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News Slideshows (03/25/2020 03 hours)


  • 1/81   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


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    Press Review


    Easter   Glenn Beck   Tory Lanez   Ann Coulter   Perriman   $6 Trillion   Forum   funchess   Steve Ballmer   Until Tomorrow   Jollof   Robby   Inglewood   Terrence McNally   Bill Rieflin   James Neal   Lazard   
  • 2/81   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


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  • 3/81   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


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  • 4/81   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


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  • 5/81   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


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  • 6/81   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


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  • 7/81   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


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  • 8/81   Do star athletes make too much money?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    With athletes in America's biggest sports leagues raking in salaries worth $300 million and more, is it time to reign in the big spending or do superstars deserve the big bucks they make?

    With athletes in America's biggest sports leagues raking in salaries worth $300 million and more, is it time to reign in the big spending or do superstars deserve the big bucks they make?


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  • 9/81   Live animal mascots: Cute or exploitative?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?


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  • 10/81   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


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  • 11/81   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


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  • 12/81   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


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  • 13/81   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


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  • 14/81   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


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  • 15/81   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


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  • 16/81   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


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  • 17/81   PHOTOS: Fluorescent turtle embryo wins forty-fifth annual Nikon Small World Competition

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.


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  • 18/81   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


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  • 19/81   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


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  • 20/81   What the CIA thinks of your anti-virus program

    PARIS (AP) — Peppering the 8,000 pages of purported Central Intelligence Agency hacking data released Tuesday by WikiLeaks are reviews of some of the world's most popular anti-virus products.

    PARIS (AP) — Peppering the 8,000 pages of purported Central Intelligence Agency hacking data released Tuesday by WikiLeaks are reviews of some of the world's most popular anti-virus products.


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  • 21/81   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


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  • 22/81   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


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  • 23/81   Asian shares track Wall St surge as U.S. stimulus hopes grow
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Asian shares extended their rally on Wednesday in the wake of Wall Street's big gains as U.S. Congress appeared closer to passing a $2 trillion stimulus package to curb the coronavirus pandemic's economic toll.  MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan rose 1.3% with Australian shares rising 4.5% and South Korean shares gaining 4.0%.  Japan's Nikkei added 2.0%.

    Asian shares extended their rally on Wednesday in the wake of Wall Street's big gains as U.S. Congress appeared closer to passing a $2 trillion stimulus package to curb the coronavirus pandemic's economic toll. MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan rose 1.3% with Australian shares rising 4.5% and South Korean shares gaining 4.0%. Japan's Nikkei added 2.0%.


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  • 24/81   Coronavirus live updates: Trump wants to 'open up' country by Easter; stocks soar; US deaths go past 700
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Stocks roared higher, the Summer Olympics are on hold, and China announced it would soon lift its lockdown. Here are the latest coronavirus updates.

    Stocks roared higher, the Summer Olympics are on hold, and China announced it would soon lift its lockdown. Here are the latest coronavirus updates.


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  • 25/81   After series of cuts, India axes Bayer's GM cotton royalty
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    India has axed the royalties that local seed companies pay to German drugmaker Bayer AG for Monsanto's genetically modified (GM) cotton, a government order said, after cutting them back since 2016.  More than 45 local cotton seed companies pay royalties to Monsanto, acquired by Bayer in 2018, for GM cotton using a gene that produces its own pesticide.

    India has axed the royalties that local seed companies pay to German drugmaker Bayer AG for Monsanto's genetically modified (GM) cotton, a government order said, after cutting them back since 2016. More than 45 local cotton seed companies pay royalties to Monsanto, acquired by Bayer in 2018, for GM cotton using a gene that produces its own pesticide.


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  • 26/81   Qantas shares soar on financing deal as rivals cut more capacity
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Qantas Airways Ltd on Wednesday secured A$1.05 billion  ($627.8 million) against its aircraft fleet to help it ride out the coronavirus crisis, sending shares up 30%, as airlines in the Asia-Pacific region sliced away capacity and jobs.  The Qantas financing of seven Boeing Co 787-9s for up to 10 years at a 2.75% interest rate showed there is still low-cost funding available to airlines with strong fundamentals, even as the global industry calls for more government aid to help replace an estimated $250 billion of lost revenue in 2020.  'Over the past few years we've significantly strengthened our balance sheet and we're now able to draw on that strength under what are exceptional circumstances,' Qantas Chief Executive Alan Joyce said in a statement.

    Qantas Airways Ltd on Wednesday secured A$1.05 billion ($627.8 million) against its aircraft fleet to help it ride out the coronavirus crisis, sending shares up 30%, as airlines in the Asia-Pacific region sliced away capacity and jobs. The Qantas financing of seven Boeing Co 787-9s for up to 10 years at a 2.75% interest rate showed there is still low-cost funding available to airlines with strong fundamentals, even as the global industry calls for more government aid to help replace an estimated $250 billion of lost revenue in 2020. 'Over the past few years we've significantly strengthened our balance sheet and we're now able to draw on that strength under what are exceptional circumstances,' Qantas Chief Executive Alan Joyce said in a statement.


