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News Slideshows (01/20/2020 15 hours)


  • 1/81   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


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    Press Review


    Happy MLK   Revis   Studio Ghibli   Birmingham Jail   Bastion   Angelina   Excluding the US   SideM   Not in the US   Sloane Stephens   Canada and Japan   Buzz Aldrin   Starlit Season   
  • 2/81   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


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  • 3/81   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


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  • 4/81   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


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  • 5/81   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


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  • 6/81   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


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  • 7/81   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


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  • 8/81   Do star athletes make too much money?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    With athletes in America's biggest sports leagues raking in salaries worth $300 million and more, is it time to reign in the big spending or do superstars deserve the big bucks they make?

    With athletes in America's biggest sports leagues raking in salaries worth $300 million and more, is it time to reign in the big spending or do superstars deserve the big bucks they make?


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  • 9/81   Live animal mascots: Cute or exploitative?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?


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  • 10/81   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


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  • 11/81   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


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  • 12/81   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


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  • 13/81   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


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  • 14/81   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


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  • 15/81   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


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  • 16/81   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named.  Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does.  At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


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  • 17/81   PHOTOS: Fluorescent turtle embryo wins forty-fifth annual Nikon Small World Competition

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.


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  • 18/81   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


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  • 19/81   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


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  • 20/81   What the CIA thinks of your anti-virus program

    PARIS (AP) — Peppering the 8,000 pages of purported Central Intelligence Agency hacking data released Tuesday by WikiLeaks are reviews of some of the world's most popular anti-virus products.

    PARIS (AP) — Peppering the 8,000 pages of purported Central Intelligence Agency hacking data released Tuesday by WikiLeaks are reviews of some of the world's most popular anti-virus products.


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  • 21/81   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


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  • 22/81   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


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  • 23/81   BBC chief Tony Hall to step down amid mounting challenges
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    BBC Director-General Tony Hall announced Monday that he will step down from the helm of the U.K. broadcaster in six months after seven years in the job.  The announcement comes as the publicly funded BBC is facing intense political and public pressure amid a fast-changing media landscape and viewing habits.

    BBC Director-General Tony Hall announced Monday that he will step down from the helm of the U.K. broadcaster in six months after seven years in the job. The announcement comes as the publicly funded BBC is facing intense political and public pressure amid a fast-changing media landscape and viewing habits.


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  • 24/81   Merchants Capital Arranges $59MM Financing for Bottleworks District
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Mortgage banking company Merchants Capital has secured $59 million in financing for Bottleworks District, a mixed-use project coming to Indianapolis' North Mass Ave. corridor in September 2020. The fully funded, three-year Merchants Bank of Indiana New Construction Loan was secured on behalf of Hendricks Commercial Properties.

    Mortgage banking company Merchants Capital has secured $59 million in financing for Bottleworks District, a mixed-use project coming to Indianapolis' North Mass Ave. corridor in September 2020. The fully funded, three-year Merchants Bank of Indiana New Construction Loan was secured on behalf of Hendricks Commercial Properties.


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  • 25/81   Stocks Edge Lower With U.S. Futures; Oil Climbs: Markets Wrap
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- European stocks and U.S. equity futures edged lower on Monday as investors awaited a fresh batch of corporate earnings and some key central bank meetings this week. Crude oil rose following supply disruptions in Libya and Iraq.Activity was muted across most major markets because of a U.S. holiday. The Stoxx Europe 600 Index trimmed an earlier decline, though it remained modestly lower after spending the morning in the red. Contracts on the main American equity benchmarks also pared some earlier losses. Equities advanced in most of Asia, though shares slumped in Hong Kong and India. European bonds were mixed and range-bound, while the pound was slightly weaker ahead of U.K. jobs data due tomorrow.Brent crude jumped back above $65 a barrel as unrest hit key production regions. Iraq temporarily stopped output at an oil field on Sunday, while Libyan production almost ground to a halt after armed forces shut down a pipeline.Jitters in the oil market seem to be testing investor confidence after the signing of the initial Sino-American trade deal and positive economic readings from China and the U.S. helped lift sentiment last week. The IMF’s latest outlook gives traders more to mull over, with the Fund predicting the world economy will strengthen in 2020, albeit at a slightly slower pace than previously anticipated.Investors now turn their attention back to corporate earnings after solid results from the biggest banks on Wall Street. Key central bank meetings in Europe and Japan are also on the agenda.“We are entering 2020 on a more stable footing with economies globally stabilizing and looking like they’re turning up, and the phase one trade deal,” Anne Anderson, head of fixed income for Australia at UBS Asset Management, told Bloomberg TV in Sydney. “So it’s a bit more positive with regard to the economic fundamentals.”Here are some events to watch out for this week:Companies including Netflix, IBM, UBS, Procter & Gamble and Hyundai will post results.Policy decisions are due from central banks including Japan, Canada, Indonesia and the European Central Bank.The World Economic Forum, the annual gathering of global leaders in politics, business and culture, opens in Davos, Switzerland.These are the main moves in markets:StocksFutures on the S&P 500 Index dipped 0.1% as of 1:45 p.m. London time.The Stoxx Europe 600 Index dipped 0.2%.The MSCI Asia Pacific Index was little changed.The MSCI Emerging Market Index decreased 0.1%.CurrenciesThe Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index advanced 0.1%.The euro decreased 0.1% to $1.1084.The British pound sank 0.1% to $1.3003.The onshore yuan dipped 0.1% to 6.866 per dollar.The Japanese yen was little changed at 110.18 per dollar.BondsGermany’s 10-year yield advanced less than one basis point to -0.21%.Britain’s 10-year yield climbed two basis points to 0.65%.Japan’s 10-year yield advanced one basis point to 0.01%.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude climbed 0.6% to $58.92 a barrel.Iron ore fell 0.4% to $93.93 per metric ton.Gold gained 0.2% to $1,560.04 an ounce.\--With assistance from Cormac Mullen, Haidi Lun and Adam Haigh.To contact the reporter on this story: Yakob Peterseil in London at ypeterseil@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Sam Potter at spotter33@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- European stocks and U.S. equity futures edged lower on Monday as investors awaited a fresh batch of corporate earnings and some key central bank meetings this week. Crude oil rose following supply disruptions in Libya and Iraq.Activity was muted across most major markets because of a U.S. holiday. The Stoxx Europe 600 Index trimmed an earlier decline, though it remained modestly lower after spending the morning in the red. Contracts on the main American equity benchmarks also pared some earlier losses. Equities advanced in most of Asia, though shares slumped in Hong Kong and India. European bonds were mixed and range-bound, while the pound was slightly weaker ahead of U.K. jobs data due tomorrow.Brent crude jumped back above $65 a barrel as unrest hit key production regions. Iraq temporarily stopped output at an oil field on Sunday, while Libyan production almost ground to a halt after armed forces shut down a pipeline.Jitters in the oil market seem to be testing investor confidence after the signing of the initial Sino-American trade deal and positive economic readings from China and the U.S. helped lift sentiment last week. The IMF’s latest outlook gives traders more to mull over, with the Fund predicting the world economy will strengthen in 2020, albeit at a slightly slower pace than previously anticipated.Investors now turn their attention back to corporate earnings after solid results from the biggest banks on Wall Street. Key central bank meetings in Europe and Japan are also on the agenda.“We are entering 2020 on a more stable footing with economies globally stabilizing and looking like they’re turning up, and the phase one trade deal,” Anne Anderson, head of fixed income for Australia at UBS Asset Management, told Bloomberg TV in Sydney. “So it’s a bit more positive with regard to the economic fundamentals.”Here are some events to watch out for this week:Companies including Netflix, IBM, UBS, Procter & Gamble and Hyundai will post results.Policy decisions are due from central banks including Japan, Canada, Indonesia and the European Central Bank.The World Economic Forum, the annual gathering of global leaders in politics, business and culture, opens in Davos, Switzerland.These are the main moves in markets:StocksFutures on the S&P 500 Index dipped 0.1% as of 1:45 p.m. London time.The Stoxx Europe 600 Index dipped 0.2%.The MSCI Asia Pacific Index was little changed.The MSCI Emerging Market Index decreased 0.1%.CurrenciesThe Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index advanced 0.1%.The euro decreased 0.1% to $1.1084.The British pound sank 0.1% to $1.3003.The onshore yuan dipped 0.1% to 6.866 per dollar.The Japanese yen was little changed at 110.18 per dollar.BondsGermany’s 10-year yield advanced less than one basis point to -0.21%.Britain’s 10-year yield climbed two basis points to 0.65%.Japan’s 10-year yield advanced one basis point to 0.01%.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude climbed 0.6% to $58.92 a barrel.Iron ore fell 0.4% to $93.93 per metric ton.Gold gained 0.2% to $1,560.04 an ounce.\--With assistance from Cormac Mullen, Haidi Lun and Adam Haigh.To contact the reporter on this story: Yakob Peterseil in London at ypeterseil@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Sam Potter at spotter33@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 26/81   BAE buys up GPS, radio units divested by UTC, Raytheon
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The two units are being divested for antitrust reasons following the Raytheon-UTC merger.

    The two units are being divested for antitrust reasons following the Raytheon-UTC merger.


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  • 27/81   Mobile Banking Market to Generate $1.82 Billion, Globally, by 2026 at 12.2% CAGR: Allied Market Research
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Allied Market Research published a report, titled, "Mobile Banking Market by Transaction (Consumer-to-consumer and Consumer-to-Business), and Platform (Android, iOS, and Others): Global Opportunity Analysis and Industry Forecast, 2019–2026." According to the report, the global mobile banking market garnered $715.3 million in 2018, and is estimated to reach $1.82 billion by 2026, growing at a CAGR of 12.2% from 2019 to 2026.

    Allied Market Research published a report, titled, "Mobile Banking Market by Transaction (Consumer-to-consumer and Consumer-to-Business), and Platform (Android, iOS, and Others): Global Opportunity Analysis and Industry Forecast, 2019–2026." According to the report, the global mobile banking market garnered $715.3 million in 2018, and is estimated to reach $1.82 billion by 2026, growing at a CAGR of 12.2% from 2019 to 2026.


