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News Slideshows (01/15/2020 03 hours)


  • 1/81   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


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    Press Review


    Luke Kuechly   Donaldson   Parnas   Alex Cora   Braves   Patrick Willis   Hyde   Yovanovitch   Joe Brady   The Great Gatsby   Lord of the Flies   Beltran   Catcher in the Rye   Damn Luke   Penn State   Giuliani   Tim Apple   Fuente   Ja Rule   Brad Rutter   Sano   Rask   Cillizza   Bemstrom   Voter ID   The Scarlet Letter   Jason Varitek   Camargo   Keuchly   
  • 2/81   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


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  • 3/81   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


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  • 4/81   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


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  • 5/81   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


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  • 6/81   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


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  • 7/81   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


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  • 8/81   Do star athletes make too much money?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    With athletes in America's biggest sports leagues raking in salaries worth $300 million and more, is it time to reign in the big spending or do superstars deserve the big bucks they make?

    With athletes in America's biggest sports leagues raking in salaries worth $300 million and more, is it time to reign in the big spending or do superstars deserve the big bucks they make?


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  • 9/81   Live animal mascots: Cute or exploitative?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?


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  • 10/81   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


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  • 11/81   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


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  • 12/81   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


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  • 13/81   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


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  • 14/81   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


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  • 15/81   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


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  • 16/81   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named.  Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does.  At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


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  • 17/81   PHOTOS: Fluorescent turtle embryo wins forty-fifth annual Nikon Small World Competition

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.


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  • 18/81   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


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  • 19/81   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


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  • 20/81   What the CIA thinks of your anti-virus program

    PARIS (AP) — Peppering the 8,000 pages of purported Central Intelligence Agency hacking data released Tuesday by WikiLeaks are reviews of some of the world's most popular anti-virus products.

    PARIS (AP) — Peppering the 8,000 pages of purported Central Intelligence Agency hacking data released Tuesday by WikiLeaks are reviews of some of the world's most popular anti-virus products.


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  • 21/81   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


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  • 22/81   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


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  • 23/81   Warren, Sanders rivalry heats up as Democratic candidates prepare to take stage for Iowa debate
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The six candidates on stage at the Sheslow Auditorium in Des Moines are the smallest group yet to debate each other.

    The six candidates on stage at the Sheslow Auditorium in Des Moines are the smallest group yet to debate each other.


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  • 24/81   In California: A race to block new drilling and fracking
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Groups sue to block a federal agency's decision to open up 1 million acres of public land for oil drilling and fracking. A group of homeless women illegally occupying an Oakland home are evicted at dawn. And the world pitches in to save ancient trees.

    Groups sue to block a federal agency's decision to open up 1 million acres of public land for oil drilling and fracking. A group of homeless women illegally occupying an Oakland home are evicted at dawn. And the world pitches in to save ancient trees.


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  • 25/81   Stocks Mixed on Lingering U.S.-China Concern: Markets Wrap
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Stocks across Asia were mixed amid signs that tensions between the U.S. and China remain high just hours before an upcoming trade deal that is due to be signed later Wednesday. Treasuries and the yen were steady.Sentiment was dented earlier and U.S. equity futures fell as Reuters reported the Trump administration is drafting rules that would allow blocking more sales to Huawei. Those moves eased Wednesday morning with Japanese and South Korean shares lower while Hong Kong opened flat and shares rose in Australia.The Reuters report comes hours before officials from the two countries are due to sign a phase-one trade agreement at the White House Wednesday, highlighting how bilateral tensions remain. Existing tariffs on billions of dollars of Chinese goods coming into the U.S. are likely to stay in place until after the American presidential election, Bloomberg reported.“Right now we are in a more constructive process,” Omar Aguilar, CIO for equities at Charles Schwab, told Bloomberg TV. “While the uncertainty is still there, the fact that there’s a laid out plan for phase one and phase two has already been priced by the market and there is a positive view.”Elsewhere, oil ticked lower and gold remained steady.Here are some events to watch for this week:The biggest American financial institutions are kicking off earnings season, with Bank of America Corp., Goldman Sachs Group Inc., Morgan Stanley and BlackRock Inc. next up.The Fed’s so-called Beige Book is due on Wednesday.China GDP comes on Friday.These are the major moves in markets:StocksFutures on the S&P 500 slid 0.1% as of 10:30 a.m. in Tokyo. The underlying gauge fell 0.2% on Tuesday.Japan’s Topix index declined 0.3%.Hong Kong’s Hang Seng Index was little changed.The Shanghai Composite dipped 0.1%.South Korea’s Kospi index fell 0.2%.Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 Index added 0.4%.CurrenciesThe yen was at 109.95, little changed.The offshore yuan dipped 0.1% to 6.8963 per dollar.The euro bought $1.1128, little changed.The Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index was flat.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries remained at 1.81%.Australia’s 10-year yield was at 1.21%, down four basis points.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude oil slipped 0.2% to $58.12 a barrel.Gold rose 0.1% to $1,547.41 an ounce.\--With assistance from Cormac Mullen.To contact the reporter on this story: Adam Haigh in Sydney at ahaigh1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Christopher Anstey at canstey@bloomberg.net, Cormac Mullen, Joanna OssingerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Stocks across Asia were mixed amid signs that tensions between the U.S. and China remain high just hours before an upcoming trade deal that is due to be signed later Wednesday. Treasuries and the yen were steady.Sentiment was dented earlier and U.S. equity futures fell as Reuters reported the Trump administration is drafting rules that would allow blocking more sales to Huawei. Those moves eased Wednesday morning with Japanese and South Korean shares lower while Hong Kong opened flat and shares rose in Australia.The Reuters report comes hours before officials from the two countries are due to sign a phase-one trade agreement at the White House Wednesday, highlighting how bilateral tensions remain. Existing tariffs on billions of dollars of Chinese goods coming into the U.S. are likely to stay in place until after the American presidential election, Bloomberg reported.“Right now we are in a more constructive process,” Omar Aguilar, CIO for equities at Charles Schwab, told Bloomberg TV. “While the uncertainty is still there, the fact that there’s a laid out plan for phase one and phase two has already been priced by the market and there is a positive view.”Elsewhere, oil ticked lower and gold remained steady.Here are some events to watch for this week:The biggest American financial institutions are kicking off earnings season, with Bank of America Corp., Goldman Sachs Group Inc., Morgan Stanley and BlackRock Inc. next up.The Fed’s so-called Beige Book is due on Wednesday.China GDP comes on Friday.These are the major moves in markets:StocksFutures on the S&P 500 slid 0.1% as of 10:30 a.m. in Tokyo. The underlying gauge fell 0.2% on Tuesday.Japan’s Topix index declined 0.3%.Hong Kong’s Hang Seng Index was little changed.The Shanghai Composite dipped 0.1%.South Korea’s Kospi index fell 0.2%.Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 Index added 0.4%.CurrenciesThe yen was at 109.95, little changed.The offshore yuan dipped 0.1% to 6.8963 per dollar.The euro bought $1.1128, little changed.The Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index was flat.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries remained at 1.81%.Australia’s 10-year yield was at 1.21%, down four basis points.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude oil slipped 0.2% to $58.12 a barrel.Gold rose 0.1% to $1,547.41 an ounce.\--With assistance from Cormac Mullen.To contact the reporter on this story: Adam Haigh in Sydney at ahaigh1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Christopher Anstey at canstey@bloomberg.net, Cormac Mullen, Joanna OssingerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 26/81   Justice John Roberts, the 'umpire' presiding over Trump Senate trial
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    During his Senate confirmation hearing to become chief justice of the US Supreme Court, John Roberts compared the position to that of an 'umpire' above the political fray.  Nearly 15 years later, Roberts is headed back to the Senate, plunged into one of the bitterest political battles in US history -- the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump.  As chief justice of the nation's top court, the 64-year-old Roberts will preside over the proceedings to determine whether Trump should be removed from office for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

    During his Senate confirmation hearing to become chief justice of the US Supreme Court, John Roberts compared the position to that of an 'umpire' above the political fray. Nearly 15 years later, Roberts is headed back to the Senate, plunged into one of the bitterest political battles in US history -- the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump. As chief justice of the nation's top court, the 64-year-old Roberts will preside over the proceedings to determine whether Trump should be removed from office for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.


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  • 27/81   How Much Did Shun Ho Holdings Limited's (HKG:253) CEO Pocket Last Year?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    William Cheng is the CEO of Shun Ho Holdings Limited (HKG:253). First, this article will compare CEO compensation with...

    William Cheng is the CEO of Shun Ho Holdings Limited (HKG:253). First, this article will compare CEO compensation with...


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  • 28/81   New impeachment evidence: Lev Parnas, associate of Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani, pressed for Ukraine investigation into Joe Biden
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Lev Parnas, an associate of Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani, provided evidence showing his involvement in pressing Ukraine to investigate Biden.

    Lev Parnas, an associate of Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani, provided evidence showing his involvement in pressing Ukraine to investigate Biden.


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  • 29/81   Single Women Homeowners Share Their Best Advice for First-Time Solo Buyers
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    From realtor selection to finance research.

    From realtor selection to finance research.


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  • 30/81   Investors Who Bought Jinchuan Group International Resources (HKG:2362) Shares Five Years Ago Are Now Up 39%
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Stock pickers are generally looking for stocks that will outperform the broader market. Buying under-rated businesses...

    Stock pickers are generally looking for stocks that will outperform the broader market. Buying under-rated businesses...


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  • 31/81   Paper-rich startup employees look for 'pre-wealth' help to lock down stock options
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    For Silicon Valley's potential startup millionaires, compensation packages staked on future promises of wealth are where the action is, but what happens when these employees get laid off or have to leave before an exit?  When Wouter Witvoet left a startup that he had joined as employee #4, he felt relatively prepared, having set aside $50,000 to exercise his available stock options, only to be informed by HR that he was also liable to pay taxes on said options so he was about $1.8 million short with 90 days to settle up.  Witvoet later founded Secfi, which is just one of a handful of entities looking to establish itself in the hot 'pre-wealth' management space with what it calls forward purchase agreements enabling startup employees to exercise stock options and wait until an IPO or exit to make payments.

