News Slideshows (02/12/2020 15 hours) « WhmSoft Services Photo Gallery
 
Local Search - Deals
Addresses - Schedules - Reviews
Weather Information
Hot Products
 
  WhmSoft Services Photo Gallery
News Photos Slideshows, High Tech, vlrPhone, vlrMemos


View the Current Celebrities News Photos Flash Slideshow

View the Current Sports News Photos Flash Slideshow

Install the News Photos PDF eBooks and Flash Slideshows Viewer


Free the Animation VR / AR
Play to reveal 3D images and 3D models!
Demonstration A-Frame / Multiplayer
Android app on Google Play
 
vlrPhone / vlrFilter
Project of very low consumption, radiation and bitrate softphones, with the support of the spatial audio, of the frequency shifts and of the ultrasonic communications / Multifunction Audio Filter with Remote Control!



 

Howto - Illustrated Answers
 

Follow us on Twitter Facebook Page LinkedIn



Click here to buy posters!
Click here to buy posters!
Search Offers on Amazon
Digital Photography
Digital Camera
High Technology
iPhone
iPad
Kindle
Webcam Invitation
Webcam Invitation

Vector Images - 3D Images


News Slideshows (02/12/2020 15 hours)


  • 1/81   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.


    Press Review


    Mel Tucker   bob mueller   Ashley Judd   Hump Day   Prednisone   Good Wednesday   Ziyech   Happy Hump   MOVE MOJITO   Media Day   Exxon   Chinese Grand Prix   Sarah Sanders   Coach Tucker   Two Ohio State   Chev   NFL HC   qamishli   Eric Bienemy   Swamp Creature   
  • 2/81   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 3/81   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 4/81   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 5/81   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 6/81   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 7/81   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 8/81   Do star athletes make too much money?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    With athletes in America's biggest sports leagues raking in salaries worth $300 million and more, is it time to reign in the big spending or do superstars deserve the big bucks they make?

    With athletes in America's biggest sports leagues raking in salaries worth $300 million and more, is it time to reign in the big spending or do superstars deserve the big bucks they make?


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 9/81   Live animal mascots: Cute or exploitative?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 10/81   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 11/81   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 12/81   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 13/81   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 14/81   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 15/81   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 16/81   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named.  Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does.  At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 17/81   PHOTOS: Fluorescent turtle embryo wins forty-fifth annual Nikon Small World Competition

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 18/81   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 19/81   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 20/81   What the CIA thinks of your anti-virus program

    PARIS (AP) — Peppering the 8,000 pages of purported Central Intelligence Agency hacking data released Tuesday by WikiLeaks are reviews of some of the world's most popular anti-virus products.

    PARIS (AP) — Peppering the 8,000 pages of purported Central Intelligence Agency hacking data released Tuesday by WikiLeaks are reviews of some of the world's most popular anti-virus products.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 21/81   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 22/81   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 23/81   Joella's Serves Up Limited-Time Crispy Cod Sammie for Lent
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today, Joella's Hot Chicken revealed it's bringing back a popular menu item, the Crispy Cod Sammie, for a limited time only. The Louisville-based fast casual restaurant known for its hot chicken and made-from-scratch Southern-style sides, announced the specialty sandwich will be available during the Lenten season at all Joella's locations in Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Indiana.

    Today, Joella's Hot Chicken revealed it's bringing back a popular menu item, the Crispy Cod Sammie, for a limited time only. The Louisville-based fast casual restaurant known for its hot chicken and made-from-scratch Southern-style sides, announced the specialty sandwich will be available during the Lenten season at all Joella's locations in Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Indiana.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 24/81   South East Asian Industrial Automation & Process Control Market Nears $5 Billion by 2025 - Digital Transformation & Rapid Technological Advancements, Industry 4.0 Revolution
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The "South East Asia Industrial Automation and Process Control Market by Product Type (DCS, PLC, SCADA, PLM), Industry Vertical (Textile, Oil and Gas, Food and Beverages, Life Sciences, Automotive, Packaging) - Industry Forecast to 2025" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.

    The "South East Asia Industrial Automation and Process Control Market by Product Type (DCS, PLC, SCADA, PLM), Industry Vertical (Textile, Oil and Gas, Food and Beverages, Life Sciences, Automotive, Packaging) - Industry Forecast to 2025" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 25/81   Weddings chain Noah's Event Venue closes abruptly, stranding up to 7,500 brides and grooms
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Wedding event chain Noah’s Event Venue has closed abruptly after filing for bankruptcy protection in May, sending couples scrambling.

    Wedding event chain Noah’s Event Venue has closed abruptly after filing for bankruptcy protection in May, sending couples scrambling.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 26/81   EQT Announces Debt Tender Offer
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    EQT Corporation (the "Company" or "EQT") (NYSE: EQT) announced today it has commenced a tender offer (the "Tender Offer") to purchase for cash up to $400.0 million aggregate principal amount (the "Maximum Tender Amount") of its 4.875% Senior Notes due 2021 (the "Notes").

    EQT Corporation (the "Company" or "EQT") (NYSE: EQT) announced today it has commenced a tender offer (the "Tender Offer") to purchase for cash up to $400.0 million aggregate principal amount (the "Maximum Tender Amount") of its 4.875% Senior Notes due 2021 (the "Notes").


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 27/81   Three Months After Launch, Work Truck Marketplace Comvoy Sees Success, Led by Strong Internal Team
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Comvoy, the first and only structured, searchable marketplace for work-ready trucks and vans, launched in November 2019 to match customers with the right work truck for the right job––across any vocation, body type, vehicle or upfit manufacturer. Senior team members Nikki Wilson, Kevin Kinell, and Gerry Ogris, in addition to key advisor Bernie Brenner, have helped shape the marketplace and ushered in its early successes within the dealer community.

    Comvoy, the first and only structured, searchable marketplace for work-ready trucks and vans, launched in November 2019 to match customers with the right work truck for the right job––across any vocation, body type, vehicle or upfit manufacturer. Senior team members Nikki Wilson, Kevin Kinell, and Gerry Ogris, in addition to key advisor Bernie Brenner, have helped shape the marketplace and ushered in its early successes within the dealer community.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 28/81   Guaido Returns to Clashes in Venezuela After Meeting Trump
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Opposition leader Juan Guaido staged a chaotic return to Venezuela after another international trip in which he tried to garner world leaders’ support to unseat President Nicolas Maduro.The head of the opposition-controlled National Assembly landed on Tuesday in Caracas, where Maduro’s loyalists clashed with opposition lawmakers who were there to greet him. He was swarmed by them after passing through customs and immigration, and was able to leave the airport without being arrested for violating a government travel ban. Guaido had also defied that ban last year without suffering repercussions on his re-entry to Venezuela.“This is a cowardly dictatorship, I defied them and we entered Venezuela,” Guaido said at a rally in a public square in eastern Caracas. “They don’t accept their destiny. They are alone, isolated, they represent no one.”His return caps an international tour that featured stops in Davos and Washington, where he met President Donald Trump. Guaido was publicly embraced by Trump during his State-of-the-Union address last week, in which the U.S. leader promised that “Maduro’s grip of tyranny will be smashed and broken.”Guaido has struggled to translate that support into concrete gains against a regime that remains solidly entrenched. Last April, he tried to lead an uprising against the government which failed after most of the armed forces refused to join. Yet Maduro has refrained from arresting him, possibly fearing an escalation of sanctions against his government.Why Venezuela Has Two Presidents, One Thorny Standoff: QuickTakeGuaido said journalists were attacked Tuesday. Earlier, security forces stopped buses taking National Assembly members to the airport. Opposition lawmaker Delsa Solorzano said on Twitter that authorities continued to hold legislator Deyalitza Aray, who was detained while trying to reach the airport.Journalists said they were beaten and chased by Maduro supporters while at the airport. Inside the terminal, government supporters protested against the U.S. government’s decision last week to sanction state-owned airline Conviasa.“The escalation of violence is very serious,” Guaido said at the eastern Caracas rally. “Today there were irregular groups backed by agents of the dictatorship.”Though he promised important announcements, Guaido’s speech Tuesday night focused on stirring supporters. He vowed domestic and international action to keep the pressure on Maduro, and said multilateral entities had agreed to create a “Venezuela Fund” when a transition of power takes place.What Broke Venezuela’s Economy and What Could Fix It: QuickTakeForeign TripsIn mid-January, Guaido traveled to Bogota with the support of Colombian President Ivan Duque. Subsequently, Guaido attended the World Economic Forum in Davos, met with French President Emmanuel Macron in Paris, and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in Ottawa, among others.Before leaving the U.S., he met with U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Organization of American States Secretary-General Luis Almagro.Venezuela’s socialist leader struck a defiant tone in his response to Guaido’s U.S. trip.“Donald Trump: you can’t beat Venezuela, nobody can smash or break Venezuela,” Maduro said in a speech following Guaido’s meeting at the White House. “Madness has taken over Donald Trump’s policy against Venezuela.”After Venezuela’s 2018 elections widely regarded as rigged, Guaido, in his capacity as president of the National Assembly, invoked Venezuela’s charter to launch an interim government in January 2019 and rapidly won international recognition after Maduro began a new six-year term.While Maduro had threatened to arrest Guaido for months, a Trump official warned Feb. 5 that Venezuela‘s regime would see very significant consequences if there is any harm to opposition leader upon his return.(Recasts lead, adds background in fifth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Nicolle Yapur, Fabiola Zerpa and Jose Orozco.To contact the reporters on this story: Patricia Laya in Caracas at playa2@bloomberg.net;Alex Vasquez in Caracas Office at avasquez45@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Daniel Cancel at dcancel@bloomberg.net, Robert Jameson, Walter BrandimarteFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Opposition leader Juan Guaido staged a chaotic return to Venezuela after another international trip in which he tried to garner world leaders’ support to unseat President Nicolas Maduro.The head of the opposition-controlled National Assembly landed on Tuesday in Caracas, where Maduro’s loyalists clashed with opposition lawmakers who were there to greet him. He was swarmed by them after passing through customs and immigration, and was able to leave the airport without being arrested for violating a government travel ban. Guaido had also defied that ban last year without suffering repercussions on his re-entry to Venezuela.“This is a cowardly dictatorship, I defied them and we entered Venezuela,” Guaido said at a rally in a public square in eastern Caracas. “They don’t accept their destiny. They are alone, isolated, they represent no one.”His return caps an international tour that featured stops in Davos and Washington, where he met President Donald Trump. Guaido was publicly embraced by Trump during his State-of-the-Union address last week, in which the U.S. leader promised that “Maduro’s grip of tyranny will be smashed and broken.”Guaido has struggled to translate that support into concrete gains against a regime that remains solidly entrenched. Last April, he tried to lead an uprising against the government which failed after most of the armed forces refused to join. Yet Maduro has refrained from arresting him, possibly fearing an escalation of sanctions against his government.Why Venezuela Has Two Presidents, One Thorny Standoff: QuickTakeGuaido said journalists were attacked Tuesday. Earlier, security forces stopped buses taking National Assembly members to the airport. Opposition lawmaker Delsa Solorzano said on Twitter that authorities continued to hold legislator Deyalitza Aray, who was detained while trying to reach the airport.Journalists said they were beaten and chased by Maduro supporters while at the airport. Inside the terminal, government supporters protested against the U.S. government’s decision last week to sanction state-owned airline Conviasa.“The escalation of violence is very serious,” Guaido said at the eastern Caracas rally. “Today there were irregular groups backed by agents of the dictatorship.”Though he promised important announcements, Guaido’s speech Tuesday night focused on stirring supporters. He vowed domestic and international action to keep the pressure on Maduro, and said multilateral entities had agreed to create a “Venezuela Fund” when a transition of power takes place.What Broke Venezuela’s Economy and What Could Fix It: QuickTakeForeign TripsIn mid-January, Guaido traveled to Bogota with the support of Colombian President Ivan Duque. Subsequently, Guaido attended the World Economic Forum in Davos, met with French President Emmanuel Macron in Paris, and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in Ottawa, among others.Before leaving the U.S., he met with U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Organization of American States Secretary-General Luis Almagro.Venezuela’s socialist leader struck a defiant tone in his response to Guaido’s U.S. trip.“Donald Trump: you can’t beat Venezuela, nobody can smash or break Venezuela,” Maduro said in a speech following Guaido’s meeting at the White House. “Madness has taken over Donald Trump’s policy against Venezuela.”After Venezuela’s 2018 elections widely regarded as rigged, Guaido, in his capacity as president of the National Assembly, invoked Venezuela’s charter to launch an interim government in January 2019 and rapidly won international recognition after Maduro began a new six-year term.While Maduro had threatened to arrest Guaido for months, a Trump official warned Feb. 5 that Venezuela‘s regime would see very significant consequences if there is any harm to opposition leader upon his return.(Recasts lead, adds background in fifth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Nicolle Yapur, Fabiola Zerpa and Jose Orozco.To contact the reporters on this story: Patricia Laya in Caracas at playa2@bloomberg.net;Alex Vasquez in Caracas Office at avasquez45@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Daniel Cancel at dcancel@bloomberg.net, Robert Jameson, Walter BrandimarteFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 29/81   Scientists detect an unexplainable radio signal from outer space that repeats every 16 days
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    For the first time, scientists have detected a radio signal from outer space that repeats at regular intervals.