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  • 28/81   BlackRock’s Hildebrand Says Lawmakers Key to Climate Fight
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up here to receive the Davos Diary, a special daily newsletter that will run from Jan. 20-24.BlackRock Inc. Vice Chairman Philipp Hildebrand says the fight against climate change will require a joint effort between governments and the private sector.“We should have no illusion about this, ultimately climate change cannot be tackled by just the private sector,” Hildebrand said in an interview with Bloomberg TV at the Swiss resort of Davos. “This is a government problem, it will require sustained coordinated government responses. There will be laws, there will be regulation, and the private sector adapts to that.”Sustainability and climate change are expected to dominate discussions at this year’s annual World Economic Forum, which has been held in the Swiss Alpine town of Davos since the 1970s. The event attracts the world’s most important lawmakers and wealthiest people and this year at least 119 billionaires are converging to join bankers, politicians and other grandees for their pilgrimage.BlackRock’s Chief Executive Officer Larry Fink issued his strongest statement last week as he pledged to incorporate environmental concerns into the firm’s investment process for both active and passive products. As well as sitting on the firm’s global executive committee, Hildebrand oversees BlackRock’s Sustainable Investing divisions.The $7 trillion asset manager said it will exit both debt and equity investments in thermal coal producers across its active portfolios and will introduce new investment products that screen fossil fuels. The firm is tackling the subject as asset managers come under greater pressure on sustainability, with BlackRock in particular facing increasing scrutiny for its behavior and voting record around environmental issues.As the world’s largest manager of index funds, BlackRock invests in the world’s biggest polluters. The firm plans to address the apparent conflict by creating sustainable versions of its flagship iShares index business and to double the existing number of ESG-compliant exchange-traded funds to 150.Anne Richards, chief executive officer of Fidelity International, said active managers are best placed to push the companies they invest in to change their behavior on environmental issues.“As active managers, one of the tools you always have in your kit bag ultimately is threat of divestment,” Richards said in a Bloomberg TV interview from Davos. “The first starting point is engagement, because it’s when you own the shares you really have leverage to talk to management.”The majority of Fidelity International’s assets are in active funds, although the firm has several indexes and ETFs, according to a company spokeswoman. Assets under management stood at $339.2 billion at the end of 2019.Index TrackersPassive funds will “never have that tension,” Richards said. “They will always be holders unless the index changes.”BlackRock’s passive offerings account for about two-thirds of its assets under management at $4.9 trillion and the iShares ETF business continued to be a major driver last year, pulling in more than half of all inflows during the fourth quarter. Passive funds blindly mimic an index and, by design, may include polluters. In an industry where there’s no standard definition of what makes a company or investment environmentally sustainable, moves by asset managers are also constantly evolving.(Updates with comments by Fidelity International’s Richards starting in seventh paragraph)\--With assistance from Chris Bourke.To contact the reporters on this story: Lucca de Paoli in London at gdepaoli1@bloomberg.net;Francine Lacqua in London at flacqua@bloomberg.net;Suzy Waite in London at swaite8@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Shelley Robinson at ssmith118@bloomberg.net, Patrick HenryFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up here to receive the Davos Diary, a special daily newsletter that will run from Jan. 20-24.BlackRock Inc. Vice Chairman Philipp Hildebrand says the fight against climate change will require a joint effort between governments and the private sector.“We should have no illusion about this, ultimately climate change cannot be tackled by just the private sector,” Hildebrand said in an interview with Bloomberg TV at the Swiss resort of Davos. “This is a government problem, it will require sustained coordinated government responses. There will be laws, there will be regulation, and the private sector adapts to that.”Sustainability and climate change are expected to dominate discussions at this year’s annual World Economic Forum, which has been held in the Swiss Alpine town of Davos since the 1970s. The event attracts the world’s most important lawmakers and wealthiest people and this year at least 119 billionaires are converging to join bankers, politicians and other grandees for their pilgrimage.BlackRock’s Chief Executive Officer Larry Fink issued his strongest statement last week as he pledged to incorporate environmental concerns into the firm’s investment process for both active and passive products. As well as sitting on the firm’s global executive committee, Hildebrand oversees BlackRock’s Sustainable Investing divisions.The $7 trillion asset manager said it will exit both debt and equity investments in thermal coal producers across its active portfolios and will introduce new investment products that screen fossil fuels. The firm is tackling the subject as asset managers come under greater pressure on sustainability, with BlackRock in particular facing increasing scrutiny for its behavior and voting record around environmental issues.As the world’s largest manager of index funds, BlackRock invests in the world’s biggest polluters. The firm plans to address the apparent conflict by creating sustainable versions of its flagship iShares index business and to double the existing number of ESG-compliant exchange-traded funds to 150.Anne Richards, chief executive officer of Fidelity International, said active managers are best placed to push the companies they invest in to change their behavior on environmental issues.“As active managers, one of the tools you always have in your kit bag ultimately is threat of divestment,” Richards said in a Bloomberg TV interview from Davos. “The first starting point is engagement, because it’s when you own the shares you really have leverage to talk to management.”The majority of Fidelity International’s assets are in active funds, although the firm has several indexes and ETFs, according to a company spokeswoman. Assets under management stood at $339.2 billion at the end of 2019.Index TrackersPassive funds will “never have that tension,” Richards said. “They will always be holders unless the index changes.”BlackRock’s passive offerings account for about two-thirds of its assets under management at $4.9 trillion and the iShares ETF business continued to be a major driver last year, pulling in more than half of all inflows during the fourth quarter. Passive funds blindly mimic an index and, by design, may include polluters. In an industry where there’s no standard definition of what makes a company or investment environmentally sustainable, moves by asset managers are also constantly evolving.(Updates with comments by Fidelity International’s Richards starting in seventh paragraph)\--With assistance from Chris Bourke.To contact the reporters on this story: Lucca de Paoli in London at gdepaoli1@bloomberg.net;Francine Lacqua in London at flacqua@bloomberg.net;Suzy Waite in London at swaite8@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Shelley Robinson at ssmith118@bloomberg.net, Patrick HenryFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 29/81   Oil Advances to One-Week High as Unrest Hits Iraq and Libya
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Oil rose to the highest in more than a week in London as supply disruptions in Iraq and Libya reignited concerns over the market’s vulnerability to geopolitical risk in key production regions.Brent futures increased to more than $65 a barrel after Libya’s oil production almost ground to a halt as armed forces closed a critical pipeline, shuttering output from the nation’s biggest oil project. In fellow OPEC nation Iraq, escalating protests stopped work at a minor field on Sunday.The latest incidents mark the second time this month that the market has been jolted by supply fears in OPEC nations, coming within weeks of a tense exchange between the U.S. and Iran that imperiled the region’s energy exports.While the dramas have roiled markets, with Brent swinging between a trading range of $8 a barrel, prices are now little changed from the end of last year. Traders remain reassured by what the International Energy Agency calls a “solid base” of plentiful inventories and surging American shale-oil production.“The amount of oil which is off is substantial, but right now the expectations are that it’s not going to last because it’s part of a negotiation process,” said Olivier Jakob, managing director at consultant Petromatrix GmbH in Zug, Switzerland. “We are in this situation where you have some supply concerns if one looks at protests in Iraq and the situation in Libya, but on the other hand the products are weak.”Brent crude traded 56 cents higher at $65.41 a barrel on the ICE Futures Europe exchange as of 1:45 p.m. in London, having earlier climbed 1.8% to $66, the highest since Jan. 9. West Texas Intermediate futures rose 38 cents to $58.92 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange.See also: The Man Who Cut Libya’s Oil Supply Is Getting Harder to HandleProduction has stopped at Libya’s biggest field, the 300,000-barrel-a-day Sharara, a person familiar with the situation said. The country won’t be able to pump more than 72,000 barrels a day once its storage tanks are full, according to a spokesman for the NOC, down from more than 1.2 million barrels per day on Saturday. The output plunge started when an eastern military commander, Khalifa Haftar, blocked exports at ports under his control, according to a statement on Saturday from NOC. The company declared force majeure, which can allow Libya -- home to Africa’s largest oil reserves -- to legally suspend delivery contracts.Separately, security guards in Iraq seeking permanent employment contracts blocked access to the Al Ahdab oil field, prompting a production halt, according to an official who declined to be identified. The Badra field, which has an output of about 50,000 barrels a day, is also at risk of closure.See also: Iraq Oil Supplies Vulnerable as Mideast Tensions Flare, IEA Says\--With assistance from James Thornhill, Serene Cheong, Andrew Janes, Saket Sundria and Heesu Lee.To contact the reporters on this story: Grant Smith in London at gsmith52@bloomberg.net;Alex Longley in London at alongley@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: James Herron at jherron9@bloomberg.net, Christopher Sell, Rakteem KatakeyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Oil rose to the highest in more than a week in London as supply disruptions in Iraq and Libya reignited concerns over the market’s vulnerability to geopolitical risk in key production regions.Brent futures increased to more than $65 a barrel after Libya’s oil production almost ground to a halt as armed forces closed a critical pipeline, shuttering output from the nation’s biggest oil project. In fellow OPEC nation Iraq, escalating protests stopped work at a minor field on Sunday.The latest incidents mark the second time this month that the market has been jolted by supply fears in OPEC nations, coming within weeks of a tense exchange between the U.S. and Iran that imperiled the region’s energy exports.While the dramas have roiled markets, with Brent swinging between a trading range of $8 a barrel, prices are now little changed from the end of last year. Traders remain reassured by what the International Energy Agency calls a “solid base” of plentiful inventories and surging American shale-oil production.“The amount of oil which is off is substantial, but right now the expectations are that it’s not going to last because it’s part of a negotiation process,” said Olivier Jakob, managing director at consultant Petromatrix GmbH in Zug, Switzerland. “We are in this situation where you have some supply concerns if one looks at protests in Iraq and the situation in Libya, but on the other hand the products are weak.”Brent crude traded 56 cents higher at $65.41 a barrel on the ICE Futures Europe exchange as of 1:45 p.m. in London, having earlier climbed 1.8% to $66, the highest since Jan. 9. West Texas Intermediate futures rose 38 cents to $58.92 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange.See also: The Man Who Cut Libya’s Oil Supply Is Getting Harder to HandleProduction has stopped at Libya’s biggest field, the 300,000-barrel-a-day Sharara, a person familiar with the situation said. The country won’t be able to pump more than 72,000 barrels a day once its storage tanks are full, according to a spokesman for the NOC, down from more than 1.2 million barrels per day on Saturday. The output plunge started when an eastern military commander, Khalifa Haftar, blocked exports at ports under his control, according to a statement on Saturday from NOC. The company declared force majeure, which can allow Libya -- home to Africa’s largest oil reserves -- to legally suspend delivery contracts.Separately, security guards in Iraq seeking permanent employment contracts blocked access to the Al Ahdab oil field, prompting a production halt, according to an official who declined to be identified. The Badra field, which has an output of about 50,000 barrels a day, is also at risk of closure.See also: Iraq Oil Supplies Vulnerable as Mideast Tensions Flare, IEA Says\--With assistance from James Thornhill, Serene Cheong, Andrew Janes, Saket Sundria and Heesu Lee.To contact the reporters on this story: Grant Smith in London at gsmith52@bloomberg.net;Alex Longley in London at alongley@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: James Herron at jherron9@bloomberg.net, Christopher Sell, Rakteem KatakeyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 30/81   Announcing the Kickstarter Launch for CyberTeamUS
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    CyberTeamUS is a U.S. based entity and is led by Chris Kirkland, a 32yr veteran of the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy and certified LEAN 6S Black belt and Network Engineer. It was started as an answer and countermeasure to Symantec/Norton/LifeLock and the numerous other Anti-virus Malware companies that have questionable foreign ties. It combines the best U.S. based companies as an alternative because in Kirkland's opinion, "Americans will do a much better job of protecting Americans."

    CyberTeamUS is a U.S. based entity and is led by Chris Kirkland, a 32yr veteran of the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy and certified LEAN 6S Black belt and Network Engineer. It was started as an answer and countermeasure to Symantec/Norton/LifeLock and the numerous other Anti-virus Malware companies that have questionable foreign ties. It combines the best U.S. based companies as an alternative because in Kirkland's opinion, "Americans will do a much better job of protecting Americans."


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  • 31/81   How Much Did Murphy Oil Corporation's (NYSE:MUR) CEO Pocket Last Year?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    In 2013 Roger Jenkins was appointed CEO of Murphy Oil Corporation (NYSE:MUR). This report will, first, examine the CEO...

    In 2013 Roger Jenkins was appointed CEO of Murphy Oil Corporation (NYSE:MUR). This report will, first, examine the CEO...


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  • 32/81   Who Has Been Buying Mondo TV S.p.A. (BIT:MTV) Shares?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    We often see insiders buying up shares in companies that perform well over the long term. The flip side of that is...

    We often see insiders buying up shares in companies that perform well over the long term. The flip side of that is...


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  • 33/81   Michael Hasenstab’s Global Bond Fund Loses Another $3 Billion
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- A global bond fund managed by star investor Michael Hasenstab saw assets drop by $3 billion for a second consecutive quarter, even after he backtracked on two loss-making investments.Total net assets in the Templeton Global Bond Fund declined from $30 billion to $26.9 billion in the three months through December, according to public filings. Total holdings were down by a similar amount in the third quarter.The fund manager announced a move into haven currencies after two of his biggest investments flopped in August. A massive holding in Argentina was pummeled by the country’s default, and a short position in U.S. bonds was hit by the drop in bond yields.Once a top-performing fund with assets well over double today’s value, Templeton’s flagship bond fund has also been diminished by the march of passive investments. It underperformed almost 90% of peers last year, returning 0.6% compared with a return of 6.9% for Treasuries.In a shift designed to offset loss-making positions, Hasenstab doubled exposure to the yen to more than 40% in the third quarter and added long positions in the Norwegian krone and Swedish krona. He said he expects the yen to appreciate against the dollar as monetary-policy divergence narrows between the Federal Reserve and the Bank of Japan. He also increased liquidity by boosting cash across his funds.The fund is holding on to its Treasury short, but Hasenstab said last year he is turning the focus to longer maturities. He has argued for years that markets are overvaluing long bonds given rising deficit spending and rising debt.Average duration in the fund, a measure of sensitivity to shifts in rates, increased to minus 1.01 years as of the end of December, the filings show. At the end of June it was a record low of minus 2.82 years.A spokesman for Franklin Templeton didn’t immediately comment when contacted by Bloomberg.To contact the reporter on this story: Natasha Doff in Moscow at ndoff@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Gregory L. White at gwhite64@bloomberg.net, Cecile Gutscher, Sid VermaFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- A global bond fund managed by star investor Michael Hasenstab saw assets drop by $3 billion for a second consecutive quarter, even after he backtracked on two loss-making investments.Total net assets in the Templeton Global Bond Fund declined from $30 billion to $26.9 billion in the three months through December, according to public filings. Total holdings were down by a similar amount in the third quarter.The fund manager announced a move into haven currencies after two of his biggest investments flopped in August. A massive holding in Argentina was pummeled by the country’s default, and a short position in U.S. bonds was hit by the drop in bond yields.Once a top-performing fund with assets well over double today’s value, Templeton’s flagship bond fund has also been diminished by the march of passive investments. It underperformed almost 90% of peers last year, returning 0.6% compared with a return of 6.9% for Treasuries.In a shift designed to offset loss-making positions, Hasenstab doubled exposure to the yen to more than 40% in the third quarter and added long positions in the Norwegian krone and Swedish krona. He said he expects the yen to appreciate against the dollar as monetary-policy divergence narrows between the Federal Reserve and the Bank of Japan. He also increased liquidity by boosting cash across his funds.The fund is holding on to its Treasury short, but Hasenstab said last year he is turning the focus to longer maturities. He has argued for years that markets are overvaluing long bonds given rising deficit spending and rising debt.Average duration in the fund, a measure of sensitivity to shifts in rates, increased to minus 1.01 years as of the end of December, the filings show. At the end of June it was a record low of minus 2.82 years.A spokesman for Franklin Templeton didn’t immediately comment when contacted by Bloomberg.To contact the reporter on this story: Natasha Doff in Moscow at ndoff@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Gregory L. White at gwhite64@bloomberg.net, Cecile Gutscher, Sid VermaFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 34/81   Hyphen Solutions Announces Three New Construction Management Software Products at IBS 2020
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Hyphen Solutions, the leading provider of cloud-based construction management software, announces three new products – Hyphen CRM, Hyphen Wallet and SupplyPro GM – at the NAHB International Builders' Show (IBS) 2020, the largest annual light construction show in the world.

