  • 55/79   A network of cables at the bottom of the ocean is helping scientists detect earthquakes
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The cables detected a new fault system near the San Andreas Fault, which runs along the California coast.

    The cables detected a new fault system near the San Andreas Fault, which runs along the California coast.


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  • 56/79   The human species will likely destroy itself long before the sun kills everyone on Earth, a Harvard scientists says
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Scientist Avi Loeb wrote that we should colonize space to survive the sun's future expansion. But humanity might wipe itself out before then, he said.

    Scientist Avi Loeb wrote that we should colonize space to survive the sun's future expansion. But humanity might wipe itself out before then, he said.


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  • 57/79   NASA’s in the market for quick taxi rides to and from International Space Station
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    NASA already has committed billions of dollars to procuring regularly scheduled rides to and from the International Space Station from commercial space taxi operators — but now it says it's interested in buying short-term trips as well. The proposed arrangement, detailed on Tuesday, is aimed at giving a boost to the commercialization of space operations in low Earth orbit, as well as to NASA's drive to send astronauts to the moon by 2024. It also makes the line dividing government-funded and privately funded space efforts even fuzzier. SpaceX and Boeing are both building spacecraft to serve as taxis to the… Read More

    NASA already has committed billions of dollars to procuring regularly scheduled rides to and from the International Space Station from commercial space taxi operators — but now it says it's interested in buying short-term trips as well. The proposed arrangement, detailed on Tuesday, is aimed at giving a boost to the commercialization of space operations in low Earth orbit, as well as to NASA's drive to send astronauts to the moon by 2024. It also makes the line dividing government-funded and privately funded space efforts even fuzzier. SpaceX and Boeing are both building spacecraft to serve as taxis to the… Read More


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  • 58/79   A stunning animation by a planetary scientist shows how huge our solar system is — and why that makes it so hard to depict
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The planets are so far apart, and the sun is so big, that you wouldn't be able to see anything in an accurate model of the solar system.

    The planets are so far apart, and the sun is so big, that you wouldn't be able to see anything in an accurate model of the solar system.


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  • 59/79   Expedition Titan uses mixed reality to turn Saturn’s mysterious moon into a thrill ride
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    It's doubtful anyone alive today will get to ride through the ice volcanoes of Saturn's largest moon — but you can do the next best thing at Seattle's Pacific Science Center, thanks to a mixed-reality experience called Expedition Titan. The walk-through production is the latest showcase for Hyperspace XR, a startup-in-residence that's pioneering the frontiers of mixed reality at the science center. That frontier is associated with other labels of immersive experiences, including virtual reality (MR), extended reality (XR) and augmented reality (AR). Hyperspace XR's brand of mixed reality involves creating a real-world environment — complete with walls, doorways and… Read More

    It's doubtful anyone alive today will get to ride through the ice volcanoes of Saturn's largest moon — but you can do the next best thing at Seattle's Pacific Science Center, thanks to a mixed-reality experience called Expedition Titan. The walk-through production is the latest showcase for Hyperspace XR, a startup-in-residence that's pioneering the frontiers of mixed reality at the science center. That frontier is associated with other labels of immersive experiences, including virtual reality (MR), extended reality (XR) and augmented reality (AR). Hyperspace XR's brand of mixed reality involves creating a real-world environment — complete with walls, doorways and… Read More