    For the first time, scientists have detected a radio signal from outer space that repeats at regular intervals.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 30/81   National Asset Services Surpasses 2,500 Property Investment Clients Served with $545 Million in Cash Distributions Delivered
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    National Asset Services, (NAS) one of the Nation's leading commercial real estate management companies, has successfully delivered $547.4 Million in cash distributions to over 2,500 property investors, during the company's 12-year history.

    National Asset Services, (NAS) one of the Nation's leading commercial real estate management companies, has successfully delivered $547.4 Million in cash distributions to over 2,500 property investors, during the company's 12-year history.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 31/81   Adhesion Wealth® Achieves 68% Year-Over-Year AUM Growth
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Adhesion Wealth® (Adhesion), a Vestmark company, has experienced significant growth over the previous year. In 2019, Adhesion's discretionary assets under management increased by 68%. In addition, Adhesion grew its advisory client base and discretionary accounts by 38% and 32%, respectively, over this period.

    Adhesion Wealth® (Adhesion), a Vestmark company, has experienced significant growth over the previous year. In 2019, Adhesion's discretionary assets under management increased by 68%. In addition, Adhesion grew its advisory client base and discretionary accounts by 38% and 32%, respectively, over this period.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 32/81   SkySwitch and Datagate to Provide Telecom Resellers with Advanced Billing Integrations
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Datagate Innovation, the leading Software as a Service (SaaS) telecom billing solution for managed service providers (MSPs), and SkySwitch, the leading channel-only white label Unified Communications as a Service (UCaaS) platform provider, announced that SkySwitch is now Datagate's first authorized sales and support partner in North America. The announcement of this new relationship, which creates one of the most efficient platforms in the market for resellers to manage and bill customers, was made at ITEXPO 2020 in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

    Datagate Innovation, the leading Software as a Service (SaaS) telecom billing solution for managed service providers (MSPs), and SkySwitch, the leading channel-only white label Unified Communications as a Service (UCaaS) platform provider, announced that SkySwitch is now Datagate's first authorized sales and support partner in North America. The announcement of this new relationship, which creates one of the most efficient platforms in the market for resellers to manage and bill customers, was made at ITEXPO 2020 in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 33/81   Prescient Advisory Announces Recent Appointments to the Senior Team
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Prescient, a biopharma product and portfolio strategy firm, announces the recent appointment of two new senior members, Kevin Baruzzi and Dr. Arun R. Shrivats, to its Advisory business. They join our specialist team focused on helping clients develop and commercialize assets and brands that resonate in the market and differentiate from the competition.

    Prescient, a biopharma product and portfolio strategy firm, announces the recent appointment of two new senior members, Kevin Baruzzi and Dr. Arun R. Shrivats, to its Advisory business. They join our specialist team focused on helping clients develop and commercialize assets and brands that resonate in the market and differentiate from the competition.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 34/81   Fence Quarter, LLC Announces the Debut of Its Carbon Fiber Fail Not Hardware System: The First of Its Kind Used in Wood Deck Railings
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Fence Quarter, LLC has done it again with another industry first that is changing the construction industry for the better. The company has launched its patent pending FAIL NOT carbon fiber supplement, a durable piece of hardware that can be incorporated into a wood deck railing for added support. This type of hardware system is especially beneficial for balconies and patios that require additional railing support, such as installations on the first or second floors.

    Fence Quarter, LLC has done it again with another industry first that is changing the construction industry for the better. The company has launched its patent pending FAIL NOT carbon fiber supplement, a durable piece of hardware that can be incorporated into a wood deck railing for added support. This type of hardware system is especially beneficial for balconies and patios that require additional railing support, such as installations on the first or second floors.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 35/81   UAG Introduces Rugged Protection for Samsung's Galaxy S20 Devices
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Urban Armor Gear (UAG), creator of lightweight mobile device cases, is proud to introduce an array of cases and colors for Samsung's latest devices.

    Urban Armor Gear (UAG), creator of lightweight mobile device cases, is proud to introduce an array of cases and colors for Samsung's latest devices.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 36/81   Should You Like The Michaels Companies, Inc.’s (NASDAQ:MIK) High Return On Capital Employed?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today we'll evaluate The Michaels Companies, Inc. (NASDAQ:MIK) to determine whether it could have potential as an...

    Today we'll evaluate The Michaels Companies, Inc. (NASDAQ:MIK) to determine whether it could have potential as an...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 37/81   Retro Fitness Partners with St. Jude Children's Research Hospital® in Effort to Help End Childhood Cancer
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today, Retro Fitness, a leader in the high-value, low price fitness space, is excited to announce a partnership with St. Jude Children's Research Hospital® to support the St. Jude mission: Finding cures. Saving children.® Beginning February 2020, Retro Fitness club locations nationwide will engage members, employees and franchise owners to encourage fundraising participation throughout the year. As Retro Fitness commits to its overall initiative to GET REAL, the Retro Fitness team is thrilled to inspire the members of its communities to GET REAL through philanthropy.

    Today, Retro Fitness, a leader in the high-value, low price fitness space, is excited to announce a partnership with St. Jude Children's Research Hospital® to support the St. Jude mission: Finding cures. Saving children.® Beginning February 2020, Retro Fitness club locations nationwide will engage members, employees and franchise owners to encourage fundraising participation throughout the year. As Retro Fitness commits to its overall initiative to GET REAL, the Retro Fitness team is thrilled to inspire the members of its communities to GET REAL through philanthropy.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 38/81   Sophisticated New Writing Assignment Technology From McGraw-Hill Helps College Students Learn Critical 21st Century Skills
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    McGraw-Hill, a leader in learning science and digital technology, today announced the release of new writing assignment technology in its McGraw-Hill Connect® digital course materials, which are used by millions of college students across the United States. The new writing assignment tool applies the latest advances in digitally-enabled writing instruction in one seamless solution to help students improve critical thinking and communications skills, which are increasingly in-demand in the 21st Century workforce.

    McGraw-Hill, a leader in learning science and digital technology, today announced the release of new writing assignment technology in its McGraw-Hill Connect® digital course materials, which are used by millions of college students across the United States. The new writing assignment tool applies the latest advances in digitally-enabled writing instruction in one seamless solution to help students improve critical thinking and communications skills, which are increasingly in-demand in the 21st Century workforce.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 39/81   Jeff Brodsky Is Less Than 60 Days Away from a Record-breaking Journey
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Jeff Brodsky Is Less Than 60 Days Away from a Record-breaking JourneyPR NewswireCONIFER, Colo. 12, 2020JOY International Founder and President to bike across the US barefoot to raise awareness to human trafficking.

    Jeff Brodsky Is Less Than 60 Days Away from a Record-breaking JourneyPR NewswireCONIFER, Colo. 12, 2020JOY International Founder and President to bike across the US barefoot to raise awareness to human trafficking.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 40/81   Agiloft Marks Banner Year with 134% Increase in New Sales in 2019
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Agiloft, the global standard in contract and commerce lifecycle management, today announced five consecutive years of business growth, achieving a 134% increase in new sales, and a 56% increase in overall company headcount. Agiloft also grew its implementation team by 125% and its sales team by 45%.

    Agiloft, the global standard in contract and commerce lifecycle management, today announced five consecutive years of business growth, achieving a 134% increase in new sales, and a 56% increase in overall company headcount. Agiloft also grew its implementation team by 125% and its sales team by 45%.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 41/81   Here's Why We're Watching Moleculin Biotech's (NASDAQ:MBRX) Cash Burn Situation
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    We can readily understand why investors are attracted to unprofitable companies. For example, although Amazon.com made...

    We can readily understand why investors are attracted to unprofitable companies. For example, although Amazon.com made...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 42/81   Manchin to Trump: I'm no Munchkin, and by the way, you're 'much heavier than me'
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Sen. Joe Manchin and former Mayor Michael Bloomberg respond to taunts by President Trump in a similar way.

    Sen. Joe Manchin and former Mayor Michael Bloomberg respond to taunts by President Trump in a similar way.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 43/81   As coronavirus spreads on cruise ships, what does it mean for cruisers and cruise lines? 'It's day-by-day'
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Coronavirus has forced the cruise industry to take measures to keep the outbreak at bay. But how will it impact the industry and cruisers?

    Coronavirus has forced the cruise industry to take measures to keep the outbreak at bay. But how will it impact the industry and cruisers?


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 44/81   Meghan McCain slated by Bernie Sanders supporters for tweet questioning senator's health
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Meghan McCain, the daughter of now-deceased US senator John McCain, has found herself the online target of Bernie Sanders’s supporters after a tweet in which she apparently questioned his physical fitness for office.After Sanders narrowly won the New Hampshire primary, McCain tweeted: “Democrats really gonna nominate a 78 year old white socialist who recently had a heart attack? Really......”

    Meghan McCain, the daughter of now-deceased US senator John McCain, has found herself the online target of Bernie Sanders’s supporters after a tweet in which she apparently questioned his physical fitness for office.After Sanders narrowly won the New Hampshire primary, McCain tweeted: “Democrats really gonna nominate a 78 year old white socialist who recently had a heart attack? Really......”


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 45/81   2 Russian spacecraft are trailing a US spy satellite and could create a 'dangerous situation in space'
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A US satellite used to capture images of Earth is being followed by a pair of Russian satellites, the commander of the Space Force said.

    A US satellite used to capture images of Earth is being followed by a pair of Russian satellites, the commander of the Space Force said.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 46/81   A Pennsylvania school called police after a 6-year-old girl with Down Syndrome pointed her finger like a gun, her mother says
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Margot Gaines does not understand the concept of shooting, according to her mom, who thinks Valley Forge Elementary School came down way too hard.

    Margot Gaines does not understand the concept of shooting, according to her mom, who thinks Valley Forge Elementary School came down way too hard.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 47/81   How China Is Making the Coronavirus an Even Bigger Problem
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The International Civil Aviation Organization appears more concerned with doing China’s bidding by prioritizing Beijing’s political priorities over a global health emergency.

    The International Civil Aviation Organization appears more concerned with doing China’s bidding by prioritizing Beijing’s political priorities over a global health emergency.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 48/81   Man killed in Tesla crash had complained about Autopilot
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    An Apple engineer who died when his Tesla Model X hit a concrete barrier on a Silicon Valley freeway had complained before his death that the SUV’s Autopilot system would malfunction in the area where the crash happened.

