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News Slideshows (01/24/2020 15 hours)


  • 1/71   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


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    Press Review


    Joe Rogan   Federer   B.I.T.C.H   Coco Gauff   Gessner   Happy Friyay   Myke Towers   Happy Chinese New Year   Easy Money Baby   Palmas   Mirka   St. Francis de Sales   Coscu   Spring Branch   Edith Wharton   Hardy Boys   Fri-yay   Wapa   J Hus   Dame Dash   
  • 2/71   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


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  • 3/71   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


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  • 4/71   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


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  • 5/71   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


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  • 6/71   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


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  • 7/71   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


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  • 8/71   Do star athletes make too much money?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    With athletes in America's biggest sports leagues raking in salaries worth $300 million and more, is it time to reign in the big spending or do superstars deserve the big bucks they make?

    With athletes in America's biggest sports leagues raking in salaries worth $300 million and more, is it time to reign in the big spending or do superstars deserve the big bucks they make?


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  • 9/71   Live animal mascots: Cute or exploitative?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?


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  • 10/71   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


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  • 11/71   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


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  • 12/71   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


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  • 13/71   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


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  • 14/71   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


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  • 15/71   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


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  • 16/71   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named.  Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does.  At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


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  • 17/71   PHOTOS: Fluorescent turtle embryo wins forty-fifth annual Nikon Small World Competition

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.


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  • 18/71   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


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  • 19/71   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


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  • 20/71   What the CIA thinks of your anti-virus program

    PARIS (AP) — Peppering the 8,000 pages of purported Central Intelligence Agency hacking data released Tuesday by WikiLeaks are reviews of some of the world's most popular anti-virus products.

    PARIS (AP) — Peppering the 8,000 pages of purported Central Intelligence Agency hacking data released Tuesday by WikiLeaks are reviews of some of the world's most popular anti-virus products.


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  • 21/71   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


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  • 22/71   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


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  • 23/71   (HSC) Alert: Johnson Fistel Launches Investigation into Harsco Corporation; Investors Encouraged to Contact Firm
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Shareholder Rights Law Firm Johnson Fistel, LLP, is investigating potential claims against Harsco Corporation ("Harsco " or the "Company") (NYSE: HSC) for violations of federal securities laws.

    Shareholder Rights Law Firm Johnson Fistel, LLP, is investigating potential claims against Harsco Corporation ("Harsco " or the "Company") (NYSE: HSC) for violations of federal securities laws.


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  • 24/71   Signs of Election Bounce Undermine Case for Immediate BOE Cut
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Explore what’s moving the global economy in the new season of the Stephanomics podcast. Subscribe via Apple Podcast, Spotify or Pocket Cast.U.K. economic activity roared back to the highest level since 2018 this month, weakening the case for the imminent Bank of England interest-rate cut that markets continue to price in.IHS Markit’s flash index for output across the whole economy jumped to 52.4 as firms cited reduced political uncertainty in the wake of Boris Johnson’s decisive election victory. That’s up from 49.3 last month, but not enough to convince traders that a reduction is off the table on Jan. 30.The Purchasing Managers Indexes had emerged as a key factor in the debate over BOE easing this month, providing the most up-to-date assessment of the economy after the Conservatives’ win on Dec. 12. The reading was higher than forecast and above the level many economists said was enough to stave off a rate cut.Still, traders were still pricing in a greater-than 50% chance of a move after the release, with some economists pointing out more positive data earlier in the week had raised the bar for what was expected from the PMIs. and the pound fell.The data was “marginal above the level of 52, where one could expect the Bank of England starting to become more reluctant to cut,” said Mikael Olai Milhoj, a Danske Bank analyst. A cut is “still a real possibility but a close call as things stand.”What Our Economists Say:“A significant bounce in the composite PMI reading today should be enough to deter the Bank of England from cutting rates at its January meeting.”\-- Dan Hanson. Click here for the full U.K. REACTOne reason why the debate on easing isn’t settled is that reports are awaited from BOE agents, a cross-country network that holds confidential conversations with businesses and community organizations. Investors and forecasters will be in the dark about that intelligence until the decision is announced, when the accompanying Monetary Policy Report will include a section summarizing the feedback.Markit said the Friday’s composite figure, which was up from 49.3 last month and came in well above the 50.7 median-estimate of economists, was consistent with a quarterly growth rate of about 0.2%. That’s good news for Johnson as he prepares to officially take the U.K. out of the European Union next week.“It seems likely that the rise in the PMI kills off the prospect of an imminent rate cut, with policy makers taking a wait and see approach as they assess the performance of the economy in the post-Brexit environment,” said Chris Williamson, Markit’s chief business economist.Market SwingsWhile a January rate cut was seen as unlikely at the start of 2020, a spate of weak data, along with dovish comments from policy makers, boosted speculation a move was coming. Bets moderated slightly this week after some more positive releases.Two of the BOE’s nine officials have already voted for easing, while a number of others, including Governor Mark Carney, have indicated they would be paying close attention to the data before making up their minds.“We think it’s a close call,” said Ned Rumpeltin, European head of foreign exchange at Toronto-Dominion Bank. “But ultimately we think the sum total of what we’ve seen in the UK’s recent data overall will be enough to motivate a cut next week.”The PMIs, like a report earlier this week from the Confederation of British Industry, showed optimism among firms had jumped following the election, with Markit’s measure reaching the highest since June 2015. They also suggested the pickup may translate into real growth, with measures of new work rising strongly.The flash readings, based on 85% of responses, showed a gauge for the U.K.’s dominant services sector alone jumped to a 16-month high of 52.9, from 50 last month. Meanwhile an index for manufacturing reached 49.8, up from 47.5 in December and approaching the 50 level that separates expansion from contraction. Final readings will be released in the first week of FebruaryThe PMIs have previously come under criticism for being overly sensitive to political developments, while Carney said last year that they can be a misleading indicator of economic output in times of extreme uncertainty.For example, in the immediate aftermath of 2016’s Brexit vote, they presented a far gloomier picture of the economy than ultimately came to pass, a phenomenon that repeated itself last year.\--With assistance from Jill Ward, Greg Ritchie and William Shaw.To contact the reporters on this story: Lucy Meakin in London at lmeakin1@bloomberg.net;David Goodman in London at dgoodman28@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Fergal O'Brien at fobrien@bloomberg.net, Brian Swint, Alaa ShahineFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Explore what’s moving the global economy in the new season of the Stephanomics podcast. Subscribe via Apple Podcast, Spotify or Pocket Cast.U.K. economic activity roared back to the highest level since 2018 this month, weakening the case for the imminent Bank of England interest-rate cut that markets continue to price in.IHS Markit’s flash index for output across the whole economy jumped to 52.4 as firms cited reduced political uncertainty in the wake of Boris Johnson’s decisive election victory. That’s up from 49.3 last month, but not enough to convince traders that a reduction is off the table on Jan. 30.The Purchasing Managers Indexes had emerged as a key factor in the debate over BOE easing this month, providing the most up-to-date assessment of the economy after the Conservatives’ win on Dec. 12. The reading was higher than forecast and above the level many economists said was enough to stave off a rate cut.Still, traders were still pricing in a greater-than 50% chance of a move after the release, with some economists pointing out more positive data earlier in the week had raised the bar for what was expected from the PMIs. and the pound fell.The data was “marginal above the level of 52, where one could expect the Bank of England starting to become more reluctant to cut,” said Mikael Olai Milhoj, a Danske Bank analyst. A cut is “still a real possibility but a close call as things stand.”What Our Economists Say:“A significant bounce in the composite PMI reading today should be enough to deter the Bank of England from cutting rates at its January meeting.”\-- Dan Hanson. Click here for the full U.K. REACTOne reason why the debate on easing isn’t settled is that reports are awaited from BOE agents, a cross-country network that holds confidential conversations with businesses and community organizations. Investors and forecasters will be in the dark about that intelligence until the decision is announced, when the accompanying Monetary Policy Report will include a section summarizing the feedback.Markit said the Friday’s composite figure, which was up from 49.3 last month and came in well above the 50.7 median-estimate of economists, was consistent with a quarterly growth rate of about 0.2%. That’s good news for Johnson as he prepares to officially take the U.K. out of the European Union next week.“It seems likely that the rise in the PMI kills off the prospect of an imminent rate cut, with policy makers taking a wait and see approach as they assess the performance of the economy in the post-Brexit environment,” said Chris Williamson, Markit’s chief business economist.Market SwingsWhile a January rate cut was seen as unlikely at the start of 2020, a spate of weak data, along with dovish comments from policy makers, boosted speculation a move was coming. Bets moderated slightly this week after some more positive releases.Two of the BOE’s nine officials have already voted for easing, while a number of others, including Governor Mark Carney, have indicated they would be paying close attention to the data before making up their minds.“We think it’s a close call,” said Ned Rumpeltin, European head of foreign exchange at Toronto-Dominion Bank. “But ultimately we think the sum total of what we’ve seen in the UK’s recent data overall will be enough to motivate a cut next week.”The PMIs, like a report earlier this week from the Confederation of British Industry, showed optimism among firms had jumped following the election, with Markit’s measure reaching the highest since June 2015. They also suggested the pickup may translate into real growth, with measures of new work rising strongly.The flash readings, based on 85% of responses, showed a gauge for the U.K.’s dominant services sector alone jumped to a 16-month high of 52.9, from 50 last month. Meanwhile an index for manufacturing reached 49.8, up from 47.5 in December and approaching the 50 level that separates expansion from contraction. Final readings will be released in the first week of FebruaryThe PMIs have previously come under criticism for being overly sensitive to political developments, while Carney said last year that they can be a misleading indicator of economic output in times of extreme uncertainty.For example, in the immediate aftermath of 2016’s Brexit vote, they presented a far gloomier picture of the economy than ultimately came to pass, a phenomenon that repeated itself last year.\--With assistance from Jill Ward, Greg Ritchie and William Shaw.To contact the reporters on this story: Lucy Meakin in London at lmeakin1@bloomberg.net;David Goodman in London at dgoodman28@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Fergal O'Brien at fobrien@bloomberg.net, Brian Swint, Alaa ShahineFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 25/71   Oil Set for Weekly Slump as Asia Virus Adds to Demand Concerns
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Oil headed for a 5.7% loss this week amid fears that China’s coronavirus will erode fuel demand just as markets struggle with a fragile world economy and adequate supplies.Futures held above $55 a barrel in New York, buoyed by an unexpected drop in U.S. crude inventories and a political crisis in Libya that has halted oil exports. Yet the signs of tighter supply paled against the International Energy Agency’s assessment that “the world is awash with oil,” a surplus that could grow if the virus outbreak hits consumption of jet fuel in China, the biggest oil importer.“China’s economic prospects and oil demand are at risk, hence why caution reigns supreme in financial markets,” said Stephen Brennock, an analyst at PVM Oil Associates Ltd.Goldmans Sachs Group Inc. said earlier this week that, if the coronavirus has an impact similar to the 2003 SARS epidemic, demand could be curbed by 260,000 barrels a day.The fast-spreading virus is the latest challenge for a market that’s been buffeted this year by geopolitical turmoil in the Middle East and North Africa, as well as the phase-one trade deal between Beijing and Washington.See also: China’s Economy Was Brightening This Month Before Virus Fear HitWest Texas Intermediate futures for March delivery slipped 39 cents to $55.20 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange as of 8:38 a.m. local time. Prices are poised for a third weekly drop after closing at the lowest level since Nov. 29 on Thursday. Brent crude fell 46 cents to $61.58, and was also set for a third weekly decline.\--With assistance from James Thornhill.To contact the reporters on this story: Saket Sundria in Singapore at ssundria@bloomberg.net;Grant Smith in London at gsmith52@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: James Herron at jherron9@bloomberg.net, Amanda Jordan, John DeaneFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Oil headed for a 5.7% loss this week amid fears that China’s coronavirus will erode fuel demand just as markets struggle with a fragile world economy and adequate supplies.Futures held above $55 a barrel in New York, buoyed by an unexpected drop in U.S. crude inventories and a political crisis in Libya that has halted oil exports. Yet the signs of tighter supply paled against the International Energy Agency’s assessment that “the world is awash with oil,” a surplus that could grow if the virus outbreak hits consumption of jet fuel in China, the biggest oil importer.“China’s economic prospects and oil demand are at risk, hence why caution reigns supreme in financial markets,” said Stephen Brennock, an analyst at PVM Oil Associates Ltd.Goldmans Sachs Group Inc. said earlier this week that, if the coronavirus has an impact similar to the 2003 SARS epidemic, demand could be curbed by 260,000 barrels a day.The fast-spreading virus is the latest challenge for a market that’s been buffeted this year by geopolitical turmoil in the Middle East and North Africa, as well as the phase-one trade deal between Beijing and Washington.See also: China’s Economy Was Brightening This Month Before Virus Fear HitWest Texas Intermediate futures for March delivery slipped 39 cents to $55.20 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange as of 8:38 a.m. local time. Prices are poised for a third weekly drop after closing at the lowest level since Nov. 29 on Thursday. Brent crude fell 46 cents to $61.58, and was also set for a third weekly decline.\--With assistance from James Thornhill.To contact the reporters on this story: Saket Sundria in Singapore at ssundria@bloomberg.net;Grant Smith in London at gsmith52@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: James Herron at jherron9@bloomberg.net, Amanda Jordan, John DeaneFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 26/71   Lebanon and Japan have 40 days to agree on Ghosn's fate: sources
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Lebanon and Japan have about 40 days to decide whether ousted Nissan boss Carlos Ghosn will be extradited to Japan or stand trial in Lebanon, a judicial source and a source close to Ghosn said on Thursday, following his escape from Japan last month.  Ghosn fled to Lebanon, his childhood home, as he was awaiting trial on charges of under-reporting earnings, breach of trust and misappropriation of company funds, all of which he denies.  Japan and Lebanon have no extradition agreement and Lebanon does not typically hand over its nationals.

    Lebanon and Japan have about 40 days to decide whether ousted Nissan boss Carlos Ghosn will be extradited to Japan or stand trial in Lebanon, a judicial source and a source close to Ghosn said on Thursday, following his escape from Japan last month. Ghosn fled to Lebanon, his childhood home, as he was awaiting trial on charges of under-reporting earnings, breach of trust and misappropriation of company funds, all of which he denies. Japan and Lebanon have no extradition agreement and Lebanon does not typically hand over its nationals.


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  • 27/71   A Holocaust Survivor Warns Against the Rise in Anti-Semitism in Honor of International Holocaust Remembrance Day
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The year 2020 marks the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau, the largest Nazi concentration camp, and the ending of the Holocaust and World War II. In 2005, the United Nations (UN) designated January 27 as International Holocaust Remembrance Day. On this day, the UN encourages everyone to honor the lives of the nearly two-thirds of Europe's Jews murdered by Nazi Germany's vicious acts of genocide and remember the perils of allowing unrestrained hatred to grow. At the age of seven, Dr. Erica Miller and her family, along with thousands of other Jews, were imprisoned for four years in a Nazi holding camp in Mogilev, Ukraine, before being liberated by the Russians. As a Holocaust survivor, Dr. Miller understands the critical importance of commemorating and honoring the six million Holocaust victims. "We need to remember those who perished in the Holocaust and empower ourselves to be vigilant to minimize the opportunity that it will occur again," says Dr. Miller.

    The year 2020 marks the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau, the largest Nazi concentration camp, and the ending of the Holocaust and World War II. In 2005, the United Nations (UN) designated January 27 as International Holocaust Remembrance Day. On this day, the UN encourages everyone to honor the lives of the nearly two-thirds of Europe's Jews murdered by Nazi Germany's vicious acts of genocide and remember the perils of allowing unrestrained hatred to grow. At the age of seven, Dr. Erica Miller and her family, along with thousands of other Jews, were imprisoned for four years in a Nazi holding camp in Mogilev, Ukraine, before being liberated by the Russians. As a Holocaust survivor, Dr. Miller understands the critical importance of commemorating and honoring the six million Holocaust victims. "We need to remember those who perished in the Holocaust and empower ourselves to be vigilant to minimize the opportunity that it will occur again," says Dr. Miller.


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  • 28/71   TD Bank Ranks First in Customer Satisfaction Among National Banks, According to J.D. Power
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    TD Bank, America's Most Convenient Bank®, ranks highest in customer satisfaction among national banks, according to the J.D. Power 2019 U.S. National Banking Satisfaction StudySM. This is the first time TD was evaluated in the study and the bank's first-ever national banking trophy win.

    TD Bank, America's Most Convenient Bank®, ranks highest in customer satisfaction among national banks, according to the J.D. Power 2019 U.S. National Banking Satisfaction StudySM. This is the first time TD was evaluated in the study and the bank's first-ever national banking trophy win.


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  • 29/71   Does KB Home (NYSE:KBH) Deserve A Spot On Your Watchlist?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    For beginners, it can seem like a good idea (and an exciting prospect) to buy a company that tells a good story to...

    For beginners, it can seem like a good idea (and an exciting prospect) to buy a company that tells a good story to...


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  • 30/71   Tech ETF Sweet Spots
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    With a stabilizing and steady economy shaping up, semiconductor ETFs will keep clicking.  

    With a stabilizing and steady economy shaping up, semiconductor ETFs will keep clicking.  