    Hyphen Solutions, the leading provider of cloud-based construction management software, announces three new products – Hyphen CRM, Hyphen Wallet and SupplyPro GM – at the NAHB International Builders' Show (IBS) 2020, the largest annual light construction show in the world.


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  • 35/81   Hull Financial Planning Release Comprehensive Study of Retirement Costs for Over 250 U.S. Cities
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Hull Financial Planning today announced the release of a comprehensive study of retirement costs for over 250 cities in the United States.

    Hull Financial Planning today announced the release of a comprehensive study of retirement costs for over 250 cities in the United States.


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  • 36/81   Does Maui Land & Pineapple Company, Inc. (NYSE:MLP) Have A High Beta?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Anyone researching Maui Land & Pineapple Company, Inc. (NYSE:MLP) might want to consider the historical volatility of...

    Anyone researching Maui Land & Pineapple Company, Inc. (NYSE:MLP) might want to consider the historical volatility of...


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  • 37/81   Global FDI dips, hit by Hong Kong divestment, Brexit: U.N.
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Global direct foreign investment (FDI) dipped slightly around the world last year, hit by massive divestment in Hong Kong and a drop in flows into Britain due to Brexit uncertainty, the United Nations said on Monday.  FDI could rise marginally in 2020 on the back of modest growth as trade tensions between China and the United States ease, but geopolitical uncertainties and protectionist pressures temper expectations, it said.  In 2019, global FDI flows were estimated at $1.39 trillion, down 1% from a revised $1.41 trillion in 2018, the U.N. trade and development agency UNCTAD said in a report.

    Global direct foreign investment (FDI) dipped slightly around the world last year, hit by massive divestment in Hong Kong and a drop in flows into Britain due to Brexit uncertainty, the United Nations said on Monday. FDI could rise marginally in 2020 on the back of modest growth as trade tensions between China and the United States ease, but geopolitical uncertainties and protectionist pressures temper expectations, it said. In 2019, global FDI flows were estimated at $1.39 trillion, down 1% from a revised $1.41 trillion in 2018, the U.N. trade and development agency UNCTAD said in a report.


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  • 38/81   8fit Debuts 10 Videos with Mel Douglas of Black Women's Yoga Collective
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    8fit, a health and fitness app, today announced the release of 10 exclusive yoga videos featuring instructor Mel Douglas, founder of Black Women's Yoga Collective. A seasoned, certified Power Vinyasa teacher, Mel's yoga videos broaden 8fit's already diverse collection of workouts within the 8fit app. 8fit believes the new videos will contribute to its goal of changing the fitness industry from a one-size-fits-all mold into a more inclusive, body-positive, and accessible space.

    8fit, a health and fitness app, today announced the release of 10 exclusive yoga videos featuring instructor Mel Douglas, founder of Black Women's Yoga Collective. A seasoned, certified Power Vinyasa teacher, Mel's yoga videos broaden 8fit's already diverse collection of workouts within the 8fit app. 8fit believes the new videos will contribute to its goal of changing the fitness industry from a one-size-fits-all mold into a more inclusive, body-positive, and accessible space.


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  • 39/81   Immigration Service Adopts Altibase for its Bioinformatics Analysis System for Safe and Thorough Immigration Management
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Korea Immigration Service (KIS), a branch of the Ministry of Justice, controls and supervises people's crossings into and out of Korea through borders, airports and ports and identifies and manages relevant information.

    Korea Immigration Service (KIS), a branch of the Ministry of Justice, controls and supervises people's crossings into and out of Korea through borders, airports and ports and identifies and manages relevant information.


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  • 40/81   British Pound Shows Signs of Strength Before Brexit
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Want the lowdown on European markets? In your inbox before the open, every day. Sign up here.With 11 days to go before Britain leaves the European Union, the pound has the opportunity to begin a rebound from the post-election sell-off as support levels kick in.The currency’s second day of declines on Monday may be part of a corrective phase under the Elliott Wave technical pattern. The so-called C wave marks the final phase of the pullback from the rally that started in September, signaling that bearishness on the currency could have the potential to wind down.While the end of the C wave is yet to be established, signals from the Fibonacci study suggest the first support is at $1.2920, which marks the 38.2% retracement level. A more significant 61.8% retracement -- at $1.2553 -- suggests the bullish trend in the pound is intact, even after the volatility that followed the U.K. election result.To be sure, it may be that the C wave has further yet to run toward $1.2769, the low on Nov. 8. And other factors are also weighing on the pound beyond mere technicals. The currency surged after the Conservatives’ victory in December then slipped on renewed fears of a hard Brexit, weak economic data and a flurry of dovish comments from Bank of England officials.Nervousness in the run-up to the Jan. 31 Brexit deadline could bring volatility in the currency. Nonetheless, don’t forget the technical factors which point to a pause in the sell-off. They also include stochastics showing oversold conditions and the average directional index suggesting a weakening grip from sterling bears.To contact the reporter on this story: Srinivasan Sivabalan in London at ssivabalan@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Dana El Baltaji at delbaltaji@bloomberg.net, William Shaw, Michael HunterFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Want the lowdown on European markets? In your inbox before the open, every day. Sign up here.With 11 days to go before Britain leaves the European Union, the pound has the opportunity to begin a rebound from the post-election sell-off as support levels kick in.The currency’s second day of declines on Monday may be part of a corrective phase under the Elliott Wave technical pattern. The so-called C wave marks the final phase of the pullback from the rally that started in September, signaling that bearishness on the currency could have the potential to wind down.While the end of the C wave is yet to be established, signals from the Fibonacci study suggest the first support is at $1.2920, which marks the 38.2% retracement level. A more significant 61.8% retracement -- at $1.2553 -- suggests the bullish trend in the pound is intact, even after the volatility that followed the U.K. election result.To be sure, it may be that the C wave has further yet to run toward $1.2769, the low on Nov. 8. And other factors are also weighing on the pound beyond mere technicals. The currency surged after the Conservatives’ victory in December then slipped on renewed fears of a hard Brexit, weak economic data and a flurry of dovish comments from Bank of England officials.Nervousness in the run-up to the Jan. 31 Brexit deadline could bring volatility in the currency. Nonetheless, don’t forget the technical factors which point to a pause in the sell-off. They also include stochastics showing oversold conditions and the average directional index suggesting a weakening grip from sterling bears.To contact the reporter on this story: Srinivasan Sivabalan in London at ssivabalan@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Dana El Baltaji at delbaltaji@bloomberg.net, William Shaw, Michael HunterFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 41/81   What Can We Make Of Melco Resorts & Entertainment Limited’s (NASDAQ:MLCO) High Return On Capital?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today we are going to look at Melco Resorts & Entertainment Limited (NASDAQ:MLCO) to see whether it might be an...

    Today we are going to look at Melco Resorts & Entertainment Limited (NASDAQ:MLCO) to see whether it might be an...


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  • 42/81   Trump impeachment news – live: President’s controversial legal team branded ‘absurd’ after saying he cannot be removed from office for abuse of power ahead of Senate trial
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Lawyers preparing to defend Donald Trump at his Senate impeachment trial took to the talk show circuit on Sunday to argue the president could not be removed from office over abuse of power, a position dismissed as “absurdist” and “arrant nonsense” by Democrats Adam Schiff and Jerrold Nadler, their leading opponents.The president himself was in Texas yesterday taking a victory lap over his new trade deal with China, thanking attendees at the American Farm Bureau Federation’s annual convention for backing his stand-off with the economic superpower despite their being hardest hit by it.

    Lawyers preparing to defend Donald Trump at his Senate impeachment trial took to the talk show circuit on Sunday to argue the president could not be removed from office over abuse of power, a position dismissed as “absurdist” and “arrant nonsense” by Democrats Adam Schiff and Jerrold Nadler, their leading opponents.The president himself was in Texas yesterday taking a victory lap over his new trade deal with China, thanking attendees at the American Farm Bureau Federation’s annual convention for backing his stand-off with the economic superpower despite their being hardest hit by it.


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  • 43/81   SpaceX rocket explodes after liftoff as planned; Crew Dragon capsule escapes fireball
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from Kennedy Space Center on Sunday, ultimately sacrificing itself to a test.

    A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from Kennedy Space Center on Sunday, ultimately sacrificing itself to a test.


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  • 44/81   Ex-Carnival and Norwegian Cruise Line workers reveal the things they couldn't live without on board
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Workers for cruise lines like Carnival and Norwegian might be away from home for over six months, so they need to be thoughtful about what they pack.

    Workers for cruise lines like Carnival and Norwegian might be away from home for over six months, so they need to be thoughtful about what they pack.


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  • 45/81   Bloomberg says his life would be different "if I had been black"
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The former New York City mayor was in Tulsa on Sunday to unveil an ambitious policy proposal aimed at delivering economic justice for black Americans.

    The former New York City mayor was in Tulsa on Sunday to unveil an ambitious policy proposal aimed at delivering economic justice for black Americans.


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  • 46/81   Rep. Ilhan Omar Says ‘We Must Stop Detaining’ Illegal Immigrants
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    “This should never be the case,” she wrote. “The cruelty of our immigration system becomes clearer every day. We must stop detaining immigrants and start giving them pathways to citizenship.”

    “This should never be the case,” she wrote. “The cruelty of our immigration system becomes clearer every day. We must stop detaining immigrants and start giving them pathways to citizenship.”


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  • 47/81   Cult slayed pregnant woman and five of her children in Panama
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A religious sect whose members believed to be “anointed by God” forced a pregnant woman and five of her children to walk through fire as part of a cult ritual, according to local residents.

    A religious sect whose members believed to be “anointed by God” forced a pregnant woman and five of her children to walk through fire as part of a cult ritual, according to local residents.


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  • 48/81   Photos surface showing convicted Nazi guard Demjanjuk at Sobibor
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    New photos have emerged which for the first time show convicted Nazi guard John Demjanjuk at the Sobibor death camp, a Berlin archive confirmed Monday, although he always denied ever being there.  Ukrainian-American Demjanjuk was convicted of being an accessory to the murder of nearly 30,000 Jews at Sobibor by a German court in 2011.  According to the Berlin-based Topography of Terror archive, photos of Demjanjuk are among a newly discovered collection of more than 350 snaps which give 'detailed insight' into the camp in German-occupied Poland.

    New photos have emerged which for the first time show convicted Nazi guard John Demjanjuk at the Sobibor death camp, a Berlin archive confirmed Monday, although he always denied ever being there. Ukrainian-American Demjanjuk was convicted of being an accessory to the murder of nearly 30,000 Jews at Sobibor by a German court in 2011. According to the Berlin-based Topography of Terror archive, photos of Demjanjuk are among a newly discovered collection of more than 350 snaps which give 'detailed insight' into the camp in German-occupied Poland.