    An Apple engineer who died when his Tesla Model X hit a concrete barrier on a Silicon Valley freeway had complained before his death that the SUV’s Autopilot system would malfunction in the area where the crash happened.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 49/81   Buoyed by U.S., Erdogan Vows to Expel Syrian Forces From Idlib
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan vowed to drive Russian-backed Syrian government forces from the last rebel stronghold of Idlib, escalating his threats against Damascus after being buoyed by rare public support from the U.S.Erdogan has massed tanks and commandos in Idlib after at least 14 Turks, most of them soldiers, were killed by forces loyal to President Bashar al-Assad, and on Wednesday threatened to hit Syrian targets “anywhere” if Turkish troops are harmed again.“We’re determined to drive away regime forces until the end of February” from the vicinity of Idlib, he said. At least three Turkish army outposts have been cut off in the area.Assad’s attempt to crush Turkish-backed rebels and al-Qaeda militants in the final major opposition holdout after nine years of war has triggered fierce Turkish military retaliation, while testing key strategic alliances.Turkey and Russia have so far maintained an uneasy partnership in Syria, where they back opposing sides, but disagreements over who should control Idlib have brought them to the brink of a standoff.A recapture of the province would mark a major strategic victory for Assad and threatens to give Turkey less of a say in postwar Syria, where it’s been backing rebels since the conflict began in 2011.U.S. BackingWalking a fine line, Erdogan has been careful not to alienate Russian President Vladimir Putin, who is backing Assad. The two spoke by phone Wednesday about the “aggravation of the situation” in Idlib, and noted the need for “full implementation” of agreements between Russia and Turkey to contain hostilities in Syria’s northwest, according to a Kremlin statement.Erdogan said he and Putin decided that military and civilian officials from both sides would hold further discussions.But Turkey’s openness to international support also lays bare the power imbalance in Syria, where Russia controls the air space above Idlib.Erdogan said he might soon talk with President Donald Trump on events in Syria after Ankara secured support from a visiting U.S. official in its tussle with the Assad regime.James Jeffrey, the U.S. envoy for Syria engagement and its special representative to the global coalition to defeat Islamic State, said he had traveled to Turkey to discuss whatever support the country needed to defend its soldiers against “a threat in Idlib from Russia and the Assad government.”U.S. Secretary of State Michael Pompeo said on Twitter that he had dispatched Jeffrey to “coordinate steps to respond to this destabilizing attack.”The U.S. and Turkey are finding rare common ground over the conflict in Syria despite a lengthy dispute between the NATO allies over Turkey’s purchase of an advanced Russian missile-defense system.Putin and Erdogan struck a deal at Sochi in September 2018 that provided for the creation of a demilitarized zone in Idlib between Syrian government troops and opposition groups.It required “radical militants” to withdraw from the area and provided for Turkish and Russian forces to conduct joint monitoring of the zone, as well as allowing the restoration of key transit routes to Aleppo, Syria’s shattered commercial hub.Moscow has demanded a halt to attacks on Russian forces and their allies in the northwestern province, who’ve been conducting a months-long advance on the opposition bastion.“We continue to regret the fact that these groups are attacking Syrian troops from Idlib and carrying out aggressive actions against our military infrastructure. This is unacceptable and goes against the Sochi agreements,” Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters on a conference call Wednesday.Erdogan, however, said the Syrian offensive on Idlib was aimed at forcing civilians to flee. Turkey, which already hosts the world’s largest number of Syrians who escaped the war, fears from a new influx of refugees.Turkey’s increasing military foray into Idlib is adding to geopolitical risks and unsettling investors. Turkish stocks and bonds plunged following reports of new fatalities on Monday. The yield on Turkey’s 10-year government bond and two-year notes rose as the lira slipped to an almost eight-month low against the dollar.\--With assistance from Tony Halpin.To contact the reporters on this story: Selcan Hacaoglu in Ankara at shacaoglu@bloomberg.net;Firat Kozok in Ankara at fkozok@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Onur Ant at oant@bloomberg.net, Mark Williams, Amy TeibelFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan vowed to drive Russian-backed Syrian government forces from the last rebel stronghold of Idlib, escalating his threats against Damascus after being buoyed by rare public support from the U.S.Erdogan has massed tanks and commandos in Idlib after at least 14 Turks, most of them soldiers, were killed by forces loyal to President Bashar al-Assad, and on Wednesday threatened to hit Syrian targets “anywhere” if Turkish troops are harmed again.“We’re determined to drive away regime forces until the end of February” from the vicinity of Idlib, he said. At least three Turkish army outposts have been cut off in the area.Assad’s attempt to crush Turkish-backed rebels and al-Qaeda militants in the final major opposition holdout after nine years of war has triggered fierce Turkish military retaliation, while testing key strategic alliances.Turkey and Russia have so far maintained an uneasy partnership in Syria, where they back opposing sides, but disagreements over who should control Idlib have brought them to the brink of a standoff.A recapture of the province would mark a major strategic victory for Assad and threatens to give Turkey less of a say in postwar Syria, where it’s been backing rebels since the conflict began in 2011.U.S. BackingWalking a fine line, Erdogan has been careful not to alienate Russian President Vladimir Putin, who is backing Assad. The two spoke by phone Wednesday about the “aggravation of the situation” in Idlib, and noted the need for “full implementation” of agreements between Russia and Turkey to contain hostilities in Syria’s northwest, according to a Kremlin statement.Erdogan said he and Putin decided that military and civilian officials from both sides would hold further discussions.But Turkey’s openness to international support also lays bare the power imbalance in Syria, where Russia controls the air space above Idlib.Erdogan said he might soon talk with President Donald Trump on events in Syria after Ankara secured support from a visiting U.S. official in its tussle with the Assad regime.James Jeffrey, the U.S. envoy for Syria engagement and its special representative to the global coalition to defeat Islamic State, said he had traveled to Turkey to discuss whatever support the country needed to defend its soldiers against “a threat in Idlib from Russia and the Assad government.”U.S. Secretary of State Michael Pompeo said on Twitter that he had dispatched Jeffrey to “coordinate steps to respond to this destabilizing attack.”The U.S. and Turkey are finding rare common ground over the conflict in Syria despite a lengthy dispute between the NATO allies over Turkey’s purchase of an advanced Russian missile-defense system.Putin and Erdogan struck a deal at Sochi in September 2018 that provided for the creation of a demilitarized zone in Idlib between Syrian government troops and opposition groups.It required “radical militants” to withdraw from the area and provided for Turkish and Russian forces to conduct joint monitoring of the zone, as well as allowing the restoration of key transit routes to Aleppo, Syria’s shattered commercial hub.Moscow has demanded a halt to attacks on Russian forces and their allies in the northwestern province, who’ve been conducting a months-long advance on the opposition bastion.“We continue to regret the fact that these groups are attacking Syrian troops from Idlib and carrying out aggressive actions against our military infrastructure. This is unacceptable and goes against the Sochi agreements,” Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters on a conference call Wednesday.Erdogan, however, said the Syrian offensive on Idlib was aimed at forcing civilians to flee. Turkey, which already hosts the world’s largest number of Syrians who escaped the war, fears from a new influx of refugees.Turkey’s increasing military foray into Idlib is adding to geopolitical risks and unsettling investors. Turkish stocks and bonds plunged following reports of new fatalities on Monday. The yield on Turkey’s 10-year government bond and two-year notes rose as the lira slipped to an almost eight-month low against the dollar.\--With assistance from Tony Halpin.To contact the reporters on this story: Selcan Hacaoglu in Ankara at shacaoglu@bloomberg.net;Firat Kozok in Ankara at fkozok@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Onur Ant at oant@bloomberg.net, Mark Williams, Amy TeibelFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 50/81   Philippine military backs defence divorce from U.S.
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The military chief backed President Rodrigo Duterte's termination of the 1998 Visiting Forces Agreement (VFA) and said doing so would allow the Philippines to expand its modernisation programme and its engagement with Australia and Japan - both U.S. allies.

    The military chief backed President Rodrigo Duterte's termination of the 1998 Visiting Forces Agreement (VFA) and said doing so would allow the Philippines to expand its modernisation programme and its engagement with Australia and Japan - both U.S. allies.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 51/81   'We're not some banana republic': National security adviser defends removal of Trump impeachment witness from White House job
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    National security adviser Robert O’Brien said Tuesday evening there had been “absolutely” no retaliation involved in Friday’s departure of Army Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman from the National Security Council, even as President Trump seemed to indicate that the military would “look into” whether to take disciplinary action against the Army officer.

    National security adviser Robert O’Brien said Tuesday evening there had been “absolutely” no retaliation involved in Friday’s departure of Army Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman from the National Security Council, even as President Trump seemed to indicate that the military would “look into” whether to take disciplinary action against the Army officer.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 52/81   Betelgeuse Is Acting Really Weird Right Now. Could It Be Ready To Go Supernova?
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    A neighboring star is showing some unusual activity and that could mean it's about to blow.

    A neighboring star is showing some unusual activity and that could mean it's about to blow.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 53/81   The Climate Crisis Is Threatening Bees. Here’s What's Helping To Save Them.
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    From supporting farmers to citizen science, communities are working to protect these vital pollinators.

    From supporting farmers to citizen science, communities are working to protect these vital pollinators.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 54/81   A Rare Trump-Era Climate Policy Hits an Obstacle: The Tax Man
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    WASHINGTON -- A rare policy enacted under President Donald Trump to address climate change has run into an unexpected hurdle: the tax man.In 2018, Congress approved a lucrative tax break for companies that use carbon capture technology to trap carbon dioxide produced by industrial sites before the gas escapes into the atmosphere and heats the planet. The technology is still costly and contentious, but may one day become a valuable tool for slowing global warming. House Republicans are aiming to expand support for carbon capture as part of a broader package of climate bills, the first of which is expected Wednesday.At least a dozen carbon capture projects, potentially representing billions of dollars in investments, have been announced since Congress passed its 2018 tax break. But two years later, those plans remain blocked because the Internal Revenue Service has yet to explain how, exactly, companies can claim the tax credit that would make the projects viable."The delay is unacceptable and will only further slow much-needed investment in carbon capture," said Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., an original co-sponsor of the tax break.Asked about the delay, an IRS spokesman said Thursday that the agency would begin issuing some guidance "within the next few weeks," including clarity on how project developers can partner with investors. But other important guidance is still "under development," the IRS spokesman said.That includes rules for monitoring underground storage sites and imposing penalties if the carbon dioxide leaks back out. As to why the rules have taken two years, he said the agency has been working through "many challenging issues" raised by companies, environmental groups and other interested parties.Observers say the IRS has also been busy implementing the vast 2017 Republican tax overhaul, which may partly explain the delay.But the clock is ticking on its tax credit. By law, companies have to start construction by the end of 2023 to qualify for the credit, but planning and financing large projects can take years. The uncertainty created by the delay, many fear, may prevent projects from getting off the ground.In North Dakota, Minnkota Power Cooperative, an electric utility, is studying a $1 billion plan to bury heat-trapping gases from one of its coal-fired power plants. In Indiana, the Wabash Valley Resources company aims to produce greener ammonia fertilizer by stashing its emissions underground.In Texas, Occidental Petroleum is looking to capture carbon dioxide from two ethanol plants and inject the gas into its underground wells to help extract oil. This practice, known as enhanced oil recovery, would produce more fossil fuels. But the company says that emissions from that oil would be at least partly offset by the injected carbon dioxide that remained underground -- creating a fuel that has a smaller climate impact than conventional oil.The IRS delay is striking because the tax credit was one of the few climate policies to attract bipartisan support.Democratic backers said that carbon capture could prove necessary to cut climate change pollution from industrial sources like cement or steel plants that are otherwise hard to clean up. Republican supporters, along with coal and oil companies, saw carbon capture as a less disruptive way to reduce emissions than abandoning fossil fuels altogether.And while many environmentalists recoiled from a policy that would aid oil extraction, some green groups said that oil industry support could help drive down the cost of carbon capture faster.The tax credit is worth up to $50 for each ton of carbon dioxide captured and permanently buried underground, and up to $35 per ton if the captured gas is used for activities like enhanced oil recovery. To qualify, a power plant must capture at least 500,000 tons of carbon dioxide per year, which means the credit could be worth more than $200 million over its 12-year lifetime.That's a bigger tax break than most developers can use on their own. Instead, many will need to partner with banks or investors with large tax burdens -- much as wind and solar developers have done with their own federal tax credits.That's where the IRS delay matters, given that the agency hasn't explained how these financial partnerships can be structured, what steps companies must take to ensure that the underground carbon dioxide doesn't leak out, and what the penalties might be if leaks do occur.The IRS, already strained by years of budget cuts, faces technical challenges in writing carbon capture rules. Environmental groups, for instance, have urged the IRS to use the Environmental Protection Agency's existing monitoring rules for underground storage. But some industry groups have backed an alternative standard, which critics fear could be less stringent.Carbon capture technology has long struggled to gain traction. A few early government-backed projects were never finished after billions of dollars of investments and delays.Yet there are still hopes that carbon capture could help the world avoid the worst consequences of climate change. The International Energy Agency has suggested that countries may need to capture more than 2 billion tons of carbon dioxide per year by 2040 to help keep global warming below 2 degrees Celsius, the international goal.Industry officials say they are now starting to get the hang of the technology.In 2017, with help from an Energy Department grant, NRG and JX Nippon Oil and Gas Exploration successfully retrofitted a coal plant near Houston with a carbon capture device. The plant's exhaust is run through chemicals that bind to the carbon dioxide, which is then piped to nearby oil wells. (In theory, the carbon dioxide stays underground, and newly freed oil comes up.)So far, the facility has captured an average of 1.3 million tons of carbon dioxide per year, roughly equal to the annual pollution produced by 276,000 cars.In North Dakota, Minnkota Power now plans to retrofit one of its coal units with a similar technology, aiming to capture 3 million tons of carbon dioxide per year and store it more than a mile underground. Minnkota's chief executive, Robert McLennan, said the utility is thinking about a future in which stricter climate rules could otherwise force its coal plant to shut down.But success is far from assured. The $1 billion project isn't viable without the federal tax credit, McLennan said, and lining up partners will take time. "Starting construction by the end of 2023 is going to be a challenge," he said. "The sooner the IRS can provide clarity, the better."Similarly, in New Mexico, the utilities that own the San Juan Generating Station, an 847-megawatt coal plant, were planning to retire the facility by 2022 as the state imposes stricter emissions rules. But the city of Farmington, New Mexico, is now proposing to partner with a company called Enchant Energy to take over the plant and outfit it with carbon capture technology to keep it running until 2035.Peter Mandelstam, the chief operating officer of Enchant, said carbon capture could reduce the plant's emissions by 90%, allowing it to comply with the state's new rules. "This is a less disruptive way to transition to a renewable future," he said, noting that hundreds of jobs could be lost if the plant closed today.Another company with a keen interest in carbon capture is Occidental, the largest producer of oil in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico. In addition to its plans to capture emissions from two ethanol facilities, the company has partnered with a Canadian firm, Carbon Engineering, to explore a device that would pull 1 million tons of carbon dioxide per year directly from the air for use in enhanced oil recovery.Occidental says its ultimate goal is to become carbon neutral -- by removing as much carbon dioxide from the air as its oil produces -- though it has not set a firm date on that. "We view carbon capture as a way to differentiate ourselves," said Richard Jackson, president of Occidental's low carbon ventures division.But some environmentalists fear that the end result will simply be more oil. John Noel, a senior climate campaigner at Greenpeace, said increased use of carbon dioxide to extract petroleum could potentially mean "untold amounts of oil flooding the market, maintaining demand." The risk, he said, is, "we never reach this point of transition" to a lower-carbon future.A less contentious proposal is in Indiana, where Wabash Valley Resources is converting an old power plant into a factory that makes ammonia fertilizer from petcoke, a byproduct of oil refineries. The company plans to inject its emissions, at least 1.5 million tons of carbon dioxide per year, 7,000 feet underground into porous sandstone. The company needs the tax credit for the project to make economic sense.Today, ammonia production accounts for roughly 1% of global emissions. But ammonia made using the greener manufacturing process could be sold to corn farmers producing ethanol to make lower-carbon fuels for California's market, according to Nalin Gupta, managing partner at Wabash Valley Resources. Or the ammonia might one day be used to power ships, which currently run on highly polluting bunker fuel."But first," Gupta said, "we have to show this can work."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company