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  • 60/79   U.K. Conservatives and Labour Fight Over Tackling Terrorism After London Attack
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Boris Johnson is seeking to present his Conservatives as the party of security amid a bitter row with Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour over the circumstances that led to last week’s terrorist attack. U.S. President Donald Trump’s arrival for a NATO summit is a potential wildcard in the campaign.Must Read: U.K.’s Johnson Doubles Down on Security Theme After Knife AttackFor more on the election visit ELEC.Key Developments:Johnson, Corbyn and London Mayor Sadiq Khan attended vigil for victims of Friday’s London Bridge attackHome Secretary Priti Patel says Brexit is a once-in-a-generation opportunity to strengthen the U.K. borderJohnson holds campaign event in eastern England this eveningCorbyn pledges to cut regulated rail fares by 33% from JanuaryPolls released over the weekend showed the Conservatives’ lead narrowing, with one signaling a possible hung parliamentThere is a 69% chance of a Tory majority, according to BetfairCorbyn Pressures Johnson Over NHS (1:30 p.m.)Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn urged Prime Minister Boris Johnson to demonstrate the National Health Service will not be part of negotiations with the U.S. over a post-Brexit trade deal.Though Johnson has repeatedly said the NHS won’t be on the table in talks, Corbyn demanded concrete actions in a letter to Johnson on Monday. It’s a clear attempt to put the spotlight on the Tories with U.S. President Donald Trump due to arrive in the U.K. tonight for a NATO summit.Corbyn’s demands include the postponement of talks until U.S. negotiating objectives are amended to exclude any reference to pharmaceuticals. He also said the U.S. must accept U.K. authority to set the threshold for the cost-effectiveness of drugs used by the NHS, and said Johnson’s government must rule out giving U.S. companies access to British public services via dispute mechanisms beyond the reach of U.K. courts.Corbyn Says Big Spending Needed After Austerity (11 a.m.)Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said his party’s pledge to massively ramp up government spending is necessary after a decade of austerity has left the U.K. lagging behind European peers in terms of public services.“If all of our spending commitments -- the whole of our manifesto -- is carried out to every last letter, we still barely reach the levels of public services of France or Germany,” Corbyn said on Monday, according to the Press Association. “That’s how far behind we’ve fallen because of the strategy that’s been followed.”Corbyn was speaking at an event to cut regulated rail fares by a third as part of broader plans to bring the railways back into public ownership and lower the financial burden on commuters. Train companies plan to raise prices by an average 2.7% next year.Corbyn: Terrorists Should Be Released If Rehabilitated (Earlier)Last Friday’s terrorist attack is dominating campaigning ahead of the Dec. 12 election. At an event to launch his Labour Party’s pledge to cut regulated rail fares by 33% from January, leader Jeremy Corbyn was again quizzed about prisons and sentencing amid a deepening row with Boris Johnson’s Tories.“Terrorists should be sentenced, as they are, and they should be released as and when they have completed a significant proportion of their sentence and they’ve undergone rehabilitation and they are considered safe to the public as a whole,” Corbyn said, according to the Press Association.The row comes after Johnson pledged to end a 2008 law brought in under the last Labour government that gives prisoners automatic early release. Corbyn responded by blaming a decade of cuts to the prison service under the Conservatives for weakening its ability to detect risk and rehabilitate inmates.Johnson Using Trump Playbook on Security: Lee (Earlier)Former Conservative justice minister Phillip Lee, who defected to the Liberal Democrats this year in protest at the government’s Brexit strategy, accused Prime Minister Boris Johnson of channeling the Trumpian playbook in the wake of the London Bridge terrorist attack last week.“He’s just pressing buttons. We know this is the Trump playbook,” Lee said, referring to Johnson’s pledge to toughen sentencing. “The practical reality is it’s extremely difficult to do that if you haven’t got the prison places. And we never really had enough prison places in all the time I was a justice minister.”Lee’s comments on Sky News illustrate the risk for Johnson as he seeks to blame policies under the last Labour government -- which was voted out in 2010 -- for the circumstances surrounding last week’s attack. The premier has been framing his Tories as the party of law and order, but that means having to distance himself from justice system cuts made by his Tory predecessors.“We knew there was a problem with the probation service, which had been privatized in 2012 under Chris Grayling,” said Lee, who became justice minister in 2016. “It’s a cycle -- from police, courts, probation. They’ve all got to be working well if you want to reduce crime, reduce pressure on prisons, and be able to lock up the people like Usman Khan for much longer, indeed forever,” he said, referring to the convicted terrorist who carried out Friday’s attack.U.K. to Investigate Terrorists on Early Release (Earlier)Government officials are looking at all 70-odd cases of individuals convicted of terrorism who have been released on license, Justice Secretary Robert Buckland told BBC radio on Monday.“We are satisfying ourselves about the details and making sure that first of all, any license conditions are being complied with,” Buckland said. “If not, then individuals can be and will be recalled to prison, and secondly making sure that any license conditions are as comprehensive as possible.”Officials have decided that none will be allowed at events like the one attended by the perpetrator of Friday’s attack, he said. They’ll also examine early release programs and said it’s “right” to look again at the sentencing of terrorists and put public protection at the center of a future regime.Terrorists “can in effect hoodwink trained professionals,” Buckland said. He added that politicians need to “pause, and get the tone of this debate right.”Earlier:Johnson Bolsters Security Message After London Knife AttackJohnson and Corbyn Play Blame Game After U.K. Terrorist AttackTories Focus on Security Before NATO Summit: U.K. Campaign TrailTo contact the reporter on this story: Alex Morales in London at amorales2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Stuart Biggs, Mark WilliamsFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Boris Johnson is seeking to present his Conservatives as the party of security amid a bitter row with Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour over the circumstances that led to last week’s terrorist attack. U.S. President Donald Trump’s arrival for a NATO summit is a potential wildcard in the campaign.Must Read: U.K.’s Johnson Doubles Down on Security Theme After Knife AttackFor more on the election visit ELEC.Key Developments:Johnson, Corbyn and London Mayor Sadiq Khan attended vigil for victims of Friday’s London Bridge attackHome Secretary Priti Patel says Brexit is a once-in-a-generation opportunity to strengthen the U.K. borderJohnson holds campaign event in eastern England this eveningCorbyn pledges to cut regulated rail fares by 33% from JanuaryPolls released over the weekend showed the Conservatives’ lead narrowing, with one signaling a possible hung parliamentThere is a 69% chance of a Tory majority, according to BetfairCorbyn Pressures Johnson Over NHS (1:30 p.m.)Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn urged Prime Minister Boris Johnson to demonstrate the National Health Service will not be part of negotiations with the U.S. over a post-Brexit trade deal.Though Johnson has repeatedly said the NHS won’t be on the table in talks, Corbyn demanded concrete actions in a letter to Johnson on Monday. It’s a clear attempt to put the spotlight on the Tories with U.S. President Donald Trump due to arrive in the U.K. tonight for a NATO summit.Corbyn’s demands include the postponement of talks until U.S. negotiating objectives are amended to exclude any reference to pharmaceuticals. He also said the U.S. must accept U.K. authority to set the threshold for the cost-effectiveness of drugs used by the NHS, and said Johnson’s government must rule out giving U.S. companies access to British public services via dispute mechanisms beyond the reach of U.K. courts.Corbyn Says Big Spending Needed After Austerity (11 a.m.)Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said his party’s pledge to massively ramp up government spending is necessary after a decade of austerity has left the U.K. lagging behind European peers in terms of public services.“If all of our spending commitments -- the whole of our manifesto -- is carried out to every last letter, we still barely reach the levels of public services of France or Germany,” Corbyn said on Monday, according to the Press Association. “That’s how far behind we’ve fallen because of the strategy that’s been followed.”Corbyn was speaking at an event to cut regulated rail fares by a third as part of broader plans to bring the railways back into public ownership and lower the financial burden on commuters. Train companies plan to raise prices by an average 2.7% next year.Corbyn: Terrorists Should Be Released If Rehabilitated (Earlier)Last Friday’s terrorist attack is dominating campaigning ahead of the Dec. 12 election. At an event to launch his Labour Party’s pledge to cut regulated rail fares by 33% from January, leader Jeremy Corbyn was again quizzed about prisons and sentencing amid a deepening row with Boris Johnson’s Tories.“Terrorists should be sentenced, as they are, and they should be released as and when they have completed a significant proportion of their sentence and they’ve undergone rehabilitation and they are considered safe to the public as a whole,” Corbyn said, according to the Press Association.The row comes after Johnson pledged to end a 2008 law brought in under the last Labour government that gives prisoners automatic early release. Corbyn responded by blaming a decade of cuts to the prison service under the Conservatives for weakening its ability to detect risk and rehabilitate inmates.Johnson Using Trump Playbook on Security: Lee (Earlier)Former Conservative justice minister Phillip Lee, who defected to the Liberal Democrats this year in protest at the government’s Brexit strategy, accused Prime Minister Boris Johnson of channeling the Trumpian playbook in the wake of the London Bridge terrorist attack last week.“He’s just pressing buttons. We know this is the Trump playbook,” Lee said, referring to Johnson’s pledge to toughen sentencing. “The practical reality is it’s extremely difficult to do that if you haven’t got the prison places. And we never really had enough prison places in all the time I was a justice minister.”Lee’s comments on Sky News illustrate the risk for Johnson as he seeks to blame policies under the last Labour government -- which was voted out in 2010 -- for the circumstances surrounding last week’s attack. The premier has been framing his Tories as the party of law and order, but that means having to distance himself from justice system cuts made by his Tory predecessors.“We knew there was a problem with the probation service, which had been privatized in 2012 under Chris Grayling,” said Lee, who became justice minister in 2016. “It’s a cycle -- from police, courts, probation. They’ve all got to be working well if you want to reduce crime, reduce pressure on prisons, and be able to lock up the people like Usman Khan for much longer, indeed forever,” he said, referring to the convicted terrorist who carried out Friday’s attack.U.K. to Investigate Terrorists on Early Release (Earlier)Government officials are looking at all 70-odd cases of individuals convicted of terrorism who have been released on license, Justice Secretary Robert Buckland told BBC radio on Monday.“We are satisfying ourselves about the details and making sure that first of all, any license conditions are being complied with,” Buckland said. “If not, then individuals can be and will be recalled to prison, and secondly making sure that any license conditions are as comprehensive as possible.”Officials have decided that none will be allowed at events like the one attended by the perpetrator of Friday’s attack, he said. They’ll also examine early release programs and said it’s “right” to look again at the sentencing of terrorists and put public protection at the center of a future regime.Terrorists “can in effect hoodwink trained professionals,” Buckland said. He added that politicians need to “pause, and get the tone of this debate right.”Earlier:Johnson Bolsters Security Message After London Knife AttackJohnson and Corbyn Play Blame Game After U.K. Terrorist AttackTories Focus on Security Before NATO Summit: U.K. Campaign TrailTo contact the reporter on this story: Alex Morales in London at amorales2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Stuart Biggs, Mark WilliamsFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 61/79   With Brutal Crackdown, Iran Convulsed by Worst Unrest in 40 Years
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Iran is experiencing its deadliest political unrest since the Islamic Revolution 40 years ago, with at least 180 people killed -- and possibly hundreds more -- as angry protests have been smothered in a government crackdown of unbridled force.It began two weeks ago with an abrupt increase of at least 50% in gasoline prices. Within 72 hours, outraged demonstrators in cities large and small were calling for an end to the Islamic Republic's government and the downfall of its leaders.In many places, security forces responded by opening fire on unarmed protesters, largely unemployed or low-income young men between the ages of 19 and 26, according to witness accounts and videos. In the southwest city of Mahshahr alone, witnesses and medical personnel said, Revolutionary Guard members surrounded, shot and killed 40 to 100 demonstrators -- mostly unarmed young men -- in a marsh where they had sought refuge."The recent use of lethal force against people throughout the country is unprecedented, even for the Islamic Republic and its record of violence," said Omid Memarian, deputy director at the Center for Human Rights in Iran, a New York-based group.Altogether, between 180 to 450 people -- possibly more -- were killed in four days of intense violence after the gasoline price increase was announced Nov. 15, with at least 2,000 wounded and 7,000 detained, according to international rights organizations, opposition groups and local journalists.The last enormous wave of protests in Iran -- in 2009, after a contested election, which was also met with a deadly crackdown -- left 72 people dead over a much longer period of about 10 months.Only now, nearly two weeks after the protests were crushed -- and largely obscured by an internet blackout in the country that was lifted recently -- have details corroborating the scope of killings and destruction started to dribble out.The latest outbursts not only revealed staggering levels of frustration with Iran's leaders but also underscored the serious economic and political challenges facing them, from the Trump administration's onerous sanctions on the country to the growing resentment toward Iran by neighbors in an increasingly unstable Middle East.The gas price increase, which was announced as most Iranians had gone to bed, came as Iran struggles to fill a yawning budget gap. The Trump administration sanctions, most notably their tight restrictions on exports of Iran's oil, are a big reason for the shortfall. The sanctions are meant to pressure Iran into renegotiating the 2015 nuclear agreement between Iran and major world powers, which President Donald Trump abandoned, calling it too weak.Most of the nationwide unrest seemed concentrated in neighborhoods and cities populated by low-income and working-class families, suggesting this was an uprising born in the historically loyal power base of Iran's post-revolutionary hierarchy.Many Iranians, stupefied and embittered, have directed their hostility directly at the supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, who called the crackdown a justified response to a plot by Iran's enemies at home and abroad.The killings prompted a provocative warning from Mir Hossein Mousavi, an opposition leader and former presidential candidate whose 2009 election loss set off peaceful demonstrations that Khamenei also suppressed by force.In a statement posted Saturday on an opposition website, Mousavi, who has been under house arrest since 2011 and seldom speaks publicly, blamed the supreme leader for the killings. He compared them to an infamous 1978 massacre by government forces that led to the downfall of Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi a year later at the hands of Islamic revolutionaries who now rule the country."The killers of the year 1978 were the representatives of a nonreligious regime, and the agents and shooters of November 2019 are the representatives of a religious government," he said. "Then the commander in chief was the shah and today, here, the supreme leader with absolute authority."Authorities have declined to specify casualties and arrests and have denounced unofficial figures on the national death toll as speculative. But the nation's interior minister, Abdolreza Rahmani Fazli, has cited widespread unrest around the country.On state media, he said that protests had erupted in 29 out of 31 provinces and 50 military bases had been attacked -- which, if true, suggests a level of coordination absent in the earlier protests. The property damage also included 731 banks, 140 public spaces, nine religious centers, 70 gasoline stations, 307 vehicles, 183 police cars, 1,076 motorcycles and 34 ambulances, the interior minister said. Iran's official media have reported that several members of the security forces were killed and injured during the clashes.The worst violence documented so far happened in the city of Mahshahr and its suburbs, with a population of 120,000 people in Iran's southwest Khuzestan province -- a region with an ethnic Arab majority that has a long history of unrest and opposition to the central government. Mahshahr is adjacent to the nation's largest industrial petrochemical complex and serves as a gateway to Bandar Imam, a major port.The New York Times interviewed six residents of the city, including a protest leader who had witnessed the violence; a reporter based in the city who works for Iranian media and had investigated the violence but was banned from reporting it; and a nurse at the hospital where casualties were treated.They each provided similar accounts of how the Revolutionary Guard deployed a large force to Mahshahr on Monday, Nov. 18, to crush the protests. All spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of retribution by the Guard.For three days, according to these residents, protesters had successfully gained control of most of Mahshahr and its suburbs, blocking the main road to the city and the adjacent industrial petrochemical complex. Iran's interior minister confirmed that protesters had gained control over Mahshahr and its roads in a televised interview last week, but the Iranian government did not respond to specific questions in recent days about the mass killings in the city.Local security forces and riot police officers had attempted to disperse the crowd and open the roads but failed, residents said. Several clashes between protesters and security forces erupted between Saturday evening and Monday morning before Guard members were dispatched there.When the Guard arrived near the entrance to a suburb, Shahrak Chamran, populated by low-income members of Iran's ethnic Arab minority, they immediately shot without warning at dozens of men blocking the intersection, killing several on the spot, according to the residents interviewed by phone.The residents said the other protesters scrambled to a nearby marsh and that one of them, apparently armed with an AK-47, fired back. The Guard immediately encircled the men and responded with machine-gun fire, killing as many as 100 people, the residents said.The Guard piled the dead onto the back of a truck and departed, the residents said, and relatives of the wounded then transported them to Memko Hospital.One of the residents, a 24-year-old unemployed college graduate in chemistry who had helped organize the protests blocking the roads, said he had been less than 1 mile away from the mass shooting and that his best friend, also 24, and a 32-year-old cousin were among the dead.He said they both had been shot in the chest and their bodies were returned to the families five days later, only after they had signed paperwork promising not to hold funerals or memorial services and not to give interviews to media.The young protest organizer said he, too, was shot in the ribs Nov. 19, the day after the mass shooting, when the Guard stormed with tanks into his neighborhood, Shahrak Taleghani, among the poorest suburbs of Mahshahr.He said a gunbattle erupted for hours between the Guard and ethnic Arab residents, who traditionally keep guns for hunting at home. Iranian state media and witnesses reported that a senior Guard commander had been killed in a Mahshahr clash. Video on Twitter suggests tanks had been deployed there.A 32-year-old nurse in Mahshahr reached by phone said she had tended to the wounded at the hospital and that most had sustained gunshot wounds to the head and chest.She described chaotic scenes at the hospital, with families rushing to bring in the casualties, including a 21-year-old who was to be married but could not be saved. "'Give me back my son!'" the nurse quoted his sobbing mother as saying. "'It's his wedding in two weeks!'"The nurse said security forces stationed at the hospital arrested some of the wounded protesters after their conditions had stabilized. She said some relatives, fearing arrest themselves, dropped wounded loved ones at the hospital and fled, covering their faces.On Nov. 25, a week after it happened, the city's representative in parliament, Mohamad Golmordai, vented outrage in a blunt moment of searing anti-government criticism that was broadcast on Iranian state television and captured in photos and videos uploaded to the internet."What have you done that the undignified Shah did not do?" Golmordai screamed from the parliament floor as a scuffle broke out between him and other lawmakers, including one who grabbed him by the throat.The local reporter in Mahshahr said the total number of people killed in three days of unrest in the area had reached 130, including those killed in the marsh.In other cities such as Shiraz and Shahriar, dozens were reported killed in the unrest by security forces who fired on unarmed protesters, according to rights groups and videos posted by witnesses."This regime has pushed people toward violence," said Yousef Alsarkhi, 29, a political activist from Khuzestan who migrated to the Netherlands four years ago. "The more they repress, the more aggressive and angry people get."Political analysts said the protests appeared to have delivered a severe blow to President Hassan Rouhani, a relative moderate in Iran's political spectrum, all but guaranteeing that hard-liners would win upcoming parliamentary elections and the presidency in two years.The tough response to the protests also appeared to signal a hardening rift between Iran's leaders and sizable segments of the population of 83 million."The government's response was uncompromising, brutal and rapid," said Henry Rome, an Iran analyst at the Eurasia Group, a political risk consultancy in Washington. Still, he said, the protests also had "demonstrated that many Iranians are not afraid to take to the streets."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company