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  • 31/71   Amid scandal, 'Africa's richest woman' sells European assets
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The billionaire daughter of a former African leader is shedding some of her investments in Europe after she came under official investigation for alleged  money-laundering and corruption.  Isabel dos Santos has invested heavily in recent years in Portugal, the former colonial ruler of her homeland Angola.  Since the scandal erupted earlier in the week Dos Santos, reputedly Africa's richest woman, has also agreed to sell her stake in Portuguese bank EuroBic, though she has denied any wrongdoing in her business affairs.

    The billionaire daughter of a former African leader is shedding some of her investments in Europe after she came under official investigation for alleged money-laundering and corruption. Isabel dos Santos has invested heavily in recent years in Portugal, the former colonial ruler of her homeland Angola. Since the scandal erupted earlier in the week Dos Santos, reputedly Africa's richest woman, has also agreed to sell her stake in Portuguese bank EuroBic, though she has denied any wrongdoing in her business affairs.


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  • 32/71   Exclusive: India likely to raise import duties on more than 50 items - sources
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    India plans to increase import duties on more than 50 items including electronics, electrical goods, chemicals and handicrafts, targeting about $56 billion worth of imports from China and elsewhere, officials and industry sources said.  Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman could make the announcement when she presents her annual budget for 2020/21 on Feb. 1, along with other stimulus measures to revive sagging economic growth, one of the government officials said.  Higher customs duties are likely to hit goods such as mobile phone chargers, industrial chemicals, lamps, wooden furniture, candles, jewellery and handicraft items, two government sources with direct knowledge of the matter said.

    India plans to increase import duties on more than 50 items including electronics, electrical goods, chemicals and handicrafts, targeting about $56 billion worth of imports from China and elsewhere, officials and industry sources said. Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman could make the announcement when she presents her annual budget for 2020/21 on Feb. 1, along with other stimulus measures to revive sagging economic growth, one of the government officials said. Higher customs duties are likely to hit goods such as mobile phone chargers, industrial chemicals, lamps, wooden furniture, candles, jewellery and handicraft items, two government sources with direct knowledge of the matter said.


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  • 33/71   Is There Now An Opportunity In inTEST Corporation (NYSEMKT:INTT)?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    inTEST Corporation (NYSEMKT:INTT), which is in the semiconductor business, and is based in United States, received a...

    inTEST Corporation (NYSEMKT:INTT), which is in the semiconductor business, and is based in United States, received a...


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  • 34/71   Futures rise on gains in Intel, coronavirus fears linger
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Intel Corp  jumped 5.2% in premarket trading, on course to open at a 19-year high, after it forecast better-than-expected 2020 earnings, joining many of its peers to signal a recovery in chip demand.  Advanced Micro Devices  rose 1.5%, while Broadcom Inc  gained 3.5% after entering an agreement with Apple Inc  for the supply of wireless components used in its products.  While China ramped up measures to contain a virus that has killed 26 people and infected more than 800 in the past week, investors took relief from the World Health Organisation declaring the new coronavirus an emergency just for China and stopping short of declaring the epidemic of international concern.

    Intel Corp jumped 5.2% in premarket trading, on course to open at a 19-year high, after it forecast better-than-expected 2020 earnings, joining many of its peers to signal a recovery in chip demand. Advanced Micro Devices rose 1.5%, while Broadcom Inc gained 3.5% after entering an agreement with Apple Inc for the supply of wireless components used in its products. While China ramped up measures to contain a virus that has killed 26 people and infected more than 800 in the past week, investors took relief from the World Health Organisation declaring the new coronavirus an emergency just for China and stopping short of declaring the epidemic of international concern.


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  • 35/71   Winning worker hearts and minds is key to companies achieving their green goals
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    A lot of companies say they care about the environment and commit to certain goals but don’t end up doing much about it.A whopping 78% of companies in the Standard & Poor’s 500, for example, issued sustainability reports in 2018 and 66% of all U.S. companies committed to the U.N.‘s Sustainable Development Goals in 2017 through either explicit statements about the goals or implicit actions that support them. But relatively few say they’ve actually embedded the sustainability goals into their business strategies or into departments such as communications, human resources and supply chain management, corporate functions that can play a huge role in boosting sustainability. A 2016 report found that just 2% of companies actually achieve their sustainability goals. This matters because the Trump administration’s skepticism about the threat of climate change has made it clear that the federal government won’t be leading the charge to avert the worst of it. That means it’s up to companies to pick up the baton. So what separates companies that succeed at becoming more sustainable from those that fail? I spoke with over 100 CEOs, managers and regular employees at 25 multinational companies that have committed to becoming more sustainable in hopes of answering that question. My research, published in my book “Small Actions, Big Difference,” suggests it begins with a shared purpose – and winning over employee hearts and minds.  Elevating sustainabilityPart of the problem is that companies have made profit maximization their primary purpose for decades. That has made all other aims, such as sustainability, secondary and separate from a company’s main mission.The result has been that companies tend to departmentalize sustainability efforts, depriving the company of the ingenuity and passion of the employee base in addressing one of the most complex problems of our times. Since sustainability permeates every aspect of a company’s operations – from procurement to disposal – it’s vital to embed a purpose promoting it in every department. Perhaps not surprisingly, companies that want to achieve goals like reducing their carbon footprint or waste tend to do better when they make sustainability an integral part of their core purpose and communicate this commitment to the entire staff. That’s clear from a recent analysis I conducted of environmental, social and governance performance data on over 3,000 companies during a 10-year period. I found that companies that said they have an “overarching vision” that combines financial goals with social and environmental ones tended to perform better on a measure of their impact on the environment. They also tended to preform better financially as well.Why? Because workers like a corporate purpose that trumps profit. Research has shown articulating a purpose beyond profit resonates with a company’s workforce. For my book, I spent countless hours over a period of five years interviewing executives, middle managers and factory workers to try understand what separates the companies making successful strides in reducing their environmental impact from those still struggling. What I learned from the reams of interview data that I collected and transcribed is that the successful companies endow a sense of “sustainability ownership” in their employees so that everyone – from the mailroom to the boardroom – picks up the baton as part of his or her day job. And it all starts with defining a corporate purpose, the all-important question of “why do we do what we do,” something that three companies did particularly well.  Saving lives by selling soapWhen Paul Polman took over as consumer goods giant Unilever CEO in 2009, he realized that the company had to transition to a new business model that accounted for the environmental and social realities of today’s world in order to survive.Working with his leadership team, he came up with a new purpose for Unilever: “to make sustainable living commonplace,” which was widely communicated to all workers using a variety of means from company YouTube channels to embedding “sustainability ambassadors” throughout the company. The effort worked. Employees I spoke with clearly internalized and appreciated the new corporate purpose and culture. One factory worker in India put it succintly: “I would rather save lives than sell soap.” Corporate executives credit this integration with Unilever’s success in becoming a greener company. From 2008 to 2018, the company says it cut greenhouse gas emissions by 52%, water use by 44% and waste by 97%. Like the financial results companies report, sustainability figures are audited and verified by accounting firms.  No plan BBritish retailer Marks & Spencer began incorporating sustainability into its operations in 2007 under the provocative name “Plan A” – because “there is no Plan B for our one planet,” the company said. From my interviews I learned the company uses a variety of strategies to ensure the mission is embraced by every employee, in part by appealing to the heart. For example, Marks and Spencer sponsors trips into local communities where their stores are located to show the impact of a changing climate and organizes informal after-work drinks at local pubs to discuss the crisis in a personalized way.The efforts have paid off. For example, the company says carbon emissions have plunged 75% since 2007 and waste is down 35% compared since 2009, with none being sent to a landfill.  Appeals to the headAt IBM, environmental goal setting has long been an integral part of the company’s sustainability strategy. In contrast to Marks and Spencer’s appeal to an employee’s heart, however, IBM primarily appeals to the head – and the bottom line – as you might expect from an information technology company. When discussing proposed goals with business units, IBM’s corporate staff identifies opportunities for cost savings as well as revenue growth. This helps employees gain an understanding of the environmental drivers and objectives behind each goal as well as the business and societal benefits. For example, consolidating multiple computer servers that aren’t well utilized into one larger and more energy-efficient server not only reduces energy demand and greenhouse gas emissions but also frees up space, electricity and cooling capacity to support new business. Seeing this kind of data motivates workers to innovate on the sustainability front because they’re able to see how it’ll lead to more money and environmental well-being for the company – and ultimately greater financial rewards and a sense of contributing to a greater cause as well.These types of initiatives helped IBM reduce its carbon emissions by a third from 2005 to 2018 and its nonhazardous waste by 68% since 2014. Almost 90% of the remaining waste gets recycled.  A higher purposeMy interviews, countless surveys and scholarly research show employees – particularly younger ones – prefer to work at companies that serve a higher purpose. The good news is that companies are increasingly vowing to pursue more than just profits and incorporating issues like protecting the environment and their communities into their purposes. But it’s not enough to make promises. And even companies that sincerely want to do better can find it hard if they don’t bring their employees along for the ride. Small actions can lead to big difference. [ Deep knowledge, daily. Sign up for The Conversation’s newsletter. ]This article is republished from The Conversation, a nonprofit news site dedicated to sharing ideas from academic experts.Read more:    * Can capitalism solve capitalism’s problems?  * How to really hold business to account on their carbon footprint – include their supply chainsCB Bhattacharya has previously consulted for some of the organizations he researched for "Small Actions, Big Difference." He also founded the Sustainable Business Roundtable at ESMT Berlin and the Center for Sustainable Business at the University of Pittsburgh, both of which had some organizations researched for the book as members, including IBM.

    A lot of companies say they care about the environment and commit to certain goals but don’t end up doing much about it.A whopping 78% of companies in the Standard & Poor’s 500, for example, issued sustainability reports in 2018 and 66% of all U.S. companies committed to the U.N.‘s Sustainable Development Goals in 2017 through either explicit statements about the goals or implicit actions that support them. But relatively few say they’ve actually embedded the sustainability goals into their business strategies or into departments such as communications, human resources and supply chain management, corporate functions that can play a huge role in boosting sustainability. A 2016 report found that just 2% of companies actually achieve their sustainability goals. This matters because the Trump administration’s skepticism about the threat of climate change has made it clear that the federal government won’t be leading the charge to avert the worst of it. That means it’s up to companies to pick up the baton. So what separates companies that succeed at becoming more sustainable from those that fail? I spoke with over 100 CEOs, managers and regular employees at 25 multinational companies that have committed to becoming more sustainable in hopes of answering that question. My research, published in my book “Small Actions, Big Difference,” suggests it begins with a shared purpose – and winning over employee hearts and minds. Elevating sustainabilityPart of the problem is that companies have made profit maximization their primary purpose for decades. That has made all other aims, such as sustainability, secondary and separate from a company’s main mission.The result has been that companies tend to departmentalize sustainability efforts, depriving the company of the ingenuity and passion of the employee base in addressing one of the most complex problems of our times. Since sustainability permeates every aspect of a company’s operations – from procurement to disposal – it’s vital to embed a purpose promoting it in every department. Perhaps not surprisingly, companies that want to achieve goals like reducing their carbon footprint or waste tend to do better when they make sustainability an integral part of their core purpose and communicate this commitment to the entire staff. That’s clear from a recent analysis I conducted of environmental, social and governance performance data on over 3,000 companies during a 10-year period. I found that companies that said they have an “overarching vision” that combines financial goals with social and environmental ones tended to perform better on a measure of their impact on the environment. They also tended to preform better financially as well.Why? Because workers like a corporate purpose that trumps profit. Research has shown articulating a purpose beyond profit resonates with a company’s workforce. For my book, I spent countless hours over a period of five years interviewing executives, middle managers and factory workers to try understand what separates the companies making successful strides in reducing their environmental impact from those still struggling. What I learned from the reams of interview data that I collected and transcribed is that the successful companies endow a sense of “sustainability ownership” in their employees so that everyone – from the mailroom to the boardroom – picks up the baton as part of his or her day job. And it all starts with defining a corporate purpose, the all-important question of “why do we do what we do,” something that three companies did particularly well. Saving lives by selling soapWhen Paul Polman took over as consumer goods giant Unilever CEO in 2009, he realized that the company had to transition to a new business model that accounted for the environmental and social realities of today’s world in order to survive.Working with his leadership team, he came up with a new purpose for Unilever: “to make sustainable living commonplace,” which was widely communicated to all workers using a variety of means from company YouTube channels to embedding “sustainability ambassadors” throughout the company. The effort worked. Employees I spoke with clearly internalized and appreciated the new corporate purpose and culture. One factory worker in India put it succintly: “I would rather save lives than sell soap.” Corporate executives credit this integration with Unilever’s success in becoming a greener company. From 2008 to 2018, the company says it cut greenhouse gas emissions by 52%, water use by 44% and waste by 97%. Like the financial results companies report, sustainability figures are audited and verified by accounting firms. No plan BBritish retailer Marks & Spencer began incorporating sustainability into its operations in 2007 under the provocative name “Plan A” – because “there is no Plan B for our one planet,” the company said. From my interviews I learned the company uses a variety of strategies to ensure the mission is embraced by every employee, in part by appealing to the heart. For example, Marks and Spencer sponsors trips into local communities where their stores are located to show the impact of a changing climate and organizes informal after-work drinks at local pubs to discuss the crisis in a personalized way.The efforts have paid off. For example, the company says carbon emissions have plunged 75% since 2007 and waste is down 35% compared since 2009, with none being sent to a landfill. Appeals to the headAt IBM, environmental goal setting has long been an integral part of the company’s sustainability strategy. In contrast to Marks and Spencer’s appeal to an employee’s heart, however, IBM primarily appeals to the head – and the bottom line – as you might expect from an information technology company. When discussing proposed goals with business units, IBM’s corporate staff identifies opportunities for cost savings as well as revenue growth. This helps employees gain an understanding of the environmental drivers and objectives behind each goal as well as the business and societal benefits. For example, consolidating multiple computer servers that aren’t well utilized into one larger and more energy-efficient server not only reduces energy demand and greenhouse gas emissions but also frees up space, electricity and cooling capacity to support new business. Seeing this kind of data motivates workers to innovate on the sustainability front because they’re able to see how it’ll lead to more money and environmental well-being for the company – and ultimately greater financial rewards and a sense of contributing to a greater cause as well.These types of initiatives helped IBM reduce its carbon emissions by a third from 2005 to 2018 and its nonhazardous waste by 68% since 2014. Almost 90% of the remaining waste gets recycled. A higher purposeMy interviews, countless surveys and scholarly research show employees – particularly younger ones – prefer to work at companies that serve a higher purpose. The good news is that companies are increasingly vowing to pursue more than just profits and incorporating issues like protecting the environment and their communities into their purposes. But it’s not enough to make promises. And even companies that sincerely want to do better can find it hard if they don’t bring their employees along for the ride. Small actions can lead to big difference. [ Deep knowledge, daily. Sign up for The Conversation’s newsletter. ]This article is republished from The Conversation, a nonprofit news site dedicated to sharing ideas from academic experts.Read more: * Can capitalism solve capitalism’s problems? * How to really hold business to account on their carbon footprint – include their supply chainsCB Bhattacharya has previously consulted for some of the organizations he researched for "Small Actions, Big Difference." He also founded the Sustainable Business Roundtable at ESMT Berlin and the Center for Sustainable Business at the University of Pittsburgh, both of which had some organizations researched for the book as members, including IBM.


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  • 36/71   Atlis Announces New CFO, Chief of Staff, and Key Technical Hires
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today, Atlis Motor Vehicles, electric vehicle technology startup, announced the appointment of Michael Konstas as Atlis's new Chief Financial Officer.

    Today, Atlis Motor Vehicles, electric vehicle technology startup, announced the appointment of Michael Konstas as Atlis's new Chief Financial Officer.


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  • 37/71   Karuschain Announces Impressive Blockchain MVP for The Precious Metals Supply Chain & New Company CEO in Singapore
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Karuschain revealed and presented the first MVP for its enterprise blockchain solution for the precious metals mining supply chain Karuschain SecureCapture today. This key milestone in the company's roadmap was revealed at Blockchain Impact, 2020 Perspectives in Singapore, a prestigious event for high net worth investors, funds and blockchain enthusiasts.

    Karuschain revealed and presented the first MVP for its enterprise blockchain solution for the precious metals mining supply chain Karuschain SecureCapture today. This key milestone in the company's roadmap was revealed at Blockchain Impact, 2020 Perspectives in Singapore, a prestigious event for high net worth investors, funds and blockchain enthusiasts.


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  • 38/71   Introducing Markpoint DSP, a Point of Hassle-free Media Buying and Growth
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Markpoint is happy to announce the launch of Markpoint DSP, a demand-side platform that enables advertisers to programmatically buy display, native, and video ads across web, mobile, and in-app.

    Markpoint is happy to announce the launch of Markpoint DSP, a demand-side platform that enables advertisers to programmatically buy display, native, and video ads across web, mobile, and in-app.


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  • 39/71   National Signs Announces the Appointment of Cody W. Johnson as Chief Executive Officer
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    National Signs, a nationally recognized leader in comprehensive identity solutions, today announced the appointment of Cody W. Johnson as Chief Executive Officer.

    National Signs, a nationally recognized leader in comprehensive identity solutions, today announced the appointment of Cody W. Johnson as Chief Executive Officer.