    WASHINGTON -- A rare policy enacted under President Donald Trump to address climate change has run into an unexpected hurdle: the tax man.In 2018, Congress approved a lucrative tax break for companies that use carbon capture technology to trap carbon dioxide produced by industrial sites before the gas escapes into the atmosphere and heats the planet. The technology is still costly and contentious, but may one day become a valuable tool for slowing global warming. House Republicans are aiming to expand support for carbon capture as part of a broader package of climate bills, the first of which is expected Wednesday.At least a dozen carbon capture projects, potentially representing billions of dollars in investments, have been announced since Congress passed its 2018 tax break. But two years later, those plans remain blocked because the Internal Revenue Service has yet to explain how, exactly, companies can claim the tax credit that would make the projects viable."The delay is unacceptable and will only further slow much-needed investment in carbon capture," said Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., an original co-sponsor of the tax break.Asked about the delay, an IRS spokesman said Thursday that the agency would begin issuing some guidance "within the next few weeks," including clarity on how project developers can partner with investors. But other important guidance is still "under development," the IRS spokesman said.That includes rules for monitoring underground storage sites and imposing penalties if the carbon dioxide leaks back out. As to why the rules have taken two years, he said the agency has been working through "many challenging issues" raised by companies, environmental groups and other interested parties.Observers say the IRS has also been busy implementing the vast 2017 Republican tax overhaul, which may partly explain the delay.But the clock is ticking on its tax credit. By law, companies have to start construction by the end of 2023 to qualify for the credit, but planning and financing large projects can take years. The uncertainty created by the delay, many fear, may prevent projects from getting off the ground.In North Dakota, Minnkota Power Cooperative, an electric utility, is studying a $1 billion plan to bury heat-trapping gases from one of its coal-fired power plants. In Indiana, the Wabash Valley Resources company aims to produce greener ammonia fertilizer by stashing its emissions underground.In Texas, Occidental Petroleum is looking to capture carbon dioxide from two ethanol plants and inject the gas into its underground wells to help extract oil. This practice, known as enhanced oil recovery, would produce more fossil fuels. But the company says that emissions from that oil would be at least partly offset by the injected carbon dioxide that remained underground -- creating a fuel that has a smaller climate impact than conventional oil.The IRS delay is striking because the tax credit was one of the few climate policies to attract bipartisan support.Democratic backers said that carbon capture could prove necessary to cut climate change pollution from industrial sources like cement or steel plants that are otherwise hard to clean up. Republican supporters, along with coal and oil companies, saw carbon capture as a less disruptive way to reduce emissions than abandoning fossil fuels altogether.And while many environmentalists recoiled from a policy that would aid oil extraction, some green groups said that oil industry support could help drive down the cost of carbon capture faster.The tax credit is worth up to $50 for each ton of carbon dioxide captured and permanently buried underground, and up to $35 per ton if the captured gas is used for activities like enhanced oil recovery. To qualify, a power plant must capture at least 500,000 tons of carbon dioxide per year, which means the credit could be worth more than $200 million over its 12-year lifetime.That's a bigger tax break than most developers can use on their own. Instead, many will need to partner with banks or investors with large tax burdens -- much as wind and solar developers have done with their own federal tax credits.That's where the IRS delay matters, given that the agency hasn't explained how these financial partnerships can be structured, what steps companies must take to ensure that the underground carbon dioxide doesn't leak out, and what the penalties might be if leaks do occur.The IRS, already strained by years of budget cuts, faces technical challenges in writing carbon capture rules. Environmental groups, for instance, have urged the IRS to use the Environmental Protection Agency's existing monitoring rules for underground storage. But some industry groups have backed an alternative standard, which critics fear could be less stringent.Carbon capture technology has long struggled to gain traction. A few early government-backed projects were never finished after billions of dollars of investments and delays.Yet there are still hopes that carbon capture could help the world avoid the worst consequences of climate change. The International Energy Agency has suggested that countries may need to capture more than 2 billion tons of carbon dioxide per year by 2040 to help keep global warming below 2 degrees Celsius, the international goal.Industry officials say they are now starting to get the hang of the technology.In 2017, with help from an Energy Department grant, NRG and JX Nippon Oil and Gas Exploration successfully retrofitted a coal plant near Houston with a carbon capture device. The plant's exhaust is run through chemicals that bind to the carbon dioxide, which is then piped to nearby oil wells. (In theory, the carbon dioxide stays underground, and newly freed oil comes up.)So far, the facility has captured an average of 1.3 million tons of carbon dioxide per year, roughly equal to the annual pollution produced by 276,000 cars.In North Dakota, Minnkota Power now plans to retrofit one of its coal units with a similar technology, aiming to capture 3 million tons of carbon dioxide per year and store it more than a mile underground. Minnkota's chief executive, Robert McLennan, said the utility is thinking about a future in which stricter climate rules could otherwise force its coal plant to shut down.But success is far from assured. The $1 billion project isn't viable without the federal tax credit, McLennan said, and lining up partners will take time. "Starting construction by the end of 2023 is going to be a challenge," he said. "The sooner the IRS can provide clarity, the better."Similarly, in New Mexico, the utilities that own the San Juan Generating Station, an 847-megawatt coal plant, were planning to retire the facility by 2022 as the state imposes stricter emissions rules. But the city of Farmington, New Mexico, is now proposing to partner with a company called Enchant Energy to take over the plant and outfit it with carbon capture technology to keep it running until 2035.Peter Mandelstam, the chief operating officer of Enchant, said carbon capture could reduce the plant's emissions by 90%, allowing it to comply with the state's new rules. "This is a less disruptive way to transition to a renewable future," he said, noting that hundreds of jobs could be lost if the plant closed today.Another company with a keen interest in carbon capture is Occidental, the largest producer of oil in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico. In addition to its plans to capture emissions from two ethanol facilities, the company has partnered with a Canadian firm, Carbon Engineering, to explore a device that would pull 1 million tons of carbon dioxide per year directly from the air for use in enhanced oil recovery.Occidental says its ultimate goal is to become carbon neutral -- by removing as much carbon dioxide from the air as its oil produces -- though it has not set a firm date on that. "We view carbon capture as a way to differentiate ourselves," said Richard Jackson, president of Occidental's low carbon ventures division.But some environmentalists fear that the end result will simply be more oil. John Noel, a senior climate campaigner at Greenpeace, said increased use of carbon dioxide to extract petroleum could potentially mean "untold amounts of oil flooding the market, maintaining demand." The risk, he said, is, "we never reach this point of transition" to a lower-carbon future.A less contentious proposal is in Indiana, where Wabash Valley Resources is converting an old power plant into a factory that makes ammonia fertilizer from petcoke, a byproduct of oil refineries. The company plans to inject its emissions, at least 1.5 million tons of carbon dioxide per year, 7,000 feet underground into porous sandstone. The company needs the tax credit for the project to make economic sense.Today, ammonia production accounts for roughly 1% of global emissions. But ammonia made using the greener manufacturing process could be sold to corn farmers producing ethanol to make lower-carbon fuels for California's market, according to Nalin Gupta, managing partner at Wabash Valley Resources. Or the ammonia might one day be used to power ships, which currently run on highly polluting bunker fuel."But first," Gupta said, "we have to show this can work."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 55/81   Australia's government listed 113 native animal species that need 'emergency intervention' in order to survive after its devastating bushfires
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Koalas, platypuses, and some species of echidna, possum, potoroo, and dunnart were listed as "high-priority" for government intervention.

    Koalas, platypuses, and some species of echidna, possum, potoroo, and dunnart were listed as "high-priority" for government intervention.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 56/81   A Japanese health worker caught coronavirus on the quarantined cruise ship where 174 passengers have tested positive
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    A Japanese health worker and 174 passengers on the quarantined Diamond Princess cruise ship have tested positive for newly named COVID-19 virus.

    A Japanese health worker and 174 passengers on the quarantined Diamond Princess cruise ship have tested positive for newly named COVID-19 virus.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 57/81   Wuhan evacuees joyfully threw their face masks after their 14-day quarantine ended — but they could be celebrating too early
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    A new study from China says the coronavirus incubation period could be up to 24 days, which would render a 14-day quarantine ineffective.

    A new study from China says the coronavirus incubation period could be up to 24 days, which would render a 14-day quarantine ineffective.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 58/81   Photo shows an extraordinarily overloaded Chinese worker delivering massive amounts of food because no one wants to go outside and risk catching coronavirus
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    A striking photo captured by a photographer in China shows the struggle of living under fear of contracting the coronavirus.

    A striking photo captured by a photographer in China shows the struggle of living under fear of contracting the coronavirus.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 59/81   Presidents Day weekend travel mostly OK
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    In my last post, I showed a 10 mb map that led me to speculate about whether it was a signal for a change to persistent cold:    The vortex was displaced from the North Pole and was quite elongated. I wondered if this was a sign that the vortex would soon weaken. However, that idea was wrong. Tuesday morning's map showed the vortex was back near the North Pole and much less elongated:    This suggests the Midwest and Northeast are not likely to have a blocking pattern that favors snow and cold for the major East Coast cities. This is nothing new so far in 2020. While there have been cold shots, temperatures have run well above long-term averages, as shown by this map:    The current upper-air pattern at 500 mb shows the main vortex centered well north in Canada. A series of storms from the Pacific will move through the Southwest, draw in Gulf moisture and spread precipitation across the Ohio Valley and Northeast. With no blocking in place, low pressure areas often migrate toward the main vortex to the north.    Ahead of the next storm, it will be just moderately cold. But as the center of low pressure passes north of a line from Lake Erie to Massachusetts, rain will be the main product (except in northern New England). Temperatures will go toward or past 50 in Philadelphia Thursday. The storm will exit the New England coast by Friday. Air following the storm will be much colder than what moved in behind the storm that affected the Northeast early this week. It may be below freezing in Philly Friday afternoon.Today's GFS model suggested that a storm moving into the Ohio Valley and Northeast next Tuesday could be similar to the system that affected the same area at the start of this week.