    Iran is experiencing its deadliest political unrest since the Islamic Revolution 40 years ago, with at least 180 people killed -- and possibly hundreds more -- as angry protests have been smothered in a government crackdown of unbridled force.It began two weeks ago with an abrupt increase of at least 50% in gasoline prices. Within 72 hours, outraged demonstrators in cities large and small were calling for an end to the Islamic Republic's government and the downfall of its leaders.In many places, security forces responded by opening fire on unarmed protesters, largely unemployed or low-income young men between the ages of 19 and 26, according to witness accounts and videos. In the southwest city of Mahshahr alone, witnesses and medical personnel said, Revolutionary Guard members surrounded, shot and killed 40 to 100 demonstrators -- mostly unarmed young men -- in a marsh where they had sought refuge."The recent use of lethal force against people throughout the country is unprecedented, even for the Islamic Republic and its record of violence," said Omid Memarian, deputy director at the Center for Human Rights in Iran, a New York-based group.Altogether, between 180 to 450 people -- possibly more -- were killed in four days of intense violence after the gasoline price increase was announced Nov. 15, with at least 2,000 wounded and 7,000 detained, according to international rights organizations, opposition groups and local journalists.The last enormous wave of protests in Iran -- in 2009, after a contested election, which was also met with a deadly crackdown -- left 72 people dead over a much longer period of about 10 months.Only now, nearly two weeks after the protests were crushed -- and largely obscured by an internet blackout in the country that was lifted recently -- have details corroborating the scope of killings and destruction started to dribble out.The latest outbursts not only revealed staggering levels of frustration with Iran's leaders but also underscored the serious economic and political challenges facing them, from the Trump administration's onerous sanctions on the country to the growing resentment toward Iran by neighbors in an increasingly unstable Middle East.The gas price increase, which was announced as most Iranians had gone to bed, came as Iran struggles to fill a yawning budget gap. The Trump administration sanctions, most notably their tight restrictions on exports of Iran's oil, are a big reason for the shortfall. The sanctions are meant to pressure Iran into renegotiating the 2015 nuclear agreement between Iran and major world powers, which President Donald Trump abandoned, calling it too weak.Most of the nationwide unrest seemed concentrated in neighborhoods and cities populated by low-income and working-class families, suggesting this was an uprising born in the historically loyal power base of Iran's post-revolutionary hierarchy.Many Iranians, stupefied and embittered, have directed their hostility directly at the supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, who called the crackdown a justified response to a plot by Iran's enemies at home and abroad.The killings prompted a provocative warning from Mir Hossein Mousavi, an opposition leader and former presidential candidate whose 2009 election loss set off peaceful demonstrations that Khamenei also suppressed by force.In a statement posted Saturday on an opposition website, Mousavi, who has been under house arrest since 2011 and seldom speaks publicly, blamed the supreme leader for the killings. He compared them to an infamous 1978 massacre by government forces that led to the downfall of Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi a year later at the hands of Islamic revolutionaries who now rule the country."The killers of the year 1978 were the representatives of a nonreligious regime, and the agents and shooters of November 2019 are the representatives of a religious government," he said. "Then the commander in chief was the shah and today, here, the supreme leader with absolute authority."Authorities have declined to specify casualties and arrests and have denounced unofficial figures on the national death toll as speculative. But the nation's interior minister, Abdolreza Rahmani Fazli, has cited widespread unrest around the country.On state media, he said that protests had erupted in 29 out of 31 provinces and 50 military bases had been attacked -- which, if true, suggests a level of coordination absent in the earlier protests. The property damage also included 731 banks, 140 public spaces, nine religious centers, 70 gasoline stations, 307 vehicles, 183 police cars, 1,076 motorcycles and 34 ambulances, the interior minister said. Iran's official media have reported that several members of the security forces were killed and injured during the clashes.The worst violence documented so far happened in the city of Mahshahr and its suburbs, with a population of 120,000 people in Iran's southwest Khuzestan province -- a region with an ethnic Arab majority that has a long history of unrest and opposition to the central government. Mahshahr is adjacent to the nation's largest industrial petrochemical complex and serves as a gateway to Bandar Imam, a major port.The New York Times interviewed six residents of the city, including a protest leader who had witnessed the violence; a reporter based in the city who works for Iranian media and had investigated the violence but was banned from reporting it; and a nurse at the hospital where casualties were treated.They each provided similar accounts of how the Revolutionary Guard deployed a large force to Mahshahr on Monday, Nov. 18, to crush the protests. All spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of retribution by the Guard.For three days, according to these residents, protesters had successfully gained control of most of Mahshahr and its suburbs, blocking the main road to the city and the adjacent industrial petrochemical complex. Iran's interior minister confirmed that protesters had gained control over Mahshahr and its roads in a televised interview last week, but the Iranian government did not respond to specific questions in recent days about the mass killings in the city.Local security forces and riot police officers had attempted to disperse the crowd and open the roads but failed, residents said. Several clashes between protesters and security forces erupted between Saturday evening and Monday morning before Guard members were dispatched there.When the Guard arrived near the entrance to a suburb, Shahrak Chamran, populated by low-income members of Iran's ethnic Arab minority, they immediately shot without warning at dozens of men blocking the intersection, killing several on the spot, according to the residents interviewed by phone.The residents said the other protesters scrambled to a nearby marsh and that one of them, apparently armed with an AK-47, fired back. The Guard immediately encircled the men and responded with machine-gun fire, killing as many as 100 people, the residents said.The Guard piled the dead onto the back of a truck and departed, the residents said, and relatives of the wounded then transported them to Memko Hospital.One of the residents, a 24-year-old unemployed college graduate in chemistry who had helped organize the protests blocking the roads, said he had been less than 1 mile away from the mass shooting and that his best friend, also 24, and a 32-year-old cousin were among the dead.He said they both had been shot in the chest and their bodies were returned to the families five days later, only after they had signed paperwork promising not to hold funerals or memorial services and not to give interviews to media.The young protest organizer said he, too, was shot in the ribs Nov. 19, the day after the mass shooting, when the Guard stormed with tanks into his neighborhood, Shahrak Taleghani, among the poorest suburbs of Mahshahr.He said a gunbattle erupted for hours between the Guard and ethnic Arab residents, who traditionally keep guns for hunting at home. Iranian state media and witnesses reported that a senior Guard commander had been killed in a Mahshahr clash. Video on Twitter suggests tanks had been deployed there.A 32-year-old nurse in Mahshahr reached by phone said she had tended to the wounded at the hospital and that most had sustained gunshot wounds to the head and chest.She described chaotic scenes at the hospital, with families rushing to bring in the casualties, including a 21-year-old who was to be married but could not be saved. "'Give me back my son!'" the nurse quoted his sobbing mother as saying. "'It's his wedding in two weeks!'"The nurse said security forces stationed at the hospital arrested some of the wounded protesters after their conditions had stabilized. She said some relatives, fearing arrest themselves, dropped wounded loved ones at the hospital and fled, covering their faces.On Nov. 25, a week after it happened, the city's representative in parliament, Mohamad Golmordai, vented outrage in a blunt moment of searing anti-government criticism that was broadcast on Iranian state television and captured in photos and videos uploaded to the internet."What have you done that the undignified Shah did not do?" Golmordai screamed from the parliament floor as a scuffle broke out between him and other lawmakers, including one who grabbed him by the throat.The local reporter in Mahshahr said the total number of people killed in three days of unrest in the area had reached 130, including those killed in the marsh.In other cities such as Shiraz and Shahriar, dozens were reported killed in the unrest by security forces who fired on unarmed protesters, according to rights groups and videos posted by witnesses."This regime has pushed people toward violence," said Yousef Alsarkhi, 29, a political activist from Khuzestan who migrated to the Netherlands four years ago. "The more they repress, the more aggressive and angry people get."Political analysts said the protests appeared to have delivered a severe blow to President Hassan Rouhani, a relative moderate in Iran's political spectrum, all but guaranteeing that hard-liners would win upcoming parliamentary elections and the presidency in two years.The tough response to the protests also appeared to signal a hardening rift between Iran's leaders and sizable segments of the population of 83 million."The government's response was uncompromising, brutal and rapid," said Henry Rome, an Iran analyst at the Eurasia Group, a political risk consultancy in Washington. Still, he said, the protests also had "demonstrated that many Iranians are not afraid to take to the streets."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company