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  • 40/71   Imagine Owning ImmuCell (NASDAQ:ICCC) And Wondering If The 32% Share Price Slide Is Justified
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Investors can approximate the average market return by buying an index fund. While individual stocks can be big...

    Investors can approximate the average market return by buying an index fund. While individual stocks can be big...


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  • 41/71   Next-generation Mercedes-Benz SL-Class spied, soft top and all
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Development of the next-generation Mercedes-Benz SL-Class appears to have reached the road testing stage, as a well-camouflaged example was caught undergoing what appears to be routine maintenance.  This mule, clearly meant to be hidden from prying eyes, sports what appears to be production-intent body panels and a cloth top, confirming earlier reports that the new SL would ditch the folding hard top.  Moving away from the outgoing SL's folding roof is just one of the measures being taken to make the two-door both more practical (as this will open up space behind the front seats) and purpose-built as a high-performance roadster.

    Development of the next-generation Mercedes-Benz SL-Class appears to have reached the road testing stage, as a well-camouflaged example was caught undergoing what appears to be routine maintenance. This mule, clearly meant to be hidden from prying eyes, sports what appears to be production-intent body panels and a cloth top, confirming earlier reports that the new SL would ditch the folding hard top. Moving away from the outgoing SL's folding roof is just one of the measures being taken to make the two-door both more practical (as this will open up space behind the front seats) and purpose-built as a high-performance roadster.


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  • 42/71   At impeachment trial, Democrats address Biden corruption allegations as Graham promises more developments
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Sen. Lindsey Graham made it clear that he plans to make Hunter Biden a much bigger part of the impeachment debate in the coming days.

    Sen. Lindsey Graham made it clear that he plans to make Hunter Biden a much bigger part of the impeachment debate in the coming days.


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  • 43/71   White Nationalists Arrested ahead of Richmond Rally Planned to Kill Gun-Rights Demonstrators to Spark Civil War
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Three alleged members of a white supremacist group were plotting to murder demonstrators at Monday's gun rights rally at the Virginia Capitol before they were arrested by the FBI last week, according to court documents.The men were caught discussing their plans on a hidden camera set up in their Delaware apartment by FBI agents.“We can’t let Virginia go to waste, we just can’t,” said Patrik J. Mathews, one member of the hate group "the Base" that promotes violence against African-Americans and Jews.According to authorities, the 27-year-old former Canadian Armed Forces reservist also discussed creating "instability" in Virginia by killing people, derailing trains, poisoning water, and shutting down highways in order to "kick off the economic collapse" and possibly start a "full blown civil war."Mathews also discussed the possibility of "executing" police officers and stealing their belongings and remarked that, “We could essentially be like literally hunting people.”“Virginia will be our day,” said 33-year-old Brian M. Lemley Jr., adding, “I need to claim my first victim.”“Lemley discussed using a thermal imaging scope affixed to his rifle to conduct ambush attacks,” the court filings read.The two were arrested along with a third man, 19, last Thursday. They are charged with federal firearms violations and “transporting and harboring an alien,” referring to Mathews, who is a Canadian national. Four more members of The Base have also been arrested and charged in Georgia and Wisconsin.In a search of the apartment, prosecutors said that FBI agents found propaganda fliers for The Base, communications devices, empty rifle cases, "go bags" with "numerous Meals-Ready-to-Eat," knives, and materials for building an assault rifle.Tens of thousands of gun rights advocates rallied in Richmond on Monday to protest the state’s Democratic legislature's gun-control agenda. Critics raised fears beforehand that militant white supremacists could disrupt the rally, but the day ended peacefully with no violence.

    Three alleged members of a white supremacist group were plotting to murder demonstrators at Monday's gun rights rally at the Virginia Capitol before they were arrested by the FBI last week, according to court documents.The men were caught discussing their plans on a hidden camera set up in their Delaware apartment by FBI agents.“We can’t let Virginia go to waste, we just can’t,” said Patrik J. Mathews, one member of the hate group "the Base" that promotes violence against African-Americans and Jews.According to authorities, the 27-year-old former Canadian Armed Forces reservist also discussed creating "instability" in Virginia by killing people, derailing trains, poisoning water, and shutting down highways in order to "kick off the economic collapse" and possibly start a "full blown civil war."Mathews also discussed the possibility of "executing" police officers and stealing their belongings and remarked that, “We could essentially be like literally hunting people.”“Virginia will be our day,” said 33-year-old Brian M. Lemley Jr., adding, “I need to claim my first victim.”“Lemley discussed using a thermal imaging scope affixed to his rifle to conduct ambush attacks,” the court filings read.The two were arrested along with a third man, 19, last Thursday. They are charged with federal firearms violations and “transporting and harboring an alien,” referring to Mathews, who is a Canadian national. Four more members of The Base have also been arrested and charged in Georgia and Wisconsin.In a search of the apartment, prosecutors said that FBI agents found propaganda fliers for The Base, communications devices, empty rifle cases, "go bags" with "numerous Meals-Ready-to-Eat," knives, and materials for building an assault rifle.Tens of thousands of gun rights advocates rallied in Richmond on Monday to protest the state’s Democratic legislature's gun-control agenda. Critics raised fears beforehand that militant white supremacists could disrupt the rally, but the day ended peacefully with no violence.


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  • 44/71   Wife: China's ex-Interpol boss jailed for reformist views
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    In her first comments about her imprisoned husband's sentence in China, the wife of former Interpol president Meng Hongwei dismissed his bribery conviction as “a lie, a fake case” and said he is being punished for using his senior position in the ruling Communist Party to push for reform from within. Grace Meng said during in an exclusive interview Wednesday with The Associated Press that her husband, a long-serving vice minister of public security, had been part of a reformist faction of China's secretive ruling party. In response to worsening corruption, Meng Hongwei and others argued, out of the public eye and at the highest circles of power for a “modern” constitutional and election-based political system, she said.

    In her first comments about her imprisoned husband's sentence in China, the wife of former Interpol president Meng Hongwei dismissed his bribery conviction as “a lie, a fake case” and said he is being punished for using his senior position in the ruling Communist Party to push for reform from within. Grace Meng said during in an exclusive interview Wednesday with The Associated Press that her husband, a long-serving vice minister of public security, had been part of a reformist faction of China's secretive ruling party. In response to worsening corruption, Meng Hongwei and others argued, out of the public eye and at the highest circles of power for a “modern” constitutional and election-based political system, she said.


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  • 45/71   Michelle Carter, who encouraged boyfriend's suicide, released from jail early for good behavior
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Michelle Carter, the Massachusetts woman who encouraged her boyfriend, Conrad Roy, to kill himself has been released from jail in Bristol County.

    Michelle Carter, the Massachusetts woman who encouraged her boyfriend, Conrad Roy, to kill himself has been released from jail in Bristol County.


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  • 46/71   Virologist who helped identify SARS on coronavirus outbreak: 'This time I'm scared'
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Experts are seeing shocking similarities between the coronavirus that has now spread beyond China and the SARS outbreak of 2003.Like the infectious pneumonia that has killed at least 17 people, SARS was caused by a coronavirus that originated in China. But when one of the virologists who helped identify the SARS virus visited Wuhan, where this virus originated, he didn't see nearly enough being done to fight it. People were out at markets without masks, "preparing to ring in the New Year in peace and had no sense about the epidemic," Guan Yi of the University of Hong Kong's State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases told Caixin. Airports were hardly being disinfected, Guan continued, saying the local government hasn't "even been handing out quarantine guides to people who were leaving the city."The city did disinfect the market where the virus has been traced to, but Guan criticized Wuhan for that, saying it hurts researchers' abilities to track down the virus's source. "I've never felt scared," Guan told Caixin. "This time I'm scared."A case involving the coronavirus was identified in Washington state on Wednesday, and cases have also been identified in Thailand, Japan, South Korea, and Singapore. A total of 639 cases were confirmed in China.More stories from theweek.com  Democrats walked right into Mitch McConnell's trap  Texas legalized hemp, and Austin just responded to the resulting chaos by effectively decriminalizing weed  The Oprah's Book Club controversy, explained

    Experts are seeing shocking similarities between the coronavirus that has now spread beyond China and the SARS outbreak of 2003.Like the infectious pneumonia that has killed at least 17 people, SARS was caused by a coronavirus that originated in China. But when one of the virologists who helped identify the SARS virus visited Wuhan, where this virus originated, he didn't see nearly enough being done to fight it. People were out at markets without masks, "preparing to ring in the New Year in peace and had no sense about the epidemic," Guan Yi of the University of Hong Kong's State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases told Caixin. Airports were hardly being disinfected, Guan continued, saying the local government hasn't "even been handing out quarantine guides to people who were leaving the city."The city did disinfect the market where the virus has been traced to, but Guan criticized Wuhan for that, saying it hurts researchers' abilities to track down the virus's source. "I've never felt scared," Guan told Caixin. "This time I'm scared."A case involving the coronavirus was identified in Washington state on Wednesday, and cases have also been identified in Thailand, Japan, South Korea, and Singapore. A total of 639 cases were confirmed in China.More stories from theweek.com Democrats walked right into Mitch McConnell's trap Texas legalized hemp, and Austin just responded to the resulting chaos by effectively decriminalizing weed The Oprah's Book Club controversy, explained


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  • 47/71   U.S.-Israeli woman jailed in Russia has not yet sought pardon: Kremlin
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The Kremlin said on Friday that the possible release of Naama Issachar, a U.S.-Israeli woman jailed in Russia on drug charges, was being held up because she had not yet formally asked to be granted a pardon.  Israel has called on Russia to release Issachar, who was sentenced by a Russian court to seven-and-a-half years in jail for drug offences in October.

    The Kremlin said on Friday that the possible release of Naama Issachar, a U.S.-Israeli woman jailed in Russia on drug charges, was being held up because she had not yet formally asked to be granted a pardon. Israel has called on Russia to release Issachar, who was sentenced by a Russian court to seven-and-a-half years in jail for drug offences in October.


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  • 48/71   The American Airlines flight attendant union is calling on US airlines to step up precautions for the deadly Wuhan coronavirus
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The Wuhan coronavirus outbreak has sickened more than 630 people and killed 18. It has spread to at least 8 countries.

    The Wuhan coronavirus outbreak has sickened more than 630 people and killed 18. It has spread to at least 8 countries.


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  • 49/71   Utah bans LGBTQ conversion therapy for minors
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    "It simply will save lives," said GOP State Representative Craig Hall, who originally sponsored the proposal.

    "It simply will save lives," said GOP State Representative Craig Hall, who originally sponsored the proposal.


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  • 50/71   Presidential candidate Tom Steyer: ‘I’m for reparations’
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    On Yahoo News’ “Hot Mic with Brittany Shepherd,” Democratic presidential candidate Tom Steyer spoke about race and reparations, saying that if he were elected to office, “I would start a commission on race on day one.”

    On Yahoo News’ “Hot Mic with Brittany Shepherd,” Democratic presidential candidate Tom Steyer spoke about race and reparations, saying that if he were elected to office, “I would start a commission on race on day one.”


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  • 51/71   Yahoo News/YouGov poll shows two-thirds of voters want the Senate to call new impeachment witnesses
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    In a new poll, 63 percent of registered voters agree that the Senate should call new witnesses to testify during President Trump’s impeachment trial.

    In a new poll, 63 percent of registered voters agree that the Senate should call new witnesses to testify during President Trump’s impeachment trial.


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  • 52/71   In the terrorism fight, Trump has continued a key Obama policy
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    President Donald Trump has rescinded, reversed or otherwise ended many of former President Barack Obama’s signature policies – but not a prominent one. When it comes to fighting terrorism, the current commander-in-chief has upheld, and even extended, his predecessor’s linchpin strategy: using U.S. military special operations forces and targeted killings on a grand global scale. This strategy is highlighted by Trump’s recent orders for the military to kill or capture al-Qaida leader Hamza bin Laden in September 2019 and Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi in October 2019 – and in January 2020, for a drone strike to kill Iranian Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani.The tactic of sending specially trained operatives into hostile territories dates back to America’s Colonial days. In September 1776, Lieut.-Col. Thomas Knowlton’s Rangers carried out one of the first U.S. reconnaissance missions, identifying enemy positions around what today is Manhattan. They quickly found themselves engaged in a firefight with the British.  Increasingly called uponIn the mid-20th century, America developed groups of covert combatants, including units that preceded the Navy SEALs, to operate in parallel with larger conventional military forces. For instance, during the Korean War, U.S. Underwater Demolition Teams accomplished what only specially trained troops could do consistently and effectively – destroying bridges and railroad tunnels.The rise of international terrorism in the 1970s led President Jimmy Carter to establish the Army’s 1st Special Forces Operational Detachment-Delta, better known as Delta Force.Obama, however, transformed special forces from an auxiliary arm into the tip – and at times, the whole – of America’s counterterrorism spear. He boosted special operations forces by 15,000 troops and support staff, bumped their budget 12% to US$10.4 billion, and deployed them much farther and wider – more than doubling their geographical footprint from 60 to 135 countries.Trump has eagerly embraced this strategy, deploying 8,000 special operations personnel to 80 countries. Today, they operate in predictable places such as Iraq and Afghanistan, as well as surprising settings such as South America’s Andes Mountains and Africa’s Sahel region.It took me 10 years of research to fully grasp Obama and Trump’s shared approach. In 2017, I co-produced “How Special Ops Became Central to the War on Terror” with Retro Report for the New York Times. PBS recently aired a shorter version. I’m also directing “Cojot,” which tells the little-known story of a hostage who played a key role in the first special operations rescue mission in a hostile country – the 1976 Operation Thunderbolt, better known as Israel’s daring Entebbe raid.My conclusion is that this strategy offers significant benefits, often in terms of speed and competency, but brings along severe risks, as well – such as lack of transparency and accountability, and potentially conflicting national priorities. Clear advantagesUsing a select group of elite troops and choosing very specific targets can be a highly efficient way for presidents to advance military and foreign policy goals that otherwise might take countless years, hundreds of billions of dollars, massive deployments, intense debates with Congress and thorny international entanglements. Imagine, for instance, if President George W. Bush had simply sent special operations troops to kill Iraqi president Saddam Hussein rather than getting mired in an endless war in that country. Trump recently offered an example, albeit on a smaller scale, of how this approach works: Shortly after announcing the pullout of U.S. troops from northern Syria, he successfully deployed Delta Force to take out al-Baghdadi.This strategy is also relatively inexpensive: Special operations spending in the 2020 federal budget amounts to US$13.8 billion – an enormous sum that is nevertheless just 1.87% of the $738 billion overall defense budget. And high-profile successes can boost presidents’ public approval ratings. Obama’s climbed from 46% to 52% after Osama bin Laden’s killing, and Trump’s rose from 41% to 45% after al-Baghdadi and Soleimani’s deaths.Using small dedicated groups can also fill gaps in intelligence-gathering left by satellites, drones and technological spying. Special operations soldiers can track leads on the ground, interrogate suspects and flesh out information needed to make sound decisions and execute complex missions. Zeroing in on specific marks can minimize harm to civilians who might live or work nearby – rather than destroying a village to kill one man, commandos can just attack that individual in his home. With this approach, the United States uses force more in line with its opponents. Unlike the skyjackers of the 1960s and 1970s, today’s ideological killers do not negotiate. They tend to be extremists, like religious fanatics or white supremacists, rather than attention-seeking secular political activists. They play by different rules, and so do special operations forces. Unlike conventional forces, special operators do not have to constantly answer to the public, face media scrutiny or become a political punching bag. In fact, the American people have rarely demanded to know more about exactly what special operations forces are up to.  Serious drawbacksOne of the problems with the dependence on special operations forces is that it exhausts the very people on whom it relies.“The force has been stretched to the max,” former Delta Force intelligence officer Wade Ishimoto says in my co-production with Retro Report, “How Special Ops Became Central to the War on Terror.” “Special operations should not be the panacea for every kind of difficulty,” he continues.Ishimoto warns that special operations soldiers are bound to burn out because there are too few of them to handle all the assignments in far-flung locations. Indeed, in recent years, they have experienced an increase in alcohol abuse and suicides.Yet Americans are often in the dark about their special operations. With specialized, clandestine forces, presidents likely find it easier to wage war without consulting Congress and without clear strategic plans. The recently released Afghanistan Papers show presidents can keep significant secrets about wars, such as the 18-years-and-counting Afghanistan conflict. The most obvious downside is that special operations missions can fail miserably. In April 1980, when Delta Force tried to rescue the American hostages held in Iran, the troops never made it past their initial rendezvous point in the desert. In 2017, al-Qaida-affiliated terrorists in Niger ambushed U.S. special forces soldiers, killing four of them. The enigmatic nature of the operations means it is possible some special forces deaths never make the nightly news or morning papers. Still, I doubt this strategy will change in any significant way, regardless of who wins the November 2020 presidential election. It’s not just that the benefits outweigh the drawbacks – it’s that, to many people, there is no better alternative. If there were, Trump would probably be quite happy to scrap yet another Obama policy.[ Expertise in your inbox. Sign up for The Conversation’s newsletter and get a digest of academic takes on today’s news, every day. ]This article is republished from The Conversation, a nonprofit news site dedicated to sharing ideas from academic experts.Read more:    * Who are the private contractors fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan? An inside look at this invisible military force  * Doping soldiers so they fight better – is it ethical?Boaz Dvir does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