    In my last post, I showed a 10 mb map that led me to speculate about whether it was a signal for a change to persistent cold: The vortex was displaced from the North Pole and was quite elongated. I wondered if this was a sign that the vortex would soon weaken. However, that idea was wrong. Tuesday morning's map showed the vortex was back near the North Pole and much less elongated: This suggests the Midwest and Northeast are not likely to have a blocking pattern that favors snow and cold for the major East Coast cities. This is nothing new so far in 2020. While there have been cold shots, temperatures have run well above long-term averages, as shown by this map: The current upper-air pattern at 500 mb shows the main vortex centered well north in Canada. A series of storms from the Pacific will move through the Southwest, draw in Gulf moisture and spread precipitation across the Ohio Valley and Northeast. With no blocking in place, low pressure areas often migrate toward the main vortex to the north. Ahead of the next storm, it will be just moderately cold. But as the center of low pressure passes north of a line from Lake Erie to Massachusetts, rain will be the main product (except in northern New England). Temperatures will go toward or past 50 in Philadelphia Thursday. The storm will exit the New England coast by Friday. Air following the storm will be much colder than what moved in behind the storm that affected the Northeast early this week. It may be below freezing in Philly Friday afternoon.Today's GFS model suggested that a storm moving into the Ohio Valley and Northeast next Tuesday could be similar to the system that affected the same area at the start of this week.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 60/81   The Wuhan coronavirus has killed more people in 6 weeks than SARS did in 8 months. Here's how the 2 outbreaks compare.
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    SARS killed 774 people between November 2002 and July 2003. More than 1,100 people have died from the new Wuhan coronavirus since December.

    SARS killed 774 people between November 2002 and July 2003. More than 1,100 people have died from the new Wuhan coronavirus since December.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 61/81   Only 1 in 19 people who might have the coronavirus are being diagnosed in Wuhan, new research suggests
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    New estimates of novel coronavirus cases in the city of Wuhan, China, place the number of infected people far higher than the current reports.

    New estimates of novel coronavirus cases in the city of Wuhan, China, place the number of infected people far higher than the current reports.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 62/81   Merkel’s Bavarian Allies Flex Muscles on Chancellor Choice
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Want the lowdown on European markets? In your inbox before the open, every day. Sign up here.Angela Merkel’s Bavarian allies are demanding a say on choosing the next conservative chancellor candidate, foreshadowing months of potential acrimony over who gets to run for the job of leading Europe’s biggest economy.The muscle-flexing by the CSU sister party to Merkel’s CDU underscores the complicated task of agreeing on a successor to replace the long-standing German chancellor, in what is set to keep the country’s government distracted at a time of global upheaval.The move also adds to growing pressure on Merkel after party allies said the process of selecting a new heir should be accelerated, making it more difficult for her to serve out her fourth term due to end in September 2021.Markus Blume, CSU General Secretary, on Wednesday stressed his party’s key role in selecting Merkel’s successor. “The question of the chancellor candidacy has always been decided jointly by the CDU and CSU and that will be the case again this time,” he said in an interview with Deutschlandfunk radio.With Germany taking on the European Union presidency in the second half of this year, stability in Berlin is vital, he added.After Merkel’s chosen successor Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer this week took herself out of the running and said she will also step down as CDU leader, CSU Chairman Markus Soeder reaffirmed his position that his main task is to run the wealthy southern state. But he also emphasized his responsibility to steer German politics at the national level, thereby keeping his options open for a possible run for the chancellorship.While Soeder “has a lot of plans” in Bavaria, Blume said “you can be sure that we as the CSU and he personally will act decisively at the federal level.”Blume also echoed criticism from both CDU and CSU officials over the lengthy timetable for choosing Merkel’s successor. This process should not take until December, as originally planned, because months of internal wrangling and unresolved personnel issues can alienate voters, he said.Kramp-Karrenbauer will hold talks with prospective candidates both for her job as CDU leader and for chancellor already next week, the Rheinische Post newspaper reported Wednesday, citing unidentified sources from Merkel’s bloc.AKK, as Kramp-Karrenbauer is known, also plans to meet Soeder on the sidelines of the Munich Security Conference this weekend, the paper said. It added that the CDU is looking to organize a special congress “soon” to decide who will fill the two posts, in what would be a concession to those who are critical of the succession planning process. Soeder is seen as something of a wild card to succeed Merkel, and both CSU candidates who contested the chancellery since World War II were unsuccessful. The three CDU front-runners are Armin Laschet, Friedrich Merz, and Jens Spahn, though they are yet to declare their candidacies.Laschet, the premier of the state of North Rhine-Westphalia, is from Merkel’s centrist camp, while Merz and Spahn are more to the right of the CDU and came second and third respectively to Kramp-Karrenbauer in the leadership election at the end of 2018.The 53-year-old Soeder, who became Bavarian premier in 2018 and CSU chairman a year later, is Germany’s second-most popular politician, according to one poll. At the CDU party congress in November, he brought delegates to their feet with a punchy speech that enhanced his national standing.Soeder has shed his reputation as a party rabble-rouser, taking a softer line than his predecessor on Merkel’s migration policy. The CSU chairman has declared the far-right Alternative for Germany the party’s political “enemy,” while saying that the Greens have usurped the SPD’s position as the CSU’s main competitor.The CDU must first decide on a replacement for Kramp-Karrenbauer as party leader and then a joint decision will be made on the best candidate from the conservative bloc to contest the next election, due in September 2021, Blume said.“This can of course in the end be the same person, but that doesn’t have to be the case,” he added.(Updates with Kramp-Karrenbauer report from ninth paragraph)\--With assistance from Patrick Donahue.To contact the reporter on this story: Iain Rogers in Berlin at irogers11@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Chad Thomas at cthomas16@bloomberg.net, Daniel Schaefer, Chris ReiterFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Want the lowdown on European markets? In your inbox before the open, every day. Sign up here.Angela Merkel’s Bavarian allies are demanding a say on choosing the next conservative chancellor candidate, foreshadowing months of potential acrimony over who gets to run for the job of leading Europe’s biggest economy.The muscle-flexing by the CSU sister party to Merkel’s CDU underscores the complicated task of agreeing on a successor to replace the long-standing German chancellor, in what is set to keep the country’s government distracted at a time of global upheaval.The move also adds to growing pressure on Merkel after party allies said the process of selecting a new heir should be accelerated, making it more difficult for her to serve out her fourth term due to end in September 2021.Markus Blume, CSU General Secretary, on Wednesday stressed his party’s key role in selecting Merkel’s successor. “The question of the chancellor candidacy has always been decided jointly by the CDU and CSU and that will be the case again this time,” he said in an interview with Deutschlandfunk radio.With Germany taking on the European Union presidency in the second half of this year, stability in Berlin is vital, he added.After Merkel’s chosen successor Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer this week took herself out of the running and said she will also step down as CDU leader, CSU Chairman Markus Soeder reaffirmed his position that his main task is to run the wealthy southern state. But he also emphasized his responsibility to steer German politics at the national level, thereby keeping his options open for a possible run for the chancellorship.While Soeder “has a lot of plans” in Bavaria, Blume said “you can be sure that we as the CSU and he personally will act decisively at the federal level.”Blume also echoed criticism from both CDU and CSU officials over the lengthy timetable for choosing Merkel’s successor. This process should not take until December, as originally planned, because months of internal wrangling and unresolved personnel issues can alienate voters, he said.Kramp-Karrenbauer will hold talks with prospective candidates both for her job as CDU leader and for chancellor already next week, the Rheinische Post newspaper reported Wednesday, citing unidentified sources from Merkel’s bloc.AKK, as Kramp-Karrenbauer is known, also plans to meet Soeder on the sidelines of the Munich Security Conference this weekend, the paper said. It added that the CDU is looking to organize a special congress “soon” to decide who will fill the two posts, in what would be a concession to those who are critical of the succession planning process. Soeder is seen as something of a wild card to succeed Merkel, and both CSU candidates who contested the chancellery since World War II were unsuccessful. The three CDU front-runners are Armin Laschet, Friedrich Merz, and Jens Spahn, though they are yet to declare their candidacies.Laschet, the premier of the state of North Rhine-Westphalia, is from Merkel’s centrist camp, while Merz and Spahn are more to the right of the CDU and came second and third respectively to Kramp-Karrenbauer in the leadership election at the end of 2018.The 53-year-old Soeder, who became Bavarian premier in 2018 and CSU chairman a year later, is Germany’s second-most popular politician, according to one poll. At the CDU party congress in November, he brought delegates to their feet with a punchy speech that enhanced his national standing.Soeder has shed his reputation as a party rabble-rouser, taking a softer line than his predecessor on Merkel’s migration policy. The CSU chairman has declared the far-right Alternative for Germany the party’s political “enemy,” while saying that the Greens have usurped the SPD’s position as the CSU’s main competitor.The CDU must first decide on a replacement for Kramp-Karrenbauer as party leader and then a joint decision will be made on the best candidate from the conservative bloc to contest the next election, due in September 2021, Blume said.“This can of course in the end be the same person, but that doesn’t have to be the case,” he added.(Updates with Kramp-Karrenbauer report from ninth paragraph)\--With assistance from Patrick Donahue.To contact the reporter on this story: Iain Rogers in Berlin at irogers11@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Chad Thomas at cthomas16@bloomberg.net, Daniel Schaefer, Chris ReiterFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 63/81   Syria: US troops open fire on locals in northeast, killing 1
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    A Syrian was killed and another was wounded in a rare clash Wednesday between American troops and a group of government supporters who tried to block a U.S. convoy driving through a village in northeastern Syria, state media and activists reported.  A U.S. military spokesman said coalition forces conducting a patrol near Qamishli encountered a checkpoint occupied by pro-Syrian government forces.  After coalition troops issued a series of warnings in an attempt to de-escalate the situation, the patrol came under small-arms fire from unknown individuals, coalition spokesman Myles Caggins said.

    A Syrian was killed and another was wounded in a rare clash Wednesday between American troops and a group of government supporters who tried to block a U.S. convoy driving through a village in northeastern Syria, state media and activists reported. A U.S. military spokesman said coalition forces conducting a patrol near Qamishli encountered a checkpoint occupied by pro-Syrian government forces. After coalition troops issued a series of warnings in an attempt to de-escalate the situation, the patrol came under small-arms fire from unknown individuals, coalition spokesman Myles Caggins said.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 64/81   Iranian minister apologizes over mock spacesuit post
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Iran’s information minister apologized Wednesday for posting a photo on Twitter of what appeared to be a Halloween-type costume representing a spacesuit, in an effort to promote the idea of a manned space program for his country.  The official IRNA news agency quoted Mohammad Javad Azari Jahromi, Iran's information and communications technology minister, as saying his department's advertising team “undeniably made a mistake in choosing the image' and expressed his apologies to “the people and space scientists' of Iran.

    Iran’s information minister apologized Wednesday for posting a photo on Twitter of what appeared to be a Halloween-type costume representing a spacesuit, in an effort to promote the idea of a manned space program for his country. The official IRNA news agency quoted Mohammad Javad Azari Jahromi, Iran's information and communications technology minister, as saying his department's advertising team “undeniably made a mistake in choosing the image' and expressed his apologies to “the people and space scientists' of Iran.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 65/81   Rights group: Italy-Libya deal puts migrants in danger
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Human Rights Watch warned on Wednesday that Italy’s renewed support for the Libyan coast guard is putting migrants in danger who are returned to squalid detention centers in the North African country.  Italy sees the Libyan coast guard as key to stemming a huge influx of migrants crossing the Mediterranean into Europe.  The war in Libya, where rival militias are vying for control, has made the challenge of handling the migrant flows worse.

    Human Rights Watch warned on Wednesday that Italy’s renewed support for the Libyan coast guard is putting migrants in danger who are returned to squalid detention centers in the North African country. Italy sees the Libyan coast guard as key to stemming a huge influx of migrants crossing the Mediterranean into Europe. The war in Libya, where rival militias are vying for control, has made the challenge of handling the migrant flows worse.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 66/81   Pope avoids question of married priests in Amazon document
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Pope Francis declined Wednesday to approve the ordination of married men to address a shortage of priests in the Amazon, sidestepping a fraught issue that has dominated debate in the Catholic Church and even involved retired Pope Benedict XVI.  Francis, in an eagerly awaited document, did not refer to the recommendations by Amazonian bishops to consider the ordination of married men or women deacons.  Rather, the pope urged bishops to pray for more priestly vocations and to send missionaries to a region where faithful Catholics in remote areas can go months or even years without Mass.