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  • 62/79   Israel’s AG files official indictment against PM Netanyahu
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Israel’s attorney general has officially submitted his indictment against Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, giving him 30 days to appeal for immunity.  The 77-page indictment was made public on Monday, charging the longtime Israeli leader with bribery, fraud and breach of trust in three separate corruption cases.  Israel’s political system is in disarray following the second inconclusive election of the year, making it unlikely Netanyahu would ask — or receive — parliamentary immunity from prosecution.

    Israel’s attorney general has officially submitted his indictment against Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, giving him 30 days to appeal for immunity. The 77-page indictment was made public on Monday, charging the longtime Israeli leader with bribery, fraud and breach of trust in three separate corruption cases. Israel’s political system is in disarray following the second inconclusive election of the year, making it unlikely Netanyahu would ask — or receive — parliamentary immunity from prosecution.


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  • 63/79   Germany’s Political Crisis Will Unfold in Slow Motion
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- A German political crisis isn’t a raging, unstoppable, unpredictable forest fire: It starts with seemingly irreconcilable positions but then evolves into a tedious, detail-focused negotiation and, more often than not, a compromise. That’s the direction things appear to be taking after the election of two determined leftists as co-leaders of the Social Democratic party (SPD), the junior member of Germany’s ruling coalition.When Saskia Esken and Norbert Walter-Borjans campaigned for the party leadership against Finance Minister Olaf Scholz and Klara Geywitz, they spoke scathingly about the coalition. Esken declared it had “no future.” The more cautious Walter-Borjans said he was “firmly convinced” it couldn’t meet the SPD’s demands. That probably helped them win the leadership election, in which only 54% of the party membership took part.But their victory on Saturday, with just over half of the vote, doesn’t give them a mandate to pull the ailing party out of government. Such a momentous decision would have to be taken by the party conference set for this weekend. While surprises are possible, it’s more likely that the SPD will vote instead to amend the 2018 coalition agreement.On Sunday, the new leaders spoke on German TV about the revisions they’d like to see. Walter-Borjans focused on the government’s climate package, now making its way through the parliament; he’d like a much higher carbon price than the currently envisaged 10 euros ($11) per ton of CO2 and, accordingly, higher spending to offset that price for low-income households.Esken called for more infrastructure spending to make up for years of underinvestment at a communal level. Plugging that hole, estimated at more than 138 billion euros ($152 billion), would require deviating from the balanced budget policy of the senior coalition partner, Chancellor Angela Merkel’s Christian Democratic Union (CDU) — the famous “black zero.”The new leadership duo, then, isn’t going to call for their party’s unconditional withdrawal from the coalition. What Walter-Borjans and Esken really want is to try to extract concessions from the CDU, using a two-year revision clause in the current coalition agreement to the maximum. Whether they have the leverage to get much is doubtful. Both uncharismatic functionaries, they don’t have enough influence on their own party, especially its elite cadre made up of the heads of state governments and the parliamentary faction. The latter isn’t ready for a snap election that the SPD is highly likely to lose miserably. A split in the party as its senior politicians abandon a sinking ship is a fearful prospect for the new leaders, forcing them to go softer on Merkel than they perhaps would like. The CDU, for its part, theoretically could try running a minority government (though that’s never been Merkel’s  preference). Besides, it stands to come first in any early election, and perhaps to form a new ruling coalition with the Greens, completing the SPD’s descent into irrelevance.So, as the new SPD leaders try to stake out a tough negotiating position, CDU politicians, starting with the party leader, Defense  Minister Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer, are doing the same, insisting that the revision clause doesn’t imply a renegotiation of the coalition treaty. This doesn’t mean the CDU won’t talk. It will aim to placate, if not the fiery Esken, then the SPD elite and broader membership, which gave a stronger vote of approval to the coalition deal last year (66% support on a 78% turnout) than to the new leadership duo at the weekend. The behind-the-scenes bargaining has already begun, and it will affect the outcome of the weekend’s SPD conference. Scholz, whom the new leaders formally support as finance minister, has plenty of backers, especially among the party brass, and he’s not in favor of abandoning the black zero policy. This group within the SPD will work to prevent the conference from making this demand, a potential coalition-breaker. If the SPD’s final proposals stop short of such sweeping ambition, it wouldn’t be impossible for the CDU to allow some extra spending: Economic forecasts tracked by Bloomberg predict a German budget surplus of 1% of economic output this year.What’s happening to the SPD is a tragedy for the party, whose new leaders hardly have the magnetism needed to draw voters back to a weakened, directionless political force. But it’s not a tragedy for the last Merkel government — at least not yet.“We have started quite a lot of things, but there’s still much to do,” the chancellor remarked in a speech to parliament last week. “That’s why I believe we should work up to the end of the legislative period." Then she added: “I’m up for it. Great if you are, too.”Though she’s acted increasingly tired and distant, she’s definitely capable of one last negotiation with her coalition partners to avoid disrupting the stability she’s proud to have brought to Germany. The opportunity is the SPD’s to waste, and the consequences of  doing that would be largely the SPD’s to suffer. To contact the author of this story: Leonid Bershidsky at lbershidsky@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Leonid Bershidsky is Bloomberg Opinion's Europe columnist. He was the founding editor of the Russian business daily Vedomosti and founded the opinion website Slon.ru.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- A German political crisis isn’t a raging, unstoppable, unpredictable forest fire: It starts with seemingly irreconcilable positions but then evolves into a tedious, detail-focused negotiation and, more often than not, a compromise. That’s the direction things appear to be taking after the election of two determined leftists as co-leaders of the Social Democratic party (SPD), the junior member of Germany’s ruling coalition.When Saskia Esken and Norbert Walter-Borjans campaigned for the party leadership against Finance Minister Olaf Scholz and Klara Geywitz, they spoke scathingly about the coalition. Esken declared it had “no future.” The more cautious Walter-Borjans said he was “firmly convinced” it couldn’t meet the SPD’s demands. That probably helped them win the leadership election, in which only 54% of the party membership took part.But their victory on Saturday, with just over half of the vote, doesn’t give them a mandate to pull the ailing party out of government. Such a momentous decision would have to be taken by the party conference set for this weekend. While surprises are possible, it’s more likely that the SPD will vote instead to amend the 2018 coalition agreement.On Sunday, the new leaders spoke on German TV about the revisions they’d like to see. Walter-Borjans focused on the government’s climate package, now making its way through the parliament; he’d like a much higher carbon price than the currently envisaged 10 euros ($11) per ton of CO2 and, accordingly, higher spending to offset that price for low-income households.Esken called for more infrastructure spending to make up for years of underinvestment at a communal level. Plugging that hole, estimated at more than 138 billion euros ($152 billion), would require deviating from the balanced budget policy of the senior coalition partner, Chancellor Angela Merkel’s Christian Democratic Union (CDU) — the famous “black zero.”The new leadership duo, then, isn’t going to call for their party’s unconditional withdrawal from the coalition. What Walter-Borjans and Esken really want is to try to extract concessions from the CDU, using a two-year revision clause in the current coalition agreement to the maximum. Whether they have the leverage to get much is doubtful. Both uncharismatic functionaries, they don’t have enough influence on their own party, especially its elite cadre made up of the heads of state governments and the parliamentary faction. The latter isn’t ready for a snap election that the SPD is highly likely to lose miserably. A split in the party as its senior politicians abandon a sinking ship is a fearful prospect for the new leaders, forcing them to go softer on Merkel than they perhaps would like. The CDU, for its part, theoretically could try running a minority government (though that’s never been Merkel’s  preference). Besides, it stands to come first in any early election, and perhaps to form a new ruling coalition with the Greens, completing the SPD’s descent into irrelevance.So, as the new SPD leaders try to stake out a tough negotiating position, CDU politicians, starting with the party leader, Defense  Minister Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer, are doing the same, insisting that the revision clause doesn’t imply a renegotiation of the coalition treaty. This doesn’t mean the CDU won’t talk. It will aim to placate, if not the fiery Esken, then the SPD elite and broader membership, which gave a stronger vote of approval to the coalition deal last year (66% support on a 78% turnout) than to the new leadership duo at the weekend. The behind-the-scenes bargaining has already begun, and it will affect the outcome of the weekend’s SPD conference. Scholz, whom the new leaders formally support as finance minister, has plenty of backers, especially among the party brass, and he’s not in favor of abandoning the black zero policy. This group within the SPD will work to prevent the conference from making this demand, a potential coalition-breaker. If the SPD’s final proposals stop short of such sweeping ambition, it wouldn’t be impossible for the CDU to allow some extra spending: Economic forecasts tracked by Bloomberg predict a German budget surplus of 1% of economic output this year.What’s happening to the SPD is a tragedy for the party, whose new leaders hardly have the magnetism needed to draw voters back to a weakened, directionless political force. But it’s not a tragedy for the last Merkel government — at least not yet.“We have started quite a lot of things, but there’s still much to do,” the chancellor remarked in a speech to parliament last week. “That’s why I believe we should work up to the end of the legislative period." Then she added: “I’m up for it. Great if you are, too.”Though she’s acted increasingly tired and distant, she’s definitely capable of one last negotiation with her coalition partners to avoid disrupting the stability she’s proud to have brought to Germany. The opportunity is the SPD’s to waste, and the consequences of  doing that would be largely the SPD’s to suffer. To contact the author of this story: Leonid Bershidsky at lbershidsky@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Leonid Bershidsky is Bloomberg Opinion's Europe columnist. He was the founding editor of the Russian business daily Vedomosti and founded the opinion website Slon.ru.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 64/79   Putin, Xi launch 'historic' Russian gas pipeline to China
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Russia and China on Monday launched a giant gas pipeline linking the countries for the first time, one of three major projects aimed at cementing Moscow's role as the world's top gas exporter.  Presiding by video link-up over an elaborate televised ceremony, Russian leader Vladimir Putin and Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping hailed the 'Power of Siberia' pipeline as a symbol of cooperation.  'Today is remarkable, a truly historic event not only for the global energy market, but first of all for us and for you, for Russia and China,' Putin said.