    President Donald Trump has rescinded, reversed or otherwise ended many of former President Barack Obama’s signature policies – but not a prominent one. When it comes to fighting terrorism, the current commander-in-chief has upheld, and even extended, his predecessor’s linchpin strategy: using U.S. military special operations forces and targeted killings on a grand global scale. This strategy is highlighted by Trump’s recent orders for the military to kill or capture al-Qaida leader Hamza bin Laden in September 2019 and Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi in October 2019 – and in January 2020, for a drone strike to kill Iranian Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani.The tactic of sending specially trained operatives into hostile territories dates back to America’s Colonial days. In September 1776, Lieut.-Col. Thomas Knowlton’s Rangers carried out one of the first U.S. reconnaissance missions, identifying enemy positions around what today is Manhattan. They quickly found themselves engaged in a firefight with the British. Increasingly called uponIn the mid-20th century, America developed groups of covert combatants, including units that preceded the Navy SEALs, to operate in parallel with larger conventional military forces. For instance, during the Korean War, U.S. Underwater Demolition Teams accomplished what only specially trained troops could do consistently and effectively – destroying bridges and railroad tunnels.The rise of international terrorism in the 1970s led President Jimmy Carter to establish the Army’s 1st Special Forces Operational Detachment-Delta, better known as Delta Force.Obama, however, transformed special forces from an auxiliary arm into the tip – and at times, the whole – of America’s counterterrorism spear. He boosted special operations forces by 15,000 troops and support staff, bumped their budget 12% to US$10.4 billion, and deployed them much farther and wider – more than doubling their geographical footprint from 60 to 135 countries.Trump has eagerly embraced this strategy, deploying 8,000 special operations personnel to 80 countries. Today, they operate in predictable places such as Iraq and Afghanistan, as well as surprising settings such as South America’s Andes Mountains and Africa’s Sahel region.It took me 10 years of research to fully grasp Obama and Trump’s shared approach. In 2017, I co-produced “How Special Ops Became Central to the War on Terror” with Retro Report for the New York Times. PBS recently aired a shorter version. I’m also directing “Cojot,” which tells the little-known story of a hostage who played a key role in the first special operations rescue mission in a hostile country – the 1976 Operation Thunderbolt, better known as Israel’s daring Entebbe raid.My conclusion is that this strategy offers significant benefits, often in terms of speed and competency, but brings along severe risks, as well – such as lack of transparency and accountability, and potentially conflicting national priorities. Clear advantagesUsing a select group of elite troops and choosing very specific targets can be a highly efficient way for presidents to advance military and foreign policy goals that otherwise might take countless years, hundreds of billions of dollars, massive deployments, intense debates with Congress and thorny international entanglements. Imagine, for instance, if President George W. Bush had simply sent special operations troops to kill Iraqi president Saddam Hussein rather than getting mired in an endless war in that country. Trump recently offered an example, albeit on a smaller scale, of how this approach works: Shortly after announcing the pullout of U.S. troops from northern Syria, he successfully deployed Delta Force to take out al-Baghdadi.This strategy is also relatively inexpensive: Special operations spending in the 2020 federal budget amounts to US$13.8 billion – an enormous sum that is nevertheless just 1.87% of the $738 billion overall defense budget. And high-profile successes can boost presidents’ public approval ratings. Obama’s climbed from 46% to 52% after Osama bin Laden’s killing, and Trump’s rose from 41% to 45% after al-Baghdadi and Soleimani’s deaths.Using small dedicated groups can also fill gaps in intelligence-gathering left by satellites, drones and technological spying. Special operations soldiers can track leads on the ground, interrogate suspects and flesh out information needed to make sound decisions and execute complex missions. Zeroing in on specific marks can minimize harm to civilians who might live or work nearby – rather than destroying a village to kill one man, commandos can just attack that individual in his home. With this approach, the United States uses force more in line with its opponents. Unlike the skyjackers of the 1960s and 1970s, today’s ideological killers do not negotiate. They tend to be extremists, like religious fanatics or white supremacists, rather than attention-seeking secular political activists. They play by different rules, and so do special operations forces. Unlike conventional forces, special operators do not have to constantly answer to the public, face media scrutiny or become a political punching bag. In fact, the American people have rarely demanded to know more about exactly what special operations forces are up to. Serious drawbacksOne of the problems with the dependence on special operations forces is that it exhausts the very people on whom it relies.“The force has been stretched to the max,” former Delta Force intelligence officer Wade Ishimoto says in my co-production with Retro Report, “How Special Ops Became Central to the War on Terror.” “Special operations should not be the panacea for every kind of difficulty,” he continues.Ishimoto warns that special operations soldiers are bound to burn out because there are too few of them to handle all the assignments in far-flung locations. Indeed, in recent years, they have experienced an increase in alcohol abuse and suicides.Yet Americans are often in the dark about their special operations. With specialized, clandestine forces, presidents likely find it easier to wage war without consulting Congress and without clear strategic plans. The recently released Afghanistan Papers show presidents can keep significant secrets about wars, such as the 18-years-and-counting Afghanistan conflict. The most obvious downside is that special operations missions can fail miserably. In April 1980, when Delta Force tried to rescue the American hostages held in Iran, the troops never made it past their initial rendezvous point in the desert. In 2017, al-Qaida-affiliated terrorists in Niger ambushed U.S. special forces soldiers, killing four of them. The enigmatic nature of the operations means it is possible some special forces deaths never make the nightly news or morning papers. Still, I doubt this strategy will change in any significant way, regardless of who wins the November 2020 presidential election. It’s not just that the benefits outweigh the drawbacks – it’s that, to many people, there is no better alternative. If there were, Trump would probably be quite happy to scrap yet another Obama policy.[ Expertise in your inbox. Sign up for The Conversation’s newsletter and get a digest of academic takes on today’s news, every day. ]This article is republished from The Conversation, a nonprofit news site dedicated to sharing ideas from academic experts.Read more: * Who are the private contractors fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan? An inside look at this invisible military force * Doping soldiers so they fight better – is it ethical?Boaz Dvir does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.


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  • 53/71   200 years of exploring Antarctica – the world's coldest, most forbidding and most peaceful continent
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Antarctica is the remotest part of the world, but it is a hub of scientific discovery, international diplomacy and environmental change. It was officially discovered 200 years ago, on Jan. 27, 1820, when members of a Russian expedition sighted land in what is now known as the Fimbul Ice Shelf on the continent’s east side. Early explorers were drawn there by the mythology of Terra Australis, a vast southern continent that scholars imagined for centuries as a counterweight to the Northern Hemisphere. Others sought economic bounty from hunting whales and seals, or the glory of conquering the planet’s last wilderness. Still others wanted to understand Earth’s magnetic fields in order to better navigate the seas. I am a geologist who specializes in understanding the timing and extent of past ice ages. Much of my work focuses on the glacial history of Antarctica, and I’ve been privileged to conduct five field seasons of research there. For the next two years I’ll be working with a field team made up entirely of undergraduate students from Vanderbilt University to determine whether the East Antarctic Ice Sheet changes flow patterns as it changes shape. All of the research these budding scientists conduct will be done under the auspices of the Antarctic Treaty, a global agreement that promotes scientific cooperation and environmental protection. Frozen but abundantAntarctica separated from South America 35 million years ago, and its climate started to change. It began to grow ice sheets – masses of glacial land ice covering thousands of square miles. As plate tectonics shifted other continents, Antarctica became colder and drier. For the past 14 million years, it has been the frigid continent that persists today. Antarctica is the only continent that was literally discovered, because it has no native human population. British explorer Sir James Cook circumnavigated the continent in 1772-1775, but saw only some outlying islands. Cook concluded that if there were any land, it would be “condemned to everlasting regidity by Nature, never to yield to the warmth of the sun.” Cook also reported that Antarctic waters were rich with nutrients and wildlife. This drew sealers and whalers, mainly from England and the United States, who hunted the region’s fur seals and elephant seals to near-extinction in the following decades. This hunting spree led to the discovery of the Antarctic mainland and its ice sheets, the largest in the world. Reading the iceToday the combined East and West Antarctic ice sheets hold 90% of the world’s ice, enough to raise global sea levels by roughly 200 feet (60 meters) if it all melted. Antarctica is the coldest, highest, driest, windiest, brightest, and yes, iciest continent on Earth. And 200 years of research has shown that it is a key component of Earth’s climate system.Despite the appearance that it is an unchanging, freeze-dried landscape, my research and work by many others has shown that the East Antarctica Ice Sheet does slowly thin and thicken over millions of years. Interestingly, my data also suggest that as the ice advances and retreats, it moves in the same patterns each time. Put another way, the ice flows over the same land each time it advances.While East Antarctica adds and loses ice slowly, it is so large that it is a major contributor to sea level rise. Understanding how the ice has changed in the past is key to predicting how much and how fast it will melt in the coming years. These questions are especially important in West Antarctica, where the bottom of the ice sheet is below sea level, making it very susceptible to changes in sea level and ocean temperature. By itself, the West Antarctic ice sheet has the potential to raise sea level by 16 feet (5 meters) if it collapses.As climate change raises global sea levels, parts of the West Antarctica Ice Sheet, such as the Thwaites and Pine Island Glaciers, are particularly vulnerable to collapse. At the end of the last ice age, parts of West Antarctica thinned by an average of 1.5 to 3 feet (0.5 - 1 meters) per year. Today with GPS, satellite and airborne measurements, scientists are seeing parts of West Antarctica thin by 3 to 20 feet (1 to 6 meters) per year. We also know from the geological record that this ice sheet is capable of rapid collapses, and has sometimes thinned at rates in excess of 30 feet (10 meters) per year. Recent models show sea level could rise by 1 meter by 2100 and 15 meters by 2500 if greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise at current rates and the ice sheet experiences a rapid collapse, as it has in the past.  Finding inspiration in scientific diplomacyDespite the potential for environmental disaster in Antarctica, the continent also offers evidence that nations can collaborate to find solutions. The Antarctic Treaty System is the world’s premier example of peaceful and scientific international cooperation. This landmark accord, signed in 1961, sets aside Antarctica for peaceful and scientific purposes and recognizes no land claims on the continent. It also was the first non-nuclear accord ever signed, barring use of Antarctica for nuclear weapons testing or disposal of radioactive waste.The great Antarctic explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton said that “optimism is true moral courage,” and the authors of the Antarctic Treaty were certainly courageous optimists. They were encouraged by the success of the 1957-1958 International Geophysical Year, a worldwide program of scientific research during which 12 countries built over 50 bases in Antarctica, including McMurdo Station and the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. Under the treaty, scientists from North Korea, Russia and China can freely visit U.S. research stations in Antarctica. Researchers from India and Pakistan willingly share their data about Antarctic glaciers. Thanks to the Antarctic Treaty, 10% of Earth’s land surface is protected as a wildlife and wilderness refuge. I have set foot in places in Antarctica where I know no one has ever been before, and the treaty sets areas aside that no one will ever visit. Antarctica’s landscapes are unlike anywhere else on Earth. The best comparison may be the Moon. Yet in these stark environments, life finds a way to persist – showing that there are solutions to even the most daunting challenges. If Antarctica has taught us anything in 200 years, it’s that we can cooperate and collaborate to overcome problems. As Ernest Shackleton once said, “Difficulties are just things to overcome, after all.” [ Thanks for reading! We can send you The Conversation’s stories every day in an informative email. Sign up today. ]This article is republished from The Conversation, a nonprofit news site dedicated to sharing ideas from academic experts.Read more:    * Short-term changes in Antarctica’s ice shelves are key to predicting their long-term fate  * Emperor Penguins could march to extinction if nations fail to halt climate changeDan Morgan receives funding from the National Science Foundation.

    Antarctica is the remotest part of the world, but it is a hub of scientific discovery, international diplomacy and environmental change. It was officially discovered 200 years ago, on Jan. 27, 1820, when members of a Russian expedition sighted land in what is now known as the Fimbul Ice Shelf on the continent’s east side. Early explorers were drawn there by the mythology of Terra Australis, a vast southern continent that scholars imagined for centuries as a counterweight to the Northern Hemisphere. Others sought economic bounty from hunting whales and seals, or the glory of conquering the planet’s last wilderness. Still others wanted to understand Earth’s magnetic fields in order to better navigate the seas. I am a geologist who specializes in understanding the timing and extent of past ice ages. Much of my work focuses on the glacial history of Antarctica, and I’ve been privileged to conduct five field seasons of research there. For the next two years I’ll be working with a field team made up entirely of undergraduate students from Vanderbilt University to determine whether the East Antarctic Ice Sheet changes flow patterns as it changes shape. All of the research these budding scientists conduct will be done under the auspices of the Antarctic Treaty, a global agreement that promotes scientific cooperation and environmental protection. Frozen but abundantAntarctica separated from South America 35 million years ago, and its climate started to change. It began to grow ice sheets – masses of glacial land ice covering thousands of square miles. As plate tectonics shifted other continents, Antarctica became colder and drier. For the past 14 million years, it has been the frigid continent that persists today. Antarctica is the only continent that was literally discovered, because it has no native human population. British explorer Sir James Cook circumnavigated the continent in 1772-1775, but saw only some outlying islands. Cook concluded that if there were any land, it would be “condemned to everlasting regidity by Nature, never to yield to the warmth of the sun.” Cook also reported that Antarctic waters were rich with nutrients and wildlife. This drew sealers and whalers, mainly from England and the United States, who hunted the region’s fur seals and elephant seals to near-extinction in the following decades. This hunting spree led to the discovery of the Antarctic mainland and its ice sheets, the largest in the world. Reading the iceToday the combined East and West Antarctic ice sheets hold 90% of the world’s ice, enough to raise global sea levels by roughly 200 feet (60 meters) if it all melted. Antarctica is the coldest, highest, driest, windiest, brightest, and yes, iciest continent on Earth. And 200 years of research has shown that it is a key component of Earth’s climate system.Despite the appearance that it is an unchanging, freeze-dried landscape, my research and work by many others has shown that the East Antarctica Ice Sheet does slowly thin and thicken over millions of years. Interestingly, my data also suggest that as the ice advances and retreats, it moves in the same patterns each time. Put another way, the ice flows over the same land each time it advances.While East Antarctica adds and loses ice slowly, it is so large that it is a major contributor to sea level rise. Understanding how the ice has changed in the past is key to predicting how much and how fast it will melt in the coming years. These questions are especially important in West Antarctica, where the bottom of the ice sheet is below sea level, making it very susceptible to changes in sea level and ocean temperature. By itself, the West Antarctic ice sheet has the potential to raise sea level by 16 feet (5 meters) if it collapses.As climate change raises global sea levels, parts of the West Antarctica Ice Sheet, such as the Thwaites and Pine Island Glaciers, are particularly vulnerable to collapse. At the end of the last ice age, parts of West Antarctica thinned by an average of 1.5 to 3 feet (0.5 - 1 meters) per year. Today with GPS, satellite and airborne measurements, scientists are seeing parts of West Antarctica thin by 3 to 20 feet (1 to 6 meters) per year. We also know from the geological record that this ice sheet is capable of rapid collapses, and has sometimes thinned at rates in excess of 30 feet (10 meters) per year. Recent models show sea level could rise by 1 meter by 2100 and 15 meters by 2500 if greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise at current rates and the ice sheet experiences a rapid collapse, as it has in the past. Finding inspiration in scientific diplomacyDespite the potential for environmental disaster in Antarctica, the continent also offers evidence that nations can collaborate to find solutions. The Antarctic Treaty System is the world’s premier example of peaceful and scientific international cooperation. This landmark accord, signed in 1961, sets aside Antarctica for peaceful and scientific purposes and recognizes no land claims on the continent. It also was the first non-nuclear accord ever signed, barring use of Antarctica for nuclear weapons testing or disposal of radioactive waste.The great Antarctic explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton said that “optimism is true moral courage,” and the authors of the Antarctic Treaty were certainly courageous optimists. They were encouraged by the success of the 1957-1958 International Geophysical Year, a worldwide program of scientific research during which 12 countries built over 50 bases in Antarctica, including McMurdo Station and the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. Under the treaty, scientists from North Korea, Russia and China can freely visit U.S. research stations in Antarctica. Researchers from India and Pakistan willingly share their data about Antarctic glaciers. Thanks to the Antarctic Treaty, 10% of Earth’s land surface is protected as a wildlife and wilderness refuge. I have set foot in places in Antarctica where I know no one has ever been before, and the treaty sets areas aside that no one will ever visit. Antarctica’s landscapes are unlike anywhere else on Earth. The best comparison may be the Moon. Yet in these stark environments, life finds a way to persist – showing that there are solutions to even the most daunting challenges. If Antarctica has taught us anything in 200 years, it’s that we can cooperate and collaborate to overcome problems. As Ernest Shackleton once said, “Difficulties are just things to overcome, after all.” [ Thanks for reading! We can send you The Conversation’s stories every day in an informative email. Sign up today. ]This article is republished from The Conversation, a nonprofit news site dedicated to sharing ideas from academic experts.Read more: * Short-term changes in Antarctica’s ice shelves are key to predicting their long-term fate * Emperor Penguins could march to extinction if nations fail to halt climate changeDan Morgan receives funding from the National Science Foundation.