    Pope Francis declined Wednesday to approve the ordination of married men to address a shortage of priests in the Amazon, sidestepping a fraught issue that has dominated debate in the Catholic Church and even involved retired Pope Benedict XVI. Francis, in an eagerly awaited document, did not refer to the recommendations by Amazonian bishops to consider the ordination of married men or women deacons. Rather, the pope urged bishops to pray for more priestly vocations and to send missionaries to a region where faithful Catholics in remote areas can go months or even years without Mass.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 67/81   World Capitals Resist Rising Tide of Populism
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Want to receive this post in your inbox every day? Sign up for the Balance of Power newsletter, and follow Bloomberg Politics on Twitter and Facebook for more.Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi threw everything he had at the capital, but it was all in vain.New Delhi’s decisive rejection of Modi’s Bharatiya Janata Party in state elections is the latest show of defiance by a key city against the incumbent tide of nationalist populism.In Europe, Warsaw, Budapest and Prague have emerged as bastions against the illiberal policies of the respective governments in Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic.Istanbul, Turkey’s largest city, elected a mayor in defiance of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan — a city he once ran — and his brand of identity politics. Londoners overwhelmingly opposed Brexit.New York, Los Angeles and Washington all resisted Donald Trump at the last U.S. presidential election in 2016.Big cities tend to have better educated and more cosmopolitan residents who benefit from superior services and opportunities, so it’s perhaps no great surprise they choose their own political path.And of course local issues matter every bit as much as national politics: In Delhi, water supply and education dominated. Even so, the results announced yesterday showed that in the national capital, the “Modi magic is not working,” said political analyst Satish Misra.As populists dig in, the world’s major cities may offer some respite from increasingly embittered political divisions.Global HeadlinesTight finish | Bernie Sanders won the New Hampshire primary, fending off strong challenges from Pete Buttigieg and Amy Klobuchar as he sought to solidify his status as standard bearer of a Democratic party split between progressives and moderates. The tight finish allows all three to claim a measure of success before the race accelerates into a multi-state dash.Joe Biden’s campaign saw his fifth-place finish coming early enough to hightail it to South Carolina, a state where he’s long held a giant lead in polling, before last night’s voting even ended. Entrepreneur Andrew Yang has dropped out of the race.Jail time | All four U.S. government prosecutors who backed a long prison stay for Trump ally Roger Stone resigned from the case, a stunning rebuke to the Justice Department after it cut his recommended sentence by more than half. Their resignation capped a remarkable day in which the Justice Department shifted its stance hours after Trump tweeted criticism of the proposed punishment.In doubt | President Xi Jinping and other voices in Beijing are expressing optimism about the country’s economy, with Xi telling Indonesian leader Joko Widodo in a phone call that China will “be more prosperous” after beating its deadly coronavirus. But market economists are less confident, and numerous banks cut their forecasts for 2020 in recent weeks. The virus has now killed more than 1,100 people, as authorities battle to contain its spread.Shared interests | For all the bad blood between their leaders, the governments of South America’s two largest economies are starting a diplomatic dance to discuss trade and political issues they can’t put off for too long: While Argentina’s Alberto Fernandez needs as much support as he can get for upcoming debt talks with the International Monetary Fund, Brazil’s Jair Bolsonaro seeks backing for the EU-Mercosur trade deal.Assad’s calculation | Syrian President Bashar al-Assad runs the risk of severe Turkish retaliation in his drive to recapture the last major rebel-held areas in Idlib province. But as Sylvia Westall and Donna Abu-Nasr report, with his forces backed by Russian air power and the U.S. disengaged, the possible reward of winning Idlib and then reconnecting Aleppo, once the nation’s economic engine, to Damascus and the coast is a gamble worth taking. What to WatchU.K. Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid and chief EU Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier traded blows yesterday as they discuss the post-divorce future of European capital markets. The flashpoint is a policy called “equivalence” that would give U.K. firms continued access to the single market. Air pollution from burning fossil fuels is generating economic losses of $8 billion a day, or about about 3.3% of global gross domestic product, according to a Greenpeace report. South African President Cyril Ramaphosa delivers his fourth state-of-the-nation address tomorrow with a mixed bag of results in igniting a stagnant economy and rooting out widespread corruption.And finally ... “Parasite” director Bong Joon Ho is getting support from an unexpected quarter following his historic Academy Awards triumph: South Korean conservatives. Since Bong became the first director of a foreign-language film to hoist a Best Picture Oscar, conservative politicians have been rushing to erect statues and name streets after him. The calls are surprising coming from members of South Korea’s Liberty Korea Party, the successor to the group that once backed a blacklist that denied state funding to artists such as Bong and more than 9,000 other cultural figures critical of the government. \--With assistance from Karen Leigh, Brendan Scott, Bibhudatta Pradhan and Walter Brandimarte.To contact the author of this story: Alan Crawford in Berlin at acrawford6@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Ruth Pollard at rpollard2@bloomberg.net, Karl MaierFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Want to receive this post in your inbox every day? Sign up for the Balance of Power newsletter, and follow Bloomberg Politics on Twitter and Facebook for more.Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi threw everything he had at the capital, but it was all in vain.New Delhi’s decisive rejection of Modi’s Bharatiya Janata Party in state elections is the latest show of defiance by a key city against the incumbent tide of nationalist populism.In Europe, Warsaw, Budapest and Prague have emerged as bastions against the illiberal policies of the respective governments in Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic.Istanbul, Turkey’s largest city, elected a mayor in defiance of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan — a city he once ran — and his brand of identity politics. Londoners overwhelmingly opposed Brexit.New York, Los Angeles and Washington all resisted Donald Trump at the last U.S. presidential election in 2016.Big cities tend to have better educated and more cosmopolitan residents who benefit from superior services and opportunities, so it’s perhaps no great surprise they choose their own political path.And of course local issues matter every bit as much as national politics: In Delhi, water supply and education dominated. Even so, the results announced yesterday showed that in the national capital, the “Modi magic is not working,” said political analyst Satish Misra.As populists dig in, the world’s major cities may offer some respite from increasingly embittered political divisions.Global HeadlinesTight finish | Bernie Sanders won the New Hampshire primary, fending off strong challenges from Pete Buttigieg and Amy Klobuchar as he sought to solidify his status as standard bearer of a Democratic party split between progressives and moderates. The tight finish allows all three to claim a measure of success before the race accelerates into a multi-state dash.Joe Biden’s campaign saw his fifth-place finish coming early enough to hightail it to South Carolina, a state where he’s long held a giant lead in polling, before last night’s voting even ended. Entrepreneur Andrew Yang has dropped out of the race.Jail time | All four U.S. government prosecutors who backed a long prison stay for Trump ally Roger Stone resigned from the case, a stunning rebuke to the Justice Department after it cut his recommended sentence by more than half. Their resignation capped a remarkable day in which the Justice Department shifted its stance hours after Trump tweeted criticism of the proposed punishment.In doubt | President Xi Jinping and other voices in Beijing are expressing optimism about the country’s economy, with Xi telling Indonesian leader Joko Widodo in a phone call that China will “be more prosperous” after beating its deadly coronavirus. But market economists are less confident, and numerous banks cut their forecasts for 2020 in recent weeks. The virus has now killed more than 1,100 people, as authorities battle to contain its spread.Shared interests | For all the bad blood between their leaders, the governments of South America’s two largest economies are starting a diplomatic dance to discuss trade and political issues they can’t put off for too long: While Argentina’s Alberto Fernandez needs as much support as he can get for upcoming debt talks with the International Monetary Fund, Brazil’s Jair Bolsonaro seeks backing for the EU-Mercosur trade deal.Assad’s calculation | Syrian President Bashar al-Assad runs the risk of severe Turkish retaliation in his drive to recapture the last major rebel-held areas in Idlib province. But as Sylvia Westall and Donna Abu-Nasr report, with his forces backed by Russian air power and the U.S. disengaged, the possible reward of winning Idlib and then reconnecting Aleppo, once the nation’s economic engine, to Damascus and the coast is a gamble worth taking. What to WatchU.K. Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid and chief EU Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier traded blows yesterday as they discuss the post-divorce future of European capital markets. The flashpoint is a policy called “equivalence” that would give U.K. firms continued access to the single market. Air pollution from burning fossil fuels is generating economic losses of $8 billion a day, or about about 3.3% of global gross domestic product, according to a Greenpeace report. South African President Cyril Ramaphosa delivers his fourth state-of-the-nation address tomorrow with a mixed bag of results in igniting a stagnant economy and rooting out widespread corruption.And finally ... “Parasite” director Bong Joon Ho is getting support from an unexpected quarter following his historic Academy Awards triumph: South Korean conservatives. Since Bong became the first director of a foreign-language film to hoist a Best Picture Oscar, conservative politicians have been rushing to erect statues and name streets after him. The calls are surprising coming from members of South Korea’s Liberty Korea Party, the successor to the group that once backed a blacklist that denied state funding to artists such as Bong and more than 9,000 other cultural figures critical of the government. \--With assistance from Karen Leigh, Brendan Scott, Bibhudatta Pradhan and Walter Brandimarte.To contact the author of this story: Alan Crawford in Berlin at acrawford6@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Ruth Pollard at rpollard2@bloomberg.net, Karl MaierFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 68/81   Sanders Tightens His Grip on Race, With Klobuchar Rising
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Bernie Sanders’s narrow win in New Hampshire makes him the undisputed leader of the Democratic Party’s left flank, with a second powerful showing that puts him in position to stake a claim to the Democratic presidential nomination as the race turns west and south.A surprisingly strong third-place showing from Amy Klobuchar in New Hampshire further scrambles the race and the efforts by moderate Democrats to unite behind a candidate to stop Sanders, only strengthening the hand of the 78-year-old democratic socialist.Klobuchar’s rise shows that moderate Democratic voters weren’t completely sold on their other choice, Pete Buttigieg, who had hoped that his Iowa win would crown him the candidate to beat Sanders. Buttigieg lost New Hampshire by about 4,000 votes.With 87% of precincts reporting, Sanders had won 25.7% of the vote, to Buttigieg’s 24.4%. Klobuchar was third with 19.8% and Elizabeth Warren and Joe Biden trailed in single digits.Centrist voters could further splinter as yet a third moderate formally joins the race: former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who didn’t compete in New Hampshire but will be on the ballot for the March 3 Super Tuesday contests.The clarity on the left contrasts with confusion among moderates and seems sure to reinvigorate efforts by the Democratic Party establishment to find a way to derail Sanders before it’s too late. Sanders replicated his 2016 win in New Hampshire over Hillary Clinton by tapping into younger voters and expanding the pool of Democrats – which he says would allow him to beat President Donald Trump.