    Russia and China on Monday launched a giant gas pipeline linking the countries for the first time, one of three major projects aimed at cementing Moscow's role as the world's top gas exporter. Presiding by video link-up over an elaborate televised ceremony, Russian leader Vladimir Putin and Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping hailed the 'Power of Siberia' pipeline as a symbol of cooperation. 'Today is remarkable, a truly historic event not only for the global energy market, but first of all for us and for you, for Russia and China,' Putin said.


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  • 65/79   Traditional 'foreign policy' no longer exists. Democrats are the last to know
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Progressives need a new doctrine, championing the interests of the global 99% against a transnational oligarchy  ‘The rules of the global game have changed for good. Donald Trump and his allies see it clearly. Democrats must now step up and confront reality, or risk losing ground for good.’ Photograph: Anadolu Agency/Getty ImagesThere are few phrases as fundamental to US politics as foreign policy. It shapes the balance of power between branches of government. It separates a special class of public servants. And it commands sober respect from both sides of the partisan aisle.Indeed, in American politics, “foreign policy” is a phrase used so unthinkingly that it may be strange to point out what it really is: a paradigm first developed to protect the English monarchy, imported across the Atlantic by our nation’s founders, stretched to breaking point by over two centuries of geopolitical change, and broken – at last – by the presidency of Donald Trump.embedAccording to the old paradigm of foreign policy, there is a clear line between domestic and foreign: inside our borders, we may fight about taxes, transfers, and fundamental rights; but once we venture outside those borders, it is our “national interest” against the world. In the immortal words of Senator Arthur Vandenberg: “Politics stops at the water’s edge.”The concept of “foreign policy” emerged in eighteenth-century England as a strategy to insulate the Crown’s authority abroad from parliamentary pressure at home. “We ought not to pry into such secrets as relate to foreign Affairs,” implored Sir William Yonge of his fellow Members of Parliament in 1743. “As our business relates chiefly to domestick affairs, we ought to keep within that province.” But in the US, foreign policy – and its notion of a national interest protected by the executive – became a cherished ideal behind which the founders promised to lead their city on the hill.Trump has laid waste to this worldview. From welcoming Russian electoral interference in the US to seeking dirt on rivals in relations with China and Ukraine, Trump has eschewed the traditional rules of foreign policy to practice a novel form of foreign politics: a framework of international affairs with little regard for Vandenberg’s cardinal rule.To the horror of the beltway establishment, he leaves half the state department empty and elevates transactional horse-trading above institutional protocol. Rather than relying on career diplomats and respecting old alliances, he takes to Twitter and courts useful dictators. Rather than pretending to represent the national interest, he openly advocates for a narrow swath of supporters and cronies.This is a paradigm shift long in formation. Over the course of the last two centuries, the Westphalian system that inspired the founding architects of US foreign policy – a world of sovereign nation-states communicating through their respective executives – has broken down, displaced by a new set of transnational networks often dominated by non-state actors: Facebooks and Googles, Blackrocks and Deutsche Banks.> Trump has eschewed the traditional rules of foreign policy to practice a novel form of foreign politicsIn this new global context, the boundaries between foreign and domestic have blurred. China, for example, owns more US debt, trades more with the US, and emits more greenhouse gases than any other country. Unlike with past adversaries, the interests of countless American businesses cannot be disentangled from Chinese economic success.The notion of a single “national interest”, for its part, has degraded to mere farce. After five decades of stagnant wages and inflamed wealth inequality, few believe that the boats still rise together. When the US government protects the intellectual property of its pharmaceutical companies – raising prices for American patients while guaranteeing offshore profits – whose interest does it really serve?Trump’s election was a symptom of a foreign policy paradigm in terminal decline; his foreign politics a dark premonition of what might replace it. Not only were his supporters reacting to a general sense that they had lost control over their national borders in the process of rapid international integration; they were also reacting to a more acute sense that the US government and its army of diplomats merely channeled the interests of a transnational economic elite. Trump promised to attack that elite, and – through his diplomacy-by-Twitter – cut out the middlemen unworthy of trust.Trump is, of course, not alone. From Benjamin Netanyahu to Vladimir Putin, rightwing leaders are practicing foreign politics to advance their personal interests, linking up in a network of like-minded authoritarians who have little respect for the cherished norms of the liberal international order.Where does that leave the Democratic party and its presidential contenders?Broadly divided into three camps: the Restorers, the Restrainers, and the Transformers. Each takes a different view of foreign policy, though none faces up to the paradigm shift at hand.Restorers like Joe Biden view Donald Trump as the great aberration who pushed US foreign policy off its stable path; their policies aim, therefore, to reset the clock: rejoin the Paris accords, re-sign the Iran deal. This is a platform of nostalgic denial: Restorers neither appreciate the fragility of Obama’s foreign policy victories, nor recognize his many failings.> The rules of the global game have changed for good. Trump and his allies see it clearlyRestrainers, by contrast, reckon with the failings of foreign policy past – in particular, a string of broken promises with respect to America’s armed intervention abroad. Their core commitment is to “end the endless war”, drastically downsizing the US military and demanding greater oversight of its operations. In other words, their aim is not necessarily to replace the old foreign policy toolkit wholesale, but to catch the arm of the US government as it reaches for its most lethal tool.In this sense, the Restrainers ultimately defend the foreign policy paradigm, appealing to the more noble traditions of American diplomacy. But by calling for a more “responsible” form of statecraft, the Restrainers betray their own nostalgia for the calm waters of the liberal international order. The principle of restraint is certainly an important virtue in international affairs. But it is a brittle one: it implies that the US is holding back from serving its true interests, and is therefore vulnerable to strongmen who vow to break taboos and serve them better.This is where the Transformers should come in. Represented in the presidential race by Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren, the Transformers recognize the profound shift in international affairs and the range of new methods that will be necessary as a result.Sanders speaks, for example, of the need for an “international progressive front” that supports “partnerships not just between governments, but between peoples”. Elizabeth Warren describes a similar seismic shift in our foreign affairs. “The world was changing before President Trump took office, and it will continue to change after he has gone,” Elizabeth Warren wrote in her pitch for a “Foreign Policy for All”.But the Transformers, too, have offered little to move us beyond the old paradigm. Sanders provides few concrete plans to build a progressive front or international institutions to facilitate people-to-people partnerships. And Warren’s vision remains faithful to its core myth of a unified national interest. Her “foreign policy for all” is a contradiction in terms: protecting some American interests on the global stage will require undermining others.Here, we can start to see the outline a different kind of a foreign politics: a progressive foreign politics, which begins from the same premise as Trump – that politics no longer stops at the water’s edge – but inverts its strategies, policies and priorities. One that builds new multilateral institutions, rather than wrecking them; one that powers democratic movements, rather than squashing them; one that is unafraid to champion the shared interests of a global 99% against those of a consolidated transnational oligarchy.The rules of the global game have changed for good. Trump and his allies see it clearly. Democrats must now step up and confront their new reality. Politics no longer end at the water’s edge. But from watching these debates, Democrats seem like the last to know.  * David Adler is Policy Leader Fellow at the School of Transnational Governance at the European University Institute.  * Ben Judah is a fellow at the Hudson Institute in Washington DC