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  • 54/71   Global Elite Upbeat While Climate Activists Rage: Davos Update
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up here to receive the Davos Diary, a special daily newsletter that will run from Jan. 20-24.The rich and powerful are in Davos, Switzerland, for the World Economic Forum’s 50th annual meeting, and the gathering is being closely watched to see how the global elite aims to tackle problems they helped create, above all climate change.The economy was in focus on the final day, and many delegates signaled optimism on the outlook for this year. European Central Bank President Christine Lagarde told Bloomberg TV that investors shouldn’t assume current monetary policy is locked in just because officials are reviewing their strategy.Swedish activist Greta Thunberg, who called a climate strike for Friday near the forum, slammed delegates for failing to treat global warming as a crisis.To get all the highlights delivered to your inbox, sign up for the Davos Diary newsletter. Here’s the latest (time-stamps are local time in Davos):Davos Endorses Fiscal Boost With Mnuchin Touting Tax Cuts (1:30 p.m.)Top financial officials from the major global economies used the forum’s final day to tout the benefits of government spending as a way to lift growth and reduce reliance on overloaded central banks.U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin labeled the U.S. a “bright spot” and attributed that to President Donald Trump’s tax cuts -- along with his rollback of regulations and his trade deals. Bank of Japan Governor Haruhiko Kuroda said his nation, where fiscal and monetary policies are aligned, is seeing “very strong” business investment.The International Monetary Fund‘s chief, Kristalina Georgieva, said the global economy is “in a better place” than last year for three reasons -- an easing of trade tensions, synchronized interest-rate cuts, and a bottoming out in industrial production. “We have to see fiscal policy being more aggressive,” she added.‘Things Going Pretty Well’: Bain’s Pagliuca (1:20 p.m.)Bain Capital Co-Chair Stephen Pagliuca joined other Davos delegates in expressing optimism about the economy, saying “things are going pretty well.”“It’s kind of chugging along,” Pagliuca told Bloomberg TV. “Our businesses are doing well, record low unemployment in the U.S., we’ve had kind of an oil dividend for six or seven years now, oil’s very cheap, energy’s very cheap. And so restaurants are full, planes are full and things are going pretty well.”Mnuchin Sees 20-Year Bonds Extending Average Maturity (1:39 p.m.)Mnuchin sees the U.S.’s new 20-year bond extending “slightly” the average maturity on government debt as his department prepares to launch that security and limit the cost of financing a budget deficit set to reach $1 trillion this year.Issuing ultra-long bonds, those due in more than 30 years, is “no longer on the near term -- our focus for the moment is issuing the 20-year,” Mnuchin said in an interview.“If you look at the number of 20-year bonds that we’ll raise, this will slightly extend” the average maturity, he said, declining to predict by how much. “This isn’t going to be a massive extension.”Kurz Sees German Greens in Government (1 p.m.)Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz expects his German conservative peers to follow his lead and team up with the Greens after the next election.Kurz said that he hopes the era of “grand coalitions” between conservative and center-left mainstream parties is over in Europe.“I’m almost ready to bet that there can be a similar government in Germany after the next election,” he said in an interview. “I’m skeptical of those ‘grand coalitions,’ which had their justification after World War II but became just mutual blockade in recent years.”Mnuchin Says Technology Will Make a Carbon Tax Redundant (12:55 p.m.)U.S. Treasury Secretary Mnuchin said technological developments would make carbon tax redundant, going against the grain of other participants.“If you want to put a tax on people, go ahead and put a carbon tax. That is a tax on hard working people,” Mnuchin said, speaking on a panel alongside Lagarde. “I personally think the costs are going to be a lot lower 10 years from now because of technology.”“I don’t mean to minimize this issue, there’s lots of other issues we could talk about,” Mnuchin said. “The world is dependent upon having reasonable-priced energy for the next 10 or 20 years, or we’re not going to create growth, we’re not going to create jobs.”South Africa Must Push Reforms, Mboweni Says (12:53 p.m.)South Africa’s government will press ahead with structural reforms to kick-start the economy and needs to talk with labor unions to get them on board, Finance Minister Tito Mboweni said.Investors and business lobby groups have expressed frustration at the slow pace of reforms that were promised when Cyril Ramaphosa became president in February 2018. While the delays are often thought to be due to policy disagreements within the ruling party and government, Mboweni told reporters in Davos that there’s unanimity within cabinet to push structural reforms.“There’s a need for a long conversations with the trade union movement in South Africa about structural reforms,” he said. “There are some areas where they do not agree, therefore conversations have to be held.”Scholz Doesn’t See Negative Brexit Impact on EU (12:10 p.m.)German Finance Minister Olaf Scholz said Britain’s exit from the European Union will hurt the U.K. economy but won’t have a negative impact on the rest of the bloc.“There is a task left, which is to now to get an agreement about the further relationship, but if this is also managed I’m absolutely confident that, especially on the continent, there will be no negative effect of this development,” Scholz said during a panel discussion.“It will be more difficult for the U.K., obviously, because this business model must be reorganized,” he said, adding that he’s “relatively confident” about prospects for a U.S.-EU trade agreement.U.S., China Trade Spat Is World’s “Greatest Danger,” Frenkel Says (12:10 p.m.)Jacob Frenkel, head of JPMorgan Chase & Co.’s international unit and a former governor of the Bank of Israel, described the trade war between the U.S. and China as “the greatest danger to the growth of the world economy.”The “skirmish” between the two countries has affected expectations, mood and capital investment plans and placed in danger “the bridges that connect the various parts of the global economy,” Frenkel said in a Bloomberg TV interview.Frenkel added that interest rates close to zero has “exhausted its benefits” and is causing damage to the financial industry.Japan Still ‘Far Away’ From Inflation Goal: Kuroda (11:55 a.m.)The Bank of Japan will maintain its “accommodative” monetary policy stance for the time being as it strives to lift inflation closer to its target, according to Governor Kuroda.“We are still far away from the 2% inflation target so that the Bank of Japan will continue accommodative monetary policy for some time,” Kuroda said during a panel discussion. Domestic demand is fairly strong in Japan and strength in business investment will likely continue, Kuroda added.Trade Deals Reduce Uncertainty, Lagarde Says (11:50 a.m.)Lagarde said the outlook for the euro region is mixed but an easing of trade tensions has made downside risks less pronounced.“I see some positive signs, and I see some concerning signs as well,” the ECB president said during a panel discussion. “We are delighted to see trade agreements or truces being negotiated and concluded because we believe it will remove uncertainty the world over.”“Brexit is a little bit less uncertain, but we still have that possible cliff edge in December 2020,” Lagarde added, referring to the deadline for Britain and the EU to negotiate a trade agreement.Thunberg Protest Urges “System Change” (11:40 a.m.)Thunberg marched with a great swarm of media to join a group of more than 50 protesters near the forum. With placards that read “planet over profit” and “stop (f)lying to us,” demonstrators chanted “system change not climate change” and “oceans are rising and so are we.”Onlookers and media outnumber the climate activists by about two to one.At the press conference earlier, one of the activists said that there was an international group of climate strikers in Davos who had been sleeping outside in tents to experience the discomfort we all need to face to stop the use of fossil fuels.No End in Sight to Plastics Crisis (11:15 a.m.)Only a small fraction of all plastic produced is recycled, and much of the rest often ends up affecting wildlife in oceans and forests, according to participants in a panel discussion developed with QuickTake by Bloomberg.Reducing use of plastics needs to be a broad-based effort, but is critical for consumer goods companies, according to Tak Niinami, chief executive officer of drinks maker Suntory Holdings Ltd. “We industry want to be liked by society, otherwise we can’t survive,” he said.The use of plastics has doubled in the last two decades, and it’s expected to double again in the next two. “We cannot allow it,” said former U.S. Vice President Al Gore.‘We’re in a Better Place’: Goldman’s Patel (11:15 a.m.)Sheila Patel, chairman of Goldman Sachs Asset Management, said the global economy is “certainly in a better place than we were a year ago at Davos.”“A year ago you had everyone worried about liquidity, extremely worried about where the markets would head and we were counseling calm,” Patel told Bloomberg TV.“Today you have people worried about liquidity given the mix of public to private that they have in their portfolios, particularly the way that various investors have leaned in to things like private credit,” she added.Thunberg Says Davos Has Failed on Climate (10:46 a.m.)Thunberg used a Friday press conference to declare the forum a failure on addressing the case for climate action she first made at Davos last year.“Before we came here, we had a few demands for the WEF, and the demands have been completely ignored,” she said. “Of course we expected nothing less,” the 17-year-old said.“We must remember that as long as we don’t treat this crisis as a crisis, as long as science is ignored, we won’t be able to solve this crisis,” she said, speaking alongside other young climate activists.She interjected during remarks by one of her fellow activists to specify that the urgency they all felt around climate action didn’t mean the end is near. “Of course, this is not the last year we have,” she said.Germany Maintaining ‘Strong’ Investment: Scholz (10:40 a.m.)German Finance Minister Scholz said the country has “a very expansionary fiscal policy” and last year’s budget surplus will give Chancellor Angela Merkel’s government room to maintain strong investment.“We are already doing a lot of things which will help to expand investments,” Scholz said in an interview with Bloomberg TV. “Now with the surplus we have all the possibility to be strong in this field as anyone asks us to be and as we really want ourselves.”A trade deal between the U.S. and the European Union is possible “really soon,” although it will require “very hard work,” Scholz said.“It is absolutely important that we do not build trade barriers,” he added. “The wealth of the nation is better when we have a rules-based free trade.”Villeroy Calls for Flexible, Credible Inflation Target (10:31 a.m.)The ECB should ensure in its strategic review that its inflation target is “symmetric, flexible and credible,” Governing Council member Francois Villeroy de Galhau said.To be credible the ECB must explain its inflation target to households and businesses and listen to them about their inflation expectations, Villeroy said in a Bloomberg TV interview. The strategic review should go beyond market professionals to households and businesses because they are price makers and wage-setters, he added.Centeno Sees Germany Stepping Up Spending (10:10 a.m.)To spur economic activity, euro-area countries that can spend more need to, and Germany is showing signs that it is ready to play its part, according to Eurogroup President Mario Centeno.“We know that some countries have more space than others to act,” Centeno said in a Bloomberg TV interview. “Germany is one of those countries that can act, and actually we see some action from the German side.”Recent investment in the rail sector “goes precisely in that direction,” Centeno added. “It’s public investment, connected with climate action. I expect more of those actions to be taken in the course of 2020, so that 2020 can finally see this acceleration of the global economy, and Europe can also play a role in that.”EU, China, Brazil Form Trade-Dispute Alliance (10 a.m.)The European Union and a group of 16 nations that includes China and Brazil are forming an alliance to settle trade disputes among themselves using an interim appeal-arbitration mechanism at the World Trade Organization.“We will work towards putting in place contingency measures that would allow for appeals of WTO panel reports in disputes among ourselves,” according to a copy of a joint declaration obtained by Bloomberg.The development marks an advance of the EU’s backup plan for settling international trade disputes now that the WTO appellate body is paralyzed. WTO delegates meeting in Davos are expected to announce the arrangement later Friday.“We believe that a functioning dispute settlement system of the WTO is of the utmost importance for the rules-based trading system, and that an independent and impartial appeal stage must continue to be one of its essential features,” according to the document.ESM Chief Sees More People Now in Favor of Stronger Euro Role (9:05 a.m.)The international role of the euro is becoming increasingly the focus of debate in Europe, according to European Stability Mechanism Managing Director Klaus Regling.“More people are now in favor of having a stronger role for the euro which is partly the answer to the U.S. current administration withdrawing from multilateralism,” Regling said in a Bloomberg TV interview.”Europe believes in multilateralism, and one way to strengthen European sovereignty is the international role of the euro.”Tech CEOs Dodge Issues by Warning About AI (9 a.m.)Technology’s most influential leaders have a new message: It’s not us you need to worry about -- it’s artificial intelligence.Two years ago big tech embarked on a repentance tour to Davos in response to criticism about the companies’ role in issues such as election interference by Russia-backed groups; spreading misinformation; the distribution of extremist content; antitrust violations; and tax avoidance. Uber Technologies Inc.’s new chief even asked to be regulated.These problems haven’t gone away, but this time executives warned that AI that must be regulated, rather than the companies themselves.“AI is one of the most profound things we’re working on as humanity. It’s more profound than fire or electricity,” Alphabet Inc. Chief Executive Officer Sundar Pichai said in an interview. Comparing it to international discussions on climate change, he said, “you can’t get safety by having one country or a set of countries working on it. You need a global framework.”German Health Minister Says China Virus Less of a Threat (8:45 a.m.)China is more transparent and more aggressive in attempting to control the coronavirus outbreak compared with SARS, and that’s helping the international community better prepare to deal with the situation, according to German Health Minister Jens Spahn.“We are prepared and keep on preparing, but at the same time I think we have to put into perspective,” Spahn said in a Bloomberg TV interview. “There’s a big difference to SARS.”Coronavirus the ‘New Norm’: Axa’s Buberl (8:30 a.m.)Axa SA Chief Executive Officer Thomas Buberl said outbreaks like the coronavirus are the “new norm” and there will be more viruses popping up due to climate change.“We always learn in these emergency situations and then forget again when it’s gone,” Buberl told Bloomberg TV.“We need to remind ourselves that the environment is changing, it is getting warmer everywhere and therefore new viruses will pop up,” he added. “Going forward, the implication of climate on health is something that we need to study more and need to understand better.”VW’s Diess Upbeat on Battle With Tesla (8:10 a.m.)Volkswagen AG Chief Executive Officer Herbert Diess said he’s optimistic the German car giant can keep pace with Tesla Inc. in the electric-car market and even overtake Elon Musk’s company at some point.“I think it’s an open race” to define the car of the future, Diess told Bloomberg TV. “I would take Tesla more seriously than Google and there are also from our peers some very competitive companies like Toyota.”This year will be “very difficult” for automakers, with global demand “basically flat” and tighter emissions regulations coming into force in Europe, Diess said. “We’re basically optimistic, but it will be a very demanding year for the industry,” he added.Lagarde: ECB Policy Not Necessarily on Autopilot (7:30 a.m.)Lagarde said that market observers should not assume that the ECB’s monetary policy will be on “autopilot” for the next two years.“To those who think that it’s autopilot, I think that’s ridiculous,” Lagarde said in an interview with Bloomberg TV’s Francine Lacqua. “There is a forward guidance, which is strong, which is setting a very clear timetable that is fact dependent. But let’s look at the facts. Let’s look at how the economy evolves.”Lagarde added that if markets are interested in what happens over the next 12 months, “they should not pay too much attention” to the ECB’s strategy review.“To those who say it’s going to be completely static and stable for 12 months I say watch out, because things change and we might have different signals and we might reconsider,” she said. She conceded that the goal of completing the review by the end of this year is “ambitious.”Carrie Lam Courts Elite With Dim Sum (5:39 a.m.)Carrie Lam hosted 200 business and political leaders for dim sum and cocktails at a Swiss ski resort to reassure them that Hong Kong’s future is bright.The city’s leader said that Hong Kong is still open for business, despite paralyzing protests and an economy in recession. She also said that officials back home are working to contain the coronavirus that’s killed more than two dozen people in China and infected hundreds of others. Hong Kong has identified two cases.In a room decorated with gold candles and red Chinese lanterns for Lunar New Year, Lam said her government “will safeguard Hong Kong’s fundamentals, including the rule of law.” She was also “fully confident of the city’s future,” according to a readout from her office.Singapore Leader Says Rebound Depends on Calm (1:57 a.m.)Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong said the city state’s economy could improve in 2020 only if any number of global risks don’t materialize, particularly emanating from the U.S.Lee said that he’s “relieved” that Singapore’s economy escaped recession in 2019. The government’s growth forecast for this year -- anywhere from 0.5%-2.5% -- indicates “we really don’t know” how things will pan out, he said in an interview with Bloomberg’s Editor-in-Chief John Micklethwait.“That’s the range of what our economy is capable of, but whether we realize that capability, that potential, depends on international conditions,” Lee said. “If there’s a blowout between China and America, or if there’s something happening in the Middle East, either with Iran or with Syria, then all bets are off.”Soros: Facebook Conspiring to Re-Elect Trump (00:18 a.m.)Billionaire George Soros said that nothing is keeping Facebook Inc. from spreading disinformation and the company may be in cahoots with Trump to get him re-elected.“I think there is a kind of informal mutual assistance operation or agreement developing between Trump and Facebook,” Soros, 89, said Thursday. “Facebook will work together to re-elect Trump, and Trump will work to protect Facebook so that this situation cannot be changed and it makes me very concerned about the outcome for 2020.”Soros didn’t offer any evidence for his claim. “This is just plain wrong,” Facebook spokesman Andy Stone said in response.