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News Slideshows (12/03/2019 03 hours)


  • 1/80   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


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    Press Review


    Van Halen   Dalvin Cook   Billie Eilish   Chris Carson   Peloton   Dave Matthews   Addison Russell   Lashley   Xavier Rhodes   Diggs   Samoa Joe   Kevin Pillar   Broly   Marlins   Lil Bub   Tozawa   CJ Ham   Josh Gordon   Burr   Ronaldo   Lockett   Treinen   Vikes   Reds   Mike Hughes   Taijuan Walker   Ty Jerome   David Lee Roth   
  • 2/80   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


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  • 3/80   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


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  • 4/80   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


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  • 5/80   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


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  • 6/80   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


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  • 7/80   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


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  • 8/80   Live animal mascots: Cute or exploitative?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?


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  • 9/80   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


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  • 10/80   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


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  • 11/80   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


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  • 12/80   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


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  • 13/80   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


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  • 14/80   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


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  • 15/80   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named.  Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does.  At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


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  • 16/80   PHOTOS: Fluorescent turtle embryo wins forty-fifth annual Nikon Small World Competition

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.


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  • 17/80   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


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  • 18/80   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


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  • 19/80   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


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  • 20/80   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


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  • 21/80   Synergy Medical Ensures End-to-End Patient Safety With SynMed® and MedEye®
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Synergy Medical today announced an exclusive partnership with MedEye. MedEye has been on the market in Europe since 2016 and has had significant success in preventing medication errors at the patient bedside, in both hospital and Long-Term Care settings. Given Synergy Medical's long track record with accurate medication dispensing technology, and a packaging offering that is ideal for assisted living and long-term care environments, MedEye has chosen to work with Synergy Medical to introduce the technology in North America.

    Synergy Medical today announced an exclusive partnership with MedEye. MedEye has been on the market in Europe since 2016 and has had significant success in preventing medication errors at the patient bedside, in both hospital and Long-Term Care settings. Given Synergy Medical's long track record with accurate medication dispensing technology, and a packaging offering that is ideal for assisted living and long-term care environments, MedEye has chosen to work with Synergy Medical to introduce the technology in North America.


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  • 22/80   Charter Prices $1.2 Billion Senior Unsecured Notes
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Charter Communications, Inc. (NASDAQ: CHTR) (along with its subsidiaries, "Charter") today announced that its subsidiaries, CCO Holdings, LLC and CCO Holdings Capital Corp. (collectively, the "Issuers"), have priced $1.2 billion in aggregate principal amount of senior unsecured notes due 2030 (the "Notes"). The Notes will form a part of the same series as the Issuers' senior unsecured notes due 2030 issued on October 1, 2019 and on October 24, 2019, which bear interest at a rate of 4.750% per annum. The Notes will be issued at a price of 101.125% of the aggregate principal amount.

    Charter Communications, Inc. (NASDAQ: CHTR) (along with its subsidiaries, "Charter") today announced that its subsidiaries, CCO Holdings, LLC and CCO Holdings Capital Corp. (collectively, the "Issuers"), have priced $1.2 billion in aggregate principal amount of senior unsecured notes due 2030 (the "Notes"). The Notes will form a part of the same series as the Issuers' senior unsecured notes due 2030 issued on October 1, 2019 and on October 24, 2019, which bear interest at a rate of 4.750% per annum. The Notes will be issued at a price of 101.125% of the aggregate principal amount.


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  • 23/80   New Zealand to ban big foreign political donations
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    New Zealand moved to ban large foreign political donations and misleading social media advertisements Tuesday amid concerns about offshore interference in next year's general election.  Justice Minister Andrew Little said the move  -- which bars donations over NZ$50 (US$33) -- was aimed at protecting New Zealand's democracy from a growing international threat.  'It's in China's interest to extend an influence in New Zealand, there's nothing wrong with that –- that's what great powers do,' Rodney Jones, a New Zealand economist based in Beijing told Newshub earlier this year.

    New Zealand moved to ban large foreign political donations and misleading social media advertisements Tuesday amid concerns about offshore interference in next year's general election. Justice Minister Andrew Little said the move -- which bars donations over NZ$50 (US$33) -- was aimed at protecting New Zealand's democracy from a growing international threat. 'It's in China's interest to extend an influence in New Zealand, there's nothing wrong with that –- that's what great powers do,' Rodney Jones, a New Zealand economist based in Beijing told Newshub earlier this year.


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  • 24/80   How Many Yuzhou Properties Company Limited (HKG:1628) Shares Did Insiders Buy, In The Last Year?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    It is not uncommon to see companies perform well in the years after insiders buy shares. Unfortunately, there are also...

    It is not uncommon to see companies perform well in the years after insiders buy shares. Unfortunately, there are also...


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  • 25/80   Stocks Drop, Yen Holds Gain as Tariff Man Returns: Markets Wrap
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Asian stocks slumped Tuesday after a sell-off on Wall Street triggered by fresh tariffs announced by President Donald Trump, renewing concerns about global trade tensions.Japan’s currency held most of its gains after its biggest jump since October on Monday in the wake of Trump slapping steel tariffs on Brazil and Argentina. Shares in Japan, Australia and South Korea dropped. Hong Kong and Shanghai benchmarks opened lower. U.S. futures were little changed after the S&P 500 Index slumped 0.9% Monday, when disappointing U.S. manufacturing data added to the risk-off tone. Treasuries were the odd asset out, falling on Monday amid a global retreat from bonds, and were little changed Tuesday. A U.S. proposal for tariffs on $2.4 billion of French goods, announced after the Wall Street close, may add to concerns about the looming Dec. 15 deadline on the next round of levies on China. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross warned that those will go ahead if there’s no U.S.-China trade deal.“It looks like it’s going to be pushed to the beginning of next year at the best case,” Steve Brice, chief investment strategist at Standard Chartered private bank, said on Bloomberg TV with regard to a U.S.-China trade agreement. The message to investors is “maybe trim a little bit of equity exposure, or certainly not chase the market at this stage. But look to do so in the next few weeks if we see a 5-to-7% pullback.”Meantime, an unexpected decline in U.S. manufacturing contrasted with signs of recovery in China and Europe. Two-year Treasury yields dipped on Monday.Elsewhere, oil rose the most in more than a week as traders sifted for fresh signals of whether OPEC and allied crude producers will tighten supplies when they meet later this week.Here are some key events coming up this week:The Reserve Bank of Australia’s monetary policy decision is due Tuesday.Saudi Aramco’s initial public offering is scheduled to be priced on Thursday.Friday brings the U.S. jobs report, where estimates are for non-farm payrolls to rise by 190,000 in November.These are the main moves in markets:StocksTopix index declined 0.8% as of 10:31 a.m. in Tokyo.Australia S&P/ASX 200 Index lost 2%.South Korea’s Kospi index fell 0.9%.Hang Seng Index fell 1.2%.Shanghai Composite down 0.3%.Futures on the S&P 500 Index were little changed.CurrenciesThe yen was at 109.07 per dollar.The offshore yuan was at 7.0433 per dollar.The euro was at $1.1073.Britain’s pound was at $1.2933.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries was flat at 1.82% after climbing four basis points Monday.Australian 10-year yields rose about three basis points to 1.12%.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude was up 0.2% at $56.09 a barrel.Gold was little changed at $1,463.50 an ounce.\--With assistance from Rita Nazareth, Vildana Hajric, Sophie Caronello and Joanna Ossinger.To contact the reporter on this story: Andreea Papuc in Sydney at apapuc1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Christopher Anstey at canstey@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Asian stocks slumped Tuesday after a sell-off on Wall Street triggered by fresh tariffs announced by President Donald Trump, renewing concerns about global trade tensions.Japan’s currency held most of its gains after its biggest jump since October on Monday in the wake of Trump slapping steel tariffs on Brazil and Argentina. Shares in Japan, Australia and South Korea dropped. Hong Kong and Shanghai benchmarks opened lower. U.S. futures were little changed after the S&P 500 Index slumped 0.9% Monday, when disappointing U.S. manufacturing data added to the risk-off tone. Treasuries were the odd asset out, falling on Monday amid a global retreat from bonds, and were little changed Tuesday. A U.S. proposal for tariffs on $2.4 billion of French goods, announced after the Wall Street close, may add to concerns about the looming Dec. 15 deadline on the next round of levies on China. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross warned that those will go ahead if there’s no U.S.-China trade deal.“It looks like it’s going to be pushed to the beginning of next year at the best case,” Steve Brice, chief investment strategist at Standard Chartered private bank, said on Bloomberg TV with regard to a U.S.-China trade agreement. The message to investors is “maybe trim a little bit of equity exposure, or certainly not chase the market at this stage. But look to do so in the next few weeks if we see a 5-to-7% pullback.”Meantime, an unexpected decline in U.S. manufacturing contrasted with signs of recovery in China and Europe. Two-year Treasury yields dipped on Monday.Elsewhere, oil rose the most in more than a week as traders sifted for fresh signals of whether OPEC and allied crude producers will tighten supplies when they meet later this week.Here are some key events coming up this week:The Reserve Bank of Australia’s monetary policy decision is due Tuesday.Saudi Aramco’s initial public offering is scheduled to be priced on Thursday.Friday brings the U.S. jobs report, where estimates are for non-farm payrolls to rise by 190,000 in November.These are the main moves in markets:StocksTopix index declined 0.8% as of 10:31 a.m. in Tokyo.Australia S&P/ASX 200 Index lost 2%.South Korea’s Kospi index fell 0.9%.Hang Seng Index fell 1.2%.Shanghai Composite down 0.3%.Futures on the S&P 500 Index were little changed.CurrenciesThe yen was at 109.07 per dollar.The offshore yuan was at 7.0433 per dollar.The euro was at $1.1073.Britain’s pound was at $1.2933.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries was flat at 1.82% after climbing four basis points Monday.Australian 10-year yields rose about three basis points to 1.12%.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude was up 0.2% at $56.09 a barrel.Gold was little changed at $1,463.50 an ounce.\--With assistance from Rita Nazareth, Vildana Hajric, Sophie Caronello and Joanna Ossinger.To contact the reporter on this story: Andreea Papuc in Sydney at apapuc1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Christopher Anstey at canstey@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 26/80   China Traders Look to Profit in Bond Market That Won’t Move
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Making money in a market that moves so little has become a key challenge for China’s sovereign-bond traders.With 10-year notes trading in the narrowest range in seven years, investors are casting their nets far and wide to enhance returns. It’s policy bank bonds for JPMorgan Asset Management and PineBridge Investments Asia Ltd., dollar-denominated debt for Nissay Asset Management Corp. and convertible bonds for Morgan Stanley Huaxin Fund Management Co.China’s 10-year yield has fallen just 9 basis points this year, missing out on a global rally that in August took the world’s stockpile of negative-yielding bonds to a record $17 trillion. The People’s Bank of China helped trigger a sell-off in October when it effectively withdrew liquidity from the financial system, but bonds have since stabilized following a series of unexpected policy-rate cuts and cash injections.But that wasn’t enough to spur a rally: the central bank signaled this week it will continue to refrain from large-scale easing. A supply surge in local government notes is also concerning traders.Here’s how some investors are navigating the market:Policy bank bondsChina’s quasi-sovereign policy bank notes -- particularly in the three-year tenor -- are worth considering, says Jason Pang, a fixed-income portfolio manager at JPMorgan Asset Management. The bonds are in a “sweet spot” as they benefit from any liquidity injections and still provide a decent yield above 3% and greater roll-down returns, he said, referring to the strategy of selling a note as it approaches maturity. Arthur Lau, head of Asia excluding Japan fixed income at PineBridge Investments, also prefers policy bank bonds, as the notes have higher yields than sovereigns. He favors them in five- to seven-year tenors.Dollar-denominated debtToshinobu Chiba, chief portfolio manager of fixed-income investment at Nissay Asset Management, took an overweight position in dollar-denominated China credit in October and sold Chinese government bonds after consumer prices rose by the fastest pace since 2013 in September. He’s looking to buy China dollar bonds, with a view that the central bank has little room to ease monetary policy if inflation remains high. He says dollar corporate debt will remain attractive in the coming six months, with rising demand for it signaled by a tightening credit spread.Investment grade creditWhile Pictet Asset Management Ltd.’s head of China debt Cary Yeung is still positive on Chinese sovereign bonds, he’s also a fan of onshore investment-grade credit for its “low volatility, decent carry and stable” fundamentals. He likes short-dated high-yield bonds issued by property companies, as the sector’s sales have been doing well and it might see more favorable policies in the future.Derivatives and othersLi Yi, a fund manager at Morgan Stanley Huaxin, whose onshore China bond fund has outperformed 95% of peers over the past three years, says to “pay attention to convertible bonds, treasury bond futures and other derivatives to enhance returns.”Better yearFor Manu George, a fixed-income director at Schroder Investment, the current yield of Chinese sovereign debt is already attractive and he has taken a long position. China bonds are likely to see a better year in 2020, he says.The yield on China’s 10-year sovereign bond was little changed at 3.21% as of 9:30 a.m. local time. (Adds details from second paragraph)\--With assistance from Tian Chen and Jing Zhao.To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Livia Yap in Shanghai at lyap14@bloomberg.net;Claire Che in Beijing at yche16@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sofia Horta e Costa at shortaecosta@bloomberg.net, David Watkins, Philip GlamannFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Making money in a market that moves so little has become a key challenge for China’s sovereign-bond traders.With 10-year notes trading in the narrowest range in seven years, investors are casting their nets far and wide to enhance returns. It’s policy bank bonds for JPMorgan Asset Management and PineBridge Investments Asia Ltd., dollar-denominated debt for Nissay Asset Management Corp. and convertible bonds for Morgan Stanley Huaxin Fund Management Co.China’s 10-year yield has fallen just 9 basis points this year, missing out on a global rally that in August took the world’s stockpile of negative-yielding bonds to a record $17 trillion. The People’s Bank of China helped trigger a sell-off in October when it effectively withdrew liquidity from the financial system, but bonds have since stabilized following a series of unexpected policy-rate cuts and cash injections.But that wasn’t enough to spur a rally: the central bank signaled this week it will continue to refrain from large-scale easing. A supply surge in local government notes is also concerning traders.Here’s how some investors are navigating the market:Policy bank bondsChina’s quasi-sovereign policy bank notes -- particularly in the three-year tenor -- are worth considering, says Jason Pang, a fixed-income portfolio manager at JPMorgan Asset Management. The bonds are in a “sweet spot” as they benefit from any liquidity injections and still provide a decent yield above 3% and greater roll-down returns, he said, referring to the strategy of selling a note as it approaches maturity. Arthur Lau, head of Asia excluding Japan fixed income at PineBridge Investments, also prefers policy bank bonds, as the notes have higher yields than sovereigns. He favors them in five- to seven-year tenors.Dollar-denominated debtToshinobu Chiba, chief portfolio manager of fixed-income investment at Nissay Asset Management, took an overweight position in dollar-denominated China credit in October and sold Chinese government bonds after consumer prices rose by the fastest pace since 2013 in September. He’s looking to buy China dollar bonds, with a view that the central bank has little room to ease monetary policy if inflation remains high. He says dollar corporate debt will remain attractive in the coming six months, with rising demand for it signaled by a tightening credit spread.Investment grade creditWhile Pictet Asset Management Ltd.’s head of China debt Cary Yeung is still positive on Chinese sovereign bonds, he’s also a fan of onshore investment-grade credit for its “low volatility, decent carry and stable” fundamentals. He likes short-dated high-yield bonds issued by property companies, as the sector’s sales have been doing well and it might see more favorable policies in the future.Derivatives and othersLi Yi, a fund manager at Morgan Stanley Huaxin, whose onshore China bond fund has outperformed 95% of peers over the past three years, says to “pay attention to convertible bonds, treasury bond futures and other derivatives to enhance returns.”Better yearFor Manu George, a fixed-income director at Schroder Investment, the current yield of Chinese sovereign debt is already attractive and he has taken a long position. China bonds are likely to see a better year in 2020, he says.The yield on China’s 10-year sovereign bond was little changed at 3.21% as of 9:30 a.m. local time. (Adds details from second paragraph)\--With assistance from Tian Chen and Jing Zhao.To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Livia Yap in Shanghai at lyap14@bloomberg.net;Claire Che in Beijing at yche16@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sofia Horta e Costa at shortaecosta@bloomberg.net, David Watkins, Philip GlamannFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 27/80   Is Vincent Medical Holdings Limited (HKG:1612) A Smart Choice For Dividend Investors?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Dividend paying stocks like Vincent Medical Holdings Limited (HKG:1612) tend to be popular with investors, and for...