    Progressives need a new doctrine, championing the interests of the global 99% against a transnational oligarchy ‘The rules of the global game have changed for good. Donald Trump and his allies see it clearly. Democrats must now step up and confront reality, or risk losing ground for good.’ Photograph: Anadolu Agency/Getty ImagesThere are few phrases as fundamental to US politics as foreign policy. It shapes the balance of power between branches of government. It separates a special class of public servants. And it commands sober respect from both sides of the partisan aisle.Indeed, in American politics, “foreign policy” is a phrase used so unthinkingly that it may be strange to point out what it really is: a paradigm first developed to protect the English monarchy, imported across the Atlantic by our nation’s founders, stretched to breaking point by over two centuries of geopolitical change, and broken – at last – by the presidency of Donald Trump.embedAccording to the old paradigm of foreign policy, there is a clear line between domestic and foreign: inside our borders, we may fight about taxes, transfers, and fundamental rights; but once we venture outside those borders, it is our “national interest” against the world. In the immortal words of Senator Arthur Vandenberg: “Politics stops at the water’s edge.”The concept of “foreign policy” emerged in eighteenth-century England as a strategy to insulate the Crown’s authority abroad from parliamentary pressure at home. “We ought not to pry into such secrets as relate to foreign Affairs,” implored Sir William Yonge of his fellow Members of Parliament in 1743. “As our business relates chiefly to domestick affairs, we ought to keep within that province.” But in the US, foreign policy – and its notion of a national interest protected by the executive – became a cherished ideal behind which the founders promised to lead their city on the hill.Trump has laid waste to this worldview. From welcoming Russian electoral interference in the US to seeking dirt on rivals in relations with China and Ukraine, Trump has eschewed the traditional rules of foreign policy to practice a novel form of foreign politics: a framework of international affairs with little regard for Vandenberg’s cardinal rule.To the horror of the beltway establishment, he leaves half the state department empty and elevates transactional horse-trading above institutional protocol. Rather than relying on career diplomats and respecting old alliances, he takes to Twitter and courts useful dictators. Rather than pretending to represent the national interest, he openly advocates for a narrow swath of supporters and cronies.This is a paradigm shift long in formation. Over the course of the last two centuries, the Westphalian system that inspired the founding architects of US foreign policy – a world of sovereign nation-states communicating through their respective executives – has broken down, displaced by a new set of transnational networks often dominated by non-state actors: Facebooks and Googles, Blackrocks and Deutsche Banks.> Trump has eschewed the traditional rules of foreign policy to practice a novel form of foreign politicsIn this new global context, the boundaries between foreign and domestic have blurred. China, for example, owns more US debt, trades more with the US, and emits more greenhouse gases than any other country. Unlike with past adversaries, the interests of countless American businesses cannot be disentangled from Chinese economic success.The notion of a single “national interest”, for its part, has degraded to mere farce. After five decades of stagnant wages and inflamed wealth inequality, few believe that the boats still rise together. When the US government protects the intellectual property of its pharmaceutical companies – raising prices for American patients while guaranteeing offshore profits – whose interest does it really serve?Trump’s election was a symptom of a foreign policy paradigm in terminal decline; his foreign politics a dark premonition of what might replace it. Not only were his supporters reacting to a general sense that they had lost control over their national borders in the process of rapid international integration; they were also reacting to a more acute sense that the US government and its army of diplomats merely channeled the interests of a transnational economic elite. Trump promised to attack that elite, and – through his diplomacy-by-Twitter – cut out the middlemen unworthy of trust.Trump is, of course, not alone. From Benjamin Netanyahu to Vladimir Putin, rightwing leaders are practicing foreign politics to advance their personal interests, linking up in a network of like-minded authoritarians who have little respect for the cherished norms of the liberal international order.Where does that leave the Democratic party and its presidential contenders?Broadly divided into three camps: the Restorers, the Restrainers, and the Transformers. Each takes a different view of foreign policy, though none faces up to the paradigm shift at hand.Restorers like Joe Biden view Donald Trump as the great aberration who pushed US foreign policy off its stable path; their policies aim, therefore, to reset the clock: rejoin the Paris accords, re-sign the Iran deal. This is a platform of nostalgic denial: Restorers neither appreciate the fragility of Obama’s foreign policy victories, nor recognize his many failings.> The rules of the global game have changed for good. Trump and his allies see it clearlyRestrainers, by contrast, reckon with the failings of foreign policy past – in particular, a string of broken promises with respect to America’s armed intervention abroad. Their core commitment is to “end the endless war”, drastically downsizing the US military and demanding greater oversight of its operations. In other words, their aim is not necessarily to replace the old foreign policy toolkit wholesale, but to catch the arm of the US government as it reaches for its most lethal tool.In this sense, the Restrainers ultimately defend the foreign policy paradigm, appealing to the more noble traditions of American diplomacy. But by calling for a more “responsible” form of statecraft, the Restrainers betray their own nostalgia for the calm waters of the liberal international order. The principle of restraint is certainly an important virtue in international affairs. But it is a brittle one: it implies that the US is holding back from serving its true interests, and is therefore vulnerable to strongmen who vow to break taboos and serve them better.This is where the Transformers should come in. Represented in the presidential race by Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren, the Transformers recognize the profound shift in international affairs and the range of new methods that will be necessary as a result.Sanders speaks, for example, of the need for an “international progressive front” that supports “partnerships not just between governments, but between peoples”. Elizabeth Warren describes a similar seismic shift in our foreign affairs. “The world was changing before President Trump took office, and it will continue to change after he has gone,” Elizabeth Warren wrote in her pitch for a “Foreign Policy for All”.But the Transformers, too, have offered little to move us beyond the old paradigm. Sanders provides few concrete plans to build a progressive front or international institutions to facilitate people-to-people partnerships. And Warren’s vision remains faithful to its core myth of a unified national interest. Her “foreign policy for all” is a contradiction in terms: protecting some American interests on the global stage will require undermining others.Here, we can start to see the outline a different kind of a foreign politics: a progressive foreign politics, which begins from the same premise as Trump – that politics no longer stops at the water’s edge – but inverts its strategies, policies and priorities. One that builds new multilateral institutions, rather than wrecking them; one that powers democratic movements, rather than squashing them; one that is unafraid to champion the shared interests of a global 99% against those of a consolidated transnational oligarchy.The rules of the global game have changed for good. Trump and his allies see it clearly. Democrats must now step up and confront their new reality. Politics no longer end at the water’s edge. But from watching these debates, Democrats seem like the last to know. * David Adler is Policy Leader Fellow at the School of Transnational Governance at the European University Institute. * Ben Judah is a fellow at the Hudson Institute in Washington DC