\--With assistance from Shelly Banjo, Dandan Li, Michelle Jamrisko, Katia Porzecanski, Sarah Frier, Francine Lacqua, Geraldine Amiel, Haslinda Amin, Viktoria Dendrinou, Giles Turner, Bryce Baschuk, Joao Lima, Aaron Rutkoff, Javier Blas, Akshat Rathi, Donal Griffin, Boris Groendahl, Jill Ward, Saleha Mohsin and Paul Gordon.To contact the reporters on this story: Chris Reiter in Berlin at creiter2@bloomberg.net;Iain Rogers in Berlin at irogers11@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Chad Thomas at cthomas16@bloomberg.net;Simon Kennedy at skennedy4@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up here to receive the Davos Diary, a special daily newsletter that will run from Jan. 20-24.The rich and powerful are in Davos, Switzerland, for the World Economic Forum’s 50th annual meeting, and the gathering is being closely watched to see how the global elite aims to tackle problems they helped create, above all climate change.The economy was in focus on the final day, and many delegates signaled optimism on the outlook for this year. European Central Bank President Christine Lagarde told Bloomberg TV that investors shouldn’t assume current monetary policy is locked in just because officials are reviewing their strategy.Swedish activist Greta Thunberg, who called a climate strike for Friday near the forum, slammed delegates for failing to treat global warming as a crisis.To get all the highlights delivered to your inbox, sign up for the Davos Diary newsletter. Here’s the latest (time-stamps are local time in Davos):Davos Endorses Fiscal Boost With Mnuchin Touting Tax Cuts (1:30 p.m.)Top financial officials from the major global economies used the forum’s final day to tout the benefits of government spending as a way to lift growth and reduce reliance on overloaded central banks.U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin labeled the U.S. a “bright spot” and attributed that to President Donald Trump’s tax cuts -- along with his rollback of regulations and his trade deals. Bank of Japan Governor Haruhiko Kuroda said his nation, where fiscal and monetary policies are aligned, is seeing “very strong” business investment.The International Monetary Fund‘s chief, Kristalina Georgieva, said the global economy is “in a better place” than last year for three reasons -- an easing of trade tensions, synchronized interest-rate cuts, and a bottoming out in industrial production. “We have to see fiscal policy being more aggressive,” she added.‘Things Going Pretty Well’: Bain’s Pagliuca (1:20 p.m.)Bain Capital Co-Chair Stephen Pagliuca joined other Davos delegates in expressing optimism about the economy, saying “things are going pretty well.”“It’s kind of chugging along,” Pagliuca told Bloomberg TV. “Our businesses are doing well, record low unemployment in the U.S., we’ve had kind of an oil dividend for six or seven years now, oil’s very cheap, energy’s very cheap. And so restaurants are full, planes are full and things are going pretty well.”Mnuchin Sees 20-Year Bonds Extending Average Maturity (1:39 p.m.)Mnuchin sees the U.S.’s new 20-year bond extending “slightly” the average maturity on government debt as his department prepares to launch that security and limit the cost of financing a budget deficit set to reach $1 trillion this year.Issuing ultra-long bonds, those due in more than 30 years, is “no longer on the near term -- our focus for the moment is issuing the 20-year,” Mnuchin said in an interview.“If you look at the number of 20-year bonds that we’ll raise, this will slightly extend” the average maturity, he said, declining to predict by how much. “This isn’t going to be a massive extension.”Kurz Sees German Greens in Government (1 p.m.)Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz expects his German conservative peers to follow his lead and team up with the Greens after the next election.Kurz said that he hopes the era of “grand coalitions” between conservative and center-left mainstream parties is over in Europe.“I’m almost ready to bet that there can be a similar government in Germany after the next election,” he said in an interview. “I’m skeptical of those ‘grand coalitions,’ which had their justification after World War II but became just mutual blockade in recent years.”Mnuchin Says Technology Will Make a Carbon Tax Redundant (12:55 p.m.)U.S. Treasury Secretary Mnuchin said technological developments would make carbon tax redundant, going against the grain of other participants.“If you want to put a tax on people, go ahead and put a carbon tax. That is a tax on hard working people,” Mnuchin said, speaking on a panel alongside Lagarde. “I personally think the costs are going to be a lot lower 10 years from now because of technology.”“I don’t mean to minimize this issue, there’s lots of other issues we could talk about,” Mnuchin said. “The world is dependent upon having reasonable-priced energy for the next 10 or 20 years, or we’re not going to create growth, we’re not going to create jobs.”South Africa Must Push Reforms, Mboweni Says (12:53 p.m.)South Africa’s government will press ahead with structural reforms to kick-start the economy and needs to talk with labor unions to get them on board, Finance Minister Tito Mboweni said.Investors and business lobby groups have expressed frustration at the slow pace of reforms that were promised when Cyril Ramaphosa became president in February 2018. While the delays are often thought to be due to policy disagreements within the ruling party and government, Mboweni told reporters in Davos that there’s unanimity within cabinet to push structural reforms.“There’s a need for a long conversations with the trade union movement in South Africa about structural reforms,” he said. “There are some areas where they do not agree, therefore conversations have to be held.”Scholz Doesn’t See Negative Brexit Impact on EU (12:10 p.m.)German Finance Minister Olaf Scholz said Britain’s exit from the European Union will hurt the U.K. economy but won’t have a negative impact on the rest of the bloc.“There is a task left, which is to now to get an agreement about the further relationship, but if this is also managed I’m absolutely confident that, especially on the continent, there will be no negative effect of this development,” Scholz said during a panel discussion.“It will be more difficult for the U.K., obviously, because this business model must be reorganized,” he said, adding that he’s “relatively confident” about prospects for a U.S.-EU trade agreement.U.S., China Trade Spat Is World’s “Greatest Danger,” Frenkel Says (12:10 p.m.)Jacob Frenkel, head of JPMorgan Chase & Co.’s international unit and a former governor of the Bank of Israel, described the trade war between the U.S. and China as “the greatest danger to the growth of the world economy.”The “skirmish” between the two countries has affected expectations, mood and capital investment plans and placed in danger “the bridges that connect the various parts of the global economy,” Frenkel said in a Bloomberg TV interview.Frenkel added that interest rates close to zero has “exhausted its benefits” and is causing damage to the financial industry.Japan Still ‘Far Away’ From Inflation Goal: Kuroda (11:55 a.m.)The Bank of Japan will maintain its “accommodative” monetary policy stance for the time being as it strives to lift inflation closer to its target, according to Governor Kuroda.“We are still far away from the 2% inflation target so that the Bank of Japan will continue accommodative monetary policy for some time,” Kuroda said during a panel discussion. Domestic demand is fairly strong in Japan and strength in business investment will likely continue, Kuroda added.Trade Deals Reduce Uncertainty, Lagarde Says (11:50 a.m.)Lagarde said the outlook for the euro region is mixed but an easing of trade tensions has made downside risks less pronounced.“I see some positive signs, and I see some concerning signs as well,” the ECB president said during a panel discussion. “We are delighted to see trade agreements or truces being negotiated and concluded because we believe it will remove uncertainty the world over.”“Brexit is a little bit less uncertain, but we still have that possible cliff edge in December 2020,” Lagarde added, referring to the deadline for Britain and the EU to negotiate a trade agreement.Thunberg Protest Urges “System Change” (11:40 a.m.)Thunberg marched with a great swarm of media to join a group of more than 50 protesters near the forum. With placards that read “planet over profit” and “stop (f)lying to us,” demonstrators chanted “system change not climate change” and “oceans are rising and so are we.”Onlookers and media outnumber the climate activists by about two to one.At the press conference earlier, one of the activists said that there was an international group of climate strikers in Davos who had been sleeping outside in tents to experience the discomfort we all need to face to stop the use of fossil fuels.No End in Sight to Plastics Crisis (11:15 a.m.)Only a small fraction of all plastic produced is recycled, and much of the rest often ends up affecting wildlife in oceans and forests, according to participants in a panel discussion developed with QuickTake by Bloomberg.Reducing use of plastics needs to be a broad-based effort, but is critical for consumer goods companies, according to Tak Niinami, chief executive officer of drinks maker Suntory Holdings Ltd. “We industry want to be liked by society, otherwise we can’t survive,” he said.The use of plastics has doubled in the last two decades, and it’s expected to double again in the next two. “We cannot allow it,” said former U.S. Vice President Al Gore.‘We’re in a Better Place’: Goldman’s Patel (11:15 a.m.)Sheila Patel, chairman of Goldman Sachs Asset Management, said the global economy is “certainly in a better place than we were a year ago at Davos.”“A year ago you had everyone worried about liquidity, extremely worried about where the markets would head and we were counseling calm,” Patel told Bloomberg TV.“Today you have people worried about liquidity given the mix of public to private that they have in their portfolios, particularly the way that various investors have leaned in to things like private credit,” she added.Thunberg Says Davos Has Failed on Climate (10:46 a.m.)Thunberg used a Friday press conference to declare the forum a failure on addressing the case for climate action she first made at Davos last year.“Before we came here, we had a few demands for the WEF, and the demands have been completely ignored,” she said. “Of course we expected nothing less,” the 17-year-old said.“We must remember that as long as we don’t treat this crisis as a crisis, as long as science is ignored, we won’t be able to solve this crisis,” she said, speaking alongside other young climate activists.She interjected during remarks by one of her fellow activists to specify that the urgency they all felt around climate action didn’t mean the end is near. “Of course, this is not the last year we have,” she said.Germany Maintaining ‘Strong’ Investment: Scholz (10:40 a.m.)German Finance Minister Scholz said the country has “a very expansionary fiscal policy” and last year’s budget surplus will give Chancellor Angela Merkel’s government room to maintain strong investment.“We are already doing a lot of things which will help to expand investments,” Scholz said in an interview with Bloomberg TV. “Now with the surplus we have all the possibility to be strong in this field as anyone asks us to be and as we really want ourselves.”A trade deal between the U.S. and the European Union is possible “really soon,” although it will require “very hard work,” Scholz said.“It is absolutely important that we do not build trade barriers,” he added. “The wealth of the nation is better when we have a rules-based free trade.”Villeroy Calls for Flexible, Credible Inflation Target (10:31 a.m.)The ECB should ensure in its strategic review that its inflation target is “symmetric, flexible and credible,” Governing Council member Francois Villeroy de Galhau said.To be credible the ECB must explain its inflation target to households and businesses and listen to them about their inflation expectations, Villeroy said in a Bloomberg TV interview. The strategic review should go beyond market professionals to households and businesses because they are price makers and wage-setters, he added.Centeno Sees Germany Stepping Up Spending (10:10 a.m.)To spur economic activity, euro-area countries that can spend more need to, and Germany is showing signs that it is ready to play its part, according to Eurogroup President Mario Centeno.“We know that some countries have more space than others to act,” Centeno said in a Bloomberg TV interview. “Germany is one of those countries that can act, and actually we see some action from the German side.”Recent investment in the rail sector “goes precisely in that direction,” Centeno added. “It’s public investment, connected with climate action. I expect more of those actions to be taken in the course of 2020, so that 2020 can finally see this acceleration of the global economy, and Europe can also play a role in that.”EU, China, Brazil Form Trade-Dispute Alliance (10 a.m.)The European Union and a group of 16 nations that includes China and Brazil are forming an alliance to settle trade disputes among themselves using an interim appeal-arbitration mechanism at the World Trade Organization.“We will work towards putting in place contingency measures that would allow for appeals of WTO panel reports in disputes among ourselves,” according to a copy of a joint declaration obtained by Bloomberg.The development marks an advance of the EU’s backup plan for settling international trade disputes now that the WTO appellate body is paralyzed. WTO delegates meeting in Davos are expected to announce the arrangement later Friday.“We believe that a functioning dispute settlement system of the WTO is of the utmost importance for the rules-based trading system, and that an independent and impartial appeal stage must continue to be one of its essential features,” according to the document.ESM Chief Sees More People Now in Favor of Stronger Euro Role (9:05 a.m.)The international role of the euro is becoming increasingly the focus of debate in Europe, according to European Stability Mechanism Managing Director Klaus Regling.“More people are now in favor of having a stronger role for the euro which is partly the answer to the U.S. current administration withdrawing from multilateralism,” Regling said in a Bloomberg TV interview.”Europe believes in multilateralism, and one way to strengthen European sovereignty is the international role of the euro.”Tech CEOs Dodge Issues by Warning About AI (9 a.m.)Technology’s most influential leaders have a new message: It’s not us you need to worry about -- it’s artificial intelligence.Two years ago big tech embarked on a repentance tour to Davos in response to criticism about the companies’ role in issues such as election interference by Russia-backed groups; spreading misinformation; the distribution of extremist content; antitrust violations; and tax avoidance. Uber Technologies Inc.’s new chief even asked to be regulated.These problems haven’t gone away, but this time executives warned that AI that must be regulated, rather than the companies themselves.“AI is one of the most profound things we’re working on as humanity. It’s more profound than fire or electricity,” Alphabet Inc. Chief Executive Officer Sundar Pichai said in an interview. Comparing it to international discussions on climate change, he said, “you can’t get safety by having one country or a set of countries working on it. You need a global framework.”German Health Minister Says China Virus Less of a Threat (8:45 a.m.)China is more transparent and more aggressive in attempting to control the coronavirus outbreak compared with SARS, and that’s helping the international community better prepare to deal with the situation, according to German Health Minister Jens Spahn.“We are prepared and keep on preparing, but at the same time I think we have to put into perspective,” Spahn said in a Bloomberg TV interview. “There’s a big difference to SARS.”Coronavirus the ‘New Norm’: Axa’s Buberl (8:30 a.m.)Axa SA Chief Executive Officer Thomas Buberl said outbreaks like the coronavirus are the “new norm” and there will be more viruses popping up due to climate change.“We always learn in these emergency situations and then forget again when it’s gone,” Buberl told Bloomberg TV.“We need to remind ourselves that the environment is changing, it is getting warmer everywhere and therefore new viruses will pop up,” he added. “Going forward, the implication of climate on health is something that we need to study more and need to understand better.”VW’s Diess Upbeat on Battle With Tesla (8:10 a.m.)Volkswagen AG Chief Executive Officer Herbert Diess said he’s optimistic the German car giant can keep pace with Tesla Inc. in the electric-car market and even overtake Elon Musk’s company at some point.“I think it’s an open race” to define the car of the future, Diess told Bloomberg TV. “I would take Tesla more seriously than Google and there are also from our peers some very competitive companies like Toyota.”This year will be “very difficult” for automakers, with global demand “basically flat” and tighter emissions regulations coming into force in Europe, Diess said. “We’re basically optimistic, but it will be a very demanding year for the industry,” he added.Lagarde: ECB Policy Not Necessarily on Autopilot (7:30 a.m.)Lagarde said that market observers should not assume that the ECB’s monetary policy will be on “autopilot” for the next two years.“To those who think that it’s autopilot, I think that’s ridiculous,” Lagarde said in an interview with Bloomberg TV’s Francine Lacqua. “There is a forward guidance, which is strong, which is setting a very clear timetable that is fact dependent. But let’s look at the facts. Let’s look at how the economy evolves.”Lagarde added that if markets are interested in what happens over the next 12 months, “they should not pay too much attention” to the ECB’s strategy review.“To those who say it’s going to be completely static and stable for 12 months I say watch out, because things change and we might have different signals and we might reconsider,” she said. She conceded that the goal of completing the review by the end of this year is “ambitious.”Carrie Lam Courts Elite With Dim Sum (5:39 a.m.)Carrie Lam hosted 200 business and political leaders for dim sum and cocktails at a Swiss ski resort to reassure them that Hong Kong’s future is bright.The city’s leader said that Hong Kong is still open for business, despite paralyzing protests and an economy in recession. She also said that officials back home are working to contain the coronavirus that’s killed more than two dozen people in China and infected hundreds of others. Hong Kong has identified two cases.In a room decorated with gold candles and red Chinese lanterns for Lunar New Year, Lam said her government “will safeguard Hong Kong’s fundamentals, including the rule of law.” She was also “fully confident of the city’s future,” according to a readout from her office.Singapore Leader Says Rebound Depends on Calm (1:57 a.m.)Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong said the city state’s economy could improve in 2020 only if any number of global risks don’t materialize, particularly emanating from the U.S.Lee said that he’s “relieved” that Singapore’s economy escaped recession in 2019. The government’s growth forecast for this year -- anywhere from 0.5%-2.5% -- indicates “we really don’t know” how things will pan out, he said in an interview with Bloomberg’s Editor-in-Chief John Micklethwait.“That’s the range of what our economy is capable of, but whether we realize that capability, that potential, depends on international conditions,” Lee said. “If there’s a blowout between China and America, or if there’s something happening in the Middle East, either with Iran or with Syria, then all bets are off.”Soros: Facebook Conspiring to Re-Elect Trump (00:18 a.m.)Billionaire George Soros said that nothing is keeping Facebook Inc. from spreading disinformation and the company may be in cahoots with Trump to get him re-elected.“I think there is a kind of informal mutual assistance operation or agreement developing between Trump and Facebook,” Soros, 89, said Thursday. “Facebook will work together to re-elect Trump, and Trump will work to protect Facebook so that this situation cannot be changed and it makes me very concerned about the outcome for 2020.”Soros didn’t offer any evidence for his claim. “This is just plain wrong,” Facebook spokesman Andy Stone said in response.\--With assistance from Shelly Banjo, Dandan Li, Michelle Jamrisko, Katia Porzecanski, Sarah Frier, Francine Lacqua, Geraldine Amiel, Haslinda Amin, Viktoria Dendrinou, Giles Turner, Bryce Baschuk, Joao Lima, Aaron Rutkoff, Javier Blas, Akshat Rathi, Donal Griffin, Boris Groendahl, Jill Ward, Saleha Mohsin and Paul Gordon.To contact the reporters on this story: Chris Reiter in Berlin at creiter2@bloomberg.net;Iain Rogers in Berlin at irogers11@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Chad Thomas at cthomas16@bloomberg.net;Simon Kennedy at skennedy4@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 55/71   Son: Former Egyptian president Mubarak undergoes surgery
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Egypt's former autocratic president Hosni Mubarak, who was forced to step down following 2011 mass protests, has undergone surgery, his eldest son tweeted Friday.  Alaa Mubarak tweeted that his 91-year-old father was operated on Thursday and that his condition was “stable.” He provided no details about the surgery.  Mubarak was ousted in the 2011 uprising that swept Egypt as part of the Arab Spring movement that gripped the region.