    Dividend paying stocks like Vincent Medical Holdings Limited (HKG:1612) tend to be popular with investors, and for...


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  • 28/80   The 18th Shanghai International Nonwovens Exhibition Will be Held in December 2019
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The 18th Shanghai International Nonwovens Exhibition, organized by Informa Markets, will be held in Shanghai World Expo Exhibition and Convention Center from Dec. 11-13, 2019. Almost 500 exhibitors from 25 countries and regions confirmed their participation. Wonderful exhibitor technical presentations will be held and the newest products and technology are waiting for visitors.

    The 18th Shanghai International Nonwovens Exhibition, organized by Informa Markets, will be held in Shanghai World Expo Exhibition and Convention Center from Dec. 11-13, 2019. Almost 500 exhibitors from 25 countries and regions confirmed their participation. Wonderful exhibitor technical presentations will be held and the newest products and technology are waiting for visitors.


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  • 29/80   The 18th Shanghai International Nonwovens Exhibition Will be Held in December 2019
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The 18th Shanghai International Nonwovens Exhibition, organized by Informa Markets, will be held in Shanghai World Expo Exhibition and Convention Center from Dec. 11-13, 2019. Almost 500 exhibitors from 25 countries and regions confirmed their participation. Wonderful exhibitor technical presentations will be held and the newest products and technology are waiting for visitors.

    The 18th Shanghai International Nonwovens Exhibition, organized by Informa Markets, will be held in Shanghai World Expo Exhibition and Convention Center from Dec. 11-13, 2019. Almost 500 exhibitors from 25 countries and regions confirmed their participation. Wonderful exhibitor technical presentations will be held and the newest products and technology are waiting for visitors.


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  • 30/80   How Does Xin Point Holdings Limited (HKG:1571) Fare As A Dividend Stock?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Is Xin Point Holdings Limited (HKG:1571) a good dividend stock? How can we tell? Dividend paying companies with...

    Is Xin Point Holdings Limited (HKG:1571) a good dividend stock? How can we tell? Dividend paying companies with...


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  • 31/80   Jumbo Interactive Limited (ASX:JIN): What Does Its Beta Value Mean For Your Portfolio?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    If you own shares in Jumbo Interactive Limited (ASX:JIN) then it's worth thinking about how it contributes to the...

    If you own shares in Jumbo Interactive Limited (ASX:JIN) then it's worth thinking about how it contributes to the...


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  • 32/80   Did You Manage To Avoid Zhong Ao Home Group's (HKG:1538) Painful 51% Share Price Drop?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    In order to justify the effort of selecting individual stocks, it's worth striving to beat the returns from a market...

    In order to justify the effort of selecting individual stocks, it's worth striving to beat the returns from a market...


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  • 33/80   ROSEN, A HIGHLY RANKED FIRM, Announces Filing of Securities Class Action Lawsuit Against Prudential Financial, Inc. - PRU
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Rosen Law Firm, a global investor rights law firm, announces the filing of a class action lawsuit on behalf of purchasers of the securities of Prudential Financial, Inc. (NYSE: PRU) between February 15, 2019 and August 2, 2019, inclusive (the "Class Period"). The lawsuit seeks to recover damages for Prudential investors under the federal securities laws.

    Rosen Law Firm, a global investor rights law firm, announces the filing of a class action lawsuit on behalf of purchasers of the securities of Prudential Financial, Inc. (NYSE: PRU) between February 15, 2019 and August 2, 2019, inclusive (the "Class Period"). The lawsuit seeks to recover damages for Prudential investors under the federal securities laws.


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  • 34/80   Stocks drop as Trump's Latin American tariffs revive trade angst
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Asian shares skidded on Tuesday after U.S. President Donald Trump stunned markets with tariffs against Brazil and Argentina, recharging fears about global trade tensions, while weak U.S. factory data added to the investor gloom.  Contrary to his remarks, both Brazil and Argentina have been trying to strengthen their respective currencies against the dollar.

    Asian shares skidded on Tuesday after U.S. President Donald Trump stunned markets with tariffs against Brazil and Argentina, recharging fears about global trade tensions, while weak U.S. factory data added to the investor gloom. Contrary to his remarks, both Brazil and Argentina have been trying to strengthen their respective currencies against the dollar.


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  • 35/80   Global stocks drop as Trump's Latin American tariffs revive trade angst
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Asian shares skidded on Tuesday after U.S. President Donald Trump stunned markets with tariffs against Brazil and Argentina, recharging fears about global trade tensions, while weak U.S. factory data added to the investor gloom.  Contrary to his remarks, both Brazil and Argentina have been trying to strengthen their respective currencies against the dollar.

    Asian shares skidded on Tuesday after U.S. President Donald Trump stunned markets with tariffs against Brazil and Argentina, recharging fears about global trade tensions, while weak U.S. factory data added to the investor gloom. Contrary to his remarks, both Brazil and Argentina have been trying to strengthen their respective currencies against the dollar.


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  • 36/80   Some Red Star Macalline Group (HKG:1528) Shareholders Are Down 16%
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Passive investing in an index fund is a good way to ensure your own returns roughly match the overall market. When you...

    Passive investing in an index fund is a good way to ensure your own returns roughly match the overall market. When you...


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  • 37/80   Did Changing Sentiment Drive A2B Australia's (ASX:A2B) Share Price Down A Worrying 64%?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    In order to justify the effort of selecting individual stocks, it's worth striving to beat the returns from a market...

    In order to justify the effort of selecting individual stocks, it's worth striving to beat the returns from a market...


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  • 38/80   Dollar nurses wounds as factory data sparks economy concern
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Sentiment also took a hit after U.S. President Donald Trump announced tariffs on metal imports from Brazil and Argentina.  Recent U.S. economic data had shown signs of improvement, so a fourth consecutive month of shrinking manufacturing activity as well as an unexpected decline in construction spending put a big dent in hopes that the world's largest economy had stabilised.  Investors are also worried about how the United States will scale back a 16 month-long trade war with China, while more tariffs on other countries' goods would pose an additional risk to the global economic outlook.

    Sentiment also took a hit after U.S. President Donald Trump announced tariffs on metal imports from Brazil and Argentina. Recent U.S. economic data had shown signs of improvement, so a fourth consecutive month of shrinking manufacturing activity as well as an unexpected decline in construction spending put a big dent in hopes that the world's largest economy had stabilised. Investors are also worried about how the United States will scale back a 16 month-long trade war with China, while more tariffs on other countries' goods would pose an additional risk to the global economic outlook.


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  • 39/80   'Carpentry Compiler' turns 3D models to instructions on how to build them
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    A new digital tool, Carpentry Compiler, provides a way forward, converting the shapes of the structure to a step-by-step guide on how to produce them.  It could help your next carpentry project get off the screen and into the shop.  'If you think of both design and fabrication as programs, you can use methods from programming languages to solve problems in carpentry, which is really cool,' said project lead Adriana Schulz from the University of Washington's computer science department, in a news release.

    A new digital tool, Carpentry Compiler, provides a way forward, converting the shapes of the structure to a step-by-step guide on how to produce them. It could help your next carpentry project get off the screen and into the shop. 'If you think of both design and fabrication as programs, you can use methods from programming languages to solve problems in carpentry, which is really cool,' said project lead Adriana Schulz from the University of Washington's computer science department, in a news release.