    For Silicon Valley's potential startup millionaires, compensation packages staked on future promises of wealth are where the action is, but what happens when these employees get laid off or have to leave before an exit? When Wouter Witvoet left a startup that he had joined as employee #4, he felt relatively prepared, having set aside $50,000 to exercise his available stock options, only to be informed by HR that he was also liable to pay taxes on said options so he was about $1.8 million short with 90 days to settle up. Witvoet later founded Secfi, which is just one of a handful of entities looking to establish itself in the hot 'pre-wealth' management space with what it calls forward purchase agreements enabling startup employees to exercise stock options and wait until an IPO or exit to make payments.


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  • 32/81   What Investore Property Limited's (NZSE:IPL) ROE Can Tell Us
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Many investors are still learning about the various metrics that can be useful when analysing a stock. This article is...

    Many investors are still learning about the various metrics that can be useful when analysing a stock. This article is...


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  • 33/81   U.S. Chicken Feet Entering China May Presage New Trading Era
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- A container with 23.94 tons of American chicken feet cleared Chinese customs Tuesday, potentially heralding the start of a new trading era between the two countries just days before they sign a long-awaited trade deal.The chicken feet, or phoenix claws as they’re known in Chinese recipes, were inspected and approved for unloading by customs in Shanghai, the official Securities Times reported. The event marks the return of U.S. poultry meat to China five years after it was banned, it said.China prohibited the import of all U.S. poultry products in 2015 in response to cases of avian flu in America. That stance changed last year as demand for alternative animal protein surged after the spread of deadly African swine fever slashed the country’s hog herds and reduced pork supplies.The Asian nation is expected to increase purchases of American farm products after signing the trade deal on Wednesday in Washington, which may include a pledge to buy $40 billion a year of agricultural goods. U.S. chicken giant Sanderson Farms Inc. said last month it sent its first container of chicken feet, also known as paws, to China.Chicken feet are popular in traditional regional Chinese cooking and are served as snacks to go with alcohol, in cold dishes, in soups or as the main dish. They are typically steamed first to make them puffy before being stewed and simmered in abalone sauce.\--With assistance from Dominic Carey.To contact the reporter on this story: Alfred Cang in Singapore at acang@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Alexander Kwiatkowski at akwiatkowsk2@bloomberg.net, James Poole, Anna KitanakaFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- A container with 23.94 tons of American chicken feet cleared Chinese customs Tuesday, potentially heralding the start of a new trading era between the two countries just days before they sign a long-awaited trade deal.The chicken feet, or phoenix claws as they’re known in Chinese recipes, were inspected and approved for unloading by customs in Shanghai, the official Securities Times reported. The event marks the return of U.S. poultry meat to China five years after it was banned, it said.China prohibited the import of all U.S. poultry products in 2015 in response to cases of avian flu in America. That stance changed last year as demand for alternative animal protein surged after the spread of deadly African swine fever slashed the country’s hog herds and reduced pork supplies.The Asian nation is expected to increase purchases of American farm products after signing the trade deal on Wednesday in Washington, which may include a pledge to buy $40 billion a year of agricultural goods. U.S. chicken giant Sanderson Farms Inc. said last month it sent its first container of chicken feet, also known as paws, to China.Chicken feet are popular in traditional regional Chinese cooking and are served as snacks to go with alcohol, in cold dishes, in soups or as the main dish. They are typically steamed first to make them puffy before being stewed and simmered in abalone sauce.\--With assistance from Dominic Carey.To contact the reporter on this story: Alfred Cang in Singapore at acang@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Alexander Kwiatkowski at akwiatkowsk2@bloomberg.net, James Poole, Anna KitanakaFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 34/81   Stocks tread water ahead of signing of initial U.S.-China trade deal
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS






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  • 35/81   Stocks tread water ahead of signing of initial U.S.-China trade deal
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Stocks were steady in early Asian trade on Wednesday as investors awaited the signing of an initial U.S.-China trade deal, with sentiment somewhat dented by comments from the U.S. Treasury Secretary's that tariffs would remain in place for now.  Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said on late Tuesday that the United States would keep in place tariffs on Chinese goods until the completion of a second phase of a U.S.-China trade agreement.  The news came hours before the signing of a preliminary trade agreement to ease an 18-month-old trade war between the world's two largest economies.

    Stocks were steady in early Asian trade on Wednesday as investors awaited the signing of an initial U.S.-China trade deal, with sentiment somewhat dented by comments from the U.S. Treasury Secretary's that tariffs would remain in place for now. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said on late Tuesday that the United States would keep in place tariffs on Chinese goods until the completion of a second phase of a U.S.-China trade agreement. The news came hours before the signing of a preliminary trade agreement to ease an 18-month-old trade war between the world's two largest economies.


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  • 36/81   Makeshift koala hospital scrambles to save dozens injured in bushfires
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Dozens of injured koalas arrive at the Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park's makeshift animal hospital each day in cat carriers, washing baskets or clinging to wildlife carers.  Injured in bushfires that have ravaged the wildlife haven off the coast of South Australia state, there are so many marsupials currently requiring urgent treatment that carers don't have time to give them names -- they are simply referred to by a number.

    Dozens of injured koalas arrive at the Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park's makeshift animal hospital each day in cat carriers, washing baskets or clinging to wildlife carers. Injured in bushfires that have ravaged the wildlife haven off the coast of South Australia state, there are so many marsupials currently requiring urgent treatment that carers don't have time to give them names -- they are simply referred to by a number.


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  • 37/81   What Does Wison Engineering Services Co. Ltd.'s (HKG:2236) P/E Ratio Tell You?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The goal of this article is to teach you how to use price to earnings ratios (P/E ratios). We'll apply a basic P/E...

    The goal of this article is to teach you how to use price to earnings ratios (P/E ratios). We'll apply a basic P/E...


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  • 38/81   Ex-BofA Trader Is on a Hiring Spree for a New Quant Fund in Korea
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Follow Bloomberg on Telegram for all the investment news and analysis you need.After working as a high-frequency trader for six years in New York, Kwon Yong-jin returned to his home country South Korea, sensing opportunity in a place where quantitative investing is in its early stages.The former trader at Bank of America Merrill Lynch and Tower Research Capital LLC, the high-frequency trading giant founded by Mark Gorton two decades ago, has started his own quant trading firm in Seoul focusing on overseas assets and cryptocurrencies despite rising global suspicion about such strategies. Kwon has hired seven employees so far and says he’s looking for more.“I don’t say quant investing is better than humans investing,” Kwon, chief executive officer at Blue Financial Group, said in an interview at his office in Seoul. “The highest quality will always come from humans. Still, the factory-made products are cheaper and can be provided to ordinary people.”Blue Financial is backed by B-Brick, a venture capital firm where Kwon also works as chief strategy officer. Blue Financial trades an average of about $100 million a day, mainly in foreign currencies, U.S. stocks and crypto.Kwon likes employing a “lead-lag strategy” that catches information-driven trades in different regions, like various European currencies that react differently to a Brexit development. But one place he isn’t looking to invest: Korean stocks. In his home market, he sees too many inefficiencies that may not be resolved soon, so he doesn’t think he can make a profit with quant trading there.There are growing doubts globally over various quant strategies that have been grappling with underperformance and competition from cheap exchange-traded products. A Eurekahedge index tracking those using artificial intelligence and machine learning has returned 9.8% in the past three years through December, compared with 13% gains for hedge funds overall.Read more: High-Speed Traders Abandon Microwaves in Korea on Exchange SnubKwon, who studied computer science and applied mathematics at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, says South Korea is still in the early stages of development in terms of a quant-investing industry. And he’s prepared to capitalize on disparities between more mature markets.“For me, the biggest advantage to run a quant firm here in Seoul is quant developers and data scientists are so undervalued,” Kwon said. “The average salary to pay for them is almost a third, or even a quarter of that for applicants in New York, while I think the only thing they are lacking is they can’t speak English.”(Adds detail about Korean market in fifth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Cecile Vannucci.To contact the reporters on this story: Heejin Kim in Seoul at hkim579@bloomberg.net;Kyungji Cho in Seoul at kcho54@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Lianting Tu at ltu4@bloomberg.net, Joanna OssingerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Follow Bloomberg on Telegram for all the investment news and analysis you need.After working as a high-frequency trader for six years in New York, Kwon Yong-jin returned to his home country South Korea, sensing opportunity in a place where quantitative investing is in its early stages.The former trader at Bank of America Merrill Lynch and Tower Research Capital LLC, the high-frequency trading giant founded by Mark Gorton two decades ago, has started his own quant trading firm in Seoul focusing on overseas assets and cryptocurrencies despite rising global suspicion about such strategies. Kwon has hired seven employees so far and says he’s looking for more.“I don’t say quant investing is better than humans investing,” Kwon, chief executive officer at Blue Financial Group, said in an interview at his office in Seoul. “The highest quality will always come from humans. Still, the factory-made products are cheaper and can be provided to ordinary people.”Blue Financial is backed by B-Brick, a venture capital firm where Kwon also works as chief strategy officer. Blue Financial trades an average of about $100 million a day, mainly in foreign currencies, U.S. stocks and crypto.Kwon likes employing a “lead-lag strategy” that catches information-driven trades in different regions, like various European currencies that react differently to a Brexit development. But one place he isn’t looking to invest: Korean stocks. In his home market, he sees too many inefficiencies that may not be resolved soon, so he doesn’t think he can make a profit with quant trading there.There are growing doubts globally over various quant strategies that have been grappling with underperformance and competition from cheap exchange-traded products. A Eurekahedge index tracking those using artificial intelligence and machine learning has returned 9.8% in the past three years through December, compared with 13% gains for hedge funds overall.Read more: High-Speed Traders Abandon Microwaves in Korea on Exchange SnubKwon, who studied computer science and applied mathematics at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, says South Korea is still in the early stages of development in terms of a quant-investing industry. And he’s prepared to capitalize on disparities between more mature markets.“For me, the biggest advantage to run a quant firm here in Seoul is quant developers and data scientists are so undervalued,” Kwon said. “The average salary to pay for them is almost a third, or even a quarter of that for applicants in New York, while I think the only thing they are lacking is they can’t speak English.”(Adds detail about Korean market in fifth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Cecile Vannucci.To contact the reporters on this story: Heejin Kim in Seoul at hkim579@bloomberg.net;Kyungji Cho in Seoul at kcho54@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Lianting Tu at ltu4@bloomberg.net, Joanna OssingerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 39/81   How Much is Nex Metals Explorations Limited's (ASX:NME) CEO Getting Paid?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Ken Allen has been the CEO of Nex Metals Explorations Limited (ASX:NME) since 2007. This report will, first, examine...