    Egypt's former autocratic president Hosni Mubarak, who was forced to step down following 2011 mass protests, has undergone surgery, his eldest son tweeted Friday. Alaa Mubarak tweeted that his 91-year-old father was operated on Thursday and that his condition was “stable.” He provided no details about the surgery. Mubarak was ousted in the 2011 uprising that swept Egypt as part of the Arab Spring movement that gripped the region.


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  • 56/71   More airports screening passengers amid China virus outbreak
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    More airports are beginning to screen passengers arriving from China amid growing concerns Friday over the outbreak of a new virus there that has already killed more than two dozen people and sickened hundreds.  The energy-rich Gulf Arab nation of Qatar, home to long-haul carrier Qatar Airways, said it had installed thermal scanners at its main hub, Hamad International Airport.  Kuwait announced similar measures late the night before at Kuwait International Airport, joining the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia, which on Thursday announced screenings for all passengers arriving on direct flights from China, including at Dubai International Airport, the world's busiest.

    More airports are beginning to screen passengers arriving from China amid growing concerns Friday over the outbreak of a new virus there that has already killed more than two dozen people and sickened hundreds. The energy-rich Gulf Arab nation of Qatar, home to long-haul carrier Qatar Airways, said it had installed thermal scanners at its main hub, Hamad International Airport. Kuwait announced similar measures late the night before at Kuwait International Airport, joining the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia, which on Thursday announced screenings for all passengers arriving on direct flights from China, including at Dubai International Airport, the world's busiest.


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  • 57/71   Police: 1 missing after building explosion shakes Houston
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    One person was missing following a large explosion at an apparent industrial building in Houston early Friday that heavily damaged nearby buildings and homes, left rubble scattered in the area and was felt miles away.  The Houston Fire Department said one person was taken to a hospital because of the blast and a fire burned at the site hours after the explosion.  Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo said Friday morning that one person was unaccounted for.

    One person was missing following a large explosion at an apparent industrial building in Houston early Friday that heavily damaged nearby buildings and homes, left rubble scattered in the area and was felt miles away. The Houston Fire Department said one person was taken to a hospital because of the blast and a fire burned at the site hours after the explosion. Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo said Friday morning that one person was unaccounted for.


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  • 58/71   Embattled Trump Shifts Focus to Mideast Peace
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Want to receive this post in your inbox every day? Sign up for the Balance of Power newsletter, and follow Bloomberg Politics on Twitter and Facebook for more.The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is arguably so intractable that any initiative to solve it should be given a hearing.Yet even without knowing its contents, President Donald Trump’s much-touted but much-delayed Mideast peace plan risks falling flat when it’s unveiled in the coming days.The Palestinians have rejected the peace efforts and refused to talk with the Trump administration after it moved the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem.Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his chief political opponent, Benny Gantz, have been invited to Washington next week. The Palestinians have not.The plan, which the president’s son-in-law Jared Kushner has been preparing since Trump took office, will divert attention from the impeachment trial in the U.S. Senate. It also offers Netanyahu a welcome distraction from his own legal woes as he contests Israel’s third election in a year.The document risks planting a depth charge in the Middle East at a delicate time. Iran is threatening further revenge on the U.S. for the killing of a top general, Iraq is wracked by destabilizing riots and Turkey and Russia are vying to fill the power vacuum left by U.S. disengagement in Syria and elsewhere.U.S. ally Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman is meanwhile accused of spying on Amazon chief Jeff Bezos, a fresh dent to his image in a year that Saudi Arabia is chairing the Group of 20 nations.An injection of stability would benefit the region. More uncertainty is the last thing it needs.After three years of waiting, we’re about to find out which it will be.Global HeadlinesDemocratic pressure | U.S. House Democrats have a final day to convince Senate Republicans to vote to subpoena witnesses and documents in Trump’s impeachment trial. They’re trying to strengthen their case that the president’s actions to withhold military aid to Ukraine and block a congressional inquiry violated the Constitution. Representative Jerrold Nadler said yesterday that Trump engaged in unprecedented “stonewalling” of the investigation that “puts even President Nixon to shame.”China outbreak | There’s growing anger among China’s citizens over the way officials have handled the rapidly spreading coronavirus outbreak that has killed at least 25 people. Even as the world’s most populist country tries to lock down entire cities ahead of the busy Lunar New Year travel period, social media users are venting their frustration over whether local officials could have acted faster.Fascist fears | A nationalist party known for praising Slovakia’s World War II fascist state is gaining popularity before elections next month. By toning down its message and tapping into the anger over corruption and inequality that has bolstered far-right movements across Europe, the People’s Party may end up holding the balance of power in the country’s most unpredictable election since Communism.Scorned friend | The U.S. has long leaned on Colombia, its staunchest ally in Latin America, as a bulwark against China’s effort to boost its influence on the continent by flooding it with cash. But since Trump attacked President Ivan Duque for his failure to curb cocaine trafficking last March, Chinese companies have closed deals worth billions of dollars, exceeding the total investment from the previous 15 years. On a roll | Peruvian President Martin Vizcarra has enjoyed high approval ratings since dissolving the legislature and calling early elections to break a stalemate with the opposition-controlled congress last year. If Sunday’s voting for its replacement turns out as polls suggest, he’ll get a new parliament more willing to push ahead with his agenda of political and judicial reform.What to WatchYemen’s government wants to resume direct peace talks with the Iranian-backed Houthi rebels to end a brutal five-year conflict, but military pressure and diplomacy will be needed to get the insurgents back to the negotiating table, the nation’s U.S. envoy said. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said new rules are coming soon that will put more limits on U.S. companies supplying Chinese tech giant Huawei, while the U.K. appears set to reject Trump’s call to ban the company from playing any role in its fifth-generation wireless broadband networks. Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg named one of her top lieutenants, Jan Tore Sanner, as finance minister as her new minority government prepares to navigate a hostile parliament. A banker with ties to Isabel dos Santos was found hanged in the garage of his apartment building in Lisbon on the same day that Angola’s prosecutor named both him and Africa’s richest woman as suspects in a probe over alleged mismanagement at state oil company Sonangol.Pop quiz, readers (no cheating!). In 2018, China halted virtually all imports of what, triggering far-reaching effects right around the globe? Send your answer and tell us how we’re doing or what we’re missing at balancepower@bloomberg.net.And finally ... Jakarta may be the first capital to become a victim of climate change. It’s sinking at the fastest rate of any major metropolis in the world, with two-fifths of the Indonesian city now below sea level. Climate scientists say 95% of the city could be underwater by 2050. Ironically, the president’s site for the new capital is near the heart of what is both one of the country’s biggest mining regions and global warming contributor, as Philip Heijmans, Hannah Dormido and Adrian Leung report. \--With assistance from Robert Jameson, John Quigley, Ruth Pollard and Iain Marlow.To contact the author of this story: Alan Crawford in Berlin at acrawford6@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Karl Maier at kmaier2@bloomberg.net, Michael WinfreyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Want to receive this post in your inbox every day? Sign up for the Balance of Power newsletter, and follow Bloomberg Politics on Twitter and Facebook for more.The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is arguably so intractable that any initiative to solve it should be given a hearing.Yet even without knowing its contents, President Donald Trump’s much-touted but much-delayed Mideast peace plan risks falling flat when it’s unveiled in the coming days.The Palestinians have rejected the peace efforts and refused to talk with the Trump administration after it moved the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem.Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his chief political opponent, Benny Gantz, have been invited to Washington next week. The Palestinians have not.The plan, which the president’s son-in-law Jared Kushner has been preparing since Trump took office, will divert attention from the impeachment trial in the U.S. Senate. It also offers Netanyahu a welcome distraction from his own legal woes as he contests Israel’s third election in a year.The document risks planting a depth charge in the Middle East at a delicate time. Iran is threatening further revenge on the U.S. for the killing of a top general, Iraq is wracked by destabilizing riots and Turkey and Russia are vying to fill the power vacuum left by U.S. disengagement in Syria and elsewhere.U.S. ally Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman is meanwhile accused of spying on Amazon chief Jeff Bezos, a fresh dent to his image in a year that Saudi Arabia is chairing the Group of 20 nations.An injection of stability would benefit the region. More uncertainty is the last thing it needs.After three years of waiting, we’re about to find out which it will be.Global HeadlinesDemocratic pressure | U.S. House Democrats have a final day to convince Senate Republicans to vote to subpoena witnesses and documents in Trump’s impeachment trial. They’re trying to strengthen their case that the president’s actions to withhold military aid to Ukraine and block a congressional inquiry violated the Constitution. Representative Jerrold Nadler said yesterday that Trump engaged in unprecedented “stonewalling” of the investigation that “puts even President Nixon to shame.”China outbreak | There’s growing anger among China’s citizens over the way officials have handled the rapidly spreading coronavirus outbreak that has killed at least 25 people. Even as the world’s most populist country tries to lock down entire cities ahead of the busy Lunar New Year travel period, social media users are venting their frustration over whether local officials could have acted faster.Fascist fears | A nationalist party known for praising Slovakia’s World War II fascist state is gaining popularity before elections next month. By toning down its message and tapping into the anger over corruption and inequality that has bolstered far-right movements across Europe, the People’s Party may end up holding the balance of power in the country’s most unpredictable election since Communism.Scorned friend | The U.S. has long leaned on Colombia, its staunchest ally in Latin America, as a bulwark against China’s effort to boost its influence on the continent by flooding it with cash. But since Trump attacked President Ivan Duque for his failure to curb cocaine trafficking last March, Chinese companies have closed deals worth billions of dollars, exceeding the total investment from the previous 15 years. On a roll | Peruvian President Martin Vizcarra has enjoyed high approval ratings since dissolving the legislature and calling early elections to break a stalemate with the opposition-controlled congress last year. If Sunday’s voting for its replacement turns out as polls suggest, he’ll get a new parliament more willing to push ahead with his agenda of political and judicial reform.What to WatchYemen’s government wants to resume direct peace talks with the Iranian-backed Houthi rebels to end a brutal five-year conflict, but military pressure and diplomacy will be needed to get the insurgents back to the negotiating table, the nation’s U.S. envoy said. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said new rules are coming soon that will put more limits on U.S. companies supplying Chinese tech giant Huawei, while the U.K. appears set to reject Trump’s call to ban the company from playing any role in its fifth-generation wireless broadband networks. Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg named one of her top lieutenants, Jan Tore Sanner, as finance minister as her new minority government prepares to navigate a hostile parliament. A banker with ties to Isabel dos Santos was found hanged in the garage of his apartment building in Lisbon on the same day that Angola’s prosecutor named both him and Africa’s richest woman as suspects in a probe over alleged mismanagement at state oil company Sonangol.Pop quiz, readers (no cheating!). In 2018, China halted virtually all imports of what, triggering far-reaching effects right around the globe? Send your answer and tell us how we’re doing or what we’re missing at balancepower@bloomberg.net.And finally ... Jakarta may be the first capital to become a victim of climate change. It’s sinking at the fastest rate of any major metropolis in the world, with two-fifths of the Indonesian city now below sea level. Climate scientists say 95% of the city could be underwater by 2050. Ironically, the president’s site for the new capital is near the heart of what is both one of the country’s biggest mining regions and global warming contributor, as Philip Heijmans, Hannah Dormido and Adrian Leung report. \--With assistance from Robert Jameson, John Quigley, Ruth Pollard and Iain Marlow.To contact the author of this story: Alan Crawford in Berlin at acrawford6@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Karl Maier at kmaier2@bloomberg.net, Michael WinfreyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 59/71   Israeli woman jailed in Russia yet to ask for pardon
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    An Israeli woman jailed in Russia on drug charges cannot be pardoned by President Vladimir Putin until she herself petitions for it, a Kremlin spokesman said Friday.  Naama Issachar, 26, was arrested in April at Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport, where she was transferring flights on her way from India to Israel.

    An Israeli woman jailed in Russia on drug charges cannot be pardoned by President Vladimir Putin until she herself petitions for it, a Kremlin spokesman said Friday. Naama Issachar, 26, was arrested in April at Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport, where she was transferring flights on her way from India to Israel.


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  • 60/71   Most political unrest has one big root cause: soaring inequality
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The 2008 crash stripped the sheen off global capitalism. We’re still living with the effects  The popular protests that erupted in 2019 and have continued to rumble – from France and Spain in Europe to Hong Kong and India in Asia; from Chile, Colombia and Bolivia in Latin America to Lebanon, Iran and Iraq in the Middle East – have perplexed analysts. Because they have been so far-flung and have lacked an iconic moment like the fall of the Berlin Wall, the common thread hasn’t been obvious. But there is one: rage at being left behind. In each instance, the match may differ, but the kindling has (in most cases) been furnished by the gross inequality produced by global capitalism.Consider Lebanon. The demonstrations that erupted there in October were triggered by the government’s plan to tax calls made through WhatsApp and other internet services, but they quickly mushroomed into a broader protest against high unemployment, sectarian rule, corruption, and the government’s failure to provide basic services like electricity and sanitation.According to the World Inequality Database, the top 1% of Lebanon’s population receives about 25% of the nation’s income. Six Lebanese billionaires have a combined personal wealth of about $11bn, according to Forbes. Three of those billionaires are the sons of Rafik Hariri, who made a fortune in construction and twice served as Lebanon’s prime minister before being assassinated in 2005. (A fourth son, Saad Hariri, was prime minister until his recent resignation amid reports that he had given more than $16m to a bikini model he had met while vacationing in the Seychelles.) Protesters maintained that the pampered elite, rather than strapped working people, should foot the bill for the country’s economic problems.> The match may differ, but the kindling has (in most cases) been furnished by the gross inequality produced by global capitalismIn Chile, an increase in subway fares catalyzed protest. The popular discontent caught many observers by surprise, since Chile has experienced years of steady growth and has a reputation for good governance. In fact Chile, with a per capita income of $15,800, is a member of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development for prosperous nations. Of the OECD’s 36 members, however, Chile has one of the highest levels of inequality. Its economy is dominated by a group of powerful oligarchs, among them its current president, Sebastián Piñera, who is worth an estimated $2.8bn (amassed largely in the credit card business). Despite their country’s wealth, working Chileans have had to grapple with rising utility costs, stagnant wages and paltry pensions. The protests have registered their fury.In Hong Kong, months of demonstrations have had one overriding goal: resisting China’s encroachments on the city’s autonomy and democratic institutions. That the protests have become so virulent and lasted so long, however, reflects deep exasperation with the region’s sky-high cost of living. By some accounts, Hong Kong is the world’s most unaffordable city, with rents higher than London and New York for apartments half the size. It may also be the world’s most unequal city: its 93 or so billionaires have a combined worth of more than $300bn while nearly one in five residents lives in poverty.Worldwide, the numbers are stark. As calculated by Oxfam, 26 people have the same amount of wealth as the 3.8 billion people in the world’s bottom half. In the United States, the three richest people have the same amount of wealth as the bottom 160 million.And the political fallout continues to spread. Not only the current round of street protests but also such recent upheavals as Brexit, Trump, the gilets jaunes in France, and rightwing populist governments in Hungary, Poland and Italy all have roots in the financial crash that was set off by the fall of Lehman Brothers in September 2008 and followed by the world’s worst economic contraction since 1929.In the US alone, the great recession erased about $8tn in household stock-market wealth and $6tn in home value. From 2003 to 2013, inflation-adjusted net wealth for a typical household fell 36%, from $87,992 to $56,335, while the net worth of wealthy households rose by 14%. Workers without college degrees and low-income Americans were especially hard hit.In addition to causing such widespread deprivation, the 2008 crash stripped the sheen off global capitalism. Just as the Iraq war undermined the authority of the US foreign policy establishment, so did the financial crisis discredit the bankers, asset managers, ratings agencies, and regulators responsible for running the world economy. Compounding that damage was the government’s decision to bail out many of the same institutions – Bank of America, Citigroup, Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan Chase and Wells Fargo – that had caused the crisis.> In the United States, the three richest people have the same amount of wealth as the bottom 160 millionIn a recent New York Times article about Vladimir Putin’s growing worldwide stature, the former Kremlin adviser Gleb Pavlovsky sought to explain why Putin turned away from his earlier aspirations to join the western family of nations and toward his current brand of authoritarian nationalism. The “decisive threshold” was the 2008 financial meltdown, Pavlovsky said. Before it, Putin saw America as running the world economy. “Suddenly it turned out: no, they are not running anything.” At that moment “all the old norms vanished” and Russia set about creating its own norms.Many members of the liberal establishment in America have failed to come to terms with the waning appeal of the free-market model. They dismiss populism as a sort of exogenous disease to be cured by appeals to reason and facts rather than recognize it as a darkly symptomatic response to a system that has failed so spectacularly to meet the basic needs of so many.In a recent Financial Times essay reflecting on the coming decade, Steven Pinker hailed the dramatic recent gains made by humanity – the advances in science and medicine, the spread of democracy and human rights, the embrace of free trade and environmental regulation. He waved away authoritarian populism as a passing phenomenon, since its support “is greatest among rural, less-educated, ethnic-majority and older cohorts, all in demographic decline”.In other words, the marginalized will die out, so there’s no need to worry about them. Pinker made no mention of inequality, the rise of the superrich, and the surging discontent with a global economy that has produced such grotesque imbalances.Obliviousness such as this has contributed to the growing estrangement between left-liberal political parties and their traditional working-class base – another underlying cause of global unrest. The Democratic party’s struggles in such long-time strongholds as Michigan’s Macomb county and Wisconsin’s Racine county; the Labour party’s recent thrashing in the once-dependable English north; the collapse of the Socialists in France; the fading of the Social Democrats in Germany – all testify to how thoroughly the world’s social democrats have lost their way. These parties have been captured by what Thomas Piketty, in his forthcoming book Capital and Ideology, calls “the Brahmin left” – winners in the meritocratic race fostered by postindustrial society, who have lost touch with those who are less connected, mobile, and well read.The current race among Democratic presidential contenders is in effect a competition to see which candidate can offer the most convincing explanation for the failures of the current system and the most appealing program to fix them. If no such program is forthcoming, Americans, too, might soon take to the streets.  * Michael Massing is the author most recently of Fatal Discord: Erasmus, Luther, and the Fight for the Western Mind