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  • 40/80   Impeachment Is a Political Fool’s Errand
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Having demanded Donald J. Trump’s impeachment ever since Election Night 2016, Democrats are on the verge of getting what they want.They’ll be sorry.The Democrats’ “bombshell” hearings fizzled like wet firecrackers. Hypnotic witnesses expressed policy and stylistic differences with President Trump but failed to tie him to any impeachable offense.RealClearPolitics’ November 10 multiple-poll average — two days before Adam “Torquemada” Schiff’s hearings began — showed that 51 percent of Americans supported impeachment and 42 percent objected.After two weeks of testimony and cross-examination, momentum shifted.Thursday’s RCP average clocked impeachment at a non-majority 49 percent support, while opposition grew to 44 percent. Thirst for impeachment had shrunk from a 9 percent margin to 5 percent.Black Americans — since the 1960s, the Democrats’ most loyal voters — are fleeing impeachment as they would a hotel fire. According to Emerson College’s October 22 poll, black impeachment support stood at 58 percent. Emerson’s November 21 survey measured just 37 percent of blacks supporting impeachment. Simultaneously, black opposition soared from 27 percent to 38 percent.The sound you hear is Democrats biting their nails.Nonetheless, House Judiciary Committee chairman Jerrold Nadler (D., N.Y.) will conduct a hearing Wednesday on “the historical and constitutional basis of impeachment, as well as the Framers’ intent and understanding of terms like ‘high crimes and misdemeanors.’ ”Professor Nadler’s academic symposium should be as electrifying as a planned blackout.The impeachment timetable will let Democratic Grinches steal Christmas, while Americans sing, “You’re a mean one, Mr. Schiff.” Wednesday’s hearing will occur well into the most wonderful time of the year, as stores brim with shoppers, eggnog flows, and office parties rage.The House Judiciary Committee presumably would write articles of impeachment in mid-December, as Americans decorate Christmas trees, savor The Nutcracker Suite, and sing carols at joyous gatherings. The House then would conduct a loud, abrasive impeachment debate, as every TV news program, call-in radio show, editorial page, and current-affairs website echoed the pros, cons, objections, and rebuttals surrounding this fiasco — just as college students fly home for family reunions, U.S. GIs leave their bases to hug loved ones, and Americans invest in beer, wine, champagne, and other adult beverages for Christmas festivities across this cornucopian republic.House leaders reportedly want a final impeachment vote on December 20 — two days before Hanukkah and four days before Christmas Eve. So, as Americans celebrate peace, love, and understanding, divisive Democrats would deliver bitterness, the nullification of 63 million votes, and the reversal of 2016’s presidential election — because the sorest losers since the Stone Age hate Trump’s guts for crushing Hillary.If the House impeaches Trump, the Democrats’ dreadful timing would continue. If they want a Senate trial, Mitch McConnell will give it to them, good and hard.The majority leader likely would schedule proceedings so that senators — including Michael Bennett of Colorado, Cory Booker of New Jersey, Kamala Harris of California, Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, Bernie Sanders of Vermont, and Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts — would endure a multi-week trial amid elections in Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada, and South Carolina.“A number of Democratic senators are running for president,” McConnell told RealClearPolitics. “I’m sure they’re gonna be excited to be here in their chairs, not being able to say anything during the pendency of this trial.”Meanwhile, former vice president Joe Biden could be called to testify, along with his son, Hunter. Not good for Sleepy Joe, as primary voters make their decisions. Republicans are salivating over the  chance to  grill Trump haters about possible wrongdoing. These could include The Whistleblower, suspected Whistleblower collaborator Adam Schiff, anti-Trump Fusion GPS–dossier funder Hillary Clinton, dirty-dossier author Christopher Steele; Trump-loathing FBI officials James Comey, Peter Strzok, and Lisa Page; and Democratic operative Alexandra Chalupa (who, Politico reported, literally walked into Ukraine’s Washington, D.C., embassy in March 2016 and recruited them to help her mine dirt on candidate Trump).Since Senate Republicans most assuredly would block Trump’s conviction, Americans — already tiring of impeachment — would be exhausted, frustrated, and enraged at Democrats for frittering away their hard-fought House majority on this ultimately futile exercise. Come November 2020, nauseated voters might trigger a Republican trifecta: Trump’s reelection, a renewed Senate majority, and a takeover of the House, as the GOP captures most or all of the 31 congressional districts that candidate Trump secured in 2016 but Democrats snatched in 2018. Democrats then would confirm their maturity and relevance by screaming outdoors until their vocal cords snapped.Democrats are about to turn the No. 1 item on their gift list into a stocking full of smoldering, carbon-footprint-stomping, Pennsylvania-losing coal.Bucknell University’s Michael Malarkey contributed research to this opinion piece.

    Having demanded Donald J. Trump’s impeachment ever since Election Night 2016, Democrats are on the verge of getting what they want.They’ll be sorry.The Democrats’ “bombshell” hearings fizzled like wet firecrackers. Hypnotic witnesses expressed policy and stylistic differences with President Trump but failed to tie him to any impeachable offense.RealClearPolitics’ November 10 multiple-poll average — two days before Adam “Torquemada” Schiff’s hearings began — showed that 51 percent of Americans supported impeachment and 42 percent objected.After two weeks of testimony and cross-examination, momentum shifted.Thursday’s RCP average clocked impeachment at a non-majority 49 percent support, while opposition grew to 44 percent. Thirst for impeachment had shrunk from a 9 percent margin to 5 percent.Black Americans — since the 1960s, the Democrats’ most loyal voters — are fleeing impeachment as they would a hotel fire. According to Emerson College’s October 22 poll, black impeachment support stood at 58 percent. Emerson’s November 21 survey measured just 37 percent of blacks supporting impeachment. Simultaneously, black opposition soared from 27 percent to 38 percent.The sound you hear is Democrats biting their nails.Nonetheless, House Judiciary Committee chairman Jerrold Nadler (D., N.Y.) will conduct a hearing Wednesday on “the historical and constitutional basis of impeachment, as well as the Framers’ intent and understanding of terms like ‘high crimes and misdemeanors.’ ”Professor Nadler’s academic symposium should be as electrifying as a planned blackout.The impeachment timetable will let Democratic Grinches steal Christmas, while Americans sing, “You’re a mean one, Mr. Schiff.” Wednesday’s hearing will occur well into the most wonderful time of the year, as stores brim with shoppers, eggnog flows, and office parties rage.The House Judiciary Committee presumably would write articles of impeachment in mid-December, as Americans decorate Christmas trees, savor The Nutcracker Suite, and sing carols at joyous gatherings. The House then would conduct a loud, abrasive impeachment debate, as every TV news program, call-in radio show, editorial page, and current-affairs website echoed the pros, cons, objections, and rebuttals surrounding this fiasco — just as college students fly home for family reunions, U.S. GIs leave their bases to hug loved ones, and Americans invest in beer, wine, champagne, and other adult beverages for Christmas festivities across this cornucopian republic.House leaders reportedly want a final impeachment vote on December 20 — two days before Hanukkah and four days before Christmas Eve. So, as Americans celebrate peace, love, and understanding, divisive Democrats would deliver bitterness, the nullification of 63 million votes, and the reversal of 2016’s presidential election — because the sorest losers since the Stone Age hate Trump’s guts for crushing Hillary.If the House impeaches Trump, the Democrats’ dreadful timing would continue. If they want a Senate trial, Mitch McConnell will give it to them, good and hard.The majority leader likely would schedule proceedings so that senators — including Michael Bennett of Colorado, Cory Booker of New Jersey, Kamala Harris of California, Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, Bernie Sanders of Vermont, and Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts — would endure a multi-week trial amid elections in Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada, and South Carolina.“A number of Democratic senators are running for president,” McConnell told RealClearPolitics. “I’m sure they’re gonna be excited to be here in their chairs, not being able to say anything during the pendency of this trial.”Meanwhile, former vice president Joe Biden could be called to testify, along with his son, Hunter. Not good for Sleepy Joe, as primary voters make their decisions. Republicans are salivating over the  chance to  grill Trump haters about possible wrongdoing. These could include The Whistleblower, suspected Whistleblower collaborator Adam Schiff, anti-Trump Fusion GPS–dossier funder Hillary Clinton, dirty-dossier author Christopher Steele; Trump-loathing FBI officials James Comey, Peter Strzok, and Lisa Page; and Democratic operative Alexandra Chalupa (who, Politico reported, literally walked into Ukraine’s Washington, D.C., embassy in March 2016 and recruited them to help her mine dirt on candidate Trump).Since Senate Republicans most assuredly would block Trump’s conviction, Americans — already tiring of impeachment — would be exhausted, frustrated, and enraged at Democrats for frittering away their hard-fought House majority on this ultimately futile exercise. Come November 2020, nauseated voters might trigger a Republican trifecta: Trump’s reelection, a renewed Senate majority, and a takeover of the House, as the GOP captures most or all of the 31 congressional districts that candidate Trump secured in 2016 but Democrats snatched in 2018. Democrats then would confirm their maturity and relevance by screaming outdoors until their vocal cords snapped.Democrats are about to turn the No. 1 item on their gift list into a stocking full of smoldering, carbon-footprint-stomping, Pennsylvania-losing coal.Bucknell University’s Michael Malarkey contributed research to this opinion piece.


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  • 41/80   Shootings in northern Mexico town kill 20, pile pressure on president
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Clashes sparked by suspected cartel gunmen in a northern Mexican town killed 20 people this weekend, authorities said, putting more pressure on Mexico's president to curb gang violence after the United States vowed to label the gangs terrorists.  President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, mindful of efforts by U.S. President Donald Trump to designate Mexican drug gangs as terrorist groups, repeated on Sunday that he would not accept any intervention from abroad, while doubling down on his strategy of trying to contain the cartels.  The government of the northern state of Coahuila said local security forces killed 14 gunmen on Saturday and Sunday, after a major gunfight broke out in the small town of Villa Union near the Texas border.

    Clashes sparked by suspected cartel gunmen in a northern Mexican town killed 20 people this weekend, authorities said, putting more pressure on Mexico's president to curb gang violence after the United States vowed to label the gangs terrorists. President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, mindful of efforts by U.S. President Donald Trump to designate Mexican drug gangs as terrorist groups, repeated on Sunday that he would not accept any intervention from abroad, while doubling down on his strategy of trying to contain the cartels. The government of the northern state of Coahuila said local security forces killed 14 gunmen on Saturday and Sunday, after a major gunfight broke out in the small town of Villa Union near the Texas border.


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  • 42/80   American flight bound for Miami diverted after woman fakes medical condition, police say
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    An American Airlines flight had to be diverted on Friday after a passenger attempted to fake a medical condition to get a bigger seat on the flight.

    An American Airlines flight had to be diverted on Friday after a passenger attempted to fake a medical condition to get a bigger seat on the flight.


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  • 43/80   Joe Biden nibbled on his wife's finger in a bizarre campaign stop moment
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    While Jill Biden's arm was outstretched, her husband leaned forward and bit down on the tip of her index finger for some reason.

    While Jill Biden's arm was outstretched, her husband leaned forward and bit down on the tip of her index finger for some reason.


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  • 44/80   10 wounded in shooting near New Orleans’ French Quarter
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Ten people were shot and wounded early Sunday near the French Quarter in New Orleans, a popular spot for tourists.  Two of the 10 people shot on Canal Street near the French Quarter were in critical condition in local hospitals, Police Superintendent Shaun Ferguson said.  “What happened in our city overnight was a cowardly and senseless act that we cannot and will not tolerate,” Ferguson said in a statement.

    Ten people were shot and wounded early Sunday near the French Quarter in New Orleans, a popular spot for tourists. Two of the 10 people shot on Canal Street near the French Quarter were in critical condition in local hospitals, Police Superintendent Shaun Ferguson said. “What happened in our city overnight was a cowardly and senseless act that we cannot and will not tolerate,” Ferguson said in a statement.


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  • 45/80   Existential: 2019 word of the year raises concerns for climate change, gun violence, and threats to democracy
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Climate change, gun violence, the future of democracy around the world, and the plight of an animated character named Forky have all contributed to this year’s word of the year, as named by Dictionary.com: “Existential”.The word was chosen by the team at Dictionary.com amid several quite alarming top searched words in 2019 — including the chilling term “polar vortex”, the uncertainty of “stochastic terrorism”, and the relief of “exonerate”.

    Climate change, gun violence, the future of democracy around the world, and the plight of an animated character named Forky have all contributed to this year’s word of the year, as named by Dictionary.com: “Existential”.The word was chosen by the team at Dictionary.com amid several quite alarming top searched words in 2019 — including the chilling term “polar vortex”, the uncertainty of “stochastic terrorism”, and the relief of “exonerate”.


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  • 46/80   White House Says it Won’t Participate in ‘Partisan’ Judiciary Committee Impeachment Hearing
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The White House told House Democrats Sunday evening that it will decline to participate in the first Judiciary Committee impeachment hearing this week, condemning the process as "partisan."“Under the current circumstances, we do not intend to participate in your Wednesday hearing,” White House Counsel Pat Cipollone wrote in a letter addressed to Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D., N.Y.).The first Judiciary Committee hearing will hear testimony Wednesday from constitutional scholars and professors on whether Trump's actions amount to "high crimes and misdemeanors" warranting impeachment and removal from office."We cannot fairly be expected to participate in a hearing while the witnesses are yet to be named and while it remains unclear whether the Judiciary Committee will afford the President a fair process through additional hearings," Cipollone wrote. "More importantly, an invitation to an academic discussion with law professors does not begin to provide the President with any semblance of a fair process."Nadler invited the president and his attorneys to attend the hearing and requested last week that the White House inform the committee by December 6 whether Trump is planning to offer a defense.However, the White House counsel accused the chairman of giving “the false appearance of providing the President some rudimentary process” while in fact stonewalling on information and demanding the administration's cooperation.The White House counsel added that the White House “fully reserves the right to respond further” if Nadler releases more information about the hearing.“It is too late to cure the profound procedural deficiencies that have tainted this entire inquiry,” Cipollone stated in his letter. “Nevertheless, if you are serious about conducting a fair process going forward, and in order to protect the rights and privileges of the President, we may consider participating in future Judiciary Committee proceedings if you afford the Administration the ability to do so meaningfully.”The House Intelligence Committee concluded its hearings last month on the accusations against Trump that he engaged in a quid pro quo scheme involving U.S. military aid to Ukraine and Ukraine’s public agreement to investigate Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden.