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  • 66/79   London Showdown Looms for NATO Frenemies
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Want to receive this post in your inbox every day? Sign up for the Balance of Power newsletter, and follow Bloomberg Politics on Twitter and Facebook for more.For movie fans, the words “Brain Dead” usually bring to mind a cult New Zealand zombie splatter flick directed by Peter Jackson.It’s not the verbiage you’d expect leaders to be throwing around when the member states of NATO — Europe’s security umbrella since World War II — meet in London. But brain dead is exactly how French President Emmanuel Macron is describing the alliance as he questions its current direction and future relevance.Macron is not the only one to watch. He and Turkey’s Recep Tayyip Erdogan are sniping before the meeting even starts. Erdogan responded to Macron’s criticism of his move to send troops into Syria by describing the French leader as, wait for it....brain dead.And that’s before we get to Donald Trump. The U.S. president has been a frequent critic of NATO, saying the U.S. carries too much of the cost burden of defending Europe. He has a penchant for off-the-cuff Tweets and comments about it. Still, he may be distracted this week by the hearings back home into his potential impeachment.NATO has survived turbulent periods before. It retains strong support from Germany and others who see it as a way to knit together ideologically-different nations across Europe and prevent fresh conflicts.But this week Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg will have quite the task keeping everyone in line.Global HeadlinesLaw and order | Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Conservatives are hammering home the message that they’re the party to keep the U.K. safe, just three days after a convicted terrorist killed two people near London Bridge. The NATO summit provides an opportunity to reinforce that — opposition Labour party leader Jeremy Corbyn is a lifelong antiwar campaigner who has criticized the alliance. Corbyn says the Tories’ spending cuts resulted in the prison service wrongly releasing the attacker.Impeachment heats up | The U.S. House — faced with a sharply divided public, a compressed timetable and doubts about White House participation — this week begins the task of deciding whether to bring articles of impeachment against Trump. As the case moves to the Judiciary Committee, it’s a chance for the Democrats to synthesize weeks of testimony into a convincing narrative.Click here for an explanation of the wild cards Trump would face during an impeachment trial in the Republican-led Senate.Pulling punches | China vowed to sanction some American rights organizations and halt warship visits to Hong Kong in response to Trump’s decision to sign legislation supporting the city’s protesters. The move appeared designed to avoid further economic damage both to China, which is in trade talks with the U.S., and Hong Kong, which saw retail sales suffer a record drop in October as almost six months of unrest drags down growth.The Maltese problem | Joseph Muscat has agreed to step down as prime minister after his closest aides were tied to a car bomb attack that killed an investigative journalist. But he does intend to stay in office until his party has picked a successor — in January at the earliest. That may not be good enough for those demanding a proper probe of suspected links between the murderers and the government.Tough audience | Joe Biden is working to breathe new life into his campaign in Iowa, a state where he’s struggled to keep up with his competitors despite leading the crowded 2020 field of Democratic contenders in most national polls. Biden kicked off an eight-day bus tour on the weekend that focuses on rural areas, and he’s enlisting the help of a popular ex-governor.What to Watch This WeekChancellor Angela Merkel’s coalition was thrown into crisis after the Social Democrats elected a new left-leaning leadership seen as a threat to the survival of the government. All eyes are on China as negotiators from nearly 200 nations head to Madrid for United Nations climate talks. Delegates are quietly building a legal framework to support money aimed at guiding the world in a greener direction. The U.S. will announce today what retaliatory action, if any, it will take in response to a digital tax France instituted this year that will hit large American tech companies. The Supreme Court hears arguments today on New York City’s curbs on the transportation of licensed handguns, the first time in more than a decade it considers a case dealing with the reach of the Second Amendment. Russia’s eastward pivot deepened today with the opening of a pipeline that will deliver as much as 38 billion cubic meters of gas annually to China under a 30-year contract. Namibian President Hage Geingob has won a second term despite the worst performance yet for his party amid a stuttering economy.Thanks to all who responded to our pop quiz Friday and congratulations to reader Lee Lambert, who was the first to name Crimea as the territory that Apple identified in its Maps application as part of Russia instead of Ukraine. Tell us how we’re doing or what we’re missing at balancepower@bloomberg.net.And finally ... Perhaps only in Japan can the cherry blossom become the source of political intrigue. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has seen his poll numbers slide in recent weeks amid questions about whether he rewarded supporters with invitations to a publicly funded party to behold the botanical beauty of Japan’s national flower. The scandal deepened after revelations that key documents including the guest list were shredded. \--With assistance from Daniel Ten Kate, Brendan Scott, Alex Morales and Ben Sills.To contact the author of this story: Rosalind Mathieson in London at rmathieson3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Kathleen Hunter at khunter9@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Want to receive this post in your inbox every day? Sign up for the Balance of Power newsletter, and follow Bloomberg Politics on Twitter and Facebook for more.For movie fans, the words “Brain Dead” usually bring to mind a cult New Zealand zombie splatter flick directed by Peter Jackson.It’s not the verbiage you’d expect leaders to be throwing around when the member states of NATO — Europe’s security umbrella since World War II — meet in London. But brain dead is exactly how French President Emmanuel Macron is describing the alliance as he questions its current direction and future relevance.Macron is not the only one to watch. He and Turkey’s Recep Tayyip Erdogan are sniping before the meeting even starts. Erdogan responded to Macron’s criticism of his move to send troops into Syria by describing the French leader as, wait for it....brain dead.And that’s before we get to Donald Trump. The U.S. president has been a frequent critic of NATO, saying the U.S. carries too much of the cost burden of defending Europe. He has a penchant for off-the-cuff Tweets and comments about it. Still, he may be distracted this week by the hearings back home into his potential impeachment.NATO has survived turbulent periods before. It retains strong support from Germany and others who see it as a way to knit together ideologically-different nations across Europe and prevent fresh conflicts.But this week Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg will have quite the task keeping everyone in line.Global HeadlinesLaw and order | Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Conservatives are hammering home the message that they’re the party to keep the U.K. safe, just three days after a convicted terrorist killed two people near London Bridge. The NATO summit provides an opportunity to reinforce that — opposition Labour party leader Jeremy Corbyn is a lifelong antiwar campaigner who has criticized the alliance. Corbyn says the Tories’ spending cuts resulted in the prison service wrongly releasing the attacker.Impeachment heats up | The U.S. House — faced with a sharply divided public, a compressed timetable and doubts about White House participation — this week begins the task of deciding whether to bring articles of impeachment against Trump. As the case moves to the Judiciary Committee, it’s a chance for the Democrats to synthesize weeks of testimony into a convincing narrative.Click here for an explanation of the wild cards Trump would face during an impeachment trial in the Republican-led Senate.Pulling punches | China vowed to sanction some American rights organizations and halt warship visits to Hong Kong in response to Trump’s decision to sign legislation supporting the city’s protesters. The move appeared designed to avoid further economic damage both to China, which is in trade talks with the U.S., and Hong Kong, which saw retail sales suffer a record drop in October as almost six months of unrest drags down growth.The Maltese problem | Joseph Muscat has agreed to step down as prime minister after his closest aides were tied to a car bomb attack that killed an investigative journalist. But he does intend to stay in office until his party has picked a successor — in January at the earliest. That may not be good enough for those demanding a proper probe of suspected links between the murderers and the government.Tough audience | Joe Biden is working to breathe new life into his campaign in Iowa, a state where he’s struggled to keep up with his competitors despite leading the crowded 2020 field of Democratic contenders in most national polls. Biden kicked off an eight-day bus tour on the weekend that focuses on rural areas, and he’s enlisting the help of a popular ex-governor.What to Watch This WeekChancellor Angela Merkel’s coalition was thrown into crisis after the Social Democrats elected a new left-leaning leadership seen as a threat to the survival of the government. All eyes are on China as negotiators from nearly 200 nations head to Madrid for United Nations climate talks. Delegates are quietly building a legal framework to support money aimed at guiding the world in a greener direction. The U.S. will announce today what retaliatory action, if any, it will take in response to a digital tax France instituted this year that will hit large American tech companies. The Supreme Court hears arguments today on New York City’s curbs on the transportation of licensed handguns, the first time in more than a decade it considers a case dealing with the reach of the Second Amendment. Russia’s eastward pivot deepened today with the opening of a pipeline that will deliver as much as 38 billion cubic meters of gas annually to China under a 30-year contract. Namibian President Hage Geingob has won a second term despite the worst performance yet for his party amid a stuttering economy.Thanks to all who responded to our pop quiz Friday and congratulations to reader Lee Lambert, who was the first to name Crimea as the territory that Apple identified in its Maps application as part of Russia instead of Ukraine. Tell us how we’re doing or what we’re missing at balancepower@bloomberg.net.And finally ... Perhaps only in Japan can the cherry blossom become the source of political intrigue. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has seen his poll numbers slide in recent weeks amid questions about whether he rewarded supporters with invitations to a publicly funded party to behold the botanical beauty of Japan’s national flower. The scandal deepened after revelations that key documents including the guest list were shredded. \--With assistance from Daniel Ten Kate, Brendan Scott, Alex Morales and Ben Sills.To contact the author of this story: Rosalind Mathieson in London at rmathieson3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Kathleen Hunter at khunter9@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 67/79   Merkel’s Party Plays Hardball With Coalition Future in Doubt
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Chancellor Angela Merkel’s party told the new leadership of the Social Democrats that there will be no renegotiation of the terms of their alliance and they can quit the governing coalition if they can’t accept that.The SPD on Saturday picked government critics Norbert Walter-Borjans and Saskia Esken to take the party forward over Merkel’s Vice Chancellor Olaf Scholz. The new leaders said they will demand policy changes if they are to maintain their support, and their terms will be set out at a three-day SPD conference starting Friday in Berlin.Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer, head of Merkel’s CDU party, said that there’s no way they will open up a debate on the coalition deal signed in March last year. “We’re not a therapy service for the parties in government,” she said in an interview Monday with ZDF television.“This new SPD leadership must decide whether they want to stay in this coalition or not,” Kramp-Karrenbauer added. “We made a pledge to the voters. We want to govern on the basis of what was agreed. We are focusing on that and not on the mental state of any coalition partner.”The rebellion against the SPD establishment pushes Merkel a step closer to the exit after 14 years in power. It also throws up a potential conflict between the chancellor -- keen to see out her final term -- and Kramp-Karrenbauer, who is trying to exert her authority as party leader and may be less willing to compromise as she positions herself to succeed Merkel.Merkel’s chief spokesman, Steffen Seibert, sounded a more conciliatory tone than Kramp-Karrenbauer on Monday while also ruling out any renegotiation of the current deal.‘Fundamentally Open’“It’s of course good practice that when a coalition partner wants to discuss new proposals, you come together and if you can establish unity, then new initiatives can be taken,” Seibert said at a regular news conference in Berlin. “The chancellor is fundamentally -– and that’s the way it should be in a coalition –- open to cooperation and open to talks.”Ricardo Garcia, euro-region chief economist at UBS AG, said the appointment of Walter-Borjans and Esken could herald demands for “a more ambitious climate-change package, higher minimum wages, broader agreed wages and changes to fiscal rules.”While not all of these would be acceptable to the CDU, and its Bavarian sister-party the CSU, he still expects the coalition to hold until the scheduled end of the legislature in September 2021. “If snap elections do take place, some market volatility may materialize,” Garcia wrote in a note.The Social Democrat leadership crisis was triggered in June when chairwoman Andrea Nahles resigned after the party was crushed in elections for the European Parliament. The succession contest reopened a party split between establishment figures and the left, which hoped to rebuild the SPD’s credentials with its working-class base.In comments after their victory on Saturday, Walter-Borjans said the party has no intention of abruptly leaving the coalition. The SPD is more likely to put forward a set of demands, such as abandoning Merkel’s balanced-budget stance and raising Germany’s minimum wage. He also indicated that Scholz will stay on as finance minister.‘Sensible Results’Johannes Kahrs, the SPD’s parliamentary caucus budget spokesman and a party moderate, said Monday he does not expect the government to collapse. If a general election is triggered, the party is at risk of finishing in fourth place behind the Greens and the far-right AfD.“Both sides in the coalition know that we have to find some sensible results for this country,” Kahrs said in an interview with DLF radio.“The voters have the right to expect that this nation is ruled sensibly until September 2021,” he added. “That there is some disagreement over content is completely acceptable.”Any breakup would likely be a drawn out process. In addition to a straight vote on leaving the coalition, there will be proposals at the SPD convention setting out conditions for staying, potentially paving the way for prolonged negotiations with the CDU.Malu Dreyer, who served as an interim SPD leader following the resignation of Nahles, told ZDF Monday that the coalition agreement contains ample wiggle room to adapt to “changing circumstances” if necessary.“We can’t behave as if chaos is breaking out here,” Dreyer said. “It’s actually not.”(Updates with Merkel spokesman from sixth paragraph)\--With assistance from Patrick Donahue.To contact the reporter on this story: Iain Rogers in Berlin at irogers11@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Ben Sills at bsills@bloomberg.net, Chris Reiter, Chad ThomasFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Chancellor Angela Merkel’s party told the new leadership of the Social Democrats that there will be no renegotiation of the terms of their alliance and they can quit the governing coalition if they can’t accept that.The SPD on Saturday picked government critics Norbert Walter-Borjans and Saskia Esken to take the party forward over Merkel’s Vice Chancellor Olaf Scholz. The new leaders said they will demand policy changes if they are to maintain their support, and their terms will be set out at a three-day SPD conference starting Friday in Berlin.Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer, head of Merkel’s CDU party, said that there’s no way they will open up a debate on the coalition deal signed in March last year. “We’re not a therapy service for the parties in government,” she said in an interview Monday with ZDF television.“This new SPD leadership must decide whether they want to stay in this coalition or not,” Kramp-Karrenbauer added. “We made a pledge to the voters. We want to govern on the basis of what was agreed. We are focusing on that and not on the mental state of any coalition partner.”The rebellion against the SPD establishment pushes Merkel a step closer to the exit after 14 years in power. It also throws up a potential conflict between the chancellor -- keen to see out her final term -- and Kramp-Karrenbauer, who is trying to exert her authority as party leader and may be less willing to compromise as she positions herself to succeed Merkel.Merkel’s chief spokesman, Steffen Seibert, sounded a more conciliatory tone than Kramp-Karrenbauer on Monday while also ruling out any renegotiation of the current deal.‘Fundamentally Open’“It’s of course good practice that when a coalition partner wants to discuss new proposals, you come together and if you can establish unity, then new initiatives can be taken,” Seibert said at a regular news conference in Berlin. “The chancellor is fundamentally -– and that’s the way it should be in a coalition –- open to cooperation and open to talks.”Ricardo Garcia, euro-region chief economist at UBS AG, said the appointment of Walter-Borjans and Esken could herald demands for “a more ambitious climate-change package, higher minimum wages, broader agreed wages and changes to fiscal rules.”While not all of these would be acceptable to the CDU, and its Bavarian sister-party the CSU, he still expects the coalition to hold until the scheduled end of the legislature in September 2021. “If snap elections do take place, some market volatility may materialize,” Garcia wrote in a note.The Social Democrat leadership crisis was triggered in June when chairwoman Andrea Nahles resigned after the party was crushed in elections for the European Parliament. The succession contest reopened a party split between establishment figures and the left, which hoped to rebuild the SPD’s credentials with its working-class base.In comments after their victory on Saturday, Walter-Borjans said the party has no intention of abruptly leaving the coalition. The SPD is more likely to put forward a set of demands, such as abandoning Merkel’s balanced-budget stance and raising Germany’s minimum wage. He also indicated that Scholz will stay on as finance minister.‘Sensible Results’Johannes Kahrs, the SPD’s parliamentary caucus budget spokesman and a party moderate, said Monday he does not expect the government to collapse. If a general election is triggered, the party is at risk of finishing in fourth place behind the Greens and the far-right AfD.“Both sides in the coalition know that we have to find some sensible results for this country,” Kahrs said in an interview with DLF radio.“The voters have the right to expect that this nation is ruled sensibly until September 2021,” he added. “That there is some disagreement over content is completely acceptable.”Any breakup would likely be a drawn out process. In addition to a straight vote on leaving the coalition, there will be proposals at the SPD convention setting out conditions for staying, potentially paving the way for prolonged negotiations with the CDU.Malu Dreyer, who served as an interim SPD leader following the resignation of Nahles, told ZDF Monday that the coalition agreement contains ample wiggle room to adapt to “changing circumstances” if necessary.“We can’t behave as if chaos is breaking out here,” Dreyer said. “It’s actually not.”(Updates with Merkel spokesman from sixth paragraph)\--With assistance from Patrick Donahue.To contact the reporter on this story: Iain Rogers in Berlin at irogers11@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Ben Sills at bsills@bloomberg.net, Chris Reiter, Chad ThomasFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 68/79   New broom at UN nuclear watchdog as Iran tensions rise
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Veteran Argentine diplomat Rafael Grossi was sworn in on Monday as the new director general of the UN's nuclear watchdog the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).  - Who is Rafael Grossi?  Grossi had been serving as Argentina's ambassador to the IAEA and is the agency's first leader from Latin America.