“It’s on to Nevada, it’s on to South Carolina, it’s on to win the Democratic nomination, and together I have no doubt that we will defeat Donald Trump,” Sanders told cheering supporters in Manchester, New Hampshire, as he claimed victory late Tuesday.But his rise worries Democratic Party establishment leaders, who thinks Sanders’ positions are too extreme in a general election against Trump. In the final days of the New Hampshire campaign, Buttigieg and Biden each took shots at Sanders’ electability.Ideological PuritySanders’ insistence on ideological purity will turn off moderates and independents, Buttigieg argued. And Trump will use Sanders’ democratic socialist label to paint Democrats up and down the ballot as extremists, Biden said.Both attacks missed their mark.The biggest loser of the night was Biden, who had an embarrassing fifth-place showing in single-digits. He and fourth-place finisher Warren -- a senator from neighboring Massachusetts – failed to reach the 15% vote threshold that would allow them to earn delegates.Biden’s campaign is in freefall, as he abandoned New Hampshire on Primary Night to go on to South Carolina -- where he leads the polls. A defeat there on Feb. 29 would effectively knock him from the race, a shocking turnaround in a campaign where he led national polls for much of 2019.The Biden fade has been a boon to Bloomberg, who’s coming in third in some national polls and has seen his support among African-American voters increase -- at the expense of Biden, who was Barack Obama’s vice president.Bloomberg got into the race in November because no clear front-runner was emerging. He’s been the biggest beneficiary of Biden’s continued slide, but Biden and Sanders still beat him in the national polls despite Bloomberg’s $345 million in ad buys.Debate QualificationBloomberg also needs just one more national poll ranking of at least 10% to qualify for a Las Vegas debate Feb. 19, which would be his national introduction to many voters.Bloomberg has felt the sting of being a surging candidate as a variety of anti-Bloomberg opposition research emerged on Primary Day, including an audiotape where he praised his stop-and-frisk program and other information that suggested he likened Russian President Vladimir Putin’s attack on Ukraine to the U.S. annexing California.(Bloomberg is the founder and majority owner of Bloomberg LP, the parent company of Bloomberg News.)Iowa and New Hampshire amount to just 1.6% of all Democratic delegates. The primary now turns to two more racially diverse states, Nevada on Feb. 22 and South Carolina on Feb. 29 before 14 Super Tuesday contests on March 3. The biggest Super Tuesday prize is California, and Sanders is leading there.Buttigieg still leads in the delegate race, with 22 from Iowa and New Hampshire combined. Sanders has 21, Warren has eight, Klobuchar has seven and Biden have six.The field is likely to remain muddled at least through Super Tuesday. There’s little incentive for any top-tier candidate to drop out, though at least two second-tier candidates did exit the race Tuesday -- Andrew Yang and Michael Bennet.Buttigieg and Sanders are close in the delegate race, but the primary calendar is no friend to Buttigieg, who has yet to compete in more diverse states where he has failed to earn crucial black and Latino support.Bandwagon EffectMany New Hampshire voters, an independent-minded lot who often disregard Iowa’s preferences, shifted from Buttigieg to Klobuchar, who turned in her strongest debate performance of the cycle in New Hampshire last week. She’ll face questions of whether she has the money and organization to take her campaign to the next big states, but she raised $3 million in the days after Friday’s debate and plans to expand her staff.Primary campaigns tend to have a bandwagon effect. Success breeds success, and a win in one state can have a domino effect down the calendar -- a big benefit for Sanders, as voters like to support a winner.After winning the popular vote — if not the majority of delegates — in the first two states, Sanders seems to be winning the electability argument. A Quinnipiac University Poll this week shows he’s doing about as well as any other Democrat in a head-to-head matchup with Trump, leading the incumbent 51% to 43%.Sanders is a long way from uniting the party, however. He won New Hampshire by 22 percentage points in 2016 against Clinton. On Tuesday, faced with a much larger field, Sanders won with a much narrower margin but will still take away the lion’s share of delegates.In New Hampshire, the top issues for Democrats were health care, 37%, and climate change, 28%, according to CNN.On health care, New Hampshire Democrats leaned more toward the Medicare-for-All health care plan favored by Sanders and Warren, in which private health insurance would be eliminated and replaced with a government-run plan. Almost 6 in 10 primary voters support that plan, while 4 in 10 were opposed, CNN said.‘Comeback Kid’New Hampshire voters are known for deciding late, and the CNN exit polls bear that out: 48% decided within the last few days, and the same number said Friday night’s debate was an important factor. That could have helped Buttigieg, who won the Iowa caucuses, and Klobuchar, who had a breakout debate performance.Democrats also prioritized electability over issues in their votes: 62% said it was more important to find a candidate who can defeat Trump while 34% said it was more important to find someone who they agreed with, according to CNN.For Democrats, New Hampshire in February is a particularly poor predictor of national victory in November. The last Democrat to win a contested New Hampshire primary and go on to win the presidency was Jimmy Carter in 1976.Like Iowa, losing candidates can win New Hampshire by exceeding expectations — even self-created ones. Bill Clinton dubbed himself the “Comeback Kid” in 1992 after finishing second -- a parallel that surely won’t be lost on Klobuchar’s campaign.But the contentious 2016 campaign between Sanders and Clinton showed that primary campaign grudges can spill over into the general election.Sanders is counting on unity to come through victory. “It’s both,” he told NBC News before the polls closed Tuesday. “Virtually all Democrats and a heck of a lot of independents understand that it is absolutely imperative we defeat the most dangerous president in the modern history of this country.”(Updates primary results in second paragraph)To contact the reporters on this story: Gregory Korte in Manchester, New Hampshire at gkorte@bloomberg.net;Craig Gordon in Manchester, New Hampshire at cgordon39@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Wendy Benjaminson at wbenjaminson@bloomberg.net, Michael ShepardFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Bernie Sanders’s narrow win in New Hampshire makes him the undisputed leader of the Democratic Party’s left flank, with a second powerful showing that puts him in position to stake a claim to the Democratic presidential nomination as the race turns west and south.A surprisingly strong third-place showing from Amy Klobuchar in New Hampshire further scrambles the race and the efforts by moderate Democrats to unite behind a candidate to stop Sanders, only strengthening the hand of the 78-year-old democratic socialist.Klobuchar’s rise shows that moderate Democratic voters weren’t completely sold on their other choice, Pete Buttigieg, who had hoped that his Iowa win would crown him the candidate to beat Sanders. Buttigieg lost New Hampshire by about 4,000 votes.With 87% of precincts reporting, Sanders had won 25.7% of the vote, to Buttigieg’s 24.4%. Klobuchar was third with 19.8% and Elizabeth Warren and Joe Biden trailed in single digits.Centrist voters could further splinter as yet a third moderate formally joins the race: former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who didn’t compete in New Hampshire but will be on the ballot for the March 3 Super Tuesday contests.The clarity on the left contrasts with confusion among moderates and seems sure to reinvigorate efforts by the Democratic Party establishment to find a way to derail Sanders before it’s too late. Sanders replicated his 2016 win in New Hampshire over Hillary Clinton by tapping into younger voters and expanding the pool of Democrats – which he says would allow him to beat President Donald Trump.“It’s on to Nevada, it’s on to South Carolina, it’s on to win the Democratic nomination, and together I have no doubt that we will defeat Donald Trump,” Sanders told cheering supporters in Manchester, New Hampshire, as he claimed victory late Tuesday.But his rise worries Democratic Party establishment leaders, who thinks Sanders’ positions are too extreme in a general election against Trump. In the final days of the New Hampshire campaign, Buttigieg and Biden each took shots at Sanders’ electability.Ideological PuritySanders’ insistence on ideological purity will turn off moderates and independents, Buttigieg argued. And Trump will use Sanders’ democratic socialist label to paint Democrats up and down the ballot as extremists, Biden said.Both attacks missed their mark.The biggest loser of the night was Biden, who had an embarrassing fifth-place showing in single-digits. He and fourth-place finisher Warren -- a senator from neighboring Massachusetts – failed to reach the 15% vote threshold that would allow them to earn delegates.Biden’s campaign is in freefall, as he abandoned New Hampshire on Primary Night to go on to South Carolina -- where he leads the polls. A defeat there on Feb. 29 would effectively knock him from the race, a shocking turnaround in a campaign where he led national polls for much of 2019.The Biden fade has been a boon to Bloomberg, who’s coming in third in some national polls and has seen his support among African-American voters increase -- at the expense of Biden, who was Barack Obama’s vice president.Bloomberg got into the race in November because no clear front-runner was emerging. He’s been the biggest beneficiary of Biden’s continued slide, but Biden and Sanders still beat him in the national polls despite Bloomberg’s $345 million in ad buys.Debate QualificationBloomberg also needs just one more national poll ranking of at least 10% to qualify for a Las Vegas debate Feb. 19, which would be his national introduction to many voters.Bloomberg has felt the sting of being a surging candidate as a variety of anti-Bloomberg opposition research emerged on Primary Day, including an audiotape where he praised his stop-and-frisk program and other information that suggested he likened Russian President Vladimir Putin’s attack on Ukraine to the U.S. annexing California.(Bloomberg is the founder and majority owner of Bloomberg LP, the parent company of Bloomberg News.)Iowa and New Hampshire amount to just 1.6% of all Democratic delegates. The primary now turns to two more racially diverse states, Nevada on Feb. 22 and South Carolina on Feb. 29 before 14 Super Tuesday contests on March 3. The biggest Super Tuesday prize is California, and Sanders is leading there.Buttigieg still leads in the delegate race, with 22 from Iowa and New Hampshire combined. Sanders has 21, Warren has eight, Klobuchar has seven and Biden have six.The field is likely to remain muddled at least through Super Tuesday. There’s little incentive for any top-tier candidate to drop out, though at least two second-tier candidates did exit the race Tuesday -- Andrew Yang and Michael Bennet.Buttigieg and Sanders are close in the delegate race, but the primary calendar is no friend to Buttigieg, who has yet to compete in more diverse states where he has failed to earn crucial black and Latino support.Bandwagon EffectMany New Hampshire voters, an independent-minded lot who often disregard Iowa’s preferences, shifted from Buttigieg to Klobuchar, who turned in her strongest debate performance of the cycle in New Hampshire last week. She’ll face questions of whether she has the money and organization to take her campaign to the next big states, but she raised $3 million in the days after Friday’s debate and plans to expand her staff.Primary campaigns tend to have a bandwagon effect. Success breeds success, and a win in one state can have a domino effect down the calendar -- a big benefit for Sanders, as voters like to support a winner.After winning the popular vote — if not the majority of delegates — in the first two states, Sanders seems to be winning the electability argument. A Quinnipiac University Poll this week shows he’s doing about as well as any other Democrat in a head-to-head matchup with Trump, leading the incumbent 51% to 43%.Sanders is a long way from uniting the party, however. He won New Hampshire by 22 percentage points in 2016 against Clinton. On Tuesday, faced with a much larger field, Sanders won with a much narrower margin but will still take away the lion’s share of delegates.In New Hampshire, the top issues for Democrats were health care, 37%, and climate change, 28%, according to CNN.On health care, New Hampshire Democrats leaned more toward the Medicare-for-All health care plan favored by Sanders and Warren, in which private health insurance would be eliminated and replaced with a government-run plan. Almost 6 in 10 primary voters support that plan, while 4 in 10 were opposed, CNN said.‘Comeback Kid’New Hampshire voters are known for deciding late, and the CNN exit polls bear that out: 48% decided within the last few days, and the same number said Friday night’s debate was an important factor. That could have helped Buttigieg, who won the Iowa caucuses, and Klobuchar, who had a breakout debate performance.Democrats also prioritized electability over issues in their votes: 62% said it was more important to find a candidate who can defeat Trump while 34% said it was more important to find someone who they agreed with, according to CNN.For Democrats, New Hampshire in February is a particularly poor predictor of national victory in November. The last Democrat to win a contested New Hampshire primary and go on to win the presidency was Jimmy Carter in 1976.Like Iowa, losing candidates can win New Hampshire by exceeding expectations — even self-created ones. Bill Clinton dubbed himself the “Comeback Kid” in 1992 after finishing second -- a parallel that surely won’t be lost on Klobuchar’s campaign.But the contentious 2016 campaign between Sanders and Clinton showed that primary campaign grudges can spill over into the general election.Sanders is counting on unity to come through victory. “It’s both,” he told NBC News before the polls closed Tuesday. “Virtually all Democrats and a heck of a lot of independents understand that it is absolutely imperative we defeat the most dangerous president in the modern history of this country.”(Updates primary results in second paragraph)To contact the reporters on this story: Gregory Korte in Manchester, New Hampshire at gkorte@bloomberg.net;Craig Gordon in Manchester, New Hampshire at cgordon39@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Wendy Benjaminson at wbenjaminson@bloomberg.net, Michael ShepardFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 69/81   Guinness: Japanese, who believes in smiling, is oldest man
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    A Japanese man with a sweet tooth who believes in smiles has become the world's oldest male at 112 years and 344 days old, according to Guinness World Records.  Chitetsu Watanabe, who was born in Niigata in northern Japan in 1907, received a certificate for his accomplishment on Wednesday at a nursing home in the city.  The previous record holder, Masazo Nonaka, another Japanese, died last month.