    The White House told House Democrats Sunday evening that it will decline to participate in the first Judiciary Committee impeachment hearing this week, condemning the process as "partisan."“Under the current circumstances, we do not intend to participate in your Wednesday hearing,” White House Counsel Pat Cipollone wrote in a letter addressed to Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D., N.Y.).The first Judiciary Committee hearing will hear testimony Wednesday from constitutional scholars and professors on whether Trump's actions amount to "high crimes and misdemeanors" warranting impeachment and removal from office."We cannot fairly be expected to participate in a hearing while the witnesses are yet to be named and while it remains unclear whether the Judiciary Committee will afford the President a fair process through additional hearings," Cipollone wrote. "More importantly, an invitation to an academic discussion with law professors does not begin to provide the President with any semblance of a fair process."Nadler invited the president and his attorneys to attend the hearing and requested last week that the White House inform the committee by December 6 whether Trump is planning to offer a defense.However, the White House counsel accused the chairman of giving “the false appearance of providing the President some rudimentary process” while in fact stonewalling on information and demanding the administration's cooperation.The White House counsel added that the White House “fully reserves the right to respond further” if Nadler releases more information about the hearing.“It is too late to cure the profound procedural deficiencies that have tainted this entire inquiry,” Cipollone stated in his letter. “Nevertheless, if you are serious about conducting a fair process going forward, and in order to protect the rights and privileges of the President, we may consider participating in future Judiciary Committee proceedings if you afford the Administration the ability to do so meaningfully.”The House Intelligence Committee concluded its hearings last month on the accusations against Trump that he engaged in a quid pro quo scheme involving U.S. military aid to Ukraine and Ukraine’s public agreement to investigate Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden.


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  • 47/80   Australian Taliban captive says guards were 'lovely people'
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    An Australian lecturer held hostage by the Taliban has said some of his guards were "lovely people" as he disclosed American special forces launched six unsuccessful rescue bids to free him. Timothy Weeks spent more than three years locked up, often in the dark and underground, after he and his colleague Kevin King were seized in Kabul. In his first public appearance since he was freed in a prisoner swap, the 50-year-old said he believed US Navy SEAL teams had launched repeated rescue missions, sometimes missing their targets only by hours. In one incident, he was bundled into a tunnel beneath his prison as fighting erupted above. His captors told him they were under attack by Islamic State group, but he said he now believes it was a US raid. "I believe they were right outside our door,” he told a press conference. “The moment that we got into the tunnels, we were 1 or 2 meters underground and there was a huge bang at the front door. And our guards went up and there was a lot of machine-gun fire. They pushed me over the top into the tunnels and I fell backwards and rolled and knocked myself unconscious." Timothy Weeks, top, and American Kevin King, appeared in a June 2017 hostage video Mr Weeks and Mr King were freed in return for three senior Taliban commanders last month. While he thanked Donald Trump and Australian prime minister Scott Morrison for his release, he praised the compassion of some of his captors. "I don't hate them at all," he said. "And some of them, I have great respect for, and great love for, almost. Some of them were so compassionate and such lovely, lovely people. And it really led me to think about ... how did they end up like this?" He added: "I know a lot of people don't admit this, but for me, they were soldiers. And soldiers obey the commands of their commanders. (They) don't get a choice." Mr Weeks, from Wagga Wagga in New South Wales had been working at the American University of Afghanistan for only three weeks when he was taken in August 2016. Mr King remained in hospital, Mr Weeks said. The 63-year-old had appeared dangerously frail in hostage videos. The two men were frequently moved and were held captive in both Afghanistan and Pakistan he said. He learned pashto, the language of southern Afghanistan, during his captivity so he could talk to his guards. His ordeal had had "a profound and unimaginable effect on me," he told reporters. He had always had hope that he would be freed, but at the same time, there were occasions when he felt his death was close, he said. "At times I felt as if my death was imminent and that I would never return to see those that I love again but by the will of God I am here, I am alive and I am safe and I am free.” The sight of two US Black Hawk helicopters at the site of the hostage handover had been an enormous relief. "From the moment I sighted both Black Hawk helicopters and was placed in the hands of special forces, I knew my long and tortuous ordeal had come to an end," he said. The two captives were swapped for senior Taliban commanders held by the Afghan government in an exchange designed to build trust and revive talks to find a political settlement to the country's conflict. Mr Trump last week visited Afghanistan to spend Thanksgiving with US troops and said talks were back on.

    An Australian lecturer held hostage by the Taliban has said some of his guards were "lovely people" as he disclosed American special forces launched six unsuccessful rescue bids to free him. Timothy Weeks spent more than three years locked up, often in the dark and underground, after he and his colleague Kevin King were seized in Kabul. In his first public appearance since he was freed in a prisoner swap, the 50-year-old said he believed US Navy SEAL teams had launched repeated rescue missions, sometimes missing their targets only by hours. In one incident, he was bundled into a tunnel beneath his prison as fighting erupted above. His captors told him they were under attack by Islamic State group, but he said he now believes it was a US raid. "I believe they were right outside our door,” he told a press conference. “The moment that we got into the tunnels, we were 1 or 2 meters underground and there was a huge bang at the front door. And our guards went up and there was a lot of machine-gun fire. They pushed me over the top into the tunnels and I fell backwards and rolled and knocked myself unconscious." Timothy Weeks, top, and American Kevin King, appeared in a June 2017 hostage video Mr Weeks and Mr King were freed in return for three senior Taliban commanders last month. While he thanked Donald Trump and Australian prime minister Scott Morrison for his release, he praised the compassion of some of his captors. "I don't hate them at all," he said. "And some of them, I have great respect for, and great love for, almost. Some of them were so compassionate and such lovely, lovely people. And it really led me to think about ... how did they end up like this?" He added: "I know a lot of people don't admit this, but for me, they were soldiers. And soldiers obey the commands of their commanders. (They) don't get a choice." Mr Weeks, from Wagga Wagga in New South Wales had been working at the American University of Afghanistan for only three weeks when he was taken in August 2016. Mr King remained in hospital, Mr Weeks said. The 63-year-old had appeared dangerously frail in hostage videos. The two men were frequently moved and were held captive in both Afghanistan and Pakistan he said. He learned pashto, the language of southern Afghanistan, during his captivity so he could talk to his guards. His ordeal had had "a profound and unimaginable effect on me," he told reporters. He had always had hope that he would be freed, but at the same time, there were occasions when he felt his death was close, he said. "At times I felt as if my death was imminent and that I would never return to see those that I love again but by the will of God I am here, I am alive and I am safe and I am free.” The sight of two US Black Hawk helicopters at the site of the hostage handover had been an enormous relief. "From the moment I sighted both Black Hawk helicopters and was placed in the hands of special forces, I knew my long and tortuous ordeal had come to an end," he said. The two captives were swapped for senior Taliban commanders held by the Afghan government in an exchange designed to build trust and revive talks to find a political settlement to the country's conflict. Mr Trump last week visited Afghanistan to spend Thanksgiving with US troops and said talks were back on.


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  • 48/80   Australia slams China's 'unacceptable' treatment of jailed writer
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Australia's foreign minister on Monday said the treatment of a writer detained in China was 'unacceptable', as his lawyer reported he was being shackled and subjected to daily interrogation.  Yang Hengjun, an Australian citizen, has been detained in China since January and was recently charged with spying, which could bring a lengthy prison sentence.  Letters were also being withheld 'to cut off the conduit of information from Dr Yang to the outside world, and from the outside world to Dr Yang', she said.

    Australia's foreign minister on Monday said the treatment of a writer detained in China was 'unacceptable', as his lawyer reported he was being shackled and subjected to daily interrogation. Yang Hengjun, an Australian citizen, has been detained in China since January and was recently charged with spying, which could bring a lengthy prison sentence. Letters were also being withheld 'to cut off the conduit of information from Dr Yang to the outside world, and from the outside world to Dr Yang', she said.


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  • 49/80   Yes, Britain Is Convoying to Protect Its Ships from Iran
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Will it work?

    Will it work?


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  • 50/80   9 family members killed in South Dakota plane crash
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Federal investigators are expected to arrive Monday at the South Dakota site where nine members of an extended Idaho family were killed in a plane crash.

    Federal investigators are expected to arrive Monday at the South Dakota site where nine members of an extended Idaho family were killed in a plane crash.


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  • 51/80   Spacewalking astronauts add new pumps to cosmic detector
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Spacewalking astronauts installed new pumps on a cosmic ray detector outside the International Space Station on Monday in a bid to extend its scientific life.  It was the third spacewalk in nearly three weeks for Italy’s Luca Parmitano and NASA’s Andrew Morgan.  One more spacewalk remains before NASA can declare the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer successfully repaired.

    Spacewalking astronauts installed new pumps on a cosmic ray detector outside the International Space Station on Monday in a bid to extend its scientific life. It was the third spacewalk in nearly three weeks for Italy’s Luca Parmitano and NASA’s Andrew Morgan. One more spacewalk remains before NASA can declare the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer successfully repaired.


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  • 52/80   Could a Buried Ocean on Jupiter’s Moon Point to Life Beyond Earth?
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    GettyThere’s water on Europa, one of 79 moons orbiting Jupiter, NASA just confirmed. And where there’s water, there could be life, according to the space agency.The discovery, which NASA scientists announced in a November paper in the journal Nature, is the latest in a series of findings that point to some form of life possibly sharing the cosmos with Earth’s own beings.Scientists are increasingly convinced that our planet’s microbes, plants, insects, fish, birds, lizards and apes aren’t the only living things in the universe.But we won’t know for sure unless we investigate every potential sign of life. And that’s where NASA, Congress, and the Trump administration keep dropping the ball. It could be more than a decade before NASA launches a mission to travel the roughly 400 million miles to Europa and sample its water.Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei discovered Europa, by way of telescope, way back in 1610. A series of probes began visiting the moon starting in the 1970s. NASA’s Galileo probe orbited Jupiter between 1995 and 2003 and repeatedly scanned Europa with its sensors. In the 2000s scientists began pointing the Hubble space telescope at the smooth, brown-white moon. That’s when they first saw signs of “plumes”—watery geysers periodically jetting up from Europa’s icy crust. NASA revealed the plumes in 2013. Three years later, agency scientists began a yearlong survey of Europa using a telescope at the Keck Observatory in Hawaii.On April 26, 2016, they observed around 2,000 tons of water vapor in the sky over Europa. That’s not really a lot of H2O by galactic standards. Europa’s plumes could be “rare localized events,” the scientists conceded. But they still might point to life on the frigid moon.All the probes and scans since the 1970s “have amassed enough additional information about Europa to make it a high-priority target of investigation in NASA’s search for life,” the space agency stated on Nov. 18.“What makes this moon so alluring is the possibility that it may possess all of the ingredients necessary for life,” NASA continued. “Scientists have evidence that one of these ingredients, liquid water, is present under the icy surface and may sometimes erupt into space in huge geysers.”The problem is, the only mission to Europa that NASA is working on doesn’t include the best equipment for investigating the possibility of life. “If your job is to look for life beyond Earth, if your quest is to show that there’s life on worlds other than our own, this Europan spritz is a magnificent opportunity,” Seth Shostak, an astronomer with the California-based SETI Institute, told The Daily Beast. The SETI Institute searches for extraterrestrial life, primarily by listening for alien radio broadcasts. “All that may be required to find aliens—albeit, microscopic ones—is to launch a spacecraft towards Jupiter, swing around Europa and robotically grab some of the water vapor the moon shoots your way,” Shostak added. “By either bringing that frozen water back to Earth, or simply examining it with an on-board microscope, we might find some life within—just as we could find bacteria by carefully looking at the water droplets from a sneeze. It may be the quickest way to show that life is everywhere.”But NASA’s only new Europa probe, Clipper, is set to launch in 2025 without any ability to scoop up Europa’s water. For that, it would need a robotic lander that could actually descend to the moon’s surface, bottle up some samples then boost back into orbit. Without a lander, the $4-billion Clipper is limited to conducting remote scans.There once was a plan to outfit Clipper with a lander. But it was risky. “It is most challenging at Europa due to the temporal nature of the plumes and the high-radiation environment under which the samples have to be collected and the instruments have to gain information,” Dirk Schulze-Makuch, an astronomer at Technical University Berlin, told The Daily Beast.The lander scheme had just one champion in Congress, Houston-area Republican representative John Culberson. “He was somewhat single-handedly setting the congressional budget to have a Europa lander,” Matthew Siegler, an astronomer with the Planetary Science Institute in Arizona, told The Daily Beast.But Culberson, an 18-year veteran of the House of Representatives, lost his re-election bid in 2018. Funding for the lander dwindled in the 2019 budget. “The money clearly is not going to be there,” Siegler said. Spokespersons for the House science committee didn’t respond to The Daily Beast’s requests for comment.It’s unlikely NASA will make a hard push for more money for Clipper. “You could place the blame of that on the moon, where the current administration is advocating money be spent,” Siegler noted, referring to Earth’s own moon. The Trump administration is desperate to land astronauts on Earth’s moon by 2024, the final full year of a possible second term for Trump. The moon mission involves several new spacecraft and could end up costing $30 billion. NASA’s entire annual budget has been around $20 billion in recent years. A NASA spokesperson didn’t respond to a request for comment.  It’s possible that, once the Trump-inspired moon mania fades, NASA could mount a fresh mission to Europa—one with a water-collecting lander. Siegler guessed that could happen around 2035, at the soonest. Of course, by the 2030s, an additional Europa mission might be competing with manned missions to Mars. It might also run afoul of a possible mission to Enceladus, a moon of Saturn that also appears to be capable of supporting life.“It’s worth noting that Europa is, in some sense, in competition with Enceladus, which also has geysers from an underground ocean,” Shostak said. “Maybe even more than Europa.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