    Ken Allen has been the CEO of Nex Metals Explorations Limited (ASX:NME) since 2007. This report will, first, examine...


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  • 40/81   Tesla Skeptic With Downgrader’s Remorse Digs In Over Valuation
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- An analyst who picked an inopportune time to downgrade Tesla Inc. is expressing regret, giving Elon Musk credit, and yet still doubting the electric-car maker deserves such a rich valuation.“I wish I hadn’t done it,” Joe Osha, an analyst at JMP Securities, said of his decision to cut Tesla to the equivalent of a hold from a buy on Oct. 3.The move looked shrewd at first -- the shares slumped 4.2% that day, after Tesla reported quarterly deliveries that fell short of a number the chief executive officer hyped the week before. But later in October, the billionaire shocked Wall Street with a profit, plus progress toward building a plant in China and bringing out his next electric vehicle, the Model Y. Tesla’s stock has more than doubled, closing Tuesday at a record $537.92.“As an analyst, whenever you end up in this not-very-good situation where you’ve missed a big move in a stock, there’s always a temptation to just give in,” Osha told Bloomberg Television. But he’s reluctant to recommend the shares now. “I don’t think that I’m doing my job if I tell people to buy a stock at 20 times Ebitda,” he said.As of Tuesday’s close, Tesla’s enterprise value is 27.3 times greater than the earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization that analysts expect the company to average in the next two years, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. General Motors Co. trades at a multiple of 2.6, and Ford Motor Co.’s is 2.3.Tesla’s valuation is rich even relative to technology stocks: Amazon.com Inc. trades at an 18.6 multiple, and Apple Inc.’s is 15.4.While Osha cautioned against buying Tesla now, he gave Musk props for the company’s dominance of the burgeoning market for battery-powered cars, calling the stock “really the only way to play electric vehicles right now.” He left CES -- the event formerly known as the Consumer Electronics Show -- last week unimpressed with the offerings that established automakers put on display.“It’s a little shocking, here at the beginning of 2020, that the major auto OEMs in the U.S. and Europe still don’t have a product to compete with Tesla,” he said, referring to original equipment manufacturers. “Tesla’s competitive positioning is awesome.”To contact the reporters on this story: Craig Trudell in New York at ctrudell1@bloomberg.net;Taylor Riggs in New York at triggs2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Craig Trudell at ctrudell1@bloomberg.net, Boris KorbyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- An analyst who picked an inopportune time to downgrade Tesla Inc. is expressing regret, giving Elon Musk credit, and yet still doubting the electric-car maker deserves such a rich valuation.“I wish I hadn’t done it,” Joe Osha, an analyst at JMP Securities, said of his decision to cut Tesla to the equivalent of a hold from a buy on Oct. 3.The move looked shrewd at first -- the shares slumped 4.2% that day, after Tesla reported quarterly deliveries that fell short of a number the chief executive officer hyped the week before. But later in October, the billionaire shocked Wall Street with a profit, plus progress toward building a plant in China and bringing out his next electric vehicle, the Model Y. Tesla’s stock has more than doubled, closing Tuesday at a record $537.92.“As an analyst, whenever you end up in this not-very-good situation where you’ve missed a big move in a stock, there’s always a temptation to just give in,” Osha told Bloomberg Television. But he’s reluctant to recommend the shares now. “I don’t think that I’m doing my job if I tell people to buy a stock at 20 times Ebitda,” he said.As of Tuesday’s close, Tesla’s enterprise value is 27.3 times greater than the earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization that analysts expect the company to average in the next two years, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. General Motors Co. trades at a multiple of 2.6, and Ford Motor Co.’s is 2.3.Tesla’s valuation is rich even relative to technology stocks: Amazon.com Inc. trades at an 18.6 multiple, and Apple Inc.’s is 15.4.While Osha cautioned against buying Tesla now, he gave Musk props for the company’s dominance of the burgeoning market for battery-powered cars, calling the stock “really the only way to play electric vehicles right now.” He left CES -- the event formerly known as the Consumer Electronics Show -- last week unimpressed with the offerings that established automakers put on display.“It’s a little shocking, here at the beginning of 2020, that the major auto OEMs in the U.S. and Europe still don’t have a product to compete with Tesla,” he said, referring to original equipment manufacturers. “Tesla’s competitive positioning is awesome.”To contact the reporters on this story: Craig Trudell in New York at ctrudell1@bloomberg.net;Taylor Riggs in New York at triggs2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Craig Trudell at ctrudell1@bloomberg.net, Boris KorbyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 41/81   Can MGC Pharmaceuticals (ASX:MXC) Afford To Invest In Growth?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    There's no doubt that money can be made by owning shares of unprofitable businesses. For example, biotech and mining...

    There's no doubt that money can be made by owning shares of unprofitable businesses. For example, biotech and mining...


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  • 42/81   How Iranians pivoted from condemning the US to dramatic protests against their own government after officials shot down a commercial plane
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Anti-government tensions have been building since November, and protestors have taken aim at Ayatollah Ali Khamenei with Trump's support.

    Anti-government tensions have been building since November, and protestors have taken aim at Ayatollah Ali Khamenei with Trump's support.


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  • 43/81   High court skeptical of New Jersey 'Bridgegate' convictions
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The Supreme Court seemed broadly skeptical Tuesday of the convictions of two people involved in New Jersey's “Bridgegate” scandal where officials created a massive traffic jam  to punish a mayor who refused to endorse then-governor Chris Christie's reelection.  The justices suggested during arguments  that the government had overreached in prosecuting Bridget Kelly and Bill Baroni.  Both were convicted of fraud and conspiracy for scheming in 2013 to change the traffic flow onto the George Washington Bridge between New York City and New Jersey to artificially create gridlock in New Jersey's Fort Lee.

    The Supreme Court seemed broadly skeptical Tuesday of the convictions of two people involved in New Jersey's “Bridgegate” scandal where officials created a massive traffic jam to punish a mayor who refused to endorse then-governor Chris Christie's reelection. The justices suggested during arguments that the government had overreached in prosecuting Bridget Kelly and Bill Baroni. Both were convicted of fraud and conspiracy for scheming in 2013 to change the traffic flow onto the George Washington Bridge between New York City and New Jersey to artificially create gridlock in New Jersey's Fort Lee.


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  • 44/81   How Seriously Should Trump Take North Korea's 13,000 Artillery Pieces?
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Here's what we know.

    Here's what we know.


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  • 45/81   U.S. targets Maduro-backed legislator and allies in fresh Venezuelan sanctions
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The United States on Monday imposed sanctions on seven Venezuelan politicians it said led a bid by President Nicolas Maduro to wrest control of the country's congress from U.S.-backed opposition leader Juan Guaido.  Earlier this month, troops blocked Guaido from entering congress long enough for the Socialist Party to declare allied legislator Luis Parra as head of parliament.  Washington blacklisted Parra and six of his allies 'who, at the bidding of Maduro, attempted to block the democratic process in Venezuela,' U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said in a statement.

    The United States on Monday imposed sanctions on seven Venezuelan politicians it said led a bid by President Nicolas Maduro to wrest control of the country's congress from U.S.-backed opposition leader Juan Guaido. Earlier this month, troops blocked Guaido from entering congress long enough for the Socialist Party to declare allied legislator Luis Parra as head of parliament. Washington blacklisted Parra and six of his allies 'who, at the bidding of Maduro, attempted to block the democratic process in Venezuela,' U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said in a statement.