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  • 49/81   Impeachment Anticipation Builds in Washington Ahead of Trial
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Anticipation is building in Washington ahead of the nation’s first impeachment trial in 20 years even as Democrats and Republicans continue to squabble about everything from the length of trial days to calling witnesses. The Democratic House impeachment managers held meetings for much of Sunday. They’re expected to do a formal walk-through of the Senate chamber on Monday morning, open to the public, to get their bearings. Each of the seven managers will have their own role in the proceedings. Both sides on Sunday stuck to familiar positions, reflecting legal filings made on Saturday. For Democrats, Trump is a “threat to the nation and the rule of law.” For Republicans, Democrats are staging a “brazen and unlawful” attempt to overturn the 2016 election. Alan Dershowitz, a member of Donald Trump’s legal team, said earlier he sees no grounds for the impeachment of the president. “If the allegations are not impeachable, then this trial should result in an acquittal, regardless of whether the conduct is regarded as OK by you or by me or by voters,” Dershowitz said on ABC’s “This Week.” “That’s an issue for the voters.” ‘I’m the Kicker’ Dershowitz, a constitutional law expert whose clients have included accused sex offender Jeffrey Epstein, will be part of what he characterized Sunday as “special teams” on the Trump legal roster. “I’m the kicker, and I can kick the field goal that wins the game,” Dershowitz said on CNN’s “State of the Union.”An initial six-page response from Trump’s legal team on Saturday took aim at the House Democrats who investigated the president. “Well-founded articles of impeachment both allege that crimes were committed and those are the types of crimes that constitute an abuse of the public trust,” said Robert Ray, another member of the president’s legal team and former Whitewater independent counsel.Abuse of power alone has been tried in the past, “but they have not fared well,” Ray said on “Sunday Morning Futures” on Fox News Channel.The process starting Tuesday will be the Senate’s first impeachment trial in two decades. Democrats have called on senators to conduct a fair trial as part of the oath they took this week to “do impartial justice.”Trump’s legal team will be led by White House counsel Pat Cipollone and Trump’s private attorney, Jay Sekulow. Other team members, including Dershowitz, expect to give discrete presentations on specific topics.Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff is leading the Democrat’s impeachment team with six colleagues. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi selected him in September after she decided to move forward with the investigation.Debate continued Sunday about the rules that will apply to the trial, including whether to call witnesses and whether Republicans will move to dismiss the case altogether.“We do not know what the rules are going to be at this moment. We certainly look forward to being able to review the resolution,” Representative Hakeem Jeffries of New York, one of the impeachment managers, said on “Fox News Sunday.” No DismissalThe idea of dismissing is “dead for practical purposes,” Republican Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina said on “Fox News Sunday.” “We don’t have the votes for that.”“Dismissing this case is a much less attractive option than rendering final judgment and acquitting the president,” Republican Senator Ted Cruz of Texas said on “Sunday Morning Futures” on the Fox News Channel. “A dismissal doesn’t reach the merits. An acquittal, a verdict of not guilty, that verdict stands for all time.”Impeachment Arguments Open With Dueling Filings: Key TakeawaysThe impeachment managers, who represent the geographic and demographic diversity within the Democratic Party, walked the articles of impeachment across the Capitol to the Senate chamber last week, kicking off the symbolic start to the Senate process.The managers, effectively serving as prosecutors, will spend the first days of the trial outlining the articles to the senators, who’ll be required to be present in the chamber. The trial, slated to begin at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, is expected to last for weeks.Only a few Republican senators have been open to the idea of calling witnesses, which Graham opposes. “What they’re doing here is, they’ve got a railroad job in the House and they’re trying to fix it in the Senate, and I’m not going to be part of that,” he said.Cruz also said that it witnesses are called, the trial could extend from a potential one to two weeks to six or eight weeks or longer.Open Mind“If the Senate decides, if Senator McConnell prevails and there are no witnesses, it will be the first impeachment trial in history that goes to conclusion without witnesses,” Schiff said on ABC. Senator Richard Shelby, Republican of Alabama, also on ABC, said he was keeping an open mind on the need for witnesses.“What we do this week and what we hear and what are the facts that we hear will probably meet the test and determine whether we get additional witnesses that will help us make a relevant and a fair decision,” Shelby said.Senator David Perdue, a Georgia Republican, also is open to calling witnesses, but “only within the scope” of the impeachment articles, he said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.”Some Senate Republicans have called for former Vice President Joe Biden’s son Hunter to be deposed if former National Security Adviser John Bolton testifies, as Democrats want. \--With assistance from Billy House.To contact the reporters on this story: Hailey Waller in New York at hwaller@bloomberg.net;Laura Davison in Washington at ldavison4@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: James Ludden at jludden@bloomberg.net, Ros Krasny, Steve GeimannFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Anticipation is building in Washington ahead of the nation’s first impeachment trial in 20 years even as Democrats and Republicans continue to squabble about everything from the length of trial days to calling witnesses. The Democratic House impeachment managers held meetings for much of Sunday. They’re expected to do a formal walk-through of the Senate chamber on Monday morning, open to the public, to get their bearings. Each of the seven managers will have their own role in the proceedings. Both sides on Sunday stuck to familiar positions, reflecting legal filings made on Saturday. For Democrats, Trump is a “threat to the nation and the rule of law.” For Republicans, Democrats are staging a “brazen and unlawful” attempt to overturn the 2016 election. Alan Dershowitz, a member of Donald Trump’s legal team, said earlier he sees no grounds for the impeachment of the president. “If the allegations are not impeachable, then this trial should result in an acquittal, regardless of whether the conduct is regarded as OK by you or by me or by voters,” Dershowitz said on ABC’s “This Week.” “That’s an issue for the voters.” ‘I’m the Kicker’ Dershowitz, a constitutional law expert whose clients have included accused sex offender Jeffrey Epstein, will be part of what he characterized Sunday as “special teams” on the Trump legal roster. “I’m the kicker, and I can kick the field goal that wins the game,” Dershowitz said on CNN’s “State of the Union.”An initial six-page response from Trump’s legal team on Saturday took aim at the House Democrats who investigated the president. “Well-founded articles of impeachment both allege that crimes were committed and those are the types of crimes that constitute an abuse of the public trust,” said Robert Ray, another member of the president’s legal team and former Whitewater independent counsel.Abuse of power alone has been tried in the past, “but they have not fared well,” Ray said on “Sunday Morning Futures” on Fox News Channel.The process starting Tuesday will be the Senate’s first impeachment trial in two decades. Democrats have called on senators to conduct a fair trial as part of the oath they took this week to “do impartial justice.”Trump’s legal team will be led by White House counsel Pat Cipollone and Trump’s private attorney, Jay Sekulow. Other team members, including Dershowitz, expect to give discrete presentations on specific topics.Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff is leading the Democrat’s impeachment team with six colleagues. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi selected him in September after she decided to move forward with the investigation.Debate continued Sunday about the rules that will apply to the trial, including whether to call witnesses and whether Republicans will move to dismiss the case altogether.“We do not know what the rules are going to be at this moment. We certainly look forward to being able to review the resolution,” Representative Hakeem Jeffries of New York, one of the impeachment managers, said on “Fox News Sunday.” No DismissalThe idea of dismissing is “dead for practical purposes,” Republican Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina said on “Fox News Sunday.” “We don’t have the votes for that.”“Dismissing this case is a much less attractive option than rendering final judgment and acquitting the president,” Republican Senator Ted Cruz of Texas said on “Sunday Morning Futures” on the Fox News Channel. “A dismissal doesn’t reach the merits. An acquittal, a verdict of not guilty, that verdict stands for all time.”Impeachment Arguments Open With Dueling Filings: Key TakeawaysThe impeachment managers, who represent the geographic and demographic diversity within the Democratic Party, walked the articles of impeachment across the Capitol to the Senate chamber last week, kicking off the symbolic start to the Senate process.The managers, effectively serving as prosecutors, will spend the first days of the trial outlining the articles to the senators, who’ll be required to be present in the chamber. The trial, slated to begin at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, is expected to last for weeks.Only a few Republican senators have been open to the idea of calling witnesses, which Graham opposes. “What they’re doing here is, they’ve got a railroad job in the House and they’re trying to fix it in the Senate, and I’m not going to be part of that,” he said.Cruz also said that it witnesses are called, the trial could extend from a potential one to two weeks to six or eight weeks or longer.Open Mind“If the Senate decides, if Senator McConnell prevails and there are no witnesses, it will be the first impeachment trial in history that goes to conclusion without witnesses,” Schiff said on ABC. Senator Richard Shelby, Republican of Alabama, also on ABC, said he was keeping an open mind on the need for witnesses.“What we do this week and what we hear and what are the facts that we hear will probably meet the test and determine whether we get additional witnesses that will help us make a relevant and a fair decision,” Shelby said.Senator David Perdue, a Georgia Republican, also is open to calling witnesses, but “only within the scope” of the impeachment articles, he said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.”Some Senate Republicans have called for former Vice President Joe Biden’s son Hunter to be deposed if former National Security Adviser John Bolton testifies, as Democrats want. \--With assistance from Billy House.To contact the reporters on this story: Hailey Waller in New York at hwaller@bloomberg.net;Laura Davison in Washington at ldavison4@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: James Ludden at jludden@bloomberg.net, Ros Krasny, Steve GeimannFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 50/81   US navy to name aircraft carrier in honour of black Pearl Harbor veteran
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Doris Miller was working as a mess attendant on the battleship West Virginia the morning of 7 December 1941, when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. An alarm sounded, and as the ship drew heavy fire, Miller raced to assist the West Virginia’s fatally wounded commanding officer. He also fired a machine gun against enemy planes.For his bravery and “distinguished devotion to duty” that day, Miller in 1942 was awarded the prestigious Navy Cross, the second-highest military decoration, making him the first African American to receive the medal.

    Doris Miller was working as a mess attendant on the battleship West Virginia the morning of 7 December 1941, when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. An alarm sounded, and as the ship drew heavy fire, Miller raced to assist the West Virginia’s fatally wounded commanding officer. He also fired a machine gun against enemy planes.For his bravery and “distinguished devotion to duty” that day, Miller in 1942 was awarded the prestigious Navy Cross, the second-highest military decoration, making him the first African American to receive the medal.


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  • 51/81   A plane slid off the runway and more than 800 flights were canceled as winter weather hit the Midwest
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Authorities issued alerts for areas across the Northeast as blizzard conditions were forecasted to New York and New England over the weekend.

    Authorities issued alerts for areas across the Northeast as blizzard conditions were forecasted to New York and New England over the weekend.


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  • 52/81   Watch live: SpaceX is about to blow up a rocket in a crucial test to show NASA that its spaceship ready to launch astronauts
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Elon Musk's SpaceX is going to make one of its own rocket boosters explode to prove that its Crew Dragon spaceship is ready to send people to space.

    Elon Musk's SpaceX is going to make one of its own rocket boosters explode to prove that its Crew Dragon spaceship is ready to send people to space.


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  • 53/81   A video of medics in Hazmat suits scanning plane passengers for China's mysterious Wuhan virus is stoking fears of a global epidemic
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The Wuhan virus has spread to Beijing, Shenzhen, Thailand, Japan, and South Korea. Not much is known about the illness, which is likened to SARS.

    The Wuhan virus has spread to Beijing, Shenzhen, Thailand, Japan, and South Korea. Not much is known about the illness, which is likened to SARS.


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  • 54/81   SpaceX aces a fiery rehearsal of the worst-case scenario for Crew Dragon spaceflights
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    With a fiery flash and volleys of cheers, SpaceX and NASA today rehearsed something they hope will never happen: a catastrophic rocket failure at the worst time in the launch of a crewed mission to the International Space Station. Fortunately, the closest things to crew members on today's in-flight abort test of the Crew Dragon spaceship were two test dummies, sitting on sensors in the seats that will tell engineers how flesh-and-blood fliers would have weathered the aborted trip. If the results of the test look good, that should take care of the final major hurdle before two actual NASA… Read More

    With a fiery flash and volleys of cheers, SpaceX and NASA today rehearsed something they hope will never happen: a catastrophic rocket failure at the worst time in the launch of a crewed mission to the International Space Station. Fortunately, the closest things to crew members on today's in-flight abort test of the Crew Dragon spaceship were two test dummies, sitting on sensors in the seats that will tell engineers how flesh-and-blood fliers would have weathered the aborted trip. If the results of the test look good, that should take care of the final major hurdle before two actual NASA… Read More


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  • 55/81   17 more cases of a mysterious and deadly virus have been detected in China
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Wuhan, central China, seems to be the origin point of 2019-nCov, a virus that has infected 62 patients and killed two people.

    Wuhan, central China, seems to be the origin point of 2019-nCov, a virus that has infected 62 patients and killed two people.


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  • 56/81   Space Force flies through Twitter flak after unveiling camo uniforms in earthy tones
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The newly minted U.S. Space Force unveiled its uniform on Friday — and defended its fashion statement against Twitter criticism that the camouflage color scheme should have been more spacey. Less than a month after the sixth branch of the U.S. armed forces came into existence, the Space Force showed off the utility uniform in a tweet, saying that the service's nametape and U.S. Space Command patch have "touched down at the Pentagon." The uniform will presumably be worn by thousands of Space Force personnel as they go about their duties, monitoring America's space assets from ground-based installations around the… Read More

    The newly minted U.S. Space Force unveiled its uniform on Friday — and defended its fashion statement against Twitter criticism that the camouflage color scheme should have been more spacey. Less than a month after the sixth branch of the U.S. armed forces came into existence, the Space Force showed off the utility uniform in a tweet, saying that the service's nametape and U.S. Space Command patch have "touched down at the Pentagon." The uniform will presumably be worn by thousands of Space Force personnel as they go about their duties, monitoring America's space assets from ground-based installations around the… Read More


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  • 57/81   Nike's controversial Vaporfly shoes powered the world's 2 fastest marathoners to victory. When I tried them, it felt like running on rocking horses.
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The Nike Vaporfly shoes are 4% more energetically efficient than other brands. I thought I knew what to expect when I put them on, but I was shocked.

    The Nike Vaporfly shoes are 4% more energetically efficient than other brands. I thought I knew what to expect when I put them on, but I was shocked.