    GettyThere’s water on Europa, one of 79 moons orbiting Jupiter, NASA just confirmed. And where there’s water, there could be life, according to the space agency.The discovery, which NASA scientists announced in a November paper in the journal Nature, is the latest in a series of findings that point to some form of life possibly sharing the cosmos with Earth’s own beings.Scientists are increasingly convinced that our planet’s microbes, plants, insects, fish, birds, lizards and apes aren’t the only living things in the universe.But we won’t know for sure unless we investigate every potential sign of life. And that’s where NASA, Congress, and the Trump administration keep dropping the ball. It could be more than a decade before NASA launches a mission to travel the roughly 400 million miles to Europa and sample its water.Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei discovered Europa, by way of telescope, way back in 1610. A series of probes began visiting the moon starting in the 1970s. NASA’s Galileo probe orbited Jupiter between 1995 and 2003 and repeatedly scanned Europa with its sensors. In the 2000s scientists began pointing the Hubble space telescope at the smooth, brown-white moon. That’s when they first saw signs of “plumes”—watery geysers periodically jetting up from Europa’s icy crust. NASA revealed the plumes in 2013. Three years later, agency scientists began a yearlong survey of Europa using a telescope at the Keck Observatory in Hawaii.On April 26, 2016, they observed around 2,000 tons of water vapor in the sky over Europa. That’s not really a lot of H2O by galactic standards. Europa’s plumes could be “rare localized events,” the scientists conceded. But they still might point to life on the frigid moon.All the probes and scans since the 1970s “have amassed enough additional information about Europa to make it a high-priority target of investigation in NASA’s search for life,” the space agency stated on Nov. 18.“What makes this moon so alluring is the possibility that it may possess all of the ingredients necessary for life,” NASA continued. “Scientists have evidence that one of these ingredients, liquid water, is present under the icy surface and may sometimes erupt into space in huge geysers.”The problem is, the only mission to Europa that NASA is working on doesn’t include the best equipment for investigating the possibility of life. “If your job is to look for life beyond Earth, if your quest is to show that there’s life on worlds other than our own, this Europan spritz is a magnificent opportunity,” Seth Shostak, an astronomer with the California-based SETI Institute, told The Daily Beast. The SETI Institute searches for extraterrestrial life, primarily by listening for alien radio broadcasts. “All that may be required to find aliens—albeit, microscopic ones—is to launch a spacecraft towards Jupiter, swing around Europa and robotically grab some of the water vapor the moon shoots your way,” Shostak added. “By either bringing that frozen water back to Earth, or simply examining it with an on-board microscope, we might find some life within—just as we could find bacteria by carefully looking at the water droplets from a sneeze. It may be the quickest way to show that life is everywhere.”But NASA’s only new Europa probe, Clipper, is set to launch in 2025 without any ability to scoop up Europa’s water. For that, it would need a robotic lander that could actually descend to the moon’s surface, bottle up some samples then boost back into orbit. Without a lander, the $4-billion Clipper is limited to conducting remote scans.There once was a plan to outfit Clipper with a lander. But it was risky. “It is most challenging at Europa due to the temporal nature of the plumes and the high-radiation environment under which the samples have to be collected and the instruments have to gain information,” Dirk Schulze-Makuch, an astronomer at Technical University Berlin, told The Daily Beast.The lander scheme had just one champion in Congress, Houston-area Republican representative John Culberson. “He was somewhat single-handedly setting the congressional budget to have a Europa lander,” Matthew Siegler, an astronomer with the Planetary Science Institute in Arizona, told The Daily Beast.But Culberson, an 18-year veteran of the House of Representatives, lost his re-election bid in 2018. Funding for the lander dwindled in the 2019 budget. “The money clearly is not going to be there,” Siegler said. Spokespersons for the House science committee didn’t respond to The Daily Beast’s requests for comment.It’s unlikely NASA will make a hard push for more money for Clipper. “You could place the blame of that on the moon, where the current administration is advocating money be spent,” Siegler noted, referring to Earth’s own moon. The Trump administration is desperate to land astronauts on Earth’s moon by 2024, the final full year of a possible second term for Trump. The moon mission involves several new spacecraft and could end up costing $30 billion. NASA’s entire annual budget has been around $20 billion in recent years. A NASA spokesperson didn’t respond to a request for comment.  It’s possible that, once the Trump-inspired moon mania fades, NASA could mount a fresh mission to Europa—one with a water-collecting lander. Siegler guessed that could happen around 2035, at the soonest. Of course, by the 2030s, an additional Europa mission might be competing with manned missions to Mars. It might also run afoul of a possible mission to Enceladus, a moon of Saturn that also appears to be capable of supporting life.“It’s worth noting that Europa is, in some sense, in competition with Enceladus, which also has geysers from an underground ocean,” Shostak said. “Maybe even more than Europa.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


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  • 53/80   Are lab-grown diamonds the real deal?
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Are lab-grown diamonds the real deal? originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.comShopping for a diamond for a special someone?Before you make your purchase, you may want to learn more about lab-grown diamonds.This option has grown in popularity and been seen on celebs such as Bindi Irwin.         View this post on Instagram           July 24th 2019 ?? On my birthday I said ‘yes’ and ‘forever’ to the love of my life. Chandler, close to 6 years ago I fell in love with you and every day since has been a whirlwind of adventure and true happiness. ...

    Are lab-grown diamonds the real deal? originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.comShopping for a diamond for a special someone?Before you make your purchase, you may want to learn more about lab-grown diamonds.This option has grown in popularity and been seen on celebs such as Bindi Irwin. View this post on Instagram July 24th 2019 ?? On my birthday I said ‘yes’ and ‘forever’ to the love of my life. Chandler, close to 6 years ago I fell in love with you and every day since has been a whirlwind of adventure and true happiness. ...


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  • 54/80   Cyrus Biotechnology and CRISPR pioneers team up to boost gene-editing therapies
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Seattle-based Cyrus Biotechnology says it'll collaborate with the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard on ways to optimize CRISPR gene-editing techniques for use in developing novel human therapeutics. CRISPR has revolutionized genetics by making it easier to modify the DNA coding in the genome, but more needs to be done to address safety concerns for human applications. Cyrus Biotech and the Broad Institute will work on ways to reduce the potential for the body to mount an immune response against CRISPR-based therapies. MIT biochemist Feng Zhang, one of the pioneers in the development of CRISPR, will be the principal investigator… Read More

    Seattle-based Cyrus Biotechnology says it'll collaborate with the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard on ways to optimize CRISPR gene-editing techniques for use in developing novel human therapeutics. CRISPR has revolutionized genetics by making it easier to modify the DNA coding in the genome, but more needs to be done to address safety concerns for human applications. Cyrus Biotech and the Broad Institute will work on ways to reduce the potential for the body to mount an immune response against CRISPR-based therapies. MIT biochemist Feng Zhang, one of the pioneers in the development of CRISPR, will be the principal investigator… Read More


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  • 55/80   Photos show how ants escaped a Soviet nuclear-weapons bunker after surviving on cannibalism for years
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The ants' food source remained a mystery until researchers examined some of the 2 million ant corpses piled up around the bunker.

    The ants' food source remained a mystery until researchers examined some of the 2 million ant corpses piled up around the bunker.


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  • 56/80   The Suburbs Are Kicking the Animals Out. Enter the Animal Rescue Squad.
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    ATLANTA -- In a small suburban park on a muggy morning a few months ago, a woman in elbow-length gloves was armed with a net, a loaf of bread and a tall cardboard box, all in hopes of catching an elusive goose.The goose, whose left leg was tightly wound in fishing line, walked with a pronounced hobble; as it swam, the leg dragged listlessly in the water. Yet despite its condition, animal instinct prevailed. The goose simply refused to be caught.Cindy Rooker, the would-be captor, hoped to retrieve the recalcitrant Canada goose, tuck it into the cardboard box she had brought, and drive it to a wildlife rehabilitation center a few hours away in South Carolina, where the bird would receive medical attention.But after several attempts, Rooker knew it was time to call it a day. Birds are easily stressed, and waterfowl have an inconvenient and frustrating knack for flying right into the center of a pond. Also, she didn't bring a kayak this time.A police officer who lives in Canton, Georgia, Rooker, 56, volunteers for the Wildlife Resources and Education Network (WREN). She started working with the organization at the beginning of the summer, and has since completed about 10 transports, crisscrossing the northern half of the state with the likes of orphaned baby opossums and injured hawks in the cab of her Nissan pickup truck.WREN connects people like Rooker -- committed animal lovers in the Southeast with spare time, spare gas money and an empty back seat -- with wildlife rehabbers and veterinary clinics that lack the resources to transport an animal on their own.In other words, Rooker and her fellow transporters are Mother Nature's unpaid Uber drivers.Robert Jones, an animal lover whose other pursuits include military history and small-business consulting, started WREN with Liz Crandall in 2016. The two met at the Southeastern Raptor Center at Auburn University, where Crandall worked and Jones volunteered and, later, interned.They formed WREN as a wildlife educational initiative, but with time, sharpened their focus largely on transportation after seeing the same challenge day after day: More people seemed to be stumbling upon injured wildlife every passing year, but few wanted to transport the animals to rehabbers themselves."It's a really large gap," said Jones, 34, who now lives in Jonesborough, Tennessee, and is the executive director of the Tilted Tavern Animal Sanctuary. Nonprofits like the raptor center don't always have the resources or staff to send someone out to fetch an animal, especially one that's hours away.That's where WREN -- and a handful of similar organizations, like the Connecticut Emergency Animal Response Service -- step in.When I first spoke with Crandall, 46, by phone, she had just finished up "a fawn call" (which, at least in this instance, is not a pun). Crandall, who is the assistant director of the Tilted Tavern Animal Sanctuary, said that she fields roughly a dozen calls a day and manages a handful of transports each week, often across state lines.That number is increasing each year, for reasons both dismal and hopeful: While humans are pushing into wildlife territory more and more, some of them are also becoming more aware of, and attuned to, the wildlife in their backyards."I think people are more conscientious," Crandall said. "They want to help more."WREN uses Slack to communicate to its volunteers and manage logistics, like making sure each transporter has an appropriate container for the animal (typically a cardboard box or a lidded Rubbermaid bin with holes for oxygen).Driving a captured animal requires total silence in the car -- no phone conversations, no podcasts or music -- sometimes for hours on end."It takes a lot for people to commit to something where they'll get a call maybe once a month, or maybe every day," Crandall said. Working with nature has inherent challenges and frustrations. It requires patience and flexibility, not to mention thick skin: Not every case has a happy ending.One of the organizations WREN works with is the Chattahoochee Nature Center, where Kathryn Dudeck works as wildlife director. Dudeck said that the center fields 400 to 500 phone calls a month, and takes in more than 650 animals for rehab each year.Those cases range from natural causes, like nestlings blown out of their nests in a hurricane, to injury explicitly at the hands of humans: an owl with buckshot in its wings, a red-tailed hawk hit by a car. "Needless to say, Mother Nature didn't invent the vehicle or the gun," Dudeck said. "So, we have a moral obligation to assist."David Crawford is the founder of Animal Help Now, a 911-like website and smartphone app that links people to wildlife rehabbers and transporters like WREN. App usage has increased every year since its inception in 2012, he said."As we expand and build new roads and build new suburbs, you have a lot more interaction with animals," he said. Then, he added, there is climate change: more destructive hurricanes will yield more injuries and habitat destruction; prolonged droughts, raging forest fires and searing heat waves will continue to push desperate animals further into human habitats."People are going to be interacting with wildlife a lot more than they are right now," said Crawford. He estimates that by the end of 2019, Animal Help Now will have been used in 40,000 wildlife emergencies across the country.A week after the first attempt, Rooker was back at Laurel Park. This time, there was a scrum of additional helpers, including Crandall, along with two kayaks. There were, however, no geese.Just before the group split off to search nearby ponds for the flock, Darcell Patterson, a sneaker-shod woman, intercepted the volunteers. Patterson, 66, has walked around the park every day for the last four years, she said, and brings dried food pellets with her to "establish rapport" with the resident ducks and geese.She matter-of-factly informed the group that the injured goose is named Gary, and that his leg has been wrapped in that line for a couple of years. Gary, it seems, can survive on his own, and has not yet been ostracized from his avian comrades.Crandall decided to let Gary be for now, knowing he was under Patterson's watchful eye. As long as the bird can still fly, walk and eat, Crandall explained, the stress of relocation isn't justifiable yet."Gary's got friends in high places," Patterson said.While it wasn't the Disney-worthy victory that the volunteers may have had in mind this go-round, it was still a victory by their standards."Sometimes letting wild be wild is the right thing to do," Jones said. "You teach people what situations need our intervention, and what situations don't."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company