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  • 46/81   The unintended consequences of Taiwan standing up to China
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A popular parable attributed to Taoism by Alan Watts goes something like this:A farmer's horse runs away. His neighbor commiserates at his loss, but the farmer demurs: "who knows if it is good or bad?" The neighbor leaves, puzzled how there could be any question.The next day, the horse returns with a new wild horse as its mate. The neighbor congratulates the farmer on his good fortune that a second horse had come into his possession. But the farmer demurs again: "who knows if it is good or bad?"Sure enough, the next day, the farmer's son is thrown from the saddle while breaking the wild horse, and breaks his leg. The neighbor commiserates again on his son's injury, but as expected, the farmer demurs: "who knows if it is good or bad?"And of course, the next day the army marches through to draft all the able-bodied men to go off to war, and the farmer's son is only spared because of his injury.You can take the story for as many turns as you want: any apparently bad news can lead to good fortune, and any apparently good news can lead to bad consequences.I've been thinking about that story apropos of the Taiwanese election.President Tsai Ing-wen's landslide re-election seems like unequivocally good news. Voting took place in the shadow of increasingly overt attempts at intimidation by Beijing, and the months of protesting in Hong Kong that demonstrated as clearly as possible that "one country, two systems" was a hollow promise — particularly when Chinese President Xi Jinping explicitly suggested Hong Kong as the model for Taiwan's future. Xi deserved a strong rebuke to his bullying, and he got one.But that doesn't mean the message will be received as intended. It's all but certain that Beijing will never willingly change their view that Taiwan is a renegade province that must be incorporated into China proper. What is harder to tell is whether Xi's increasingly personalized dictatorship is capable of softening its approach and biding its time, which is the only plausible path to peaceful unification.What are the other possibilities? First, China could redouble its efforts to isolate Taiwan diplomatically and pressure it economically. Taiwan has become quite integrated with the Chinese market over the past two decades, and one of Tsai's main priorities has been to seek alternatives to China for their supply chain. But Beijing could get more aggressive about trying to stymie those efforts, while also forcing Taiwanese firms that continue to do business with the mainland to side with China in America's ongoing trade war.How would Taiwan react to a further tightening of the screws? It's possible that they would reverse course and try to accommodate Beijing — but it's far more likely that they would redouble their own efforts to break out of that isolation. In the context of the great unwinding of America's relationship with China, Taiwan may find opportunities with the United States (and Japan). It's not hard to imagine, though, how China would view such moves, even if they were not accompanied by anything as provocative as a declaration of independence.Finally, there is the threat of war. At present, any military threats Beijing might make are largely idle; it is not clear that they have the capacity to subdue the island militarily. But as China's modernization proceeds, their confidence that they could achieve their military objectives will increase. In the context of deteriorating relations and an ever-stronger independent national identity on the island, it might eventually make sense for Taiwan to risk war while they still have a chance of winning.Ten years ago, it was possible to look at the Taiwanese situation and predict that China would eventually prevail through patience and the sheer preponderance of power. That is harder to believe today, as China has become increasingly threatening, and as its economic miracle has grown increasingly brittle. Ten years ago, it was also possible to look at Sino-American competition as part of a classic power transition, with the challenge being how America would manage China becoming the dominant power of the western Pacific without war. That is also much harder to believe today. As explicit great power competition has re-emerged, Taiwan has become a fault-line state, a place China cannot afford to relinquish lest its own regime lose legitimacy, but that America cannot afford to abandon lest its own position in Asia collapse.Today, we should celebrate Tsai's election as a triumph for democracy in a time when democracy could use some triumphs. But tomorrow, we should remember the many ways in which happy news can turn sour, and far more quickly than we might imagine.Want more essential commentary and analysis like this delivered straight to your inbox? Sign up for The Week's "Today's best articles" newsletter here.More stories from theweek.com  The Senate is preparing an 'unprecedented crackdown' on Capitol reporters ahead of impeachment  Bernie Sanders' appraisal of a woman's 2020 chances isn't shocking. It's conventional wisdom.  What happens when women translate the Classics

    A popular parable attributed to Taoism by Alan Watts goes something like this:A farmer's horse runs away. His neighbor commiserates at his loss, but the farmer demurs: "who knows if it is good or bad?" The neighbor leaves, puzzled how there could be any question.The next day, the horse returns with a new wild horse as its mate. The neighbor congratulates the farmer on his good fortune that a second horse had come into his possession. But the farmer demurs again: "who knows if it is good or bad?"Sure enough, the next day, the farmer's son is thrown from the saddle while breaking the wild horse, and breaks his leg. The neighbor commiserates again on his son's injury, but as expected, the farmer demurs: "who knows if it is good or bad?"And of course, the next day the army marches through to draft all the able-bodied men to go off to war, and the farmer's son is only spared because of his injury.You can take the story for as many turns as you want: any apparently bad news can lead to good fortune, and any apparently good news can lead to bad consequences.I've been thinking about that story apropos of the Taiwanese election.President Tsai Ing-wen's landslide re-election seems like unequivocally good news. Voting took place in the shadow of increasingly overt attempts at intimidation by Beijing, and the months of protesting in Hong Kong that demonstrated as clearly as possible that "one country, two systems" was a hollow promise — particularly when Chinese President Xi Jinping explicitly suggested Hong Kong as the model for Taiwan's future. Xi deserved a strong rebuke to his bullying, and he got one.But that doesn't mean the message will be received as intended. It's all but certain that Beijing will never willingly change their view that Taiwan is a renegade province that must be incorporated into China proper. What is harder to tell is whether Xi's increasingly personalized dictatorship is capable of softening its approach and biding its time, which is the only plausible path to peaceful unification.What are the other possibilities? First, China could redouble its efforts to isolate Taiwan diplomatically and pressure it economically. Taiwan has become quite integrated with the Chinese market over the past two decades, and one of Tsai's main priorities has been to seek alternatives to China for their supply chain. But Beijing could get more aggressive about trying to stymie those efforts, while also forcing Taiwanese firms that continue to do business with the mainland to side with China in America's ongoing trade war.How would Taiwan react to a further tightening of the screws? It's possible that they would reverse course and try to accommodate Beijing — but it's far more likely that they would redouble their own efforts to break out of that isolation. In the context of the great unwinding of America's relationship with China, Taiwan may find opportunities with the United States (and Japan). It's not hard to imagine, though, how China would view such moves, even if they were not accompanied by anything as provocative as a declaration of independence.Finally, there is the threat of war. At present, any military threats Beijing might make are largely idle; it is not clear that they have the capacity to subdue the island militarily. But as China's modernization proceeds, their confidence that they could achieve their military objectives will increase. In the context of deteriorating relations and an ever-stronger independent national identity on the island, it might eventually make sense for Taiwan to risk war while they still have a chance of winning.Ten years ago, it was possible to look at the Taiwanese situation and predict that China would eventually prevail through patience and the sheer preponderance of power. That is harder to believe today, as China has become increasingly threatening, and as its economic miracle has grown increasingly brittle. Ten years ago, it was also possible to look at Sino-American competition as part of a classic power transition, with the challenge being how America would manage China becoming the dominant power of the western Pacific without war. That is also much harder to believe today. As explicit great power competition has re-emerged, Taiwan has become a fault-line state, a place China cannot afford to relinquish lest its own regime lose legitimacy, but that America cannot afford to abandon lest its own position in Asia collapse.Today, we should celebrate Tsai's election as a triumph for democracy in a time when democracy could use some triumphs. But tomorrow, we should remember the many ways in which happy news can turn sour, and far more quickly than we might imagine.Want more essential commentary and analysis like this delivered straight to your inbox? Sign up for The Week's "Today's best articles" newsletter here.More stories from theweek.com The Senate is preparing an 'unprecedented crackdown' on Capitol reporters ahead of impeachment Bernie Sanders' appraisal of a woman's 2020 chances isn't shocking. It's conventional wisdom. What happens when women translate the Classics


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  • 47/81   'Clearly He's Not Actually Washing.' Grandma Puts Baby to Work Doing Dishes Because Being a Baby Is Not a Free Ride
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Don't all infants wash spoons?

    Don't all infants wash spoons?


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  • 48/81   Florida's 'Python Bowl' brings hundreds together for one goal: Catching huge snakes
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Hundreds of people registered for the Florida Python Challenge to capture invasive snakes in the Everglades in a 10-day event.

    Hundreds of people registered for the Florida Python Challenge to capture invasive snakes in the Everglades in a 10-day event.


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  • 49/81   Tens of thousands face uncertainty as Philippine volcano spews lava
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Taal volcano in the Philippines could spew lava and ash for weeks, authorities warned Tuesday, leaving tens of thousands in limbo after they fled their homes fearing a massive eruption.  The crater of the volcano exploded to life with towering clouds of ash and jets of red-hot lava on Sunday, forcing those living around the mountain south of Manila to rush to safety.  Many people abandoned livestock and pets as well as homes full of belongings after authorities sounded an alert warning that an 'explosive eruption' could come imminently.

    Taal volcano in the Philippines could spew lava and ash for weeks, authorities warned Tuesday, leaving tens of thousands in limbo after they fled their homes fearing a massive eruption. The crater of the volcano exploded to life with towering clouds of ash and jets of red-hot lava on Sunday, forcing those living around the mountain south of Manila to rush to safety. Many people abandoned livestock and pets as well as homes full of belongings after authorities sounded an alert warning that an 'explosive eruption' could come imminently.


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  • 50/81   Israel to speed up extradition of woman in sex-abuse case
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Israeli officials are seeking to expedite an extradition hearing for a woman facing dozens of sexual-abuse charges in Australia after a psychiatric panel concluded she had lied about suffering from mental illness, the Justice Ministry announced Monday. The panel's decision last week that found Malka Leifer fit to stand trial marked a major breakthrough in a years-old case that has strained relations between Israel and Australia and antagonized members of Australia's Jewish community.

    Israeli officials are seeking to expedite an extradition hearing for a woman facing dozens of sexual-abuse charges in Australia after a psychiatric panel concluded she had lied about suffering from mental illness, the Justice Ministry announced Monday. The panel's decision last week that found Malka Leifer fit to stand trial marked a major breakthrough in a years-old case that has strained relations between Israel and Australia and antagonized members of Australia's Jewish community.


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  • 51/81   U.S. troops describe 'miraculous' escape at Iraqi base attacked by Iran
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Troops at the Iraqi air base that bore the brunt of Iran's first direct missile attack against U.S. forces said they were shocked by its intensity and grateful to emerge unscathed.

    Troops at the Iraqi air base that bore the brunt of Iran's first direct missile attack against U.S. forces said they were shocked by its intensity and grateful to emerge unscathed.


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  • 52/81   U.S. birth rates have dropped by more than half — here’s why
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Birth rates in the U.S. have dropped by more than half since the post-World War II baby boom and are at a record low, according to the CDC.

    Birth rates in the U.S. have dropped by more than half since the post-World War II baby boom and are at a record low, according to the CDC.


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  • 53/81   U.S. Navy: We Have More UFO Stuff And You're Definitely Not Allowed To See It
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The military reportedly admitted having documents and footage on a famous 2004 sighting, but it's top secret.

    The military reportedly admitted having documents and footage on a famous 2004 sighting, but it's top secret.


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  • 54/81   Sex delays menopause, study finds
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Women approaching menopause who have frequent sex are less likely to cross that threshold than women of the same age who are not as active sexually, researchers said Wednesday.  On average, intimate relations at least once a week reduced the chances of entering menopause by 28 percent compared to women who had sex less than once a month, they reported in the journal Royal Society Open Science.  'If a woman is having little or infrequent sex when approaching midlife, then the body will not be receiving the physical cues of a possible pregnancy,' Megan Arnot and Ruth Mace, scientists at University College London, wrote.