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  • 58/81   Panicking About Your Kids and Their Phones? The New Research Says Don't.
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    SAN FRANCISCO -- It has become common wisdom that too much time spent on smartphones and social media is responsible for a recent spike in anxiety, depression and other mental health problems, especially among teenagers.But a growing number of academic researchers have produced studies that suggest the common wisdom is wrong.The latest research, published Friday by two psychology professors, combs through about 40 studies that have examined the link between social media use and both depression and anxiety among adolescents. That link, according to the professors, is small and inconsistent."There doesn't seem to be an evidence base that would explain the level of panic and consternation around these issues," said Candice L. Odgers, a professor at the University of California, Irvine, and the lead author of the paper, which was published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.The debate over the harm we -- and especially our children -- are doing to ourselves by staring into phones is generally predicated on the assumption that the machines we carry in our pockets pose a significant risk to our mental health.Worries about smartphones have led Congress to pass legislation to examine the impact of heavy smartphone use and pushed investors to pressure big tech companies to change the way they approach young customers.The World Health Organization said last year that infants under a year old should not be exposed to electronic screens and that children between the ages of 2 and 4 should not have more than an hour of "sedentary screen time" each day.Even in Silicon Valley, technology executives have made a point of keeping the devices and the software they develop away from their own children.But some researchers question whether those fears are justified. They are not arguing that intensive use of phones does not matter. Children who are on their phones too much can miss out on other valuable activities, like exercise. And research has shown that excessive phone use can exacerbate the problems of certain vulnerable groups, like children with mental health issues.They are, however, challenging the widespread belief that screens are responsible for broad societal problems like the rising rates of anxiety and sleep deprivation among teenagers. In most cases, they say, the phone is just a mirror that reveals the problems a child would have even without the phone.The researchers worry that the focus on keeping children away from screens is making it hard to have more productive conversations about topics like how to make phones more useful for low-income people, who tend to use them more, or how to protect the privacy of teenagers who share their lives online."Many of the people who are terrifying kids about screens, they have hit a vein of attention from society and they are going to ride that. But that is super bad for society," said Andrew Przybylski, director of research at the Oxford Internet Institute, who has published several studies on the topic.The new article by Odgers and Michaeline R. Jensen, of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, comes just a few weeks after the publication of an analysis by Amy Orben, a researcher at the University of Cambridge, and shortly before the planned publication of similar work from Jeff Hancock, the founder of the Stanford Social Media Lab. Both reached similar conclusions."The current dominant discourse around phones and well-being is a lot of hype and a lot of fear," Hancock said. "But if you compare the effects of your phone to eating properly or sleeping or smoking, it's not even close."Hancock's analysis of about 226 studies on the well-being of phone users concluded that "when you look at all these different kinds of well-being, the net effect size is essentially zero."The debate about screen time and mental health goes back to the early days of the iPhone. In 2011, the American Academy of Pediatrics published a widely cited paper that warned doctors about "Facebook depression."But by 2016, as more research came out, the academy revised that statement, deleting any mention of Facebook depression and emphasizing the conflicting evidence and the potential positive benefits of using social media.Megan Moreno, one of the lead authors of the revised statement, said the original statement had been a problem "because it created panic without a strong basis of evidence."Moreno, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Wisconsin, said that in her own medical practice, she tends to be struck by the number of children with mental health problems who are helped by social media because of the resources and connections it provides.Concern about the connection between smartphones and mental health has also been fed by high-profile works like a 2017 article in The Atlantic -- and a related book -- by psychologist Jean Twenge, who argued that a recent rise in suicide and depression among teenagers was linked to the arrival of smartphones.In her article, "Have Smartphones Ruined a Generation?," Twenge attributed the sudden rise in reports of anxiety, depression and suicide from teens after 2012 to the spread of smartphones and social media.Twenge's critics argue that her work found a correlation between the appearance of smartphones and a real rise in reports of mental health issues, but that it did not establish that phones were the cause.It could, researchers argue, just as easily be that the rise in depression led teenagers to excessive phone use at a time when there were many other potential explanations for depression and anxiety. What's more, anxiety and suicide rates appear not to have risen in large parts of Europe, where phones have also become more prevalent."Why else might American kids be anxious other than telephones?" Hancock said. "How about climate change? How about income inequality? How about more student debt? There are so many big giant structural issues that have a huge impact on us but are invisible and that we aren't looking at."Twenge remains committed to her position, and she points to several more recent studies by other academics who have found a specific link between social media use and poor mental health. One paper found that when a group of college students gave up social media for three weeks, their sense of loneliness and depression declined.Odgers, Hancock and Przybylski said they had not taken any funding from the tech industry, and all have been outspoken critics of the industry on issues other than mental health, such as privacy and the companies' lack of transparency.Odgers added that she was not surprised that people had a hard time accepting her findings. Her own mother questioned her research after one of her grandsons stopped talking to her during the long drives she used to enjoy. But children tuning out their elders when they become teenagers is hardly a new trend, she said.She also reminded her mother that their conversation was taking place during a video chat with Odgers' son -- the kind of intergenerational connection that was impossible before smartphones.Odgers acknowledged that she was reluctant to give her two children more time on their iPads. But she recently tried playing the video game Fortnite with her son and found it an unexpectedly positive experience."It's hard work because it's not the environment we were raised in," she said. "It can be a little scary at times. I have those moments, too."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company

    SAN FRANCISCO -- It has become common wisdom that too much time spent on smartphones and social media is responsible for a recent spike in anxiety, depression and other mental health problems, especially among teenagers.But a growing number of academic researchers have produced studies that suggest the common wisdom is wrong.The latest research, published Friday by two psychology professors, combs through about 40 studies that have examined the link between social media use and both depression and anxiety among adolescents. That link, according to the professors, is small and inconsistent."There doesn't seem to be an evidence base that would explain the level of panic and consternation around these issues," said Candice L. Odgers, a professor at the University of California, Irvine, and the lead author of the paper, which was published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.The debate over the harm we -- and especially our children -- are doing to ourselves by staring into phones is generally predicated on the assumption that the machines we carry in our pockets pose a significant risk to our mental health.Worries about smartphones have led Congress to pass legislation to examine the impact of heavy smartphone use and pushed investors to pressure big tech companies to change the way they approach young customers.The World Health Organization said last year that infants under a year old should not be exposed to electronic screens and that children between the ages of 2 and 4 should not have more than an hour of "sedentary screen time" each day.Even in Silicon Valley, technology executives have made a point of keeping the devices and the software they develop away from their own children.But some researchers question whether those fears are justified. They are not arguing that intensive use of phones does not matter. Children who are on their phones too much can miss out on other valuable activities, like exercise. And research has shown that excessive phone use can exacerbate the problems of certain vulnerable groups, like children with mental health issues.They are, however, challenging the widespread belief that screens are responsible for broad societal problems like the rising rates of anxiety and sleep deprivation among teenagers. In most cases, they say, the phone is just a mirror that reveals the problems a child would have even without the phone.The researchers worry that the focus on keeping children away from screens is making it hard to have more productive conversations about topics like how to make phones more useful for low-income people, who tend to use them more, or how to protect the privacy of teenagers who share their lives online."Many of the people who are terrifying kids about screens, they have hit a vein of attention from society and they are going to ride that. But that is super bad for society," said Andrew Przybylski, director of research at the Oxford Internet Institute, who has published several studies on the topic.The new article by Odgers and Michaeline R. Jensen, of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, comes just a few weeks after the publication of an analysis by Amy Orben, a researcher at the University of Cambridge, and shortly before the planned publication of similar work from Jeff Hancock, the founder of the Stanford Social Media Lab. Both reached similar conclusions."The current dominant discourse around phones and well-being is a lot of hype and a lot of fear," Hancock said. "But if you compare the effects of your phone to eating properly or sleeping or smoking, it's not even close."Hancock's analysis of about 226 studies on the well-being of phone users concluded that "when you look at all these different kinds of well-being, the net effect size is essentially zero."The debate about screen time and mental health goes back to the early days of the iPhone. In 2011, the American Academy of Pediatrics published a widely cited paper that warned doctors about "Facebook depression."But by 2016, as more research came out, the academy revised that statement, deleting any mention of Facebook depression and emphasizing the conflicting evidence and the potential positive benefits of using social media.Megan Moreno, one of the lead authors of the revised statement, said the original statement had been a problem "because it created panic without a strong basis of evidence."Moreno, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Wisconsin, said that in her own medical practice, she tends to be struck by the number of children with mental health problems who are helped by social media because of the resources and connections it provides.Concern about the connection between smartphones and mental health has also been fed by high-profile works like a 2017 article in The Atlantic -- and a related book -- by psychologist Jean Twenge, who argued that a recent rise in suicide and depression among teenagers was linked to the arrival of smartphones.In her article, "Have Smartphones Ruined a Generation?," Twenge attributed the sudden rise in reports of anxiety, depression and suicide from teens after 2012 to the spread of smartphones and social media.Twenge's critics argue that her work found a correlation between the appearance of smartphones and a real rise in reports of mental health issues, but that it did not establish that phones were the cause.It could, researchers argue, just as easily be that the rise in depression led teenagers to excessive phone use at a time when there were many other potential explanations for depression and anxiety. What's more, anxiety and suicide rates appear not to have risen in large parts of Europe, where phones have also become more prevalent."Why else might American kids be anxious other than telephones?" Hancock said. "How about climate change? How about income inequality? How about more student debt? There are so many big giant structural issues that have a huge impact on us but are invisible and that we aren't looking at."Twenge remains committed to her position, and she points to several more recent studies by other academics who have found a specific link between social media use and poor mental health. One paper found that when a group of college students gave up social media for three weeks, their sense of loneliness and depression declined.Odgers, Hancock and Przybylski said they had not taken any funding from the tech industry, and all have been outspoken critics of the industry on issues other than mental health, such as privacy and the companies' lack of transparency.Odgers added that she was not surprised that people had a hard time accepting her findings. Her own mother questioned her research after one of her grandsons stopped talking to her during the long drives she used to enjoy. But children tuning out their elders when they become teenagers is hardly a new trend, she said.She also reminded her mother that their conversation was taking place during a video chat with Odgers' son -- the kind of intergenerational connection that was impossible before smartphones.Odgers acknowledged that she was reluctant to give her two children more time on their iPads. But she recently tried playing the video game Fortnite with her son and found it an unexpectedly positive experience."It's hard work because it's not the environment we were raised in," she said. "It can be a little scary at times. I have those moments, too."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company


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  • 59/81   A mysterious and deadly virus from China could have infected 35 times more people than official totals, scientists warn
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Airports in the US and parts of Asia have started screening travellers from Wuhan, central China, in the hope of stopping the disease from spreading.

    Airports in the US and parts of Asia have started screening travellers from Wuhan, central China, in the hope of stopping the disease from spreading.


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  • 60/81   A mysterious virus in China is a reminder that the world isn't ready for a pandemic. Bill Gates says we should prepare for a deadly outbreak as we do for war.
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The virus, which causes pneumonia-like symptoms and is in the same family as SARS, has killed a second person and spread to Thailand and Japan.

    The virus, which causes pneumonia-like symptoms and is in the same family as SARS, has killed a second person and spread to Thailand and Japan.


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  • 61/81   Amazon Web Services enlists AI to help NASA get ahead of solar superstorms
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    If the sun throws out a radiation blast of satellite-killing proportions someday, Amazon Web Services may well play a role in heading off a technological doomsday. That's the upshot of a project that has NASA working with AWS Professional Services and the Amazon Machine Learning Solutions Lab to learn more about the early warning signs of a solar superstorm, with the aid of artificial intelligence. Solar storms occur when disturbances on the sun's surface throw off a blasts of radiation and eruptions of electrically charged particles at speeds of millions of miles per hour. A sufficiently strong radiation blast can… Read More

    If the sun throws out a radiation blast of satellite-killing proportions someday, Amazon Web Services may well play a role in heading off a technological doomsday. That's the upshot of a project that has NASA working with AWS Professional Services and the Amazon Machine Learning Solutions Lab to learn more about the early warning signs of a solar superstorm, with the aid of artificial intelligence. Solar storms occur when disturbances on the sun's surface throw off a blasts of radiation and eruptions of electrically charged particles at speeds of millions of miles per hour. A sufficiently strong radiation blast can… Read More


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  • 62/81   Two police officers killed as Iraq protests break out again
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Two Iraqi police officers were killed and dozens of protesters were wounded in Baghdad and other cities on Monday in clashes with security forces, medical and security sources said, as anti-government unrest resumed after a lull of several weeks. In Baghdad's Tayaran Square overnight, protesters threw petrol bombs and stones at police who responded with tear gas and stun grenades, Reuters witnesses said. Elsewhere in southern Iraq, hundreds of protesters burned tyres and blocked main roads in several cities, including Nassiriya, Kerbala and Amara. They say Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi has not fulfilled promises including naming a new government acceptable to Iraqis. "They (security forces) should stop shooting and aiming, who are they and who are we? Both sides are Iraqis. So why are you killing your brothers?" said one woman protester in Baghdad who declined to give her name. In the Iraqi oil city of Basra, two policemen were struck and killed by a civilian car during the protest, security sources said. The driver was trying to avoid the scene of clashes between protesters and security forces when he drove into the two officers, they said.  A policeman is seen at West Qurna-1 oilfield, which is operated by ExxonMobil, in Basra Credit: REUTERS/Essam al-Sudani/File Photo Baghdad police said its forces had reopened all roads that were closed by "violent gatherings". It said 14 officers were wounded near Tahrir square, including with head wounds and broken bones. Traffic was disrupted on a highway linking Baghdad to southern cities, a Reuters witness said. Production in southern oilfields was unaffected by the unrest, oil officials said. Mass protests have gripped Iraq since Oct. 1, with mostly young protesters demanding an overhaul of a political system they see as profoundly corrupt and as keeping most Iraqis in poverty. More than 450 people have been killed. Numbers had dwindled but protests resumed last week as demonstrators sought to keep up momentum after attention turned to the threat of a U.S.-Iran conflict following Washington's killing of Tehran's top general in an air strike inside Iraq. The killing of Qassem Soleimani, to which Tehran responded with a ballistic missile attack on two Iraqi military bases housing U.S. troops, has highlighted the influence of some foreign powers in Iraq, especially Iran and the United States.