    ATLANTA -- In a small suburban park on a muggy morning a few months ago, a woman in elbow-length gloves was armed with a net, a loaf of bread and a tall cardboard box, all in hopes of catching an elusive goose.The goose, whose left leg was tightly wound in fishing line, walked with a pronounced hobble; as it swam, the leg dragged listlessly in the water. Yet despite its condition, animal instinct prevailed. The goose simply refused to be caught.Cindy Rooker, the would-be captor, hoped to retrieve the recalcitrant Canada goose, tuck it into the cardboard box she had brought, and drive it to a wildlife rehabilitation center a few hours away in South Carolina, where the bird would receive medical attention.But after several attempts, Rooker knew it was time to call it a day. Birds are easily stressed, and waterfowl have an inconvenient and frustrating knack for flying right into the center of a pond. Also, she didn't bring a kayak this time.A police officer who lives in Canton, Georgia, Rooker, 56, volunteers for the Wildlife Resources and Education Network (WREN). She started working with the organization at the beginning of the summer, and has since completed about 10 transports, crisscrossing the northern half of the state with the likes of orphaned baby opossums and injured hawks in the cab of her Nissan pickup truck.WREN connects people like Rooker -- committed animal lovers in the Southeast with spare time, spare gas money and an empty back seat -- with wildlife rehabbers and veterinary clinics that lack the resources to transport an animal on their own.In other words, Rooker and her fellow transporters are Mother Nature's unpaid Uber drivers.Robert Jones, an animal lover whose other pursuits include military history and small-business consulting, started WREN with Liz Crandall in 2016. The two met at the Southeastern Raptor Center at Auburn University, where Crandall worked and Jones volunteered and, later, interned.They formed WREN as a wildlife educational initiative, but with time, sharpened their focus largely on transportation after seeing the same challenge day after day: More people seemed to be stumbling upon injured wildlife every passing year, but few wanted to transport the animals to rehabbers themselves."It's a really large gap," said Jones, 34, who now lives in Jonesborough, Tennessee, and is the executive director of the Tilted Tavern Animal Sanctuary. Nonprofits like the raptor center don't always have the resources or staff to send someone out to fetch an animal, especially one that's hours away.That's where WREN -- and a handful of similar organizations, like the Connecticut Emergency Animal Response Service -- step in.When I first spoke with Crandall, 46, by phone, she had just finished up "a fawn call" (which, at least in this instance, is not a pun). Crandall, who is the assistant director of the Tilted Tavern Animal Sanctuary, said that she fields roughly a dozen calls a day and manages a handful of transports each week, often across state lines.That number is increasing each year, for reasons both dismal and hopeful: While humans are pushing into wildlife territory more and more, some of them are also becoming more aware of, and attuned to, the wildlife in their backyards."I think people are more conscientious," Crandall said. "They want to help more."WREN uses Slack to communicate to its volunteers and manage logistics, like making sure each transporter has an appropriate container for the animal (typically a cardboard box or a lidded Rubbermaid bin with holes for oxygen).Driving a captured animal requires total silence in the car -- no phone conversations, no podcasts or music -- sometimes for hours on end."It takes a lot for people to commit to something where they'll get a call maybe once a month, or maybe every day," Crandall said. Working with nature has inherent challenges and frustrations. It requires patience and flexibility, not to mention thick skin: Not every case has a happy ending.One of the organizations WREN works with is the Chattahoochee Nature Center, where Kathryn Dudeck works as wildlife director. Dudeck said that the center fields 400 to 500 phone calls a month, and takes in more than 650 animals for rehab each year.Those cases range from natural causes, like nestlings blown out of their nests in a hurricane, to injury explicitly at the hands of humans: an owl with buckshot in its wings, a red-tailed hawk hit by a car. "Needless to say, Mother Nature didn't invent the vehicle or the gun," Dudeck said. "So, we have a moral obligation to assist."David Crawford is the founder of Animal Help Now, a 911-like website and smartphone app that links people to wildlife rehabbers and transporters like WREN. App usage has increased every year since its inception in 2012, he said."As we expand and build new roads and build new suburbs, you have a lot more interaction with animals," he said. Then, he added, there is climate change: more destructive hurricanes will yield more injuries and habitat destruction; prolonged droughts, raging forest fires and searing heat waves will continue to push desperate animals further into human habitats."People are going to be interacting with wildlife a lot more than they are right now," said Crawford. He estimates that by the end of 2019, Animal Help Now will have been used in 40,000 wildlife emergencies across the country.A week after the first attempt, Rooker was back at Laurel Park. This time, there was a scrum of additional helpers, including Crandall, along with two kayaks. There were, however, no geese.Just before the group split off to search nearby ponds for the flock, Darcell Patterson, a sneaker-shod woman, intercepted the volunteers. Patterson, 66, has walked around the park every day for the last four years, she said, and brings dried food pellets with her to "establish rapport" with the resident ducks and geese.She matter-of-factly informed the group that the injured goose is named Gary, and that his leg has been wrapped in that line for a couple of years. Gary, it seems, can survive on his own, and has not yet been ostracized from his avian comrades.Crandall decided to let Gary be for now, knowing he was under Patterson's watchful eye. As long as the bird can still fly, walk and eat, Crandall explained, the stress of relocation isn't justifiable yet."Gary's got friends in high places," Patterson said.While it wasn't the Disney-worthy victory that the volunteers may have had in mind this go-round, it was still a victory by their standards."Sometimes letting wild be wild is the right thing to do," Jones said. "You teach people what situations need our intervention, and what situations don't."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company


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  • 57/80   Life expectancy in the US keeps going down, and a new study says America's worsening inequality could be to blame
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    According to new research, the average American's life expectancy has once again gone down, despite the nation's billion-dollar health care system.

    According to new research, the average American's life expectancy has once again gone down, despite the nation's billion-dollar health care system.


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  • 58/80   Blue Origin’s expansion plans rush ahead at its Seattle-area HQ — and in Los Angeles
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    KENT, Wash. — Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin space venture is rapidly expanding on several fronts, ranging from its headquarters facility south of Seattle to a new beachhead in the Los Angeles area — within the orbit of its main competitor, Elon Musk's SpaceX. Just three and a half years ago, Blue Origin's workforce amounted to 600 employees, and even then, Bezos said his company's 300,000-square-foot office and production facility in Kent was "busting out of the seams." Now the employee count is at around 2,500, heading toward 3,500 in the next year. That's according to a report from… Read More

    KENT, Wash. — Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin space venture is rapidly expanding on several fronts, ranging from its headquarters facility south of Seattle to a new beachhead in the Los Angeles area — within the orbit of its main competitor, Elon Musk's SpaceX. Just three and a half years ago, Blue Origin's workforce amounted to 600 employees, and even then, Bezos said his company's 300,000-square-foot office and production facility in Kent was "busting out of the seams." Now the employee count is at around 2,500, heading toward 3,500 in the next year. That's according to a report from… Read More


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  • 59/80   A network of cables at the bottom of the ocean is helping scientists detect earthquakes
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The cables detected a new fault system near the San Andreas Fault, which runs along the California coast.

    The cables detected a new fault system near the San Andreas Fault, which runs along the California coast.


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  • 60/80   The human species will likely destroy itself long before the sun kills everyone on Earth, a Harvard scientists says
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Scientist Avi Loeb wrote that we should colonize space to survive the sun's future expansion. But humanity might wipe itself out before then, he said.

    Scientist Avi Loeb wrote that we should colonize space to survive the sun's future expansion. But humanity might wipe itself out before then, he said.


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  • 61/80   Trump re-election could sound death knell for Nato, allies fear
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The US president’s ambivalence or even hostility towards the alliance will hover over the 70th anniversary meeting in the UKDonald Trump has repeatedly complained about Nato’s demands on the US. His former national security adviser John Bolton recently warned he could ‘go full isolationist’ in a second term. Photograph: Olivier Matthys/APDonald Trump arrived in the UK to meet Nato allies who are fearful that he could pose a serious threat to the survival of the alliance if he wins re-election next year.Days before Wednesday’s leaders’ meeting just outside London to mark Nato’s 70th anniversary, the US announced it was cutting its contribution to joint Nato projects.Nato officials say the cut (which reduces the US contribution to equivalence with Germany’s) was mutually agreed, but it comes against a backdrop of Trump’s longstanding ambivalence about the value of the alliance, and suggestions that US security guarantees to allied nations were dependent on their military spending.John Bolton, Trump’s national security adviser until September, heightened fears among allies about the president’s intentions in a private speech to a hedge fund last month, in which Bolton (according to a NBC report) warned that Trump could “go full isolationist” if he wins re-election next November, withdrawing from Nato and other international alliances.Trump has continually complained about the defence spending of European allies who committed less than the agreed 2% to defence, particularly Germany. And he has cast doubt on US commitment to its obligations under article 5 of Nato’s founding document, the Washington Treaty, under which an attack on one ally is considered an attack on all allies.Before leaving Washington on Monday, Trump repeated his complaint about “other countries that we protect, that weren’t paying”.“They were delinquent. So we’ll be talking about that,” he told reporters, though he noted that allies were now spending $130bn more than before he took office, a development he took credit for.Tweeting from Air Force One on the way to the UK, Trump declared: “In the 3 decades before my election, NATO spending declined by two-thirds, and only 3 other NATO members were meeting their financial obligations. Since I took office, the number of NATO allies fulfilling their obligations more than DOUBLED, and NATO spending increased by $130B!”In fact the number of allies meeting the 2% commitment has tripled to nine since 2016, though some of that increase was already planned and Russian aggression in Ukraine is also an important factor.Air Force One touched down at London Stansted just before 10pm.A European diplomat in Washington pointed out that under the Trump administration, the US military presence on the alliance’s eastern flank has been stepped up, but expressed concern that such reinforcements were driven by other administration officials seeking to compensate for Trump’s personal affinity for Vladimir Putin and his denigration of his European allies.“The greatest fear is what he would do in a second term. He would be more free from constraints,” the diplomat said, adding that he was under pressure from his capital to assess what a second Trump term would look like. “It is impossible to predict,” he said.Trump last year publicly called into question whether the US would intervene in defence of the newest member, Montenegro, under article 5. In an July 2018 interview, Trump described Montenegrins as “very aggressive people” and expressed concern they would somehow drag the US into a conflict “and congratulations, you’re in World War III”.The New York Times has reported that Trump has said privately several times that he would like to withdraw from Nato.A Montenegrin guard of honor stands next to a Nato flag during a 2017 ceremony to mark the accession to Nato of Montenegro in Podgorica. Photograph: Stevo Vasiljevic/Reuters“I think what Bolton says resonates with people because it is something that has worried people since Trump took office and there is concern that he would feel less constrained in a second term, and could actually do something,” said Amanda Sloat, a former senior state department official now at the Brookings Institution.“Given that you have someone who was working very closely with the president over the last year expressing that concern himself, I think it is bringing back to the fore the possibility that this is something that could happen in a Trump second term.”Susan Rice, national security adviser in the Obama administration, said that congressional Republicans would step in to prevent Trump pulling the US out of Nato, but she expressed concern about the long-term draining effect of Trump’s ambivalence on Nato cohesion.“I still do think that Congress would throw its body in the way of a move to withdraw from Nato,” Rice told the Guardian. “But, you know, Congress has surprised me in the recent past, by its inability or unwillingness to challenge Trump. What I think is more likely is this continued erosion of confidence in our leadership within Nato, and more efforts that call into question our commitment, and more signals to the authoritarians within Nato and Russia itself that this whole institution is vulnerable.“It’s hard to envision the United States withdrawing from Nato, but I could see it suffering a death by a thousand cuts,” Rice said.Nato’s secretary general, Jens Stoltenberg, has credited the $130bn in increased defence spending by Nato allies to Trump. In a further effort to appease the US president, Stoltenberg has also brokered a deal by which the US contribution the Nato common funding for shared projects, was reduced from 22% of the roughly $2.5bn total to just over 16%, in line with the share paid by Germany, which has a significantly smaller economy.Other countries are supposed to make up for the consequent shortfall, but France is reportedly refusing to contribute more on grounds that the redistribution represents pandering to Trump.“It’s actually a very small budget within the Nato context,” said Rachel Ellehuus, deputy director of the Europe programme at the Centre for Strategic and International Studies.“So it’s largely symbolic that the US is cutting its contribution. But the US administration was very clear that we wanted to have our share of common funding more in line with what Germany was paying.”