    Veteran Argentine diplomat Rafael Grossi was sworn in on Monday as the new director general of the UN's nuclear watchdog the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). - Who is Rafael Grossi? Grossi had been serving as Argentina's ambassador to the IAEA and is the agency's first leader from Latin America.


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  • 69/79   EU leads international help to Albania quake recovery
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The European Union and the United Nations are coordinating the international efforts to assist Albania after the 6.4-magnitude earthquake that killed 51 people and left thousands homeless.  Luigi Soreca, EU ambassador to Albania, said Monday that Brussels mobilized the Civil Protection Mechanism on the day of earthquake, Nov. 26, with many search-and-rescue teams arriving in the country.  An EU team is leading the damage assessment and distribution of aid.

    The European Union and the United Nations are coordinating the international efforts to assist Albania after the 6.4-magnitude earthquake that killed 51 people and left thousands homeless. Luigi Soreca, EU ambassador to Albania, said Monday that Brussels mobilized the Civil Protection Mechanism on the day of earthquake, Nov. 26, with many search-and-rescue teams arriving in the country. An EU team is leading the damage assessment and distribution of aid.


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  • 70/79   Trump turns 'very routine' physical into attack on media
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    President Trump lashed out at the media Tuesday over reporting about his sudden trip to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center last weekend.

    President Trump lashed out at the media Tuesday over reporting about his sudden trip to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center last weekend.


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  • 71/79   5 Turkey Cooking Tips Will Guarantee You Have the Perfect Bird This Holidays
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    There's no need to wing it at Thanksgiving this year.

    There's no need to wing it at Thanksgiving this year.


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  • 72/79   9 Easy Ways to Make Your Jack-o'-Lanterns Last Longer
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    A little bleach goes a long way.

    A little bleach goes a long way.


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  • 73/79   Is It Time for a Medication Reconciliation?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    More than half of adult Americans regularly take at least one prescription drug, according to a recent Consumer Reports nationally representative survey. And for those who take any medication on ...

    More than half of adult Americans regularly take at least one prescription drug, according to a recent Consumer Reports nationally representative survey. And for those who take any medication on ...


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  • 74/79   Brown-Bag Lunches for Kids With Food Allergies
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...


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  • 75/79   What to Feed Your Family When the Power Goes Out
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...


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  • 76/79   Try These Healthy Snack Ideas for Kids
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...

    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...


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  • 77/79   The 9 Best Jobs for Teachers To Make Some Cash During the Summer Break
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.


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  • 78/79   How to Spot and Avoid Algal Blooms
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...


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  • 79/79   Get These 4 Vaccines for College
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If your child is a college student—or soon to be one—making sure he or she is fully vaccinated is critically important, especially for those who will be living in a dorm or other shared space. Th...

    If your child is a college student—or soon to be one—making sure he or she is fully vaccinated is critically important, especially for those who will be living in a dorm or other shared space. Th...


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