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  • 27/81   Trump Administration Weighs 90-Day Deferral of Tariffs
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- The Trump administration is debating whether to defer payments of duties on imported goods from around the world for three months, people familiar with the talks said.Discussions in recent days involving the U.S. Customs and Border Protection and other government agencies about suspending tariffs, across a broad range of goods, for a three-month period sparked push back from domestic industry associations.In a letter to acting CBP commissioner Mark Morgan, the Coalition for a Prosperous America expressed concern that the move was under consideration.“At a time of ?nancial hardship and unrest as a result of the coronavirus – CBP should not reintroduce unfairly traded goods to cause American workers further economic pain because of lobbying efforts of stateless companies,” the group wrote Tuesday. “This effort by CBP will only exacerbate the ?nancial situation of countless Americans.”Spokespeople for CBP and the White House didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment after hours.Amid supply chain turmoil and rapidly falling consumer demand, many small- and medium-sized companies have been disproportionately impacted by the virus outbreak and are awaiting government support from a stimulus package that the administration is in the final stages of negotiating with Capitol Hill.President Donald Trump has resisted calls for tariff cuts that have become increasingly loud as the coronavirus outbreak in the U.S. caused widespread economic harm. Last week, he made clear that “there’s no reason” for tariff relief even as a wide range of industries buckle from the shutdown of businesses.Deferral DebateThe cash flow problems companies are facing because of the public health crisis and weight of additional levies from tariffs should be considered, California Senator Dianne Feinstein, a Democrat, wrote in a letter to Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin that’s being circulated for signatures.“At such a moment when Congress has clearly indicated that deferring employer taxes should be a part of the U.S. response to the crisis, the Treasury Department should direct that all tariffs will be deferred for at least 90 days and, more broadly, until the companies paying them can emerge from the ongoing crisis,” according to a copy of the letter seen by Bloomberg.But some industries with tough competition from abroad say the deferral could harm their businesses.“This approach might very well be a death blow for domestic manufacturers simply trying to stay in business and for their workers struggling to survive,” said Michael Wessel, who works with the United Steelworkers Union and other domestic industry groups. “Letting importers off the hook for such an extended period from having to pay duties at this critical time could be the difference between survival and bankruptcy.”(Updates with letter from California Senator Dianne Feinstein)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- The Trump administration is debating whether to defer payments of duties on imported goods from around the world for three months, people familiar with the talks said.Discussions in recent days involving the U.S. Customs and Border Protection and other government agencies about suspending tariffs, across a broad range of goods, for a three-month period sparked push back from domestic industry associations.In a letter to acting CBP commissioner Mark Morgan, the Coalition for a Prosperous America expressed concern that the move was under consideration.“At a time of ?nancial hardship and unrest as a result of the coronavirus – CBP should not reintroduce unfairly traded goods to cause American workers further economic pain because of lobbying efforts of stateless companies,” the group wrote Tuesday. “This effort by CBP will only exacerbate the ?nancial situation of countless Americans.”Spokespeople for CBP and the White House didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment after hours.Amid supply chain turmoil and rapidly falling consumer demand, many small- and medium-sized companies have been disproportionately impacted by the virus outbreak and are awaiting government support from a stimulus package that the administration is in the final stages of negotiating with Capitol Hill.President Donald Trump has resisted calls for tariff cuts that have become increasingly loud as the coronavirus outbreak in the U.S. caused widespread economic harm. Last week, he made clear that “there’s no reason” for tariff relief even as a wide range of industries buckle from the shutdown of businesses.Deferral DebateThe cash flow problems companies are facing because of the public health crisis and weight of additional levies from tariffs should be considered, California Senator Dianne Feinstein, a Democrat, wrote in a letter to Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin that’s being circulated for signatures.“At such a moment when Congress has clearly indicated that deferring employer taxes should be a part of the U.S. response to the crisis, the Treasury Department should direct that all tariffs will be deferred for at least 90 days and, more broadly, until the companies paying them can emerge from the ongoing crisis,” according to a copy of the letter seen by Bloomberg.But some industries with tough competition from abroad say the deferral could harm their businesses.“This approach might very well be a death blow for domestic manufacturers simply trying to stay in business and for their workers struggling to survive,” said Michael Wessel, who works with the United Steelworkers Union and other domestic industry groups. “Letting importers off the hook for such an extended period from having to pay duties at this critical time could be the difference between survival and bankruptcy.”(Updates with letter from California Senator Dianne Feinstein)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 28/81   Flanigan's Enterprises, Inc., owners and operators of the "Flanigan's Seafood Bar and Grill" restaurants and "Big Daddy's" retail package liquor stores, today announced that it was cancelling its April 2020 cash dividend and leveraging its take-out and delivery service in response to COVID-19.
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Flanigan's Enterprises, Inc. (NYSE American: BDL) today provides the following in response to the COVID-19 outbreak:

    Flanigan's Enterprises, Inc. (NYSE American: BDL) today provides the following in response to the COVID-19 outbreak:


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  • 29/81   Stocks Rally in Asia; U.S. Equity Futures Drop: Markets Wrap
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Stocks in Asia rallied after the best session for U.S. stocks in almost a dozen years, with investors rediscovering some appetite for risk as Congress negotiates an emergency-spending bill.Even so, U.S. futures declined; American -- and global -- equities haven’t posted back-to-back daily gains since the first half of February. For now, indexes in South Korea, Hong Kong and Australia climbed more than 3% and Japan was up 5%, after the S&P 500 soared over 9% Tuesday. The dollar extended declines against both developed and emerging currencies in a tentative sign of reduced funding stresses. Treasuries were flat.More than $20 trillion has been lost from equity markets since the peak in January, and investors have been left sifting the wreckage and weighing the chances of a lasting rebound. On the one hand, Wall Street has begun to argue that liquidations are nearing an end with real-money investors like pension funds ready to step in, and there are signs of improvement in some of world’s regions that were hardest-hit by the virus. But the number of infections globally continues to accelerate and many of the largest economies are grinding to a halt.“I feel very good being in cash right now because there are going to be phenomenal opportunities when the stimulus is finalized and if we look forward a month or two,” Carol Pepper, chief executive officer at Pepper International, told Bloomberg TV. “We still need to see a slowing of the virus cases and a peaking in the U.S., because until then we’ll have these huge relief-rally days and then we’ll get a scary day and the market will plunge down again.”Tuesday’s gain in risk assets followed an unprecedented move by the Federal Reserve to backstop large swaths of the financial system. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose more than 11% to clock its biggest advance since 1933. Still, key gauges of U.S. manufacturing and services in March fell the most on record, showing the deep toll the pandemic has already taken.Elsewhere, gold was steady after a recent surge. Oil added to gains.These are the main moves in markets:StocksJapan’s Topix index rose 5% as of 10:25 a.m. in Tokyo.S&P 500 futures fell 0.6%. The S&P 500 advanced 9.4% on Tuesday.South Korea’s Kospi index gained 3.8%.Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index rose 2.6%.The Shanghai Composite gained 1.9%.Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 Index advanced 3.5%.Euro Stoxx 50 futures dipped 0.3%.CurrenciesThe yen traded at 110.90 per dollar, up 0.3%.The offshore yuan held at 7.0746 per dollar, up 0.2%.The euro bought $1.0799, up 0.1%.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries dipped to 0.84%.Australia’s 10-year bond yield rose eight basis points to 0.97%.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude rose 3.5% to $24.88 a barrel.Gold fell 0.8% to $1,620.28 an ounce.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Stocks in Asia rallied after the best session for U.S. stocks in almost a dozen years, with investors rediscovering some appetite for risk as Congress negotiates an emergency-spending bill.Even so, U.S. futures declined; American -- and global -- equities haven’t posted back-to-back daily gains since the first half of February. For now, indexes in South Korea, Hong Kong and Australia climbed more than 3% and Japan was up 5%, after the S&P 500 soared over 9% Tuesday. The dollar extended declines against both developed and emerging currencies in a tentative sign of reduced funding stresses. Treasuries were flat.More than $20 trillion has been lost from equity markets since the peak in January, and investors have been left sifting the wreckage and weighing the chances of a lasting rebound. On the one hand, Wall Street has begun to argue that liquidations are nearing an end with real-money investors like pension funds ready to step in, and there are signs of improvement in some of world’s regions that were hardest-hit by the virus. But the number of infections globally continues to accelerate and many of the largest economies are grinding to a halt.“I feel very good being in cash right now because there are going to be phenomenal opportunities when the stimulus is finalized and if we look forward a month or two,” Carol Pepper, chief executive officer at Pepper International, told Bloomberg TV. “We still need to see a slowing of the virus cases and a peaking in the U.S., because until then we’ll have these huge relief-rally days and then we’ll get a scary day and the market will plunge down again.”Tuesday’s gain in risk assets followed an unprecedented move by the Federal Reserve to backstop large swaths of the financial system. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose more than 11% to clock its biggest advance since 1933. Still, key gauges of U.S. manufacturing and services in March fell the most on record, showing the deep toll the pandemic has already taken.Elsewhere, gold was steady after a recent surge. Oil added to gains.These are the main moves in markets:StocksJapan’s Topix index rose 5% as of 10:25 a.m. in Tokyo.S&P 500 futures fell 0.6%. The S&P 500 advanced 9.4% on Tuesday.South Korea’s Kospi index gained 3.8%.Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index rose 2.6%.The Shanghai Composite gained 1.9%.Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 Index advanced 3.5%.Euro Stoxx 50 futures dipped 0.3%.CurrenciesThe yen traded at 110.90 per dollar, up 0.3%.The offshore yuan held at 7.0746 per dollar, up 0.2%.The euro bought $1.0799, up 0.1%.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries dipped to 0.84%.Australia’s 10-year bond yield rose eight basis points to 0.97%.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude rose 3.5% to $24.88 a barrel.Gold fell 0.8% to $1,620.28 an ounce.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 30/81   Trump sets Easter as possible date for lifting restrictions - live updates
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    President Trump has repeatedly talked about changing guidelines and lifting restrictions and today gave Easter as a possible deadline.

    President Trump has repeatedly talked about changing guidelines and lifting restrictions and today gave Easter as a possible deadline.


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  • 31/81   SonoScape Shares its Experience of Fighting Against COVID-19 to the Global Community
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    SonoScape, one of the leading providers of ultrasound and endoscopy solutions, headquartered in Shenzhen China, started to help with the coronavirus epidemic as early as in January. The company worked against time with top priority of ensuring the health and safety of employees while supporting diagnostic and treatment solutions for hospitals. Today SonoScape shared its experiences in China for companies in similar situations.