    A Japanese man with a sweet tooth who believes in smiles has become the world's oldest male at 112 years and 344 days old, according to Guinness World Records. Chitetsu Watanabe, who was born in Niigata in northern Japan in 1907, received a certificate for his accomplishment on Wednesday at a nursing home in the city. The previous record holder, Masazo Nonaka, another Japanese, died last month.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 70/81   After Iowa caucus problems, concerns grow over Nevada's plan
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Concerns have been growing that next week's Nevada caucuses could offer a repeat of the chaos that ensnared the Iowa vote, with Nevada facing many of the same organizational and technical challenges that crippled Iowa’s process.  Adding to the mix is that Nevada also plans to offer early voting, a complicated step that Iowa did not attempt.  “This sounds just dangerous, like people are still improvising and making up the rules as they go,” said Doug Jones, a University of Iowa computer scientist and expert on voting technology.

    Concerns have been growing that next week's Nevada caucuses could offer a repeat of the chaos that ensnared the Iowa vote, with Nevada facing many of the same organizational and technical challenges that crippled Iowa’s process. Adding to the mix is that Nevada also plans to offer early voting, a complicated step that Iowa did not attempt. “This sounds just dangerous, like people are still improvising and making up the rules as they go,” said Doug Jones, a University of Iowa computer scientist and expert on voting technology.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 71/81   Iron Ore’s Brazilian Rain Dance Looks Premature
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Good news has been in short supply for iron-ore markets since China began shuttering swathes of the economy to contain the coronavirus outbreak. Prices gained after Vale SA offered a thin salve Tuesday, saying first-quarter output will be lower than previously anticipated because of heavy rains in Brazil. The market may be cheering a little too soon.Iron-ore supply was supposed to return to normal this year, after 2019 was marked by disruptions including a fatal accident at one of Vale’s dams and a tropical cyclone in Australia. The Brazilian heavyweight and Rio Tinto Group, which vie to be the world’s biggest shipper of the steelmaking ingredient, both plan to increase production. The prospect of higher supply was reflected in Australia’s quarterly forecasts, published in December, which saw prices easing to $60 per metric ton by 2021 — more than a fifth below 2019’s elevated average.The coronavirus epidemic has accelerated that trend by slashing demand in the world’s largest consumer of iron ore, pushing prices in Singapore below $80 by early February.The picture isn’t encouraging. China’s return to work is proving gradual, even with official encouragement. Wuhan, the epicenter of the outbreak, accounts for about 2% of Chinese steel production, according to Bloomberg Intelligence. Some mills are working, but downstream demand has been hit across the country. Iron-ore stockpiles are building at China’s ports. Inventories of rebar, a benchmark for steel used in building work, stand at their highest level for early February since 2012. Carmakers also expect a production and sales hit: About 70% of dealers polled by the local industry association said earlier this week they had seen almost no customers since the end of January. Worse, the country’s role in global supply chains means there will be ripples.All of this will still be fine in the long run if two things happen next: first, if supply eases alongside demand; second,  if China regains its appetite fast, perhaps aided by stimulus.The trouble for the market is that the current iron-ore price appears to have built in both assumptions. Optimism around the incremental number of virus cases, combined with Vale’s outlook, means Singapore futures are now down about 9% from when the epidemic began to look serious in mid-January. Domestic futures on the Dalian exchange have risen for two consecutive days, alongside stocks in steelmakers, cement companies and developers, encouraged by comments from President Xi Jinping.The output picture does offer some hope. There is consolation in Vale’s rain-hit first quarter, and indeed minor disruption around Cyclone Damien in Australia. Vale’s full-year output target of 355 million tons involves assumptions around permits that could yet see delays. Yet Rio Tinto, BHP Group and others expect higher output in 2020. Chinese production may also be less sensitive to weaker prices than it once was, ticking higher despite the virus.Demand is  harder to forecast. There will be fits and starts, and the long incubation period for the novel coronavirus makes its path far harder to predict outside Wuhan and the surrounding province of Hubei. Supply chains will take months to repair even if the virus is contained.The biggest unknown is the shape of China’s post-virus stimulus. Undoubtedly, it will lean on infrastructure, but that will take time to feed through. And don’t expect a repeat of the swift post-SARS recovery — in 2003, China was on an expansion path. That was also the case during the global financial crisis, when China splurged the equivalent of $586 billion on bridges and the like.China in 2020 has to weigh the need to crank up growth, with the end of its current five year plan looming, against the risks of causing a further buildup of debt and creating property bubbles. Infrastructure and construction, which traditionally account for most of China’s steel and iron ore consumption, may benefit far less than in past crises. Much will become clear after the legislature’s annual meeting in March (assuming it goes ahead on schedule). A sugar rush may well be on the way; it just may not be sweet enough. To contact the author of this story: Clara Ferreira Marques at cferreirama@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Matthew Brooker at mbrooker1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Clara Ferreira Marques is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering commodities and environmental, social and governance issues. Previously, she was an associate editor for Reuters Breakingviews, and editor and correspondent for Reuters in Singapore, India, the U.K., Italy and Russia.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Good news has been in short supply for iron-ore markets since China began shuttering swathes of the economy to contain the coronavirus outbreak. Prices gained after Vale SA offered a thin salve Tuesday, saying first-quarter output will be lower than previously anticipated because of heavy rains in Brazil. The market may be cheering a little too soon.Iron-ore supply was supposed to return to normal this year, after 2019 was marked by disruptions including a fatal accident at one of Vale’s dams and a tropical cyclone in Australia. The Brazilian heavyweight and Rio Tinto Group, which vie to be the world’s biggest shipper of the steelmaking ingredient, both plan to increase production. The prospect of higher supply was reflected in Australia’s quarterly forecasts, published in December, which saw prices easing to $60 per metric ton by 2021 — more than a fifth below 2019’s elevated average.The coronavirus epidemic has accelerated that trend by slashing demand in the world’s largest consumer of iron ore, pushing prices in Singapore below $80 by early February.The picture isn’t encouraging. China’s return to work is proving gradual, even with official encouragement. Wuhan, the epicenter of the outbreak, accounts for about 2% of Chinese steel production, according to Bloomberg Intelligence. Some mills are working, but downstream demand has been hit across the country. Iron-ore stockpiles are building at China’s ports. Inventories of rebar, a benchmark for steel used in building work, stand at their highest level for early February since 2012. Carmakers also expect a production and sales hit: About 70% of dealers polled by the local industry association said earlier this week they had seen almost no customers since the end of January. Worse, the country’s role in global supply chains means there will be ripples.All of this will still be fine in the long run if two things happen next: first, if supply eases alongside demand; second,  if China regains its appetite fast, perhaps aided by stimulus.The trouble for the market is that the current iron-ore price appears to have built in both assumptions. Optimism around the incremental number of virus cases, combined with Vale’s outlook, means Singapore futures are now down about 9% from when the epidemic began to look serious in mid-January. Domestic futures on the Dalian exchange have risen for two consecutive days, alongside stocks in steelmakers, cement companies and developers, encouraged by comments from President Xi Jinping.The output picture does offer some hope. There is consolation in Vale’s rain-hit first quarter, and indeed minor disruption around Cyclone Damien in Australia. Vale’s full-year output target of 355 million tons involves assumptions around permits that could yet see delays. Yet Rio Tinto, BHP Group and others expect higher output in 2020. Chinese production may also be less sensitive to weaker prices than it once was, ticking higher despite the virus.Demand is  harder to forecast. There will be fits and starts, and the long incubation period for the novel coronavirus makes its path far harder to predict outside Wuhan and the surrounding province of Hubei. Supply chains will take months to repair even if the virus is contained.The biggest unknown is the shape of China’s post-virus stimulus. Undoubtedly, it will lean on infrastructure, but that will take time to feed through. And don’t expect a repeat of the swift post-SARS recovery — in 2003, China was on an expansion path. That was also the case during the global financial crisis, when China splurged the equivalent of $586 billion on bridges and the like.China in 2020 has to weigh the need to crank up growth, with the end of its current five year plan looming, against the risks of causing a further buildup of debt and creating property bubbles. Infrastructure and construction, which traditionally account for most of China’s steel and iron ore consumption, may benefit far less than in past crises. Much will become clear after the legislature’s annual meeting in March (assuming it goes ahead on schedule). A sugar rush may well be on the way; it just may not be sweet enough. To contact the author of this story: Clara Ferreira Marques at cferreirama@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Matthew Brooker at mbrooker1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Clara Ferreira Marques is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering commodities and environmental, social and governance issues. Previously, she was an associate editor for Reuters Breakingviews, and editor and correspondent for Reuters in Singapore, India, the U.K., Italy and Russia.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 72/81   The US has confirmed 13 cases of the coronavirus across 6 states. Here's what we know about all the US patients.
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    The US has confirmed 13 cases of the virus: seven in California, two in Illinois, and one each in Arizona, Massachusetts, Washington, and Wisconsin.

    The US has confirmed 13 cases of the virus: seven in California, two in Illinois, and one each in Arizona, Massachusetts, Washington, and Wisconsin.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 73/81   The outbreaks of both the Wuhan coronavirus and SARS likely started in Chinese wet markets. Photos show what the markets look like.
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    The Wuhan coronavirus outbreak likely started in a Chinese wet market, where meat and poultry are sold alongside live animals.

    The Wuhan coronavirus outbreak likely started in a Chinese wet market, where meat and poultry are sold alongside live animals.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 74/81   What You Need to Know About the Wuhan Coronavirus
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    There are 13 cases in the U.S. Eleven of those people had traveled to China. The State Department says travelers should not go to China. The World Health Organization has declared an internationa...

    There are 13 cases in the U.S. Eleven of those people had traveled to China. The State Department says travelers should not go to China. The World Health Organization has declared an internationa...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 75/81   Chinese doctor punished for warning people about coronavirus now has the illness
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Li Wenliang, a doctor from Wuhan, China, was one of the first to recognize the public health threat of coronavirus. He now has the disease himself.

    Li Wenliang, a doctor from Wuhan, China, was one of the first to recognize the public health threat of coronavirus. He now has the disease himself.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 76/81   China put 46 million people on lockdown to contain the Wuhan coronavirus, and now the US is prepared to quarantine people, too. But quarantines throughout history have been riddled with mishaps.
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Quarantines have been used to contain diseases for hundreds of years. The first formal system was established in Venice during the 14th Century.

    Quarantines have been used to contain diseases for hundreds of years. The first formal system was established in Venice during the 14th Century.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 77/81   7th and 8th U.S. coronavirus cases confirmed in Massachusetts and California
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    The confirmed cases in California and Massachusetts conclude eight in the country so far.

    The confirmed cases in California and Massachusetts conclude eight in the country so far.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 78/81   75,000 in Wuhan infected with coronavirus: study estimates
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    More than 75,000 people -- ten times the official tally of confirmed cases -- have been infected with the coronavirus in Wuhan, ground zero of a global health emergency, according to research published Friday. "We estimate that 75,815 individuals have been infected in Wuhan as of January 25, 2020," a team led by Gabriel Leung from the University of Hong Kong reported in The Lancet. As of January 31, the Chinese government said the number of confirmed cases had risen above 9,700 for all of China, including 213 deaths.

    More than 75,000 people -- ten times the official tally of confirmed cases -- have been infected with the coronavirus in Wuhan, ground zero of a global health emergency, according to research published Friday. "We estimate that 75,815 individuals have been infected in Wuhan as of January 25, 2020," a team led by Gabriel Leung from the University of Hong Kong reported in The Lancet. As of January 31, the Chinese government said the number of confirmed cases had risen above 9,700 for all of China, including 213 deaths.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 79/81   Don't Forget These Vaccines When You Travel
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If you're planning a winter trip to another country, you may be preoccupied with booking airfare and finding lodging, but certain destinations require an extra step of planning: travel vaccines. ...

    If you're planning a winter trip to another country, you may be preoccupied with booking airfare and finding lodging, but certain destinations require an extra step of planning: travel vaccines. ...


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 80/81   Trump turns 'very routine' physical into attack on media
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    President Trump lashed out at the media Tuesday over reporting about his sudden trip to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center last weekend.

    President Trump lashed out at the media Tuesday over reporting about his sudden trip to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center last weekend.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.
  • 81/81   5 Turkey Cooking Tips Will Guarantee You Have the Perfect Bird This Holidays
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    There's no need to wing it at Thanksgiving this year.

    There's no need to wing it at Thanksgiving this year.


    Click on the image for the web page.

    Click here for more description.

 
 


       

Voice Sythesis
The Microsoft SAPI 5 ActiveX object is needed.
In the security option of your browser, you must not disable the initialization of non signed ActiveX controls.
You can install and use any English voice compatible with SAPI 5.
(such as the speech component of Microsoft).
Download
No Voice Title Title and Description
Voice and Output



Rate

 

 
Volume

 

 

Slideshow Speed (Quick to Slow)
Zero One Two Three Four Five

Blog and RSS feed URLs
http://moblog.whmsoft.net/en
http://moblog.whmsoft.net/en/?feed=rss2

Subscribe to WhmSoft Services Photo Gallery by Email
Subscribe to RSS Feed with Google Subscribe to RSS Feed with Yahoo! Subscribe to RSS Feed with AOL Subscribe to RSS Feed with Bloglines
Subscribe to RSS Feed with Netvibes Subscribe to RSS Feed with Newsgator Subscribe to RSS Feed with Pageflakes Subscribe to RSS Feed with Rojo

Slideshow - News Photos - From Yahoo! News
  • Meta
  • Hot Products



    Leave a Reply