    Two Iraqi police officers were killed and dozens of protesters were wounded in Baghdad and other cities on Monday in clashes with security forces, medical and security sources said, as anti-government unrest resumed after a lull of several weeks. In Baghdad's Tayaran Square overnight, protesters threw petrol bombs and stones at police who responded with tear gas and stun grenades, Reuters witnesses said. Elsewhere in southern Iraq, hundreds of protesters burned tyres and blocked main roads in several cities, including Nassiriya, Kerbala and Amara. They say Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi has not fulfilled promises including naming a new government acceptable to Iraqis. "They (security forces) should stop shooting and aiming, who are they and who are we? Both sides are Iraqis. So why are you killing your brothers?" said one woman protester in Baghdad who declined to give her name. In the Iraqi oil city of Basra, two policemen were struck and killed by a civilian car during the protest, security sources said. The driver was trying to avoid the scene of clashes between protesters and security forces when he drove into the two officers, they said.  A policeman is seen at West Qurna-1 oilfield, which is operated by ExxonMobil, in Basra Credit: REUTERS/Essam al-Sudani/File Photo Baghdad police said its forces had reopened all roads that were closed by "violent gatherings". It said 14 officers were wounded near Tahrir square, including with head wounds and broken bones. Traffic was disrupted on a highway linking Baghdad to southern cities, a Reuters witness said. Production in southern oilfields was unaffected by the unrest, oil officials said. Mass protests have gripped Iraq since Oct. 1, with mostly young protesters demanding an overhaul of a political system they see as profoundly corrupt and as keeping most Iraqis in poverty. More than 450 people have been killed. Numbers had dwindled but protests resumed last week as demonstrators sought to keep up momentum after attention turned to the threat of a U.S.-Iran conflict following Washington's killing of Tehran's top general in an air strike inside Iraq. The killing of Qassem Soleimani, to which Tehran responded with a ballistic missile attack on two Iraqi military bases housing U.S. troops, has highlighted the influence of some foreign powers in Iraq, especially Iran and the United States.


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  • 63/81   Sri Lanka to treat war-missing as dead, issue certificates
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Sri Lanka's president has decided that tens of thousands of people still missing from the country's quarter-century civil war will be formally declared dead and death certificates will be issued, his office said Monday.  President Gotabaya Rajapaksa made his decision known last week during a meeting with the United Nations' resident coordinator in Colombo, his office said in a statement.

    Sri Lanka's president has decided that tens of thousands of people still missing from the country's quarter-century civil war will be formally declared dead and death certificates will be issued, his office said Monday. President Gotabaya Rajapaksa made his decision known last week during a meeting with the United Nations' resident coordinator in Colombo, his office said in a statement.


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  • 64/81   Germany downplays flap over Tunisia invite to Libya summit
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The German government on Monday downplayed Tunisia's rejection of a last-minute invitation to a weekend conference on Libya that had ruffled feathers in the North African nation.  Chancellor Angela Merkel hosted world powers and other countries that have backed one side or the other in Libya's long-running civil war, in a bid to get those who have influence in Libya on the same page.  Libya's two main rival leaders also were invited to Berlin, where they held talks with Merkel and her foreign minister ahead of Sunday's conference.

    The German government on Monday downplayed Tunisia's rejection of a last-minute invitation to a weekend conference on Libya that had ruffled feathers in the North African nation. Chancellor Angela Merkel hosted world powers and other countries that have backed one side or the other in Libya's long-running civil war, in a bid to get those who have influence in Libya on the same page. Libya's two main rival leaders also were invited to Berlin, where they held talks with Merkel and her foreign minister ahead of Sunday's conference.


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  • 65/81   Free Markets Made Davos. Now Governments Are Crashing the Party
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up here to receive the Davos Diary, a special daily newsletter that will run from Jan. 20-24.In a memorable exchange at Davos last year, tech billionaire Michael Dell was explaining how higher taxes on the rich had never done much good anywhere, when he was contradicted. Actually, said Erik Brynjolfsson, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, they’d worked pretty well within living memory in his own country, the U.S.For an executive crowd that’s thrived under 40 years or more of policies based on freeing up business and markets, the observation was a reminder that older versions of Western capitalism didn’t always look like that – and a warning the next incarnation might not, either.Rather than a hands-off approach, governments are gearing up for a more active role in steering economies through the big challenges of the coming decade, from global warming and inequality to the great-power race for a technological edge. Perhaps unsurprisingly, politicians from Europe, Asia and even the U.S. are embracing the idea.“We’re past peak laissez-faire in many ways,” said Adair Turner, former head of the U.K.’s bank regulator and a Davos regular.“We passed it in the financial system 10 years ago, when we nearly blew up the world economy,” he said. “It’s taken longer in other areas. But people are realizing there’s a need for strategic direction in areas like climate change.”On plenty of other issues too.Managed TradeIn the U.S., both Republicans and Democrats increasingly want to manage international trade instead of leaving it to markets. Donald Trump broke that mold, and his would-be opponents aren’t inclined to take a less interventionist line. When Democratic contenders for this fall’s presidential election were asked in a debate if they’d remove China tariffs on day one, none of them said “yes.”Indeed, the initial trade agreement signed last week suggests “the more successful the deal, the greater the drift toward more state-managed economies in both China and the U.S.,” according to a BofA Global Research note.Democrats are meanwhile itching to intervene in health care. If Obamacare was about structuring private markets, the next overhaul may involve direct public spending – paid for with the higher taxes objected to by Dell, founder of the eponymous computer giant.There’s been a similar shift on higher education. Even one of Trump’s senior student-loan officials described the American way of financing college degrees with private debt as “nuts.”Trump, who is due to deliver opening remarks in Davos on Tuesday, has delivered tax cuts for companies and individuals, sticking with a Republican orthodoxy since the administration of Ronald Reagan, who was president in 1987 when the annual gathering that had been taking place in Davos since 1971 changed its name to the World Economic Forum. High stock prices and profits are celebrated as evidence America is thriving.‘Common Good’But on some issues, Republicans don’t sound as reflexively business-friendly as they used to.Sharpening competition with China, which for Trump has been mostly about trade, has spurred some Republicans into a broader rethink. One idea taking hold is that if its chief rival has a government-directed industrial policy, America may need one too.Republican Senator Marco Rubio has made that case in a series of reports and speeches. While the market “will always reach the most efficient economic outcome,” at times that result can be “at odds with the common good and the national interest,” he said last month.In Europe, Germany and France – which coined the term ‘dirigisme’ as well as ‘entrepreneur’ – are pushing for mergers to create continental champions able to compete globally in fields such as car batteries.‘Golden Age’Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s government wants freedom from European Union competition and subsidy rules to be able to aid U.K. industry as it sees fit. Johnson has promised a post-Brexit “golden age,” helped by state funding for infrastructure and health.Tech giants are in the political crosshairs everywhere. U.S. lawmakers have been hauling tech bosses into hearings and threatening them with antitrust actions.European regulators have taken the fight further, opening lawsuits, levying billions in fines and threatening tech companies with a new digital tax. The energy industry, too, is under more direct pressure in Europe, where leaders have backed ambitious goals for reducing carbon emissions.The revival of activist government isn’t confined to Western economies. The world over, “nation-states are reasserting themselves, presenting new risks to the capital and assets of corporations,” Eurasia Group said in a report on 2020 developments.The success of the state-led Chinese economy may be one underlying reason.‘Half the Story’China’s breakout has been characterized as “a movement in the direction of markets,” said Dani Rodrik, an economics professor at Harvard. “This gets only half the story right. It completely overlooks the other half, which has to do with management of the currency, the role of the state, and promoting new industries.”Even the International Monetary Fund, traditionally an advocate of light-touch government, is working on a new framework that will allow more space for policy makers to manage flows of capital and intervene in currency markets.Economists at the IMF and elsewhere also see a bigger role for governments to manage economies with fiscal policy. For most of the Davos era central banks have taken the lead by tweaking the price of credit. But interest rates have been stuck at rock-bottom levels for more than a decade, and businesses and households are maxed out anyway.Politicians, unlike central bankers, have the power to address inequality directly. Governments can raise tax rates for top earners “without sacrificing economic growth,” IMF chief Kristalina Georgieva, a Davos attendee, wrote in a blog post this month.The question may arise again at this year’s WEF, where one of the themes is: “Fairer Economies.” Just don’t expect the discussion to be comfortable.“The classic Davos Man answer is to say, ‘There’s lots to be done -- but don’t tax the rich more’,” said Turner. “The more thoughtful ones realize that can’t be quite true.”(Adds Trump’s address in Davos in 11th paragraph. An earlier version of this story corrected the reference to first WEF meeting in the same paragraph.)\--With assistance from Simon Kennedy and Alex Tanzi.To contact the reporter on this story: Ben Holland in Washington at bholland1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Simon Kennedy at skennedy4@bloomberg.net, Alan CrawfordFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up here to receive the Davos Diary, a special daily newsletter that will run from Jan. 20-24.In a memorable exchange at Davos last year, tech billionaire Michael Dell was explaining how higher taxes on the rich had never done much good anywhere, when he was contradicted. Actually, said Erik Brynjolfsson, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, they’d worked pretty well within living memory in his own country, the U.S.For an executive crowd that’s thrived under 40 years or more of policies based on freeing up business and markets, the observation was a reminder that older versions of Western capitalism didn’t always look like that – and a warning the next incarnation might not, either.Rather than a hands-off approach, governments are gearing up for a more active role in steering economies through the big challenges of the coming decade, from global warming and inequality to the great-power race for a technological edge. Perhaps unsurprisingly, politicians from Europe, Asia and even the U.S. are embracing the idea.“We’re past peak laissez-faire in many ways,” said Adair Turner, former head of the U.K.’s bank regulator and a Davos regular.“We passed it in the financial system 10 years ago, when we nearly blew up the world economy,” he said. “It’s taken longer in other areas. But people are realizing there’s a need for strategic direction in areas like climate change.”On plenty of other issues too.Managed TradeIn the U.S., both Republicans and Democrats increasingly want to manage international trade instead of leaving it to markets. Donald Trump broke that mold, and his would-be opponents aren’t inclined to take a less interventionist line. When Democratic contenders for this fall’s presidential election were asked in a debate if they’d remove China tariffs on day one, none of them said “yes.”Indeed, the initial trade agreement signed last week suggests “the more successful the deal, the greater the drift toward more state-managed economies in both China and the U.S.,” according to a BofA Global Research note.Democrats are meanwhile itching to intervene in health care. If Obamacare was about structuring private markets, the next overhaul may involve direct public spending – paid for with the higher taxes objected to by Dell, founder of the eponymous computer giant.There’s been a similar shift on higher education. Even one of Trump’s senior student-loan officials described the American way of financing college degrees with private debt as “nuts.”Trump, who is due to deliver opening remarks in Davos on Tuesday, has delivered tax cuts for companies and individuals, sticking with a Republican orthodoxy since the administration of Ronald Reagan, who was president in 1987 when the annual gathering that had been taking place in Davos since 1971 changed its name to the World Economic Forum. High stock prices and profits are celebrated as evidence America is thriving.‘Common Good’But on some issues, Republicans don’t sound as reflexively business-friendly as they used to.Sharpening competition with China, which for Trump has been mostly about trade, has spurred some Republicans into a broader rethink. One idea taking hold is that if its chief rival has a government-directed industrial policy, America may need one too.Republican Senator Marco Rubio has made that case in a series of reports and speeches. While the market “will always reach the most efficient economic outcome,” at times that result can be “at odds with the common good and the national interest,” he said last month.In Europe, Germany and France – which coined the term ‘dirigisme’ as well as ‘entrepreneur’ – are pushing for mergers to create continental champions able to compete globally in fields such as car batteries.‘Golden Age’Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s government wants freedom from European Union competition and subsidy rules to be able to aid U.K. industry as it sees fit. Johnson has promised a post-Brexit “golden age,” helped by state funding for infrastructure and health.Tech giants are in the political crosshairs everywhere. U.S. lawmakers have been hauling tech bosses into hearings and threatening them with antitrust actions.European regulators have taken the fight further, opening lawsuits, levying billions in fines and threatening tech companies with a new digital tax. The energy industry, too, is under more direct pressure in Europe, where leaders have backed ambitious goals for reducing carbon emissions.The revival of activist government isn’t confined to Western economies. The world over, “nation-states are reasserting themselves, presenting new risks to the capital and assets of corporations,” Eurasia Group said in a report on 2020 developments.The success of the state-led Chinese economy may be one underlying reason.‘Half the Story’China’s breakout has been characterized as “a movement in the direction of markets,” said Dani Rodrik, an economics professor at Harvard. “This gets only half the story right. It completely overlooks the other half, which has to do with management of the currency, the role of the state, and promoting new industries.”Even the International Monetary Fund, traditionally an advocate of light-touch government, is working on a new framework that will allow more space for policy makers to manage flows of capital and intervene in currency markets.Economists at the IMF and elsewhere also see a bigger role for governments to manage economies with fiscal policy. For most of the Davos era central banks have taken the lead by tweaking the price of credit. But interest rates have been stuck at rock-bottom levels for more than a decade, and businesses and households are maxed out anyway.Politicians, unlike central bankers, have the power to address inequality directly. Governments can raise tax rates for top earners “without sacrificing economic growth,” IMF chief Kristalina Georgieva, a Davos attendee, wrote in a blog post this month.The question may arise again at this year’s WEF, where one of the themes is: “Fairer Economies.” Just don’t expect the discussion to be comfortable.“The classic Davos Man answer is to say, ‘There’s lots to be done -- but don’t tax the rich more’,” said Turner. “The more thoughtful ones realize that can’t be quite true.”(Adds Trump’s address in Davos in 11th paragraph. An earlier version of this story corrected the reference to first WEF meeting in the same paragraph.)\--With assistance from Simon Kennedy and Alex Tanzi.To contact the reporter on this story: Ben Holland in Washington at bholland1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Simon Kennedy at skennedy4@bloomberg.net, Alan CrawfordFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 66/81   Haftar chokes off oil Libya's oil production as fighting continues
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Khalifa Haftar, the warlord besieging Libya's UN-backed government, has choked off the country's oil exports in defiance of a shaky international ceasefire deal endorsed by international powers over the weekend. Vladimir Putin, Angela Merkel, Boris Johnson and other world leaders met in Berlin on Sunday to repeat demands for a ceasefire but the summit was quickly overshadowed by a fresh crisis over oil. Despite the fierce fighting between Mr Haftar’s self-styled Libyan National Army and the UN-backed Government of National Accord (GNA), both sides have generally allowed oil production and export to continue. But in apparent bid to put pressure on the GNA, forces loyal to Mr Haftar have closed ports in the eastern part of the country and shut down a pipeline to two major oil fields in the southwest, effectively choking off oil production. The National Oil Corporation estimates that output will plummet from 1.2 million barrels per day to just 72,000 barrels per day in a few days’ time if Mr Haftar does not release his grip on the ports and pipeline.   World leaders gathered in Berlin over the weekend to try to reach an agreement on Libya Credit: Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images The move caused oil prices to jump to a one-week high although markets appeared to expect that the situation would be resolved soon. Antonio Guterres, the UN secretary general, said he was very worried about the situation. The GNA is heavily reliant on oil revenues and a prolonged shutdown could severely weaken a government that is already struggling to hold onto the capital Tripoli against a months-long assault by Mr Haftar’s forces. There were reports of ongoing fighting on the frontlines south of Tripoli on Sunday and Western leaders appeared downbeat on the prospects of putting the ceasefire agreement into force. "Ensuring that a ceasefire is immediately respected is simply not easy to guarantee," said Mrs Merkel. "But I hope that through today's conference, we have a chance the truce will hold further.” European leaders have discussed the prospect of sending forces to Libya to oversee the ceasefire but there appeared to be little appetite for deployment unless the ceasefire brought an actual end to the fighting. “If there is a ceasefire, yes of course, there's a case for us doing what we do very well which is sending experts to monitor the ceasefire,” said Mr Johnson. GNA forces inspect damage in Tripoli Credit: Photo by Enes Canli/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images EU leaders met Monday to discuss reviving a naval mission intended to ensure that a UN arms embargo against Libya’s warring factions was respected. Despite the UN prohibition on sending weapons, regional sponsors of both sides of the civil war have flooded the country with weapons. Turkey has provided arms to the GNA and sent Syrian rebel fighters to aid them in battle while the UAE, Russia, and Egypt have all provided support to Mr Haftar’s forces. "It's clear that the arms embargo requires high level control and if you want to keep the ceasefire alive someone has to monitor it," said Josep Borrell, the EU foreign policy chief. Operation Sophia was set up in 2015 to combat people smugglers operating from the Libyan coast and to enforce a UN arms embargo on the warring parties. It was suspended as a naval mission in March last year after Italy objected to recused migrants being landed in its ports, and is now limited to aerial surveillance.