    Women approaching menopause who have frequent sex are less likely to cross that threshold than women of the same age who are not as active sexually, researchers said Wednesday. On average, intimate relations at least once a week reduced the chances of entering menopause by 28 percent compared to women who had sex less than once a month, they reported in the journal Royal Society Open Science. 'If a woman is having little or infrequent sex when approaching midlife, then the body will not be receiving the physical cues of a possible pregnancy,' Megan Arnot and Ruth Mace, scientists at University College London, wrote.


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  • 55/81   Scientists discover Earth’s oldest solid material – stardust older than the sun
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The "stardust" sample is about 5 billion to 7 billion years old and predates the sun, which the Field Museum says is about 4.6 billion years old.

    The "stardust" sample is about 5 billion to 7 billion years old and predates the sun, which the Field Museum says is about 4.6 billion years old.


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  • 56/81   How Insects Cope With the Effects of Gravity
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    You wouldn't think gravity would be a big worry for insects. They're so small. So light. An ant that fell from a second-floor balcony and landed on its head wouldn't even get a bruise.Consequently, scientists have not concerned themselves greatly with what gravity does to insects. But a group of scientists who routinely put grasshoppers into the linear accelerator at the Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois decided to take a closer look.That's not as strange as it sounds. With synchrotron X-rays, you can get highly detailed images and video, so the Argonne lab is used for medicine and art and archaeology studies, as well as looking inside grasshoppers to see how their bodies work.Jon F. Harrison of Arizona State University and Jake Socha of Virginia Tech have studied insects at Argonne for years, but their work on gravity came about by accident. Some X-rays showed different results when grasshoppers were right side up or upside down.When new tests refined their observations, the researchers learned that gravity has a significant effect on the grasshopper equivalents of blood pressure and breathing. And furthermore, grasshoppers have adaptations that help minimize the disturbance caused by gravity.Insects and gravity have not gotten much, or indeed any attention, Socha said, and the findings could change broader understandings of insect physiology. "People are not studying this," he said. "This is a new discovery." The researchers published their results Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.David Hu at Georgia Tech, whose research addresses the intersection of physics and biology in animals, said, "This study shows that grasshoppers have amazing control of their body pressure at different orientations. The authors' previous work showed that beetles seem to be able to do the same thing." He was not involved in the study."We see insects and assume that just because they're smaller, they're less complicated than us. That's just not true," he said.Harrison and Socha first noticed a problem while they were doing synchrotron X-rays of grasshoppers to study their air sacs, which are a bit like lungs. The results didn't seem to make sense. "We thought we had made a mistake," Socha said.Then they realized that they hadn't been paying attention to whether the grasshopper was head up or head down in the container that held it.Grasshoppers, like other insects, get oxygen through tubes, or trachea that are open to the outside air and branch into smaller and smaller tubes in the insect's body. All insects have these, and some have air sacs, to store and pump air, as grasshoppers do.It turned out that the tubes were more compressed at the bottom of the animal, because gravity was causing the grasshopper equivalent of blood to sink to the bottom half of the animal.This is similar to what happens when humans stand up quickly and become lightheaded, or the way blood goes to the head during a headstand. Humans have valves in the circulatory system to combat this problem, and your heart rate can increase, to pump blood faster.But insects don't have the same system. A grasshopper has a heart, but most of its body had been thought to be like one big bag of blood. Nonetheless, the researchers found that the grasshoppers could substantially counter the effect of gravity when they were conscious. When they were anesthetized with nitrogen, they could not.The researchers found that the grasshoppers could change the pressure in different parts of their body. And the animals were able to keep different pressure in different parts of the body. How they do it is the next question. But they must have some way of blocking off the abdomen from the thorax, say, to create different pressures.The discovery reveals something brand-new about the intersection of physics and biology. For now, it seems to be true in grasshoppers, at the least, and probably beetles, based on another study of Socha's. But all insects are going to be subject to the same physical forces, which few scientists have ever paid attention to before. And it seems unlikely, said Socha, that grasshoppers are the only ones to evolve coping mechanisms.Still, it may be that smaller insects, like fruit flies, don't need to regulate their bodies in the same way. Hu said that ants maintain the same metabolism whether they are walking horizontally or straight up a wall. Future studies will show at what size insects have these adaptations, and what exactly they are.As to the potential practical impact of the findings, Socha said some research on insects is related to human biology, and should take into account these gravitational effects. And Hu said that the discovery could influence the design of so-called lab-on-a-chip devices that use tiny amounts of fluid.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company

    You wouldn't think gravity would be a big worry for insects. They're so small. So light. An ant that fell from a second-floor balcony and landed on its head wouldn't even get a bruise.Consequently, scientists have not concerned themselves greatly with what gravity does to insects. But a group of scientists who routinely put grasshoppers into the linear accelerator at the Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois decided to take a closer look.That's not as strange as it sounds. With synchrotron X-rays, you can get highly detailed images and video, so the Argonne lab is used for medicine and art and archaeology studies, as well as looking inside grasshoppers to see how their bodies work.Jon F. Harrison of Arizona State University and Jake Socha of Virginia Tech have studied insects at Argonne for years, but their work on gravity came about by accident. Some X-rays showed different results when grasshoppers were right side up or upside down.When new tests refined their observations, the researchers learned that gravity has a significant effect on the grasshopper equivalents of blood pressure and breathing. And furthermore, grasshoppers have adaptations that help minimize the disturbance caused by gravity.Insects and gravity have not gotten much, or indeed any attention, Socha said, and the findings could change broader understandings of insect physiology. "People are not studying this," he said. "This is a new discovery." The researchers published their results Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.David Hu at Georgia Tech, whose research addresses the intersection of physics and biology in animals, said, "This study shows that grasshoppers have amazing control of their body pressure at different orientations. The authors' previous work showed that beetles seem to be able to do the same thing." He was not involved in the study."We see insects and assume that just because they're smaller, they're less complicated than us. That's just not true," he said.Harrison and Socha first noticed a problem while they were doing synchrotron X-rays of grasshoppers to study their air sacs, which are a bit like lungs. The results didn't seem to make sense. "We thought we had made a mistake," Socha said.Then they realized that they hadn't been paying attention to whether the grasshopper was head up or head down in the container that held it.Grasshoppers, like other insects, get oxygen through tubes, or trachea that are open to the outside air and branch into smaller and smaller tubes in the insect's body. All insects have these, and some have air sacs, to store and pump air, as grasshoppers do.It turned out that the tubes were more compressed at the bottom of the animal, because gravity was causing the grasshopper equivalent of blood to sink to the bottom half of the animal.This is similar to what happens when humans stand up quickly and become lightheaded, or the way blood goes to the head during a headstand. Humans have valves in the circulatory system to combat this problem, and your heart rate can increase, to pump blood faster.But insects don't have the same system. A grasshopper has a heart, but most of its body had been thought to be like one big bag of blood. Nonetheless, the researchers found that the grasshoppers could substantially counter the effect of gravity when they were conscious. When they were anesthetized with nitrogen, they could not.The researchers found that the grasshoppers could change the pressure in different parts of their body. And the animals were able to keep different pressure in different parts of the body. How they do it is the next question. But they must have some way of blocking off the abdomen from the thorax, say, to create different pressures.The discovery reveals something brand-new about the intersection of physics and biology. For now, it seems to be true in grasshoppers, at the least, and probably beetles, based on another study of Socha's. But all insects are going to be subject to the same physical forces, which few scientists have ever paid attention to before. And it seems unlikely, said Socha, that grasshoppers are the only ones to evolve coping mechanisms.Still, it may be that smaller insects, like fruit flies, don't need to regulate their bodies in the same way. Hu said that ants maintain the same metabolism whether they are walking horizontally or straight up a wall. Future studies will show at what size insects have these adaptations, and what exactly they are.As to the potential practical impact of the findings, Socha said some research on insects is related to human biology, and should take into account these gravitational effects. And Hu said that the discovery could influence the design of so-called lab-on-a-chip devices that use tiny amounts of fluid.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company


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  • 57/81   32 award-winning underwater photos reveal a troupe of tiny seahorses, a hot-pink sea slug, and fish living in beer bottles
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The images that took first place in the Ocean Art Underwater Photo Competition showcase the beauty and drama of ocean life.

    The images that took first place in the Ocean Art Underwater Photo Competition showcase the beauty and drama of ocean life.


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  • 58/81   'A fundamental reshaping of finance': The CEO of $7 trillion BlackRock says climate change will be the focal point of the firm's investing strategy
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    "In the near future — and sooner than most anticipate — there will be a significant reallocation of capital," CEO Larry Fink said in an annual letter.

    "In the near future — and sooner than most anticipate — there will be a significant reallocation of capital," CEO Larry Fink said in an annual letter.


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  • 59/81   Exposure to flame retardants is causing US kids to lose millions of IQ points. They're more damaging than lead or mercury.
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Exposure to pesticides and flame retardants resulted in a total loss of nearly 190 million IQ points among children from 2001 to 2016.

    Exposure to pesticides and flame retardants resulted in a total loss of nearly 190 million IQ points among children from 2001 to 2016.


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  • 60/81   Dynetics teams up with Sierra Nevada Corp. for NASA’s big lunar lander competition
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Alabama-based Dynetics says it's leading a team of companies proposing a crew-carrying lunar lander for NASA, in competition with other companies including Blue Origin and Boeing. One of Dynetics' partners is Sierra Nevada Corp., which is already working on a cargo-carrying space plane called the Dream Chaser for commercial resupply missions to the International Space Station. The Dynetics-SNC team-up was first reported late last week by Space News, and confirmed by tweets from Dynetics and SNC. Dynetics says other companies are on the team but has declined to identify them. NASA's human lander program is aimed at clearing the way… Read More

    Alabama-based Dynetics says it's leading a team of companies proposing a crew-carrying lunar lander for NASA, in competition with other companies including Blue Origin and Boeing. One of Dynetics' partners is Sierra Nevada Corp., which is already working on a cargo-carrying space plane called the Dream Chaser for commercial resupply missions to the International Space Station. The Dynetics-SNC team-up was first reported late last week by Space News, and confirmed by tweets from Dynetics and SNC. Dynetics says other companies are on the team but has declined to identify them. NASA's human lander program is aimed at clearing the way… Read More


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  • 61/81   A meteor that struck Australia brought indestructible stardust more ancient than the sun. It's the oldest solid material ever found on Earth.
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    In 1969, a meteorite broke into pieces above Murchison, Australia. The fragments contain grains of stardust up to 7 billion years old.