    SonoScape, one of the leading providers of ultrasound and endoscopy solutions, headquartered in Shenzhen China, started to help with the coronavirus epidemic as early as in January. The company worked against time with top priority of ensuring the health and safety of employees while supporting diagnostic and treatment solutions for hospitals. Today SonoScape shared its experiences in China for companies in similar situations.


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  • 32/81   Coronavirus: India enters 'total lockdown' after spike in cases
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Panic-buying grips major cities as the country brings in restrictions amid the coronavirus crisis.

    Panic-buying grips major cities as the country brings in restrictions amid the coronavirus crisis.


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  • 33/81   Oil Rides U.S. Stimulus Rally While Price War Rages Unabated
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Oil rode a rally driven by optimism over U.S. stimulus spending into a third day, but a vicious price war that shows no signs of abating continued to hang over the market.Futures in New York extended their gain this week to around 11% after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi signaled Congress will reach a deal on a massive spending bill, a day after the Federal Reserve unveiled a sweeping set of economic measures. Those efforts spurred dramatic gains in stocks, with the S&P 500 Index having its best session since 2008.The specter of collapsing demand and a rapidly expanding glut of oil make a sustained recovery in prices unlikely, however. Reflecting those worries, global benchmark Brent crude’s six-month timespread sank into the deepest contango in more than a decade, a bearish signal indicating over-supply.As large parts of the global economy shut down to stop the spread of the coronavirus, neither Saudi Arabia nor Russia show any sign of backing down on threats to pump more oil to gain market share. Major trading house Gunvor Group Ltd. estimated the worldwide crude surplus stood at 14 million to 15 million barrels a day, while two of the world’s biggest oilfield services providers warned of a rapid rollback of U.S. shale.“Arguably, oil is all priced in at $20-odd dollars a barrel,” said Michael McCarthy, chief market strategist at CMC Markets Asia Pacific. However, “it’s a little too soon to say we’ve hit a bottom” as there’s still a chance the U.S. stimulus doesn’t happen, he said. West Texas Intermediate for May delivery rose 4% to $24.98 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange as of 9:24 a.m. in Singapore after closing up 2.8% on Tuesday. Brent for May climbed 3.7% to $28.15 a barrel on the ICE Futures Europe exchange.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Oil rode a rally driven by optimism over U.S. stimulus spending into a third day, but a vicious price war that shows no signs of abating continued to hang over the market.Futures in New York extended their gain this week to around 11% after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi signaled Congress will reach a deal on a massive spending bill, a day after the Federal Reserve unveiled a sweeping set of economic measures. Those efforts spurred dramatic gains in stocks, with the S&P 500 Index having its best session since 2008.The specter of collapsing demand and a rapidly expanding glut of oil make a sustained recovery in prices unlikely, however. Reflecting those worries, global benchmark Brent crude’s six-month timespread sank into the deepest contango in more than a decade, a bearish signal indicating over-supply.As large parts of the global economy shut down to stop the spread of the coronavirus, neither Saudi Arabia nor Russia show any sign of backing down on threats to pump more oil to gain market share. Major trading house Gunvor Group Ltd. estimated the worldwide crude surplus stood at 14 million to 15 million barrels a day, while two of the world’s biggest oilfield services providers warned of a rapid rollback of U.S. shale.“Arguably, oil is all priced in at $20-odd dollars a barrel,” said Michael McCarthy, chief market strategist at CMC Markets Asia Pacific. However, “it’s a little too soon to say we’ve hit a bottom” as there’s still a chance the U.S. stimulus doesn’t happen, he said. West Texas Intermediate for May delivery rose 4% to $24.98 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange as of 9:24 a.m. in Singapore after closing up 2.8% on Tuesday. Brent for May climbed 3.7% to $28.15 a barrel on the ICE Futures Europe exchange.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 34/81   Trump managed to get coronavirus test kits at 'last minute' without invoking wartime law, FEMA says
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Donald Trump's administration managed to obtain coronavirus test kits at 'last minute' from private market without invoking Defense Production Act.

    Donald Trump's administration managed to obtain coronavirus test kits at 'last minute' from private market without invoking Defense Production Act.


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  • 35/81   Trump says he hopes to lift coronavirus restrictions by Easter because it would be a 'beautiful time'
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Trump said he would like to see the country "back to work" by Easte as he considers easing stringent coronavirus social-distancing guidelines.

    Trump said he would like to see the country "back to work" by Easte as he considers easing stringent coronavirus social-distancing guidelines.


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  • 36/81   In California: Coronavirus claims first state resident under age 18
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Cases across California are quicking rising, with half in the 18-49 age range. To help slow the spread, tourist-friendly destinations are asking you to hold off on that visit. Plus, some Princess Cruise ship passengers are cleared to go home this week. First order of business: Hugging a spouse.

    Cases across California are quicking rising, with half in the 18-49 age range. To help slow the spread, tourist-friendly destinations are asking you to hold off on that visit. Plus, some Princess Cruise ship passengers are cleared to go home this week. First order of business: Hugging a spouse.


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  • 37/81   Tornado rips across Mississippi and Alabama, causing injuries and damage
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    A "large and destructive" tornado ripped across northeastern Mississippi and northwestern Alabama late Tuesday afternoon.

    A "large and destructive" tornado ripped across northeastern Mississippi and northwestern Alabama late Tuesday afternoon.