    The US president’s ambivalence or even hostility towards the alliance will hover over the 70th anniversary meeting in the UKDonald Trump has repeatedly complained about Nato’s demands on the US. His former national security adviser John Bolton recently warned he could ‘go full isolationist’ in a second term. Photograph: Olivier Matthys/APDonald Trump arrived in the UK to meet Nato allies who are fearful that he could pose a serious threat to the survival of the alliance if he wins re-election next year.Days before Wednesday’s leaders’ meeting just outside London to mark Nato’s 70th anniversary, the US announced it was cutting its contribution to joint Nato projects.Nato officials say the cut (which reduces the US contribution to equivalence with Germany’s) was mutually agreed, but it comes against a backdrop of Trump’s longstanding ambivalence about the value of the alliance, and suggestions that US security guarantees to allied nations were dependent on their military spending.John Bolton, Trump’s national security adviser until September, heightened fears among allies about the president’s intentions in a private speech to a hedge fund last month, in which Bolton (according to a NBC report) warned that Trump could “go full isolationist” if he wins re-election next November, withdrawing from Nato and other international alliances.Trump has continually complained about the defence spending of European allies who committed less than the agreed 2% to defence, particularly Germany. And he has cast doubt on US commitment to its obligations under article 5 of Nato’s founding document, the Washington Treaty, under which an attack on one ally is considered an attack on all allies.Before leaving Washington on Monday, Trump repeated his complaint about “other countries that we protect, that weren’t paying”.“They were delinquent. So we’ll be talking about that,” he told reporters, though he noted that allies were now spending $130bn more than before he took office, a development he took credit for.Tweeting from Air Force One on the way to the UK, Trump declared: “In the 3 decades before my election, NATO spending declined by two-thirds, and only 3 other NATO members were meeting their financial obligations. Since I took office, the number of NATO allies fulfilling their obligations more than DOUBLED, and NATO spending increased by $130B!”In fact the number of allies meeting the 2% commitment has tripled to nine since 2016, though some of that increase was already planned and Russian aggression in Ukraine is also an important factor.Air Force One touched down at London Stansted just before 10pm.A European diplomat in Washington pointed out that under the Trump administration, the US military presence on the alliance’s eastern flank has been stepped up, but expressed concern that such reinforcements were driven by other administration officials seeking to compensate for Trump’s personal affinity for Vladimir Putin and his denigration of his European allies.“The greatest fear is what he would do in a second term. He would be more free from constraints,” the diplomat said, adding that he was under pressure from his capital to assess what a second Trump term would look like. “It is impossible to predict,” he said.Trump last year publicly called into question whether the US would intervene in defence of the newest member, Montenegro, under article 5. In an July 2018 interview, Trump described Montenegrins as “very aggressive people” and expressed concern they would somehow drag the US into a conflict “and congratulations, you’re in World War III”.The New York Times has reported that Trump has said privately several times that he would like to withdraw from Nato.A Montenegrin guard of honor stands next to a Nato flag during a 2017 ceremony to mark the accession to Nato of Montenegro in Podgorica. Photograph: Stevo Vasiljevic/Reuters“I think what Bolton says resonates with people because it is something that has worried people since Trump took office and there is concern that he would feel less constrained in a second term, and could actually do something,” said Amanda Sloat, a former senior state department official now at the Brookings Institution.“Given that you have someone who was working very closely with the president over the last year expressing that concern himself, I think it is bringing back to the fore the possibility that this is something that could happen in a Trump second term.”Susan Rice, national security adviser in the Obama administration, said that congressional Republicans would step in to prevent Trump pulling the US out of Nato, but she expressed concern about the long-term draining effect of Trump’s ambivalence on Nato cohesion.“I still do think that Congress would throw its body in the way of a move to withdraw from Nato,” Rice told the Guardian. “But, you know, Congress has surprised me in the recent past, by its inability or unwillingness to challenge Trump. What I think is more likely is this continued erosion of confidence in our leadership within Nato, and more efforts that call into question our commitment, and more signals to the authoritarians within Nato and Russia itself that this whole institution is vulnerable.“It’s hard to envision the United States withdrawing from Nato, but I could see it suffering a death by a thousand cuts,” Rice said.Nato’s secretary general, Jens Stoltenberg, has credited the $130bn in increased defence spending by Nato allies to Trump. In a further effort to appease the US president, Stoltenberg has also brokered a deal by which the US contribution the Nato common funding for shared projects, was reduced from 22% of the roughly $2.5bn total to just over 16%, in line with the share paid by Germany, which has a significantly smaller economy.Other countries are supposed to make up for the consequent shortfall, but France is reportedly refusing to contribute more on grounds that the redistribution represents pandering to Trump.“It’s actually a very small budget within the Nato context,” said Rachel Ellehuus, deputy director of the Europe programme at the Centre for Strategic and International Studies.“So it’s largely symbolic that the US is cutting its contribution. But the US administration was very clear that we wanted to have our share of common funding more in line with what Germany was paying.”


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  • 62/80   China Spares Trade in First Retaliation to U.S.’s Hong Kong Law
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- China avoided measures related to trade in its first actions retaliating against the U.S. over a law supporting Hong Kong’s protesters, instead vowing to sanction some rights organizations and halt warship visits to the city.Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying told a news briefing Monday that U.S. groups targeted for sanctions included the National Endowment for Democracy, Human Rights Watch and Freedom House. Hua said that China would also suspend further Hong Kong port visits by U.S. Navy ships over the legislation, which Trump signed into law Wednesday.Hua didn’t provide details on how China would sanction the rights groups, which are already restricted from operating on the mainland. Similarly, China had already refused visits by a pair of American warships in August.“This seems to be an empty threat because these groups don’t operate inside mainland China,” said Patrick Poon, a Hong Kong-based China researcher at London-based Amnesty International, which wasn’t named. “But if there are more tangible threats on staffers and representatives for these organizations operating in Hong Kong, it would be a serious clampdown on freedom of expression.”China’s yuan weakened to 7.0449 per dollar, the lowest level in more than a week, following the foreign ministry’s statement. The currency pared that decline to 7.0412 as of 5:20 p.m. in Shanghai.While China has promised retaliation since it became clear that U.S. lawmakers intended to pass the legislation, President Xi Jinping has limited options for hitting back exacerbating his own economic slowdown at home. China summoned the U.S. ambassador, Terry Branstad, over the law, prompting speculation that its passage could weigh on trade negotiations between the world’s two largest economies.Hong Kong has become a persistent source of friction between Beijing and Washington since historic protests broke out almost six months ago, leading to often violent clashes between police and pro-democracy demonstrators. The legislation requires annual reviews of the former British colony’s special trade status under American law, as well as sanctions against any officials deemed responsible for human rights abuses or undermining the city’s autonomy.“China urges the U.S. side to correct its mistakes and stop any words and deeds that interfere in Hong Kong affairs and China’s internal politics,” Hua told reporters Monday in Beijing. “China will take further necessary actions in light of the development of the situation to firmly safeguard Hong Kong’s stability and prosperity, as well as China’s sovereignty, security and development interests.”The International Republican Institute, one of the groups mentioned by Hua, said China was trying to “scapegoat others for its own failures of governance.” The National Endowment for Democracy didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment, while Human Rights Watch declined to comment.‘Very Tough’“The people of Hong Kong may welcome our solidarity, but they do not need our leadership,” Michael J. Abramowitz, president of Freedom House, said in a statement, citing a landslide win for pro-democracy candidates in last month’s local elections. “The Chinese Communist Party’s most recent actions will only strengthen our resolve as we continue to oppose its well-documented efforts to undermine fundamental human rights.”While signing the bills, Trump signaled that he didn’t want the broader relationship with China to veer off track. He expressed concerns with unspecified portions of the new law, saying they risked interfering with his constitutional authority to carry out American foreign policy.Hu Xijin, the editor-in-chief of state-run Global Times, said last week that China was considering putting the law’s drafters a no-entry list. Hua made no mention of any such action.Still, Zhu Feng, the dean of the Institute of International Relations at Nanjing University, called the countermeasures “very tough and unprecedented,” especially the decision to halt port visits. “For the first time in the four decades since China and U.S. established diplomatic ties, China has suspended the review of these requests,” Zhu said.(Updates with statements from human rights groups)\--With assistance from Tian Chen and Li Liu.To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Dandan Li in Beijing at dli395@bloomberg.net;Shelly Banjo in Hong Kong at sbanjo@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.net, Daniel Ten KateFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- China avoided measures related to trade in its first actions retaliating against the U.S. over a law supporting Hong Kong’s protesters, instead vowing to sanction some rights organizations and halt warship visits to the city.Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying told a news briefing Monday that U.S. groups targeted for sanctions included the National Endowment for Democracy, Human Rights Watch and Freedom House. Hua said that China would also suspend further Hong Kong port visits by U.S. Navy ships over the legislation, which Trump signed into law Wednesday.Hua didn’t provide details on how China would sanction the rights groups, which are already restricted from operating on the mainland. Similarly, China had already refused visits by a pair of American warships in August.“This seems to be an empty threat because these groups don’t operate inside mainland China,” said Patrick Poon, a Hong Kong-based China researcher at London-based Amnesty International, which wasn’t named. “But if there are more tangible threats on staffers and representatives for these organizations operating in Hong Kong, it would be a serious clampdown on freedom of expression.”China’s yuan weakened to 7.0449 per dollar, the lowest level in more than a week, following the foreign ministry’s statement. The currency pared that decline to 7.0412 as of 5:20 p.m. in Shanghai.While China has promised retaliation since it became clear that U.S. lawmakers intended to pass the legislation, President Xi Jinping has limited options for hitting back exacerbating his own economic slowdown at home. China summoned the U.S. ambassador, Terry Branstad, over the law, prompting speculation that its passage could weigh on trade negotiations between the world’s two largest economies.Hong Kong has become a persistent source of friction between Beijing and Washington since historic protests broke out almost six months ago, leading to often violent clashes between police and pro-democracy demonstrators. The legislation requires annual reviews of the former British colony’s special trade status under American law, as well as sanctions against any officials deemed responsible for human rights abuses or undermining the city’s autonomy.“China urges the U.S. side to correct its mistakes and stop any words and deeds that interfere in Hong Kong affairs and China’s internal politics,” Hua told reporters Monday in Beijing. “China will take further necessary actions in light of the development of the situation to firmly safeguard Hong Kong’s stability and prosperity, as well as China’s sovereignty, security and development interests.”The International Republican Institute, one of the groups mentioned by Hua, said China was trying to “scapegoat others for its own failures of governance.” The National Endowment for Democracy didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment, while Human Rights Watch declined to comment.‘Very Tough’“The people of Hong Kong may welcome our solidarity, but they do not need our leadership,” Michael J. Abramowitz, president of Freedom House, said in a statement, citing a landslide win for pro-democracy candidates in last month’s local elections. “The Chinese Communist Party’s most recent actions will only strengthen our resolve as we continue to oppose its well-documented efforts to undermine fundamental human rights.”While signing the bills, Trump signaled that he didn’t want the broader relationship with China to veer off track. He expressed concerns with unspecified portions of the new law, saying they risked interfering with his constitutional authority to carry out American foreign policy.Hu Xijin, the editor-in-chief of state-run Global Times, said last week that China was considering putting the law’s drafters a no-entry list. Hua made no mention of any such action.Still, Zhu Feng, the dean of the Institute of International Relations at Nanjing University, called the countermeasures “very tough and unprecedented,” especially the decision to halt port visits. “For the first time in the four decades since China and U.S. established diplomatic ties, China has suspended the review of these requests,” Zhu said.(Updates with statements from human rights groups)\--With assistance from Tian Chen and Li Liu.To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Dandan Li in Beijing at dli395@bloomberg.net;Shelly Banjo in Hong Kong at sbanjo@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.net, Daniel Ten KateFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 63/80   Trump in London for NATO summit amid election race
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Fellow NATO leaders will be relieved that Trump, who derailed last year's summit agenda with his demands, appears to be satisfied with how the allies have stepped up their military investment.  The pro-Brexit premier is the favourite in the opinion polls to win a majority in next week's vote, but opposition Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has attacked him for his closeness to Trump.

    Fellow NATO leaders will be relieved that Trump, who derailed last year's summit agenda with his demands, appears to be satisfied with how the allies have stepped up their military investment. The pro-Brexit premier is the favourite in the opinion polls to win a majority in next week's vote, but opposition Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has attacked him for his closeness to Trump.