    In 1969, a meteorite broke into pieces above Murchison, Australia. The fragments contain grains of stardust up to 7 billion years old.


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  • 62/81   What's behind the latest European bid to save the Iran nuclear deal and how it could end up killing it
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    While the European powers hope they have found an avenue to fix the Iran nuclear deal, it may actually spell its end.  France, Germany and the United Kingdom filed a formal complaint within the nuclear agreement on Tuesday to force its remaining parties to convene and discuss Iran's breaches of its commitments since last May. The step, known as the dispute mechanism, is meant to resolve differences within the deal when one party believes another is not meeting its commitments.  If there's no resolution, it could lead to United Nations sanctions on Iran resuming as quickly as 65 days from now.

    While the European powers hope they have found an avenue to fix the Iran nuclear deal, it may actually spell its end. France, Germany and the United Kingdom filed a formal complaint within the nuclear agreement on Tuesday to force its remaining parties to convene and discuss Iran's breaches of its commitments since last May. The step, known as the dispute mechanism, is meant to resolve differences within the deal when one party believes another is not meeting its commitments. If there's no resolution, it could lead to United Nations sanctions on Iran resuming as quickly as 65 days from now.


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  • 63/81   EU states launch process disputing Iran's nuclear compliance
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Three EU countries on Tuesday launched a process charging Iran with failing to observe the terms of the 2015 deal curtailing its nuclear programme, a move that sparked anger and threats from Tehran at a time of growing tensions.  A US State Department spokesperson said Washington fully supported the three countries, adding 'further diplomatic and economic pressure is warranted'.  The decision to begin the so-called dispute mechanism process comes as tensions soar between the West and Iran following the killing of top commander Qasem Soleimani in a US air strike, and the admission by Tehran days later that it had accidentally shot down a Ukrainian airliner.

    Three EU countries on Tuesday launched a process charging Iran with failing to observe the terms of the 2015 deal curtailing its nuclear programme, a move that sparked anger and threats from Tehran at a time of growing tensions. A US State Department spokesperson said Washington fully supported the three countries, adding 'further diplomatic and economic pressure is warranted'. The decision to begin the so-called dispute mechanism process comes as tensions soar between the West and Iran following the killing of top commander Qasem Soleimani in a US air strike, and the admission by Tehran days later that it had accidentally shot down a Ukrainian airliner.


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  • 64/81   War powers measure has majority support in US Senate: Democrats
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    US Senate Democrats on Tuesday asserted that they have sufficient bipartisan backing to pass a war powers resolution as early as next week aimed at restricting President Donald Trump's military action against Iran.  'We now have the 51 votes that we need for the version that's the bipartisan version,' said Democratic Senator Tim Kaine, who introduced the measure intended to force Trump to seek authority from Congress if military hostilities with Iran last for more than 30 days.  Kaine named four Republican senators -- Rand Paul, Mike Lee, Todd Young and Susan Collins -- who he said will join the 47 Democrats voting in favor in the 100-member chamber.

    US Senate Democrats on Tuesday asserted that they have sufficient bipartisan backing to pass a war powers resolution as early as next week aimed at restricting President Donald Trump's military action against Iran. 'We now have the 51 votes that we need for the version that's the bipartisan version,' said Democratic Senator Tim Kaine, who introduced the measure intended to force Trump to seek authority from Congress if military hostilities with Iran last for more than 30 days. Kaine named four Republican senators -- Rand Paul, Mike Lee, Todd Young and Susan Collins -- who he said will join the 47 Democrats voting in favor in the 100-member chamber.


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  • 65/81   Europe Turns Up Heat on Iran in Bid to Save Nuclear Accord
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- European nations insist they still want to save the Iran nuclear deal, but to do that they now need to turn up the pressure on Tehran.Germany, France and the U.K. triggered a dramatic escalation in the standoff with Iran on Tuesday, starting formal action against the Islamic Republic for breaching restrictions on uranium enrichment set out in the 2015 accord.Violating the terms of the deal marks a dangerous new course that could see Iran coming closer to developing a nuclear weapon and leaves the so-called EU-3 with little choice but to start the agreement’s dispute resolution mechanism, according to European Union diplomats who spoke on condition of anonymity. Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif said the decision was a strategic mistake.The three European signatories of the deal have been struggling to hold it together since President Donald Trump pulled the U.S. out 20 months ago. But rather than buckle under pressure from Washington and finish off the accord -- a process that could ultimately lead to tougher sanctions on Iran, including on weapons imports -- EU governments are calling Tehran’s bluff in an effort to force open a new diplomatic front that could salvage the deal, the diplomats said.And the timing couldn’t be more delicate.The U.S. and Iran were on the brink of war less that two weeks ago after Trump ordered the killing of top Iranian general Qassem Soleimani. As Iranian forces launched retaliatory attacks on U.S. facilities in the Middle East, they accidentally shot down a Ukrainian airliner over Tehran, triggering protests against the regime.“We’re calling on Iran to participate in this process constructively,” German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas told reporters in Berlin. “The goal of these negotiations will be to preserve the nuclear accord.”The move opens a new phase for the European leaders who have been keeping the nuclear deal on life support.While Trump campaigned in 2016 on a pledge to dismantle the pact negotiated under his predecessor Barack Obama, the European allies have viewed it as an anchor for global efforts to prevent nuclear proliferation.Outreach in MoscowThe Europeans have been building up to Tuesday’s decision since December when foreign ministers dispatched their top lieutenants to China and Russia -- the two other signatories -- to seek consensus on triggering the dispute mechanism, but found little support. The decision was made public following Iran’s announcement on Jan. 5 that it would no longer be bound by the terms of the deal.A U.S. State Department official, who asked not to be identified, said in a statement that the UK, France, and Germany took the right step in response to a series of provocations Iran has taken to expand proliferation-sensitive nuclear activities.The resolution mechanism involves a complex series of steps that could ultimately bring the accord to an end if Iran refuses to return to compliance. But there’s nothing automatic about the process and politicians can intervene along the way can to prevent the deal collapsing.The European nations aim to use an extended open-ended window allowed by the mechanism to push for a diplomatic resolution, the officials said.The EU will first try to resolve Iran’s nuclear violations within an initial 15-day period set out in the accord. If that fails, the foreign ministers of signatory nations, including China and Russia, would gather to debate the matter and would have the option of sending Iran back to the UN Security Council to face even stiffer international sanctions.Along the way, the unity among the Europeans over Iran will also be tested.U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson alarmed allies when he told the BBC on Tuesday that the U.S. sees “many, many faults” in the deal and that “if we are going to get rid of it, let’s replace it and let’s replace it with the Trump deal.”The comments, possibly an attempt to assuage the U.S. president as Johnson prepares to lead Britain out of the EU, were not welcomed in other capitals, one European diplomat said. Johnson’s top foreign secretary, Dominic Raab, rowed back somewhat later Tuesday, insisting that triggering the mechanism was a tactic intended to save the deal.“We do so with a view to bringing Iran back into full compliance,” Raab told the House of Commons in London.(Updates with U.S. official in 11th paragraph)\--With assistance from Arne Delfs and Nick Wadhams.To contact the reporters on this story: Jonathan Tirone in Vienna at jtirone@bloomberg.net;Patrick Donahue in Berlin at pdonahue1@bloomberg.net;Robert Hutton in London at rhutton1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Ben Sills at bsills@bloomberg.net, Thomas PennyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- European nations insist they still want to save the Iran nuclear deal, but to do that they now need to turn up the pressure on Tehran.Germany, France and the U.K. triggered a dramatic escalation in the standoff with Iran on Tuesday, starting formal action against the Islamic Republic for breaching restrictions on uranium enrichment set out in the 2015 accord.Violating the terms of the deal marks a dangerous new course that could see Iran coming closer to developing a nuclear weapon and leaves the so-called EU-3 with little choice but to start the agreement’s dispute resolution mechanism, according to European Union diplomats who spoke on condition of anonymity. Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif said the decision was a strategic mistake.The three European signatories of the deal have been struggling to hold it together since President Donald Trump pulled the U.S. out 20 months ago. But rather than buckle under pressure from Washington and finish off the accord -- a process that could ultimately lead to tougher sanctions on Iran, including on weapons imports -- EU governments are calling Tehran’s bluff in an effort to force open a new diplomatic front that could salvage the deal, the diplomats said.And the timing couldn’t be more delicate.The U.S. and Iran were on the brink of war less that two weeks ago after Trump ordered the killing of top Iranian general Qassem Soleimani. As Iranian forces launched retaliatory attacks on U.S. facilities in the Middle East, they accidentally shot down a Ukrainian airliner over Tehran, triggering protests against the regime.“We’re calling on Iran to participate in this process constructively,” German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas told reporters in Berlin. “The goal of these negotiations will be to preserve the nuclear accord.”The move opens a new phase for the European leaders who have been keeping the nuclear deal on life support.While Trump campaigned in 2016 on a pledge to dismantle the pact negotiated under his predecessor Barack Obama, the European allies have viewed it as an anchor for global efforts to prevent nuclear proliferation.Outreach in MoscowThe Europeans have been building up to Tuesday’s decision since December when foreign ministers dispatched their top lieutenants to China and Russia -- the two other signatories -- to seek consensus on triggering the dispute mechanism, but found little support. The decision was made public following Iran’s announcement on Jan. 5 that it would no longer be bound by the terms of the deal.A U.S. State Department official, who asked not to be identified, said in a statement that the UK, France, and Germany took the right step in response to a series of provocations Iran has taken to expand proliferation-sensitive nuclear activities.The resolution mechanism involves a complex series of steps that could ultimately bring the accord to an end if Iran refuses to return to compliance. But there’s nothing automatic about the process and politicians can intervene along the way can to prevent the deal collapsing.The European nations aim to use an extended open-ended window allowed by the mechanism to push for a diplomatic resolution, the officials said.The EU will first try to resolve Iran’s nuclear violations within an initial 15-day period set out in the accord. If that fails, the foreign ministers of signatory nations, including China and Russia, would gather to debate the matter and would have the option of sending Iran back to the UN Security Council to face even stiffer international sanctions.Along the way, the unity among the Europeans over Iran will also be tested.U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson alarmed allies when he told the BBC on Tuesday that the U.S. sees “many, many faults” in the deal and that “if we are going to get rid of it, let’s replace it and let’s replace it with the Trump deal.”The comments, possibly an attempt to assuage the U.S. president as Johnson prepares to lead Britain out of the EU, were not welcomed in other capitals, one European diplomat said. Johnson’s top foreign secretary, Dominic Raab, rowed back somewhat later Tuesday, insisting that triggering the mechanism was a tactic intended to save the deal.“We do so with a view to bringing Iran back into full compliance,” Raab told the House of Commons in London.(Updates with U.S. official in 11th paragraph)\--With assistance from Arne Delfs and Nick Wadhams.To contact the reporters on this story: Jonathan Tirone in Vienna at jtirone@bloomberg.net;Patrick Donahue in Berlin at pdonahue1@bloomberg.net;Robert Hutton in London at rhutton1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Ben Sills at bsills@bloomberg.net, Thomas PennyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 66/81   U.K.'s Boris Johnson wants Britons to 'bung a bob for Big Ben bong'
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson is speaking English, as far as we can tell.Still, his latest nationwide plan could use a little bit of translating before Americans -- or perhaps anyone -- can understand it. Johnson is launching a new £500,000 push so the U.K. can "bong Big Ben on Brexit night," and he wants Britons to "bung a bob for a Big Ben bong" so that can happen.Johnson revealed his new tongue twister in an early-morning interview with BBC, describing how the famous Big Ben clock is under construction and has lost its famous "bong." But "the bongs cost £500,000," or about $650,000, Johnson said. So he's developing a plan where Britons can contribute to Big Ben's restoration, or, in Johnson-ese, "bung a bob for a Big Ben bong." > "The bongs cost £500,000… but we're working up a plan so that people can bung a bob for a Big Ben bong"> > Boris Johnson says "we need to restore the clapper, in order to bong Big Ben on Brexit night, and that is expensive"BBCBreakfast https://t.co/4A3CjflbN3 pic.twitter.com/0BXiu1DYkp> > -- BBC Politics (@BBCPolitics) January 14, 2020British tabloid Daily Express boiled down Johnson's words into an alliterative -- and easier to pronounce -- demand for its Wednesday cover.> EXPRESS: Big Ben MUST bong for Brexit TomorrowsPapersToday pic.twitter.com/CFixxSlw2Y> > -- Neil Henderson (@hendopolis) January 14, 2020American tabloids, may we suggest "Big (Ben) Buck Hunter" for all your cover needs?More stories from theweek.com  The Senate is preparing an 'unprecedented crackdown' on Capitol reporters ahead of impeachment  Bernie Sanders' appraisal of a woman's 2020 chances isn't shocking. It's conventional wisdom.  What happens when women translate the Classics