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  • 38/81   Hahnemann Hospital Owner Joel Freedman Offers Shuttered Medical Center at a Fraction of Market Cost to Provide Assistance to Philadelphia in Event of Coronavirus Patient Surge
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The owner of shuttered Hahnemann University Hospital has offered to lease the medical facility to the City of Philadelphia at substantially below market cost so it can be used by the City in the event that a surge of COVID-19 pandemic cases occur.

    The owner of shuttered Hahnemann University Hospital has offered to lease the medical facility to the City of Philadelphia at substantially below market cost so it can be used by the City in the event that a surge of COVID-19 pandemic cases occur.


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  • 39/81   Deal close — but still not there — on $2-trillion economic stimulus, the largest in history
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The nearly $2-trillion deal is expected to include direct cash payments to many Americans, and aid for both large corporations and small businesses

    The nearly $2-trillion deal is expected to include direct cash payments to many Americans, and aid for both large corporations and small businesses


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  • 40/81   Willow Biosciences Reports Fourth Quarter and 2019 Year End Results and Operational Update
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Willow Biosciences Inc. ("Willow" or the "Company") (TSX: WLLW; OTCQB: CANSF) is pleased to announce its financial and operating results for the three months and year ended December 31, 2019. Selected financial and operational information is outlined below and should be read with Willow's audited consolidated financial statements (the "Financial Statements") and management's discussion and analysis (the "MD&A;") as of December 31, 2019, which are available on SEDAR at www.sedar.com and on Willow's website at www.willowbio.com. The Company's annual information form (the "AIF") for the year ended December 31, 2019 has also been filed on SEDAR and is available on Willow's website.

    Willow Biosciences Inc. ("Willow" or the "Company") (TSX: WLLW; OTCQB: CANSF) is pleased to announce its financial and operating results for the three months and year ended December 31, 2019. Selected financial and operational information is outlined below and should be read with Willow's audited consolidated financial statements (the "Financial Statements") and management's discussion and analysis (the "MD&A;") as of December 31, 2019, which are available on SEDAR at www.sedar.com and on Willow's website at www.willowbio.com. The Company's annual information form (the "AIF") for the year ended December 31, 2019 has also been filed on SEDAR and is available on Willow's website.


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  • 41/81   In New Rochelle, coronavirus patients have been asymptomatic for weeks. They're still quarantined.
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    About 20 days after their quarantine, New Rochelle residents who tested positive for coronavirus are waiting to be cleared of a quarantine.

    About 20 days after their quarantine, New Rochelle residents who tested positive for coronavirus are waiting to be cleared of a quarantine.


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  • 42/81   Trump downplays coronavirus threat again, even as number of cases in U.S. surges
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    President Trump continued to downplay the exponential spread of the coronavirus in the United States on Monday, comparing the rising death toll to the number of Americans killed in car crashes and by the seasonal flu.

    President Trump continued to downplay the exponential spread of the coronavirus in the United States on Monday, comparing the rising death toll to the number of Americans killed in car crashes and by the seasonal flu.


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  • 43/81   "I hope to be roaming outside freely and without a face mask very soon," says an American quarantined in Beijing
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Patrick, who is an American citizen, returned back to his current home in Beijing recently and per law is being quarantined in his apartment for 14 days since his arrival back to China. “Right now, [I’m] keeping my spirits up and enjoying it. I hope to be roaming outside freely and without a face mask very soon.”

    Patrick, who is an American citizen, returned back to his current home in Beijing recently and per law is being quarantined in his apartment for 14 days since his arrival back to China. “Right now, [I’m] keeping my spirits up and enjoying it. I hope to be roaming outside freely and without a face mask very soon.”


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  • 44/81   How to date, have sex, and fall in love during the coronavirus pandemic
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    With cities on lockdown to stop the spread of COVID-19, dating may seem impossible. Insider compiled a guide on how to date during the pandemic.

    With cities on lockdown to stop the spread of COVID-19, dating may seem impossible. Insider compiled a guide on how to date during the pandemic.


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  • 45/81   Hawley, Stefanik Introduce Bill to Investigate China for Coronavirus Coverup
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Senator Josh Hawley (R., Mo.) and Representative Elise Stefanik (R., N.Y.) on Tuesday introduced a bicameral resolution to condemn the Chinese Communist Party for its initial handling of the coronavirus outbreak, and called for an international investigation to determine how the coverup hastened the emergence of a global pandemic.“Since day one, the Chinese Communist Party intentionally lied to the world about the origin of this pandemic. The CCP was aware of the reality of the virus as early as December but ordered laboratories to destroy samples and forced doctors to keep silent,” Hawley, who first called for an investigation last week, said in a press release.“There is no doubt that China’s unconscionable decision to orchestrate an elaborate coverup of the wide-ranging and deadly implications of coronavirus led to the death of thousands of people, including hundreds of Americans and climbing,” Stefanik added. “This Resolution calls for China to provide compensation for the harm, loss, and destruction their arrogance brought upon the rest of the world. Simply put China must, and will, be held accountable.”The bill calls the international community to “quantify the harm caused” by China’s actions and to “design a mechanism for delivering compensation” from the CCP to those affected.Reports have detailed how Wuhan laboratories in December discovered that coronavirus was related to the deadly SARS virus which broke out in 2002-2003, but were subsequently gagged by government authorities, who ordered them to turn over or destroy evidence.China has also promoted a propaganda campaign to push a conspiracy theory that the virus originated in the U.S., which experts have called “a counteroffensive” and “a kind of blame-shifting.”