    The 2008 crash stripped the sheen off global capitalism. We’re still living with the effects The popular protests that erupted in 2019 and have continued to rumble – from France and Spain in Europe to Hong Kong and India in Asia; from Chile, Colombia and Bolivia in Latin America to Lebanon, Iran and Iraq in the Middle East – have perplexed analysts. Because they have been so far-flung and have lacked an iconic moment like the fall of the Berlin Wall, the common thread hasn’t been obvious. But there is one: rage at being left behind. In each instance, the match may differ, but the kindling has (in most cases) been furnished by the gross inequality produced by global capitalism.Consider Lebanon. The demonstrations that erupted there in October were triggered by the government’s plan to tax calls made through WhatsApp and other internet services, but they quickly mushroomed into a broader protest against high unemployment, sectarian rule, corruption, and the government’s failure to provide basic services like electricity and sanitation.According to the World Inequality Database, the top 1% of Lebanon’s population receives about 25% of the nation’s income. Six Lebanese billionaires have a combined personal wealth of about $11bn, according to Forbes. Three of those billionaires are the sons of Rafik Hariri, who made a fortune in construction and twice served as Lebanon’s prime minister before being assassinated in 2005. (A fourth son, Saad Hariri, was prime minister until his recent resignation amid reports that he had given more than $16m to a bikini model he had met while vacationing in the Seychelles.) Protesters maintained that the pampered elite, rather than strapped working people, should foot the bill for the country’s economic problems.> The match may differ, but the kindling has (in most cases) been furnished by the gross inequality produced by global capitalismIn Chile, an increase in subway fares catalyzed protest. The popular discontent caught many observers by surprise, since Chile has experienced years of steady growth and has a reputation for good governance. In fact Chile, with a per capita income of $15,800, is a member of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development for prosperous nations. Of the OECD’s 36 members, however, Chile has one of the highest levels of inequality. Its economy is dominated by a group of powerful oligarchs, among them its current president, Sebastián Piñera, who is worth an estimated $2.8bn (amassed largely in the credit card business). Despite their country’s wealth, working Chileans have had to grapple with rising utility costs, stagnant wages and paltry pensions. The protests have registered their fury.In Hong Kong, months of demonstrations have had one overriding goal: resisting China’s encroachments on the city’s autonomy and democratic institutions. That the protests have become so virulent and lasted so long, however, reflects deep exasperation with the region’s sky-high cost of living. By some accounts, Hong Kong is the world’s most unaffordable city, with rents higher than London and New York for apartments half the size. It may also be the world’s most unequal city: its 93 or so billionaires have a combined worth of more than $300bn while nearly one in five residents lives in poverty.Worldwide, the numbers are stark. As calculated by Oxfam, 26 people have the same amount of wealth as the 3.8 billion people in the world’s bottom half. In the United States, the three richest people have the same amount of wealth as the bottom 160 million.And the political fallout continues to spread. Not only the current round of street protests but also such recent upheavals as Brexit, Trump, the gilets jaunes in France, and rightwing populist governments in Hungary, Poland and Italy all have roots in the financial crash that was set off by the fall of Lehman Brothers in September 2008 and followed by the world’s worst economic contraction since 1929.In the US alone, the great recession erased about $8tn in household stock-market wealth and $6tn in home value. From 2003 to 2013, inflation-adjusted net wealth for a typical household fell 36%, from $87,992 to $56,335, while the net worth of wealthy households rose by 14%. Workers without college degrees and low-income Americans were especially hard hit.In addition to causing such widespread deprivation, the 2008 crash stripped the sheen off global capitalism. Just as the Iraq war undermined the authority of the US foreign policy establishment, so did the financial crisis discredit the bankers, asset managers, ratings agencies, and regulators responsible for running the world economy. Compounding that damage was the government’s decision to bail out many of the same institutions – Bank of America, Citigroup, Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan Chase and Wells Fargo – that had caused the crisis.> In the United States, the three richest people have the same amount of wealth as the bottom 160 millionIn a recent New York Times article about Vladimir Putin’s growing worldwide stature, the former Kremlin adviser Gleb Pavlovsky sought to explain why Putin turned away from his earlier aspirations to join the western family of nations and toward his current brand of authoritarian nationalism. The “decisive threshold” was the 2008 financial meltdown, Pavlovsky said. Before it, Putin saw America as running the world economy. “Suddenly it turned out: no, they are not running anything.” At that moment “all the old norms vanished” and Russia set about creating its own norms.Many members of the liberal establishment in America have failed to come to terms with the waning appeal of the free-market model. They dismiss populism as a sort of exogenous disease to be cured by appeals to reason and facts rather than recognize it as a darkly symptomatic response to a system that has failed so spectacularly to meet the basic needs of so many.In a recent Financial Times essay reflecting on the coming decade, Steven Pinker hailed the dramatic recent gains made by humanity – the advances in science and medicine, the spread of democracy and human rights, the embrace of free trade and environmental regulation. He waved away authoritarian populism as a passing phenomenon, since its support “is greatest among rural, less-educated, ethnic-majority and older cohorts, all in demographic decline”.In other words, the marginalized will die out, so there’s no need to worry about them. Pinker made no mention of inequality, the rise of the superrich, and the surging discontent with a global economy that has produced such grotesque imbalances.Obliviousness such as this has contributed to the growing estrangement between left-liberal political parties and their traditional working-class base – another underlying cause of global unrest. The Democratic party’s struggles in such long-time strongholds as Michigan’s Macomb county and Wisconsin’s Racine county; the Labour party’s recent thrashing in the once-dependable English north; the collapse of the Socialists in France; the fading of the Social Democrats in Germany – all testify to how thoroughly the world’s social democrats have lost their way. These parties have been captured by what Thomas Piketty, in his forthcoming book Capital and Ideology, calls “the Brahmin left” – winners in the meritocratic race fostered by postindustrial society, who have lost touch with those who are less connected, mobile, and well read.The current race among Democratic presidential contenders is in effect a competition to see which candidate can offer the most convincing explanation for the failures of the current system and the most appealing program to fix them. If no such program is forthcoming, Americans, too, might soon take to the streets. * Michael Massing is the author most recently of Fatal Discord: Erasmus, Luther, and the Fight for the Western Mind


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  • 61/71   Troubles Mount for U.K.-U.S. Alliance Ahead of Trade Talks
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. Britain and America suddenly seem to be fighting all the time. The so-called special relationship has been repeatedly tested this week -- and the timing is sensitive, just as Boris Johnson and President Donald Trump prepare to negotiate a major new trade deal.The latest clash came late Thursday, when the Trump administration refused Johnson’s request to extradite the wife of a U.S. diplomat who was involved in a fatal car accident in the U.K. in August.The death of teenager Harry Dunn in the crash is an emotive subject in the U.K., where Johnson’s government has argued that diplomatic immunity granted to the American driver, Anne Sacoolas, should be disregarded. The U.S. refusal dismayed Dunn’s family, who called on Johnson to stand up against the “lawless administration in Washington.”“It’s one of the darkest days in the history of this special relationship,” Radd Seiger, a spokesman for the Dunn family, said on Friday. “Boris Johnson wanted to be prime minister and he is now being tested severely. I expect him today to rise to that challenge.”Johnson’s government described the U.S. decision as “a denial of justice.”‘Considering Options’“We are now urgently considering our options,” Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said in an emailed statement. Raab said he called U.S. Ambassador Woody Johnson to express the government’s “disappointment” and to explain that “the U.K. would have acted differently if this had been a U.K. diplomat serving in the U.S.”The row blew up at the end of a week of flash points between London and Washington. They include Johnson’s plan to impose a digital services tax on Internet giants in April, the imminent decision on whether to allow Chinese firm Huawei Technologies Co. a role in Britain’s new wireless broadband networks, and talks on a new trade agreement.U.K.’s Javid Snubs Trump Trade Offer, Saying EU Deal Comes FirstAs usual in recent British foreign policy, the crucial context is Brexit. The U.K. leaves the European Union in a week’s time, and will be free to negotiate new trade partnerships with countries outside the bloc. Top of that list is the U.S., and Trump has said he wants a sweeping new deal as soon as possible.The two leaders still enjoy a strong personal rapport. Trump backed Johnson to be prime minister, and this week said he has “a lot of guts” and has “done a terrific job.” Trump also championed the Brexit campaign led by Johnson.Time PressureBut Johnson’s focus may well be elsewhere. He has just 11 months to settle the terms of the U.K.’s new relationship with the EU to avoid a cliff-edge at the end of year, when the transition period maintaining the status quo expires. U.K. Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid said this week the EU deal would have to take top priority.That line irked Javid’s U.S. counterpart Steven Mnuchin, who travels to London this weekend. Preparatory talks between the two governments have been taking place for three years, and formal trade negotiations could start as soon as February.Then there is the U.K.’s plan to push ahead with a tax on technology companies from April, despite a U.S. threat this week to retaliate with tariffs on any country that takes measures it regards as discriminating against American businesses.“As a nation we decide our taxes, not the United States,” Theresa Villiers, a member of Johnson’s cabinet, told the BBC’s Question Time program late Thursday. Finding an international solution “is taking so long that we have to act domestically now,” she said.The U.K. is also poised to defy intense U.S. lobbying by allowing Huawei to play a part in developing fifth-generation wireless broadband networks on the grounds that excluding the Chinese company would be too costly. Trump’s administration has warned that doing so would put intelligence-sharing between the allies at risk.Officially, none of these points of dispute are linked to each other. Yet they provide a difficult political backdrop to what is likely to be a hard-edged negotiation over trade.(Updates with Raab comment in sixth paragraph)To contact the reporter on this story: Tim Ross in London at tross54@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Flavia Krause-Jackson at fjackson@bloomberg.net, Stuart Biggs, Alex MoralesFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. Britain and America suddenly seem to be fighting all the time. The so-called special relationship has been repeatedly tested this week -- and the timing is sensitive, just as Boris Johnson and President Donald Trump prepare to negotiate a major new trade deal.The latest clash came late Thursday, when the Trump administration refused Johnson’s request to extradite the wife of a U.S. diplomat who was involved in a fatal car accident in the U.K. in August.The death of teenager Harry Dunn in the crash is an emotive subject in the U.K., where Johnson’s government has argued that diplomatic immunity granted to the American driver, Anne Sacoolas, should be disregarded. The U.S. refusal dismayed Dunn’s family, who called on Johnson to stand up against the “lawless administration in Washington.”“It’s one of the darkest days in the history of this special relationship,” Radd Seiger, a spokesman for the Dunn family, said on Friday. “Boris Johnson wanted to be prime minister and he is now being tested severely. I expect him today to rise to that challenge.”Johnson’s government described the U.S. decision as “a denial of justice.”‘Considering Options’“We are now urgently considering our options,” Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said in an emailed statement. Raab said he called U.S. Ambassador Woody Johnson to express the government’s “disappointment” and to explain that “the U.K. would have acted differently if this had been a U.K. diplomat serving in the U.S.”The row blew up at the end of a week of flash points between London and Washington. They include Johnson’s plan to impose a digital services tax on Internet giants in April, the imminent decision on whether to allow Chinese firm Huawei Technologies Co. a role in Britain’s new wireless broadband networks, and talks on a new trade agreement.U.K.’s Javid Snubs Trump Trade Offer, Saying EU Deal Comes FirstAs usual in recent British foreign policy, the crucial context is Brexit. The U.K. leaves the European Union in a week’s time, and will be free to negotiate new trade partnerships with countries outside the bloc. Top of that list is the U.S., and Trump has said he wants a sweeping new deal as soon as possible.The two leaders still enjoy a strong personal rapport. Trump backed Johnson to be prime minister, and this week said he has “a lot of guts” and has “done a terrific job.” Trump also championed the Brexit campaign led by Johnson.Time PressureBut Johnson’s focus may well be elsewhere. He has just 11 months to settle the terms of the U.K.’s new relationship with the EU to avoid a cliff-edge at the end of year, when the transition period maintaining the status quo expires. U.K. Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid said this week the EU deal would have to take top priority.That line irked Javid’s U.S. counterpart Steven Mnuchin, who travels to London this weekend. Preparatory talks between the two governments have been taking place for three years, and formal trade negotiations could start as soon as February.Then there is the U.K.’s plan to push ahead with a tax on technology companies from April, despite a U.S. threat this week to retaliate with tariffs on any country that takes measures it regards as discriminating against American businesses.“As a nation we decide our taxes, not the United States,” Theresa Villiers, a member of Johnson’s cabinet, told the BBC’s Question Time program late Thursday. Finding an international solution “is taking so long that we have to act domestically now,” she said.The U.K. is also poised to defy intense U.S. lobbying by allowing Huawei to play a part in developing fifth-generation wireless broadband networks on the grounds that excluding the Chinese company would be too costly. Trump’s administration has warned that doing so would put intelligence-sharing between the allies at risk.Officially, none of these points of dispute are linked to each other. Yet they provide a difficult political backdrop to what is likely to be a hard-edged negotiation over trade.(Updates with Raab comment in sixth paragraph)To contact the reporter on this story: Tim Ross in London at tross54@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Flavia Krause-Jackson at fjackson@bloomberg.net, Stuart Biggs, Alex MoralesFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 62/71   Don't Forget These Vaccines When You Travel
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you're planning a winter trip to another country, you may be preoccupied with booking airfare and finding lodging, but certain destinations require an extra step of planning: travel vaccines. ...

    If you're planning a winter trip to another country, you may be preoccupied with booking airfare and finding lodging, but certain destinations require an extra step of planning: travel vaccines. ...


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  • 63/71   Trump turns 'very routine' physical into attack on media
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    President Trump lashed out at the media Tuesday over reporting about his sudden trip to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center last weekend.

    President Trump lashed out at the media Tuesday over reporting about his sudden trip to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center last weekend.


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  • 64/71   5 Turkey Cooking Tips Will Guarantee You Have the Perfect Bird This Holidays
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    There's no need to wing it at Thanksgiving this year.

    There's no need to wing it at Thanksgiving this year.


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  • 65/71   9 Easy Ways to Make Your Jack-o'-Lanterns Last Longer
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    A little bleach goes a long way.

    A little bleach goes a long way.


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  • 66/71   Is It Time for a Medication Reconciliation?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    More than half of adult Americans regularly take at least one prescription drug, according to a recent Consumer Reports nationally representative survey. And for those who take any medication on ...

    More than half of adult Americans regularly take at least one prescription drug, according to a recent Consumer Reports nationally representative survey. And for those who take any medication on ...


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  • 67/71   Brown-Bag Lunches for Kids With Food Allergies
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...

    If your school-age child has food allergies, you know that preparing safe lunches that are also enticing can be a challenge. That's why we created this menu of lunchroom suggestions that addresse...


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  • 68/71   What to Feed Your Family When the Power Goes Out
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...

    If you won’t be able to leave your house for a few days or if the power is out for longer than a couple of hours, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer Re...


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  • 69/71   Try These Healthy Snack Ideas for Kids
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...

    To fuel their growing bodies and provide the energy necessary to study and stay active, kids and teens need to eat every 3 to 4 hours, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That’s ...


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  • 70/71   The 9 Best Jobs for Teachers To Make Some Cash During the Summer Break
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.

    Make the most of your skills with one of these jobs.


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  • 71/71   How to Spot and Avoid Algal Blooms
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...

    With many U.S. waterways reaching their highest temperatures at this time of year, colonies of algae in lakes, ponds, and even the ocean can “bloom”—grow far more rapidly than normal. While most ...


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