    U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson is speaking English, as far as we can tell.Still, his latest nationwide plan could use a little bit of translating before Americans -- or perhaps anyone -- can understand it. Johnson is launching a new £500,000 push so the U.K. can "bong Big Ben on Brexit night," and he wants Britons to "bung a bob for a Big Ben bong" so that can happen.Johnson revealed his new tongue twister in an early-morning interview with BBC, describing how the famous Big Ben clock is under construction and has lost its famous "bong." But "the bongs cost £500,000," or about $650,000, Johnson said. So he's developing a plan where Britons can contribute to Big Ben's restoration, or, in Johnson-ese, "bung a bob for a Big Ben bong." > "The bongs cost £500,000… but we're working up a plan so that people can bung a bob for a Big Ben bong"> > Boris Johnson says "we need to restore the clapper, in order to bong Big Ben on Brexit night, and that is expensive"BBCBreakfast https://t.co/4A3CjflbN3 pic.twitter.com/0BXiu1DYkp> > -- BBC Politics (@BBCPolitics) January 14, 2020British tabloid Daily Express boiled down Johnson's words into an alliterative -- and easier to pronounce -- demand for its Wednesday cover.> EXPRESS: Big Ben MUST bong for Brexit TomorrowsPapersToday pic.twitter.com/CFixxSlw2Y> > -- Neil Henderson (@hendopolis) January 14, 2020American tabloids, may we suggest "Big (Ben) Buck Hunter" for all your cover needs?More stories from theweek.com The Senate is preparing an 'unprecedented crackdown' on Capitol reporters ahead of impeachment Bernie Sanders' appraisal of a woman's 2020 chances isn't shocking. It's conventional wisdom. What happens when women translate the Classics


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  • 67/81   The backchannel: Here's how the United States and Iran communicate
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    “The diplomatic communication channel between [the] U.S. and Iran that is provided by Switzerland in the framework of the protective power mandate continues to operate,” a Swiss Ministry of Foreign Affairs spokesperson said in an email to Yahoo News.

    “The diplomatic communication channel between [the] U.S. and Iran that is provided by Switzerland in the framework of the protective power mandate continues to operate,” a Swiss Ministry of Foreign Affairs spokesperson said in an email to Yahoo News.