    Senator Josh Hawley (R., Mo.) and Representative Elise Stefanik (R., N.Y.) on Tuesday introduced a bicameral resolution to condemn the Chinese Communist Party for its initial handling of the coronavirus outbreak, and called for an international investigation to determine how the coverup hastened the emergence of a global pandemic.“Since day one, the Chinese Communist Party intentionally lied to the world about the origin of this pandemic. The CCP was aware of the reality of the virus as early as December but ordered laboratories to destroy samples and forced doctors to keep silent,” Hawley, who first called for an investigation last week, said in a press release.“There is no doubt that China’s unconscionable decision to orchestrate an elaborate coverup of the wide-ranging and deadly implications of coronavirus led to the death of thousands of people, including hundreds of Americans and climbing,” Stefanik added. “This Resolution calls for China to provide compensation for the harm, loss, and destruction their arrogance brought upon the rest of the world. Simply put China must, and will, be held accountable.”The bill calls the international community to “quantify the harm caused” by China’s actions and to “design a mechanism for delivering compensation” from the CCP to those affected.Reports have detailed how Wuhan laboratories in December discovered that coronavirus was related to the deadly SARS virus which broke out in 2002-2003, but were subsequently gagged by government authorities, who ordered them to turn over or destroy evidence.China has also promoted a propaganda campaign to push a conspiracy theory that the virus originated in the U.S., which experts have called “a counteroffensive” and “a kind of blame-shifting.”


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  • 46/81   'Friend of coronavirus': Police in north India shame those defying lockdown
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Police in India's northern city of Meerut are making citizens who break its lockdown hold up signs reading, 'I am a friend of coronavirus,' or 'I am the enemy of society,' before posting their pictures on Twitter.  Most of India, which had 482 infections and nine deaths by Tuesday, is under lockdown to curb the spread of the virus, including Meerut, in the most populous state of Uttar Pradesh.  Meerut police tweeted a picture of Alim holding a sign that read 'I am a friend of coronavirus' with the caption, 'Some people do not care about society's safety.'

    Police in India's northern city of Meerut are making citizens who break its lockdown hold up signs reading, 'I am a friend of coronavirus,' or 'I am the enemy of society,' before posting their pictures on Twitter. Most of India, which had 482 infections and nine deaths by Tuesday, is under lockdown to curb the spread of the virus, including Meerut, in the most populous state of Uttar Pradesh. Meerut police tweeted a picture of Alim holding a sign that read 'I am a friend of coronavirus' with the caption, 'Some people do not care about society's safety.'


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  • 47/81   Coronavirus: American children are dying because of quarantine, doctors warn
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Children kept at home due to the coronavirus pandemic may be putting them at greater risks of harm from both accidents and - tragically - abusive parents, according to a doctor.In Fort Worth, Texas, a sudden surge of child abuse cases has raised red flags for doctors at the facility.

    Children kept at home due to the coronavirus pandemic may be putting them at greater risks of harm from both accidents and - tragically - abusive parents, according to a doctor.In Fort Worth, Texas, a sudden surge of child abuse cases has raised red flags for doctors at the facility.


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  • 48/81   As coronavirus cases increase, Defense Secretary Mark Esper places new restriction on Pentagon
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Defense Secretary Mark Esper said Monday he is again raising the protection condition on the Pentagon, which will further restrict access to one of the world’s largest office buildings. The Pentagon will now be at Level C, the second highest of the military’s five health protection conditions.

    Defense Secretary Mark Esper said Monday he is again raising the protection condition on the Pentagon, which will further restrict access to one of the world’s largest office buildings. The Pentagon will now be at Level C, the second highest of the military’s five health protection conditions.


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  • 49/81   'Absolutely irresponsible': Rand Paul's colleagues are calling him out after he reportedly went to the gym after testing for coronavirus
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Two of Paul's colleagues in the Senate criticized him after he reportedly refused to isolate himself after testing for the coronavirus.

    Two of Paul's colleagues in the Senate criticized him after he reportedly refused to isolate himself after testing for the coronavirus.


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  • 50/81   Fourteen inmates escaped from jail, 6 still on the loose
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    "Despite the governor’s shelter-in-place or stay-at-home order, apparently they didn’t want to do that, so they are out and about," said the county sheriff.

    "Despite the governor’s shelter-in-place or stay-at-home order, apparently they didn’t want to do that, so they are out and about," said the county sheriff.


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  • 51/81   White House press corps confirms 'suspected case' of coronavirus in the briefing room
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A member of the White House press corps who has been in the briefing room several times with President Trump has come down with a suspected case of coronavirus. 

    A member of the White House press corps who has been in the briefing room several times with President Trump has come down with a suspected case of coronavirus. 


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  • 52/81   Scientists discover an ancient wormlike creature that's the ancestor of all animals – including us
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Scientists have discovered a fossil of our earliest ancestor: A tiny, wormlike creature that lived about 555 million years ago.

    Scientists have discovered a fossil of our earliest ancestor: A tiny, wormlike creature that lived about 555 million years ago.