    Khalifa Haftar, the warlord besieging Libya's UN-backed government, has choked off the country's oil exports in defiance of a shaky international ceasefire deal endorsed by international powers over the weekend. Vladimir Putin, Angela Merkel, Boris Johnson and other world leaders met in Berlin on Sunday to repeat demands for a ceasefire but the summit was quickly overshadowed by a fresh crisis over oil. Despite the fierce fighting between Mr Haftar’s self-styled Libyan National Army and the UN-backed Government of National Accord (GNA), both sides have generally allowed oil production and export to continue. But in apparent bid to put pressure on the GNA, forces loyal to Mr Haftar have closed ports in the eastern part of the country and shut down a pipeline to two major oil fields in the southwest, effectively choking off oil production. The National Oil Corporation estimates that output will plummet from 1.2 million barrels per day to just 72,000 barrels per day in a few days’ time if Mr Haftar does not release his grip on the ports and pipeline.   World leaders gathered in Berlin over the weekend to try to reach an agreement on Libya Credit: Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images The move caused oil prices to jump to a one-week high although markets appeared to expect that the situation would be resolved soon. Antonio Guterres, the UN secretary general, said he was very worried about the situation. The GNA is heavily reliant on oil revenues and a prolonged shutdown could severely weaken a government that is already struggling to hold onto the capital Tripoli against a months-long assault by Mr Haftar’s forces. There were reports of ongoing fighting on the frontlines south of Tripoli on Sunday and Western leaders appeared downbeat on the prospects of putting the ceasefire agreement into force. "Ensuring that a ceasefire is immediately respected is simply not easy to guarantee," said Mrs Merkel. "But I hope that through today's conference, we have a chance the truce will hold further.” European leaders have discussed the prospect of sending forces to Libya to oversee the ceasefire but there appeared to be little appetite for deployment unless the ceasefire brought an actual end to the fighting. “If there is a ceasefire, yes of course, there's a case for us doing what we do very well which is sending experts to monitor the ceasefire,” said Mr Johnson. GNA forces inspect damage in Tripoli Credit: Photo by Enes Canli/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images EU leaders met Monday to discuss reviving a naval mission intended to ensure that a UN arms embargo against Libya’s warring factions was respected. Despite the UN prohibition on sending weapons, regional sponsors of both sides of the civil war have flooded the country with weapons. Turkey has provided arms to the GNA and sent Syrian rebel fighters to aid them in battle while the UAE, Russia, and Egypt have all provided support to Mr Haftar’s forces. "It's clear that the arms embargo requires high level control and if you want to keep the ceasefire alive someone has to monitor it," said Josep Borrell, the EU foreign policy chief. Operation Sophia was set up in 2015 to combat people smugglers operating from the Libyan coast and to enforce a UN arms embargo on the warring parties. It was suspended as a naval mission in March last year after Italy objected to recused migrants being landed in its ports, and is now limited to aerial surveillance.


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  • 67/81   Lebanese president, security chiefs meet after Beirut riots
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Lebanon's top security officials met with the president on Monday after a weekend of rioting in Beirut that left hundreds of people injured and damaged public and private property — violence that comes against the backdrop of a deepening political deadlock.  The meeting at the presidential palace was to discuss the three months of protests that have roiled Lebanon and that over the past week turned into acts of vandalism in different parts of Beirut.  On the agenda was also the formation of a joint operations to coordinate among the country's security agencies to better deal with protesters.

    Lebanon's top security officials met with the president on Monday after a weekend of rioting in Beirut that left hundreds of people injured and damaged public and private property — violence that comes against the backdrop of a deepening political deadlock. The meeting at the presidential palace was to discuss the three months of protests that have roiled Lebanon and that over the past week turned into acts of vandalism in different parts of Beirut. On the agenda was also the formation of a joint operations to coordinate among the country's security agencies to better deal with protesters.


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  • 68/81   The strongest case for Joe Biden
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    I'm not thrilled with the prospect of Joe Biden winning the Democratic nomination and becoming president, and I know no one who is. That doesn't mean I hate him. It's just hard to get truly excited by a guy who's a milquetoast moderate, prone to embarrassing gaffes and verbal flubs, and showing undeniable signs of cognitive wear and tear as he approaches old age.But there is a compelling case to be made for Biden — one that hasn't been clearly articulated by the candidate or his campaign. That's likely because the case is at bottom about process rather than policy substance, and process is out of fashion in our moment of tribal partisan feuds.For all the energy spent over the past three years on ringing alarm bells about the threat that Donald Trump poses to American democracy, that threat has usually been put in terms of policies or evidence of corruption. He's closing the southern border! He scuttled the Iran Deal! He's too soft on Vladimir Putin! He's taking foreign bribes through Trump properties! He's abused his power by trying to extort a foreign leader to dig up dirt on a political rival! But here's the thing: The policies might be bad, but policies can be reversed. The corruption might be impeachable, but either way the Trump administration will eventually come to an end.Where Trump is having a potentially longer-term detrimental impact is in continuing and expanding on ominous trends in democratic governance that precede him. I'm talking about the tendency of Democratic and Republican administrations alike to respond to the institutional gridlock that follows from intense partisan polarization by bypassing Congress' constitutionally designated role in passing laws, approving budgets, and authorizing war. That Congress has often been complicit in this tendency makes it no less troubling that governance increasingly involves a negotiation between the executive and judicial branches, with the legislature standing by passively on the sidelines.When it comes to foreign policy, the pattern goes back a long way, arguably to Congress' failure to pass formal declarations of war in Korea and Vietnam, but certainly to the passing of the Authorization for the Use of Military Force (AUMF) shortly after the Sept. 11 attacks — an effective blank check that has allowed three presidents (two Republicans and one Democrat) to wage wars in a long list of countries across the Greater Middle East for nearly two decades now with minimal congressional oversight.Beyond the issue of war powers, there's Barack Obama's decision to implement sweeping changes to immigration policy by executive order after Congress failed to pass its own immigration reform bill. President Trump has made many similar moves, most recently in attempting to reallocate various forms of congressionally approved military funding for use in the building of his border wall — a project that the House of Representatives (under first Republican, and now Democratic, control) has repeatedly failed to fund outright.As if this wasn't enough, Democratic candidates for president have now begun to make promises about accomplishing a range of policy goals by way of executive orders. (California Sen. Kamala Harris liked to make such autocratic gestures while her campaign was active, and Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren does the same thing now.)This is obviously an expression of frustration with divided government, which used to be rare but is now the norm. Each side in our politics desperately wants to do things. But neither has sufficient support in Congress to get them done, given the many veto points in the American political system. Hence the proliferation of efforts and promises to do end-runs around the Constitution.Interestingly, the Democratic candidate with the most ambitious policy agenda of all, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, doesn't typically talk this way. But that's at least in part because his message involves a promise to enact a "political revolution" that will presumably sweep progressive super-majorities into Congress with him, removing the need to work around legislative obstacles. Whether Sanders would refrain from attempting to govern by fiat if he found himself in the Oval Office facing a recalcitrant Congress that firmly blocked his trillions of dollars in spending proposals very much remains an open question.That's where Biden comes in.The former vice president's message is not a programmatic one. He's not ideologically devoted to a centrist agenda. (In several areas, he's running to Obama's left.) Rather's he's keenly aware that the United States is a sharply divided country, he believes he understands where many Republicans are coming from (even if he doesn't personally affirm their views), and he's committed to reaching common ground with them in attempting to govern the country.In this respect, Biden isn't promising a straightforward restoration of the Obama administration. He's actually proposing that the country can return to something more like the consensus politics of the middle decades of the 20th century — a time when Democrat John F. Kennedy proposed a major tax cut, members of both parties came together to pass landmark civil rights legislation, and Republican Richard Nixon oversaw the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency and the expansion of affirmative action policies.The case for attempting this form of governance is emphatically not that the outcome of some extended negotiation between President Biden and leading members of the congressional GOP will automatically produce the best policy. (Committed members of each party will sharply disagree about what the best policy is.) The case for attempting to reach bipartisan consensus is that, given how divided the country is, whatever emerges from such a process will be the best we can achieve under present circumstances.In the best-case scenario, both sides as well as lots of independents would not only find something to like in what gets enacted into law through such a process. Their confidence in the institutions that produced this decent outcome would increase from its currently low level, making future policy accomplishments somewhat more likely. The country and its institutions would begin healing from the partisan traumas of recent years. Biden is the only candidate running for office who's holding out the prospect of such a path forward.Now of course it's also possible, and perhaps likely, that this plan would fail — as countless Biden critics on the center-left and left have predicted it will. For one thing, a truly bipartisan policy may well please no one and so end up discrediting our institutions — along with efforts to bridge our country's deep divides — even further. Then there's the possibility that Republicans could demand that Biden come all the way over to the center-right in order to get a deal, thereby alienating a large portion of the Democratic Party, and then refuse to close the deal with him, leaving the president looking like a dupe. If Republicans place partisan advantage ahead of the attempt to govern in the name of the elusive common good, that's exactly the kind of move they'd make — like an enemy army that agrees to negotiations for a truce and then shoots the emissary sent to begin the talks.That is certainly cause for concern and suspicion. Still, there is something admirable about Biden's willingness to propose an effort at improved self-government. Our system works badly under conditions of intense partisanship. The resulting breakdown in effectiveness then fuels further anger and polarization, prompting the downward spiral in which we find ourselves today, with presidents of both parties increasingly tempted by extra-constitutional power grabs.What Joe Biden's proposing is a presidency devoted to nothing less than stopping our slow-motion drift toward authoritarianism.More stories from theweek.com  Trump just ran a two-year trade war experiment. It failed.  5 scathingly funny cartoons about the Bernie Sanders-Elizabeth Warren feud  The New York Times endorses both Warren and Klobuchar for president