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  • 68/81   Senate Readies War Powers Bill to Limit Trump’s Iran Options
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- The Senate is moving closer to a rebuke of Donald Trump over Iran, as Democratic Senator Tim Kaine said he has enough Republican votes to pass a resolution limiting the president’s ability to carry out a military attack against that country without congressional authorization.The move reflects bipartisan dissatisfaction over the administration’s varying justifications for the drone strike that killed Iranian General Qassem Soleimani in Baghdad, including a briefing last week that one GOP senator called insulting.Kaine said Tuesday he has 51 “declared votes“ for a revised version of his war powers resolution. He said GOP senators Mike Lee, Rand Paul, Susan Collins and Todd Young will support his measure.Two of these Republicans -- Lee and Paul -- said last week they would support Kaine’s effort after they blasted Trump administration officials including Secretary of State Michael Pompeo over the classified briefing. Lee said it was the worst briefing he’d ever received on military matters.Kaine told reporters Tuesday that he was approached by Republicans after that meeting with Trump administration officials turned tense.“In conversations with Republican colleagues, especially after the briefing last week, they were discouraged that the attitude that was being communicated to us was that Congress is an annoyance” and they only wanted to provide “morsels of information,” Kaine said.Lower-level officials from the departments of State and Defense will provide another classified briefing Wednesday to members of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Briefers include Brian Hook, the special representative for Iran, and David Schenker, the assistant secretary of state for the Middle East.Revised ResolutionThe Senate Foreign Relations Committee has led some of the only efforts from Republican lawmakers to push back on Trump’s policy priorities in the last three years. The panel has introduced resolutions to prevent the Trump administration from selling arms to Saudi Arabia and continuing to back the Saudi-led coalition fighting in Yemen.Trump vetoed those measures, and Congress failed to reach the two-thirds majority needed to override his veto. If the Kaine resolution passes the Senate, it will have to be adopted by the House before going to the president. Trump would probably veto it.The House already adopted a similar resolution that only got three Republican votes in the Democratic-led chamber. That bill was introduced under a slightly different procedure that wouldn’t need Trump’s signature but would likely face a challenge in court.Kaine’s resolution would order the president to cease any hostilities against Iran, its government or its military without express authorization from Congress. The measure includes changes requested by Republicans who were frustrated by last week’s briefing.“After that they came to me and we have been able to make amendments that earned the support first of Senators Lee and Paul, but now the support also of Senators Young and Collins,” Kaine said.The revised version of the bill did not attract the support of Senator Mitt Romney, a Republican from Utah, who said in a statement that the resolution sends the wrong message to Iran during a time of heightened tensions in the region.“This resolution would undermine our deterrent capability and send the wrong message to Iran,” Romney said. “As it is currently drafted, this resolution would tie the president’s hands in responding to further potential Iranian aggression.”Also on Tuesday, a group of eight Democratic senators wrote to acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph Maguire asking for a briefing about claims by Trump and other administration officials that Soleimani was planning imminent attacks on U.S. embassies before he was killed earlier this month.“There was no mention of any of this classified evidence during the all-senators briefing last Wednesday,” said the senators, led by Chris Murphy, a Democrat from Connecticut.Majority SupportYoung said earlier Tuesday he informed the Trump administration that he plans to support Kaine’s resolution after it was revised to remove some language he said was too political.“The members of the administration with whom I spoke, who are important advisers to the president on issues of national security, were comfortable with my principled position,” Young said.Collins said in a statement that the revised Kaine resolution doesn’t prevent the president from defending U.S. forces abroad while reasserting Congress’s “constitutional role.””Congress cannot be sidelined on these important decisions,” Collins said. “Only the legislative branch may declare war or commit our armed forces to a sustained military conflict with Iran.”Kaine said the resolution is eligible for floor consideration next Tuesday though it could get a vote earlier if a deal is reached with leadership. Kaine said that under Senate rules the measure can get an expedited vote and only needs a simple majority to pass.Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer was also optimistic that it has enough support to pass.“We believe we will get 51 votes,” Schumer told reporters Tuesday. “We believe this resolution is the right way to go.”Kaine said he expects the Senate to be able to act on the resolution even though Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said the chamber plans to begin Trump’s impeachment trial on Tuesday. Schumer said senators will “work out the timing.”(Updates with lawmaker comment beginning in the 13th paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: Daniel Flatley in Washington at dflatley1@bloomberg.net;Laura Litvan in Washington at llitvan@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Joe Sobczyk at jsobczyk@bloomberg.net, Anna Edgerton, Laurie AsséoFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- The Senate is moving closer to a rebuke of Donald Trump over Iran, as Democratic Senator Tim Kaine said he has enough Republican votes to pass a resolution limiting the president’s ability to carry out a military attack against that country without congressional authorization.The move reflects bipartisan dissatisfaction over the administration’s varying justifications for the drone strike that killed Iranian General Qassem Soleimani in Baghdad, including a briefing last week that one GOP senator called insulting.Kaine said Tuesday he has 51 “declared votes“ for a revised version of his war powers resolution. He said GOP senators Mike Lee, Rand Paul, Susan Collins and Todd Young will support his measure.Two of these Republicans -- Lee and Paul -- said last week they would support Kaine’s effort after they blasted Trump administration officials including Secretary of State Michael Pompeo over the classified briefing. Lee said it was the worst briefing he’d ever received on military matters.Kaine told reporters Tuesday that he was approached by Republicans after that meeting with Trump administration officials turned tense.“In conversations with Republican colleagues, especially after the briefing last week, they were discouraged that the attitude that was being communicated to us was that Congress is an annoyance” and they only wanted to provide “morsels of information,” Kaine said.Lower-level officials from the departments of State and Defense will provide another classified briefing Wednesday to members of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Briefers include Brian Hook, the special representative for Iran, and David Schenker, the assistant secretary of state for the Middle East.Revised ResolutionThe Senate Foreign Relations Committee has led some of the only efforts from Republican lawmakers to push back on Trump’s policy priorities in the last three years. The panel has introduced resolutions to prevent the Trump administration from selling arms to Saudi Arabia and continuing to back the Saudi-led coalition fighting in Yemen.Trump vetoed those measures, and Congress failed to reach the two-thirds majority needed to override his veto. If the Kaine resolution passes the Senate, it will have to be adopted by the House before going to the president. Trump would probably veto it.The House already adopted a similar resolution that only got three Republican votes in the Democratic-led chamber. That bill was introduced under a slightly different procedure that wouldn’t need Trump’s signature but would likely face a challenge in court.Kaine’s resolution would order the president to cease any hostilities against Iran, its government or its military without express authorization from Congress. The measure includes changes requested by Republicans who were frustrated by last week’s briefing.“After that they came to me and we have been able to make amendments that earned the support first of Senators Lee and Paul, but now the support also of Senators Young and Collins,” Kaine said.The revised version of the bill did not attract the support of Senator Mitt Romney, a Republican from Utah, who said in a statement that the resolution sends the wrong message to Iran during a time of heightened tensions in the region.“This resolution would undermine our deterrent capability and send the wrong message to Iran,” Romney said. “As it is currently drafted, this resolution would tie the president’s hands in responding to further potential Iranian aggression.”Also on Tuesday, a group of eight Democratic senators wrote to acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph Maguire asking for a briefing about claims by Trump and other administration officials that Soleimani was planning imminent attacks on U.S. embassies before he was killed earlier this month.“There was no mention of any of this classified evidence during the all-senators briefing last Wednesday,” said the senators, led by Chris Murphy, a Democrat from Connecticut.Majority SupportYoung said earlier Tuesday he informed the Trump administration that he plans to support Kaine’s resolution after it was revised to remove some language he said was too political.“The members of the administration with whom I spoke, who are important advisers to the president on issues of national security, were comfortable with my principled position,” Young said.Collins said in a statement that the revised Kaine resolution doesn’t prevent the president from defending U.S. forces abroad while reasserting Congress’s “constitutional role.””Congress cannot be sidelined on these important decisions,” Collins said. “Only the legislative branch may declare war or commit our armed forces to a sustained military conflict with Iran.”Kaine said the resolution is eligible for floor consideration next Tuesday though it could get a vote earlier if a deal is reached with leadership. Kaine said that under Senate rules the measure can get an expedited vote and only needs a simple majority to pass.Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer was also optimistic that it has enough support to pass.“We believe we will get 51 votes,” Schumer told reporters Tuesday. “We believe this resolution is the right way to go.”Kaine said he expects the Senate to be able to act on the resolution even though Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said the chamber plans to begin Trump’s impeachment trial on Tuesday. Schumer said senators will “work out the timing.”(Updates with lawmaker comment beginning in the 13th paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: Daniel Flatley in Washington at dflatley1@bloomberg.net;Laura Litvan in Washington at llitvan@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Joe Sobczyk at jsobczyk@bloomberg.net, Anna Edgerton, Laurie AsséoFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 69/81   4 Republicans to back Senate war powers resolution, giving it a majority
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    It looks like the Senate will pass a resolution to restrict President Trump's military authority on Iran, following a similar vote from the House last week.Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.), who introduced the resolution, said Tuesday he has the 51 votes necessary to get it passed. It's a bipartisan effort, considering there are only 47 Democrats in Congress' upper chamber. Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) joined three of her GOP colleagues -- Sens. Todd Young (R-Ind.), Mike Lee (R-Utah), and Rand Paul (R-Ky.) -- who had already announced they would back Kaine's bill.The resolution came about after Trump approved an airstrike in Iraq earlier this month that killed Iranian Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani, heightening already-simmering tensions between Tehran and Washington. Things have cooled down since then, but Congress is still trying to ensure the country isn't rushed into a major conflict. "This should be the hardest decision we make," Kaine said. "And because we're going to be ordering young men and women to risk their lives, we shouldn't do it unless we have the guts to have the debate." > Democrats have enough Republican votes to pass war resolution limiting Trump's military powers on Iran, says Sen Tim Kaine> > Full story w/ @karoun : https://t.co/CEB7vURN6o pic.twitter.com/KEVKbjAcWN> > -- Zach Purser Brown (@zachjourno) January 14, 2020More stories from theweek.com  The Senate is preparing an 'unprecedented crackdown' on Capitol reporters ahead of impeachment  Bernie Sanders' appraisal of a woman's 2020 chances isn't shocking. It's conventional wisdom.  What happens when women translate the Classics

    It looks like the Senate will pass a resolution to restrict President Trump's military authority on Iran, following a similar vote from the House last week.Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.), who introduced the resolution, said Tuesday he has the 51 votes necessary to get it passed. It's a bipartisan effort, considering there are only 47 Democrats in Congress' upper chamber. Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) joined three of her GOP colleagues -- Sens. Todd Young (R-Ind.), Mike Lee (R-Utah), and Rand Paul (R-Ky.) -- who had already announced they would back Kaine's bill.The resolution came about after Trump approved an airstrike in Iraq earlier this month that killed Iranian Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani, heightening already-simmering tensions between Tehran and Washington. Things have cooled down since then, but Congress is still trying to ensure the country isn't rushed into a major conflict. "This should be the hardest decision we make," Kaine said. "And because we're going to be ordering young men and women to risk their lives, we shouldn't do it unless we have the guts to have the debate." > Democrats have enough Republican votes to pass war resolution limiting Trump's military powers on Iran, says Sen Tim Kaine> > Full story w/ @karoun : https://t.co/CEB7vURN6o pic.twitter.com/KEVKbjAcWN> > -- Zach Purser Brown (@zachjourno) January 14, 2020More stories from theweek.com The Senate is preparing an 'unprecedented crackdown' on Capitol reporters ahead of impeachment Bernie Sanders' appraisal of a woman's 2020 chances isn't shocking. It's conventional wisdom. What happens when women translate the Classics


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  • 70/81   Senators worried over Trump's power to start a war with Iran are mounting a bipartisan challenge
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Senate Democrats on Tuesday said they have enough votes to pass a resolution to limit Trump's ability to attack Iran without congressional approval.

    Senate Democrats on Tuesday said they have enough votes to pass a resolution to limit Trump's ability to attack Iran without congressional approval.


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  • 71/81   Dem senator says he has 51 votes to restrain Trump on Iran
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    A Democratic senator said Tuesday he has at least 51 votes to support a bipartisan resolution asserting that President Donald Trump must seek approval from Congress before engaging in further military action against Iran.  Sen. Tim Kaine of Virginia said the Senate could vote as soon as next week on the measure, which is co-sponsored by two Republican senators and has support from at least two more Republicans.  Mike Lee of Utah and Rand Paul of Kentucky have co-sponsored the measure, and GOP Sens.

    A Democratic senator said Tuesday he has at least 51 votes to support a bipartisan resolution asserting that President Donald Trump must seek approval from Congress before engaging in further military action against Iran. Sen. Tim Kaine of Virginia said the Senate could vote as soon as next week on the measure, which is co-sponsored by two Republican senators and has support from at least two more Republicans. Mike Lee of Utah and Rand Paul of Kentucky have co-sponsored the measure, and GOP Sens.


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  • 72/81   Don't Forget These Vaccines When You Travel
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    If you're planning a winter trip to another country, you may be preoccupied with booking airfare and finding lodging, but certain destinations require an extra step of planning: travel vaccines. ...

    If you're planning a winter trip to another country, you may be preoccupied with booking airfare and finding lodging, but certain destinations require an extra step of planning: travel vaccines. ...


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  • 73/81   Trump turns 'very routine' physical into attack on media
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    President Trump lashed out at the media Tuesday over reporting about his sudden trip to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center last weekend.

    President Trump lashed out at the media Tuesday over reporting about his sudden trip to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center last weekend.


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  • 74/81   5 Turkey Cooking Tips Will Guarantee You Have the Perfect Bird This Holidays
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    There's no need to wing it at Thanksgiving this year.

    There's no need to wing it at Thanksgiving this year.


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  • 75/81   9 Easy Ways to Make Your Jack-o'-Lanterns Last Longer
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    A little bleach goes a long way.

    A little bleach goes a long way.


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  • 76/81   Is It Time for a Medication Reconciliation?
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    More than half of adult Americans regularly take at least one prescription drug, according to a recent Consumer Reports nationally representative survey. And for those who take any medication on ...

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  • 77/81   Brown-Bag Lunches for Kids With Food Allergies
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    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...


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  • 78/81   What to Feed Your Family When the Power Goes Out
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    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...


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  • 79/81   Try These Healthy Snack Ideas for Kids
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    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...

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  • 80/81   The 9 Best Jobs for Teachers To Make Some Cash During the Summer Break
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    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.


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  • 81/81   How to Spot and Avoid Algal Blooms
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    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...


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