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  • 64/80   'The United States is still in': Nancy Pelosi defies Trump over Paris climate change agreement in Spain
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    House speaker Nancy Pelosi has pledged the United States is still dedicated to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, even though Donald Trump has begun the process of pulling America out of the Paris Climate Accord.The House Speaker made the claim during an appearance at the two-week long United Nations climate summit, which is being held in Spain this year.

    House speaker Nancy Pelosi has pledged the United States is still dedicated to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, even though Donald Trump has begun the process of pulling America out of the Paris Climate Accord.The House Speaker made the claim during an appearance at the two-week long United Nations climate summit, which is being held in Spain this year.


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  • 65/80   Islamic State Is Losing Afghan Territory. That Means Little for Its Victims.
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    KABUL, Afghanistan -- The Islamic State group's main stronghold in eastern Afghanistan collapsed in recent weeks, according to American and Afghan officials, following years of concerted military offensives from U.S. and Afghan forces and, more recently, the Taliban.President Ashraf Ghani recently claimed that the Islamic State, often known as ISIS, had been "obliterated" in Nangarhar Province, the group's haven in the east. And in an interview in Kabul on Sunday, Gen. Austin S. Miller, the commander of all U.S. and NATO forces in Afghanistan, said the group's loss of the terrain it stubbornly held for few years would severely restrict their recruitment and planning.But Miller also warned that the Islamic State could remain a threat in Afghanistan even if it does not hold territory, with attention required to track militants on the move and the group's remaining urban cells."It was instructive in Iraq and Syria -- when you take away big terrain from them, they move into smaller cells and they pop up in strange places," Miller said.Miller's reluctance to affirm any type of major victory over the offshoot is indicative of the broader inroads Islamic State cells have made in Afghanistan -- and of a long history of militant groups in Afghanistan bouncing back after seemingly unsustainable losses.Western and Afghan officials see a combination of factors that led to the Islamic State's losses in the east, forcing many of the fighters to either move or surrender. One Western official estimated that the group's strength was now reduced to around 300 fighters in Afghanistan, from an estimated 3,000 earlier this year.The Islamic State's presence in Afghanistan has been cited by military officials and lawmakers as one of the reasons to keep U.S. troops in Afghanistan following any peace settlement with the Taliban. Those officials have long argued that the Taliban would not be able to defeat the group, and that the insurgents still had not done much to distance themselves from al-Qaida, the group responsible for the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.What particularly worried officials was the Islamic State's continued ability to plan attacks and recruit within Kabul, the Afghan capital city, despite intensified campaigns against the group there. Some of the recruits involved in the planning or execution of deadly bombings there came from the city's top schools, officials say.But for Karimullah, a resident of Jawdara, a small village in eastern Afghanistan where a suicide bombing attributed to the Islamic State killed more than 70 people in October, battlefield victories, political posturing or even the recent death of the Islamic State's supreme leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, means little."If he's dead or not, what does it matter?" said Karimullah, who uses just one name and lost his uncle in the blast. "We were destroyed."His ambivalence is not uncommon here. To many Afghans, the group's name or differences from the Taliban are barely noteworthy. But there is no doubt that extreme violence by the Islamic State has become an enduring facet of the war, deepening the already egregious suffering across the country.The Islamic State has managed to penetrate parts of Afghan society that had been mostly untouched by the broader war for years. And the group's resilience, even in light of its recent defeats, raises the grim prospect of an unending war even if the Taliban negotiate a peace.Far from the central ISIS branch in Iraq and Syria, the Islamic State in Afghanistan started as a collection of disenfranchised Pakistani Taliban fighters who pledged allegiance to al-Baghdadi in early 2015. It has since slowly turned into a formidable threat in Afghanistan's mountainous east, with a reach that extends across the country, including in Kabul, the capital.Though the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria sent money to its Afghan affiliate to support its initial growth, the connection between the two groups is minimal, said Arian Sharifi, who was the director of threat assessment of the Afghan National Security Council until late last year.One of the group's goals, officials say, is to hold territory in Afghanistan and elsewhere in south and Central Asia, trying to establish a caliphate much like the group's earlier iteration in the Middle East.Sharifi thinks that the Islamic State in Afghanistan will try to become the group's global hub in the coming years, after losing territory in Iraq and Syria following concerted Western-backed offensives and airstrikes.The Afghan government noted that more foreign fighters were slowly arriving in Afghanistan to fight for the group there as the central branch lost territory in Iraq and Syria, an assessment supported by U.S. intelligence officials.But, Sharifi cautioned, "The Islamic State in Afghanistan is much less ideological than its Middle Eastern counterparts," he said in a recent interview. "It is very much influenced by regional politics as well."U.S. officials have been divided over how much global threat the Islamic State in Afghanistan poses. While military officials emphasize the group's ambitions, some intelligence officials believe the group remains more of a threat within the immediate region.One thing the Afghan branch shares with the central body is a hatred of Shiite Muslims, and a tendency to single them out for attacks. Still, the militants are not exclusive with their violence, as was the case in Jawdara, a mostly Sunni village.There, Karimullah and some other residents think it was more personal: The village had stood up to the Islamic State in a dispute over the town's water supply, and they believe the mosque bombing was meant to break their spirit.In its early days, the Islamic State in Afghanistan distinguished itself from other terrorist organizations operating in Afghanistan, including al-Qaida, by taking another cue from counterparts in Iraq and Syria: Its media arm distributed gruesome videos of beheadings and fighters forcing victims to sit on explosives before detonating them.But when the Islamic State detonated a suicide bomb in a wedding hall in Kabul over the summer, killing 63 people, there was little mention of ideology or local aims."I think ISIS is just a name in Afghanistan," said Hajji Hussain, the owner of the wedding hall. "We don't know who they are, and we can't trust anyone."He added, "They just enjoy killing people."And that is what makes the Islamic State stand out in Afghanistan's unending war. The Taliban often try to justify or disown attacks that killed civilians, Sharifi said.The Islamic State, he added, does not bother.While the number of Islamic State attacks declined in recent months, according to United Nations data, American officials attributed more than 20 high-profile attacks in Kabul alone last year.For years, U.S. and Afghan Special Operations forces, on the back of a relentless airstrike campaign, had kept the pressure to try to contain the group. The Taliban, also, increased their operations against the group in Nangarhar, according to Western and Afghan officials. Some reports claimed that the insurgents had sent some of their elite units to the province to strike at the Islamic State.The timing of the Taliban intensifying its offensives against the Islamic State was particularly interesting, as the insurgents tried to persuade the Americans in peace negotiations that they would act against international terrorist groups.But following any peace agreement, the number of hard-line insurgents defecting to the Islamic State to keep fighting has been a concern among Afghan and western officials.But still, with the group constricting, its damage to Afghanistan, by way of cruel bombings in the capital and rampant death among innocents, has reshaped Afghans' understanding of violence, a trauma that will linger for years to come.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company

    KABUL, Afghanistan -- The Islamic State group's main stronghold in eastern Afghanistan collapsed in recent weeks, according to American and Afghan officials, following years of concerted military offensives from U.S. and Afghan forces and, more recently, the Taliban.President Ashraf Ghani recently claimed that the Islamic State, often known as ISIS, had been "obliterated" in Nangarhar Province, the group's haven in the east. And in an interview in Kabul on Sunday, Gen. Austin S. Miller, the commander of all U.S. and NATO forces in Afghanistan, said the group's loss of the terrain it stubbornly held for few years would severely restrict their recruitment and planning.But Miller also warned that the Islamic State could remain a threat in Afghanistan even if it does not hold territory, with attention required to track militants on the move and the group's remaining urban cells."It was instructive in Iraq and Syria -- when you take away big terrain from them, they move into smaller cells and they pop up in strange places," Miller said.Miller's reluctance to affirm any type of major victory over the offshoot is indicative of the broader inroads Islamic State cells have made in Afghanistan -- and of a long history of militant groups in Afghanistan bouncing back after seemingly unsustainable losses.Western and Afghan officials see a combination of factors that led to the Islamic State's losses in the east, forcing many of the fighters to either move or surrender. One Western official estimated that the group's strength was now reduced to around 300 fighters in Afghanistan, from an estimated 3,000 earlier this year.The Islamic State's presence in Afghanistan has been cited by military officials and lawmakers as one of the reasons to keep U.S. troops in Afghanistan following any peace settlement with the Taliban. Those officials have long argued that the Taliban would not be able to defeat the group, and that the insurgents still had not done much to distance themselves from al-Qaida, the group responsible for the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.What particularly worried officials was the Islamic State's continued ability to plan attacks and recruit within Kabul, the Afghan capital city, despite intensified campaigns against the group there. Some of the recruits involved in the planning or execution of deadly bombings there came from the city's top schools, officials say.But for Karimullah, a resident of Jawdara, a small village in eastern Afghanistan where a suicide bombing attributed to the Islamic State killed more than 70 people in October, battlefield victories, political posturing or even the recent death of the Islamic State's supreme leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, means little."If he's dead or not, what does it matter?" said Karimullah, who uses just one name and lost his uncle in the blast. "We were destroyed."His ambivalence is not uncommon here. To many Afghans, the group's name or differences from the Taliban are barely noteworthy. But there is no doubt that extreme violence by the Islamic State has become an enduring facet of the war, deepening the already egregious suffering across the country.The Islamic State has managed to penetrate parts of Afghan society that had been mostly untouched by the broader war for years. And the group's resilience, even in light of its recent defeats, raises the grim prospect of an unending war even if the Taliban negotiate a peace.Far from the central ISIS branch in Iraq and Syria, the Islamic State in Afghanistan started as a collection of disenfranchised Pakistani Taliban fighters who pledged allegiance to al-Baghdadi in early 2015. It has since slowly turned into a formidable threat in Afghanistan's mountainous east, with a reach that extends across the country, including in Kabul, the capital.Though the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria sent money to its Afghan affiliate to support its initial growth, the connection between the two groups is minimal, said Arian Sharifi, who was the director of threat assessment of the Afghan National Security Council until late last year.One of the group's goals, officials say, is to hold territory in Afghanistan and elsewhere in south and Central Asia, trying to establish a caliphate much like the group's earlier iteration in the Middle East.Sharifi thinks that the Islamic State in Afghanistan will try to become the group's global hub in the coming years, after losing territory in Iraq and Syria following concerted Western-backed offensives and airstrikes.The Afghan government noted that more foreign fighters were slowly arriving in Afghanistan to fight for the group there as the central branch lost territory in Iraq and Syria, an assessment supported by U.S. intelligence officials.But, Sharifi cautioned, "The Islamic State in Afghanistan is much less ideological than its Middle Eastern counterparts," he said in a recent interview. "It is very much influenced by regional politics as well."U.S. officials have been divided over how much global threat the Islamic State in Afghanistan poses. While military officials emphasize the group's ambitions, some intelligence officials believe the group remains more of a threat within the immediate region.One thing the Afghan branch shares with the central body is a hatred of Shiite Muslims, and a tendency to single them out for attacks. Still, the militants are not exclusive with their violence, as was the case in Jawdara, a mostly Sunni village.There, Karimullah and some other residents think it was more personal: The village had stood up to the Islamic State in a dispute over the town's water supply, and they believe the mosque bombing was meant to break their spirit.In its early days, the Islamic State in Afghanistan distinguished itself from other terrorist organizations operating in Afghanistan, including al-Qaida, by taking another cue from counterparts in Iraq and Syria: Its media arm distributed gruesome videos of beheadings and fighters forcing victims to sit on explosives before detonating them.But when the Islamic State detonated a suicide bomb in a wedding hall in Kabul over the summer, killing 63 people, there was little mention of ideology or local aims."I think ISIS is just a name in Afghanistan," said Hajji Hussain, the owner of the wedding hall. "We don't know who they are, and we can't trust anyone."He added, "They just enjoy killing people."And that is what makes the Islamic State stand out in Afghanistan's unending war. The Taliban often try to justify or disown attacks that killed civilians, Sharifi said.The Islamic State, he added, does not bother.While the number of Islamic State attacks declined in recent months, according to United Nations data, American officials attributed more than 20 high-profile attacks in Kabul alone last year.For years, U.S. and Afghan Special Operations forces, on the back of a relentless airstrike campaign, had kept the pressure to try to contain the group. The Taliban, also, increased their operations against the group in Nangarhar, according to Western and Afghan officials. Some reports claimed that the insurgents had sent some of their elite units to the province to strike at the Islamic State.The timing of the Taliban intensifying its offensives against the Islamic State was particularly interesting, as the insurgents tried to persuade the Americans in peace negotiations that they would act against international terrorist groups.But following any peace agreement, the number of hard-line insurgents defecting to the Islamic State to keep fighting has been a concern among Afghan and western officials.But still, with the group constricting, its damage to Afghanistan, by way of cruel bombings in the capital and rampant death among innocents, has reshaped Afghans' understanding of violence, a trauma that will linger for years to come.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company


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