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  • 53/81   Mammal study explains 'why females live longer'
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Across wild mammal species, females live over 18% longer than males because of genetics and environment.

    Across wild mammal species, females live over 18% longer than males because of genetics and environment.


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  • 54/81   How are you doing during the COVID-19 crisis? Scientists want to hear your story
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Researchers at the University of Washington are launching a study aimed at answering the question that's on a lot of people's minds as the coronavirus epidemic spreads through the Seattle area: How are you holding up? The King County COVID-19 Community Study, a.k.a. KC3S, is recruiting King County residents to tell their stories. The study is scheduled to collect data through April 19. “We want to start collecting this information now — as the COVID-19 pandemic is unfolding — about how families and communities are being impacted, and how they are adapting,” Nicole Errett, a lecturer in the UW Department… Read More

    Researchers at the University of Washington are launching a study aimed at answering the question that's on a lot of people's minds as the coronavirus epidemic spreads through the Seattle area: How are you holding up? The King County COVID-19 Community Study, a.k.a. KC3S, is recruiting King County residents to tell their stories. The study is scheduled to collect data through April 19. “We want to start collecting this information now — as the COVID-19 pandemic is unfolding — about how families and communities are being impacted, and how they are adapting,” Nicole Errett, a lecturer in the UW Department… Read More


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  • 55/81   Fossil worm shows us our evolutionary beginnings
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    A tiny, 555-million-year-old seafloor creature reveals why our bodies are organised the way they are.

    A tiny, 555-million-year-old seafloor creature reveals why our bodies are organised the way they are.


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  • 56/81   OceanGate chooses Toray CMA to make carbon fiber for its Titanic submersibles
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Everett, Wash.-based OceanGate says Toray Composite Materials America is its preferred provider for the carbon fiber material that will be used in the company's next-generation submersibles. Toray CMA is the world's largest supplier of carbon fiber and the leader in providing fibers for numerous aircraft, including the Boeing 777 and 787. The company's U.S. head office is in Tacoma, Wash. OceanGate CEO Stockton Rush said in a statement that Toray CMA "will play a critical role as we develop the next generation of manned submersible, to usher in a new era of exploration using aerospace-quality composites." Toray CMA's vice president… Read More

    Everett, Wash.-based OceanGate says Toray Composite Materials America is its preferred provider for the carbon fiber material that will be used in the company's next-generation submersibles. Toray CMA is the world's largest supplier of carbon fiber and the leader in providing fibers for numerous aircraft, including the Boeing 777 and 787. The company's U.S. head office is in Tacoma, Wash. OceanGate CEO Stockton Rush said in a statement that Toray CMA "will play a critical role as we develop the next generation of manned submersible, to usher in a new era of exploration using aerospace-quality composites." Toray CMA's vice president… Read More


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  • 57/81   Climate change: Earth's deepest ice canyon vulnerable to melting
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Nasa scientists probe Denman Glacier which fills the deepest land gorge on Earth.

    Nasa scientists probe Denman Glacier which fills the deepest land gorge on Earth.


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  • 58/81   Electric car emissions myth 'busted'
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Fears that electric cars could actually increase carbon emissions are a baseless, a study suggests.

    Fears that electric cars could actually increase carbon emissions are a baseless, a study suggests.