    I'm not thrilled with the prospect of Joe Biden winning the Democratic nomination and becoming president, and I know no one who is. That doesn't mean I hate him. It's just hard to get truly excited by a guy who's a milquetoast moderate, prone to embarrassing gaffes and verbal flubs, and showing undeniable signs of cognitive wear and tear as he approaches old age.But there is a compelling case to be made for Biden — one that hasn't been clearly articulated by the candidate or his campaign. That's likely because the case is at bottom about process rather than policy substance, and process is out of fashion in our moment of tribal partisan feuds.For all the energy spent over the past three years on ringing alarm bells about the threat that Donald Trump poses to American democracy, that threat has usually been put in terms of policies or evidence of corruption. He's closing the southern border! He scuttled the Iran Deal! He's too soft on Vladimir Putin! He's taking foreign bribes through Trump properties! He's abused his power by trying to extort a foreign leader to dig up dirt on a political rival! But here's the thing: The policies might be bad, but policies can be reversed. The corruption might be impeachable, but either way the Trump administration will eventually come to an end.Where Trump is having a potentially longer-term detrimental impact is in continuing and expanding on ominous trends in democratic governance that precede him. I'm talking about the tendency of Democratic and Republican administrations alike to respond to the institutional gridlock that follows from intense partisan polarization by bypassing Congress' constitutionally designated role in passing laws, approving budgets, and authorizing war. That Congress has often been complicit in this tendency makes it no less troubling that governance increasingly involves a negotiation between the executive and judicial branches, with the legislature standing by passively on the sidelines.When it comes to foreign policy, the pattern goes back a long way, arguably to Congress' failure to pass formal declarations of war in Korea and Vietnam, but certainly to the passing of the Authorization for the Use of Military Force (AUMF) shortly after the Sept. 11 attacks — an effective blank check that has allowed three presidents (two Republicans and one Democrat) to wage wars in a long list of countries across the Greater Middle East for nearly two decades now with minimal congressional oversight.Beyond the issue of war powers, there's Barack Obama's decision to implement sweeping changes to immigration policy by executive order after Congress failed to pass its own immigration reform bill. President Trump has made many similar moves, most recently in attempting to reallocate various forms of congressionally approved military funding for use in the building of his border wall — a project that the House of Representatives (under first Republican, and now Democratic, control) has repeatedly failed to fund outright.As if this wasn't enough, Democratic candidates for president have now begun to make promises about accomplishing a range of policy goals by way of executive orders. (California Sen. Kamala Harris liked to make such autocratic gestures while her campaign was active, and Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren does the same thing now.)This is obviously an expression of frustration with divided government, which used to be rare but is now the norm. Each side in our politics desperately wants to do things. But neither has sufficient support in Congress to get them done, given the many veto points in the American political system. Hence the proliferation of efforts and promises to do end-runs around the Constitution.Interestingly, the Democratic candidate with the most ambitious policy agenda of all, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, doesn't typically talk this way. But that's at least in part because his message involves a promise to enact a "political revolution" that will presumably sweep progressive super-majorities into Congress with him, removing the need to work around legislative obstacles. Whether Sanders would refrain from attempting to govern by fiat if he found himself in the Oval Office facing a recalcitrant Congress that firmly blocked his trillions of dollars in spending proposals very much remains an open question.That's where Biden comes in.The former vice president's message is not a programmatic one. He's not ideologically devoted to a centrist agenda. (In several areas, he's running to Obama's left.) Rather's he's keenly aware that the United States is a sharply divided country, he believes he understands where many Republicans are coming from (even if he doesn't personally affirm their views), and he's committed to reaching common ground with them in attempting to govern the country.In this respect, Biden isn't promising a straightforward restoration of the Obama administration. He's actually proposing that the country can return to something more like the consensus politics of the middle decades of the 20th century — a time when Democrat John F. Kennedy proposed a major tax cut, members of both parties came together to pass landmark civil rights legislation, and Republican Richard Nixon oversaw the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency and the expansion of affirmative action policies.The case for attempting this form of governance is emphatically not that the outcome of some extended negotiation between President Biden and leading members of the congressional GOP will automatically produce the best policy. (Committed members of each party will sharply disagree about what the best policy is.) The case for attempting to reach bipartisan consensus is that, given how divided the country is, whatever emerges from such a process will be the best we can achieve under present circumstances.In the best-case scenario, both sides as well as lots of independents would not only find something to like in what gets enacted into law through such a process. Their confidence in the institutions that produced this decent outcome would increase from its currently low level, making future policy accomplishments somewhat more likely. The country and its institutions would begin healing from the partisan traumas of recent years. Biden is the only candidate running for office who's holding out the prospect of such a path forward.Now of course it's also possible, and perhaps likely, that this plan would fail — as countless Biden critics on the center-left and left have predicted it will. For one thing, a truly bipartisan policy may well please no one and so end up discrediting our institutions — along with efforts to bridge our country's deep divides — even further. Then there's the possibility that Republicans could demand that Biden come all the way over to the center-right in order to get a deal, thereby alienating a large portion of the Democratic Party, and then refuse to close the deal with him, leaving the president looking like a dupe. If Republicans place partisan advantage ahead of the attempt to govern in the name of the elusive common good, that's exactly the kind of move they'd make — like an enemy army that agrees to negotiations for a truce and then shoots the emissary sent to begin the talks.That is certainly cause for concern and suspicion. Still, there is something admirable about Biden's willingness to propose an effort at improved self-government. Our system works badly under conditions of intense partisanship. The resulting breakdown in effectiveness then fuels further anger and polarization, prompting the downward spiral in which we find ourselves today, with presidents of both parties increasingly tempted by extra-constitutional power grabs.What Joe Biden's proposing is a presidency devoted to nothing less than stopping our slow-motion drift toward authoritarianism.More stories from theweek.com Trump just ran a two-year trade war experiment. It failed. 5 scathingly funny cartoons about the Bernie Sanders-Elizabeth Warren feud The New York Times endorses both Warren and Klobuchar for president


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  • 69/81   Iran says it may pull out of nuclear treaty over Europe dispute
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Iran said Monday it will consider withdrawing from the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) if a dispute over its atomic programme goes before the UN Security Council.  Britain, France and Germany launched a process last week charging Iran with failing to observe the terms of the 2015 nuclear deal, a move that could eventually see the Security Council reimpose international sanctions on the country.  Iran has accused the three EU member states of inaction over sanctions the United States reimposed on it after unilaterally withdrawing from the landmark accord in 2018.

    Iran said Monday it will consider withdrawing from the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) if a dispute over its atomic programme goes before the UN Security Council. Britain, France and Germany launched a process last week charging Iran with failing to observe the terms of the 2015 nuclear deal, a move that could eventually see the Security Council reimpose international sanctions on the country. Iran has accused the three EU member states of inaction over sanctions the United States reimposed on it after unilaterally withdrawing from the landmark accord in 2018.


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  • 70/81   Jihadists attack key aid facility in northeast Nigeria
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Heavily armed jihadists have carried out an 'extremely violent' attack on a vital aid facility housing United Nations workers in northeast Nigeria, the UN said Monday.  No aid workers were harmed in the assault, but a military source said that one soldier and four assailants died in the ensuing gunfight.  The UN said it 'was outraged by the extremely violent attack on this key humanitarian facility where five United Nations staff were staying at the time of the incident'.

    Heavily armed jihadists have carried out an 'extremely violent' attack on a vital aid facility housing United Nations workers in northeast Nigeria, the UN said Monday. No aid workers were harmed in the assault, but a military source said that one soldier and four assailants died in the ensuing gunfight. The UN said it 'was outraged by the extremely violent attack on this key humanitarian facility where five United Nations staff were staying at the time of the incident'.


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  • 71/81   Iran Threatens Non-Proliferation Treaty Exit Over European Move
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Iran will withdraw from a major non-proliferation treaty if European nations attempt to refer the Islamic Republic to the UN Security Council over its infringements of the 2015 nuclear deal, the country’s foreign minister said.The U.K., France and Germany said last week they would trigger the accord’s dispute resolution mechanism, which could eventually mean the matter being referred to the Security Council. The move inflamed tensions with Tehran, which is locked in an economic confrontation with the U.S. that this month sparked a military exchange.“If Europeans continue their untenable conduct or send Iran’s nuclear case to the United Nations Security Council, we will withdraw from the N.P.T.,” Mohammad Javad Zarif told lawmakers, referring to the international treaty to stop the spread of nuclear weapons, the official parliamentary news service ICANA reported.Iran was an early signatory of the 1970 treaty, which was designed to eventually lead to disarmament. Non-nuclear weapons states that are signatories, including Iran, agree not to pursue weapons and to only develop peaceful atomic technology.Earlier on Monday, Foreign Ministry spokesman Abbas Mousavi said Iran is planning “one last step” in its gradual draw-down from complying with the nuclear deal, raising the possibility that it’s close to announcing a complete withdrawal from the embattled international accord. The final measure will have “more effective consequences,” Mousavi said.Iran has been gradually reducing its compliance with the 2015 accord, known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, since U.S. President Donald Trump abandoned it and began reimposing sanctions on the country’s economy.Earlier this month, Iran announced it’s no longer observing limits on uranium enrichment or research and development activities, but insisted it was still working within the parameters of the deal and would continue cooperating with United Nations nuclear inspectors.President Hassan Rouhani last week said all the steps could still be reversed as soon as Europe was able to commit to the agreement and take concrete steps allowing Iran to sell oil.Days before European nations turned up pressure on the Islamic Republic, the U.S. and Iran came to the brink of war after Trump ordered the killing of top Iranian general Qassem Soleimani. As Iranian forces launched retaliatory attacks on U.S. facilities in the Middle East, they accidentally shot down a Ukrainian airliner over Tehran, triggering protests against the regime.Britain has also infuriated Iran’s government by proposing that the current accord be replaced with a “Trump deal.” Mousavi said that while Iran remains open to talks with the EU on the future of the agreement, the Islamic Republic won’t agree to any proposals from either the bloc or the U.S. for an alternative to the existing deal.(Updates with Zarif comments)To contact the reporter on this story: Arsalan Shahla in Tehran at ashahla@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Lin Noueihed at lnoueihed@bloomberg.net, Mark Williams, Paul AbelskyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Iran will withdraw from a major non-proliferation treaty if European nations attempt to refer the Islamic Republic to the UN Security Council over its infringements of the 2015 nuclear deal, the country’s foreign minister said.The U.K., France and Germany said last week they would trigger the accord’s dispute resolution mechanism, which could eventually mean the matter being referred to the Security Council. The move inflamed tensions with Tehran, which is locked in an economic confrontation with the U.S. that this month sparked a military exchange.“If Europeans continue their untenable conduct or send Iran’s nuclear case to the United Nations Security Council, we will withdraw from the N.P.T.,” Mohammad Javad Zarif told lawmakers, referring to the international treaty to stop the spread of nuclear weapons, the official parliamentary news service ICANA reported.Iran was an early signatory of the 1970 treaty, which was designed to eventually lead to disarmament. Non-nuclear weapons states that are signatories, including Iran, agree not to pursue weapons and to only develop peaceful atomic technology.Earlier on Monday, Foreign Ministry spokesman Abbas Mousavi said Iran is planning “one last step” in its gradual draw-down from complying with the nuclear deal, raising the possibility that it’s close to announcing a complete withdrawal from the embattled international accord. The final measure will have “more effective consequences,” Mousavi said.Iran has been gradually reducing its compliance with the 2015 accord, known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, since U.S. President Donald Trump abandoned it and began reimposing sanctions on the country’s economy.Earlier this month, Iran announced it’s no longer observing limits on uranium enrichment or research and development activities, but insisted it was still working within the parameters of the deal and would continue cooperating with United Nations nuclear inspectors.President Hassan Rouhani last week said all the steps could still be reversed as soon as Europe was able to commit to the agreement and take concrete steps allowing Iran to sell oil.Days before European nations turned up pressure on the Islamic Republic, the U.S. and Iran came to the brink of war after Trump ordered the killing of top Iranian general Qassem Soleimani. As Iranian forces launched retaliatory attacks on U.S. facilities in the Middle East, they accidentally shot down a Ukrainian airliner over Tehran, triggering protests against the regime.Britain has also infuriated Iran’s government by proposing that the current accord be replaced with a “Trump deal.” Mousavi said that while Iran remains open to talks with the EU on the future of the agreement, the Islamic Republic won’t agree to any proposals from either the bloc or the U.S. for an alternative to the existing deal.(Updates with Zarif comments)To contact the reporter on this story: Arsalan Shahla in Tehran at ashahla@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Lin Noueihed at lnoueihed@bloomberg.net, Mark Williams, Paul AbelskyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 72/81   Don't Forget These Vaccines When You Travel
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you're planning a winter trip to another country, you may be preoccupied with booking airfare and finding lodging, but certain destinations require an extra step of planning: travel vaccines. ...

    If you're planning a winter trip to another country, you may be preoccupied with booking airfare and finding lodging, but certain destinations require an extra step of planning: travel vaccines. ...


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  • 73/81   Trump turns 'very routine' physical into attack on media
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    President Trump lashed out at the media Tuesday over reporting about his sudden trip to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center last weekend.

    President Trump lashed out at the media Tuesday over reporting about his sudden trip to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center last weekend.


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  • 74/81   5 Turkey Cooking Tips Will Guarantee You Have the Perfect Bird This Holidays
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    There's no need to wing it at Thanksgiving this year.

    There's no need to wing it at Thanksgiving this year.


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  • 75/81   9 Easy Ways to Make Your Jack-o'-Lanterns Last Longer
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    A little bleach goes a long way.

    A little bleach goes a long way.


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  • 76/81   Is It Time for a Medication Reconciliation?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    More than half of adult Americans regularly take at least one prescription drug, according to a recent Consumer Reports nationally representative survey. And for those who take any medication on ...

    More than half of adult Americans regularly take at least one prescription drug, according to a recent Consumer Reports nationally representative survey. And for those who take any medication on ...


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  • 77/81   Brown-Bag Lunches for Kids With Food Allergies
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...


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  • 78/81   What to Feed Your Family When the Power Goes Out
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...


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  • 79/81   Try These Healthy Snack Ideas for Kids
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...

    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...


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  • 80/81   The 9 Best Jobs for Teachers To Make Some Cash During the Summer Break
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.


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  • 81/81   How to Spot and Avoid Algal Blooms
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...


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