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  • 59/81   As Natural Disasters Strike, a New Fear: Relief Shelters May Spread Virus
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    WASHINGTON -- Coast-to-coast storms. A spate of wildfires. Flooding in Hawaii. As the United States rushes into disaster season, federal officials now have an added crisis to worry about: How to stop tightly packed disaster-response shelters from becoming hot spots of coronavirus transmission.The virus is forcing emergency managers to rethink long-held procedures for operating shelters like these in real time. That challenge comes as the nation's crisis-response workforce is already taxed by three years of brutal hurricanes, floods and wildfires, a trend that climate change promises to accelerate."All of these activities that we do during and after disasters are activities that require a lot of people to be in close proximity to each other," said Samantha Montano, assistant professor of emergency management and disaster science at the University of Nebraska, Omaha. "And that is the exact opposite of what we need to do to keep people safe from COVID-19.""Any hazards that we're concerned about on an annual basis, we need to be twice as concerned about them now," she said.The Federal Emergency Management Agency has begun encouraging workers to "practice social distancing" and to limit to four the number of disaster victims who can be in one of its field offices at any given time, a spokeswoman said Thursday. The agency has also halted training at its National Fire Academy and Emergency Management Institute, as well as other facilities.It also said Thursday that it would let states seek reimbursement for sheltering victims individually, for example in hotels. However, in a disaster scenario, hotels themselves might be damaged or unusable because of the crisis, or simply not close enough to serve the immediate needs.So one of the most pressing challenges remains: What to do about shelters?When Americans are forced to leave their homes because of flooding or fires and have nowhere else to go, charitable organizations routinely open temporary shelters that usually consist of rows of cots in school gymnasiums, churches, convention centers or other large indoor spaces.Those shelters have offered a place of refuge, one that has become increasingly important as climate change causes more frequent and intense disasters.On Thursday, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration issued data predicting widespread flooding between now and the end of May, with major or moderate floods in 23 states. California has already been hit by nine wildfires this year; the National Interagency Fire Center reported 11 new large fires around the country this week alone.A major storm stretched across much of the country this week, with FEMA warning Friday of heavy rain from the southern plains to the Tennessee Valley. And hurricane season is just 10 weeks away.The coronavirus has the potential to turn the shelters from a refuge into a danger of their own.The American Red Cross, which runs most of the temporary shelters around the U.S., has set new guidelines for their operation, trying to curb the risk of transmission by screening evacuees and isolating those who show symptoms, as well as spacing cots 6 feet apart and emphasizing good hygiene.Officials with the organization said they knew that wasn't a perfect solution.Amid a pandemic, "a congregate shelter is not the best environment," said Trevor Riggen, senior vice president for disaster services for the Red Cross, using the term for shelters that place groups of people in a single shared space. He said the Red Cross would try to move more people into hotels or motels, but added that there weren't always enough available rooms close to a disaster, particularly if the number of people who need shelter extends into the hundreds.Public health officials said it would be better to house disaster victims separately, despite the additional cost and logistical hurdles."Congregate settings are clearly a higher infection-control risk, especially when dealing with a novel respiratory virus," said Lucy Wilson, who ran infection control for Maryland and is now a professor in the emergency health services department at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. She compared group shelters to other crowded settings like dormitories, barracks, prisons and cruise ships, where "respiratory diseases are known to rapidly spread."Arnold Monto, a professor of epidemiology and global health at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, said he thought the Red Cross was taking reasonable steps to protect the health of people in its shelters. But he said it seemed likely, based on what is known so far about COVID-19, that people who don't have symptoms may nonetheless have the disease -- and, more important, can probably spread it to others."Being in a motel would give them more distance," Monto said. "The more people you have, the more likely that one of them might be affected."The federal government's Thursday announcement that states can seek federal reimbursement for the cost of sheltering people individually -- provided it's at the direction of a public health official -- could help address that concern, assuming the rooms are available. Keeping people out of group shelters "may be necessary in this Public Health Emergency to save lives," the agency said in a fact sheet, "as well as to lessen or avert the threat of a catastrophe."Riggen said the Red Cross would try to get people into hotels when the risk of contagion is particularly high. Following an apartment fire this month in Jacksonville, Florida, a state with a large number of coronavirus cases, the organization put 45 people in hotels on the advice of local health officials, he said.In the meantime, the Red Cross is continuing to rely on shelters, but with a few changes.Its new guidelines call for taking the temperature of everyone coming into shelters, whether evacuees or volunteers, as well as checking for other symptoms of COVID-19. Once inside, everyone is supposed to be checked three times a day. Other steps include hand-washing stations, along with "enhanced cleaning of all hard surfaces."People are also told not to pull their cots together.The Red Cross has already applied its new guidelines at two shelters, according to Riggen. One is in Hawaii, which was hit this week by flooding. That shelter housed 150 people on Tuesday night.The other was at a school in Salt Lake City, which was set up following a 5.7-magnitude earthquake Wednesday. A Red Cross spokeswoman, Greta Gustafson, said Friday that no one had stayed at the shelter. Workers at the shelter denied entry Thursday to a photographer for The New York Times."We are not aware of any positive tests" for COVID-19 at either of the two shelters, Gustafson said.Despite the risk of the coronavirus, switching from a shelter model to putting people in hotels is more challenging that it might seem. And money isn't the only problem.In addition to being expensive, having people dispersed across different locations makes it harder to provide them with food and supplies, Riggen said. In some places, particularly rural areas, there may not be enough hotels nearby. And it's not always possible to get a hotel room if somebody is pushed from their home in the middle of the night."We don't want to leave people standing out on the curb waiting," Riggen said.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company

    WASHINGTON -- Coast-to-coast storms. A spate of wildfires. Flooding in Hawaii. As the United States rushes into disaster season, federal officials now have an added crisis to worry about: How to stop tightly packed disaster-response shelters from becoming hot spots of coronavirus transmission.The virus is forcing emergency managers to rethink long-held procedures for operating shelters like these in real time. That challenge comes as the nation's crisis-response workforce is already taxed by three years of brutal hurricanes, floods and wildfires, a trend that climate change promises to accelerate."All of these activities that we do during and after disasters are activities that require a lot of people to be in close proximity to each other," said Samantha Montano, assistant professor of emergency management and disaster science at the University of Nebraska, Omaha. "And that is the exact opposite of what we need to do to keep people safe from COVID-19.""Any hazards that we're concerned about on an annual basis, we need to be twice as concerned about them now," she said.The Federal Emergency Management Agency has begun encouraging workers to "practice social distancing" and to limit to four the number of disaster victims who can be in one of its field offices at any given time, a spokeswoman said Thursday. The agency has also halted training at its National Fire Academy and Emergency Management Institute, as well as other facilities.It also said Thursday that it would let states seek reimbursement for sheltering victims individually, for example in hotels. However, in a disaster scenario, hotels themselves might be damaged or unusable because of the crisis, or simply not close enough to serve the immediate needs.So one of the most pressing challenges remains: What to do about shelters?When Americans are forced to leave their homes because of flooding or fires and have nowhere else to go, charitable organizations routinely open temporary shelters that usually consist of rows of cots in school gymnasiums, churches, convention centers or other large indoor spaces.Those shelters have offered a place of refuge, one that has become increasingly important as climate change causes more frequent and intense disasters.On Thursday, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration issued data predicting widespread flooding between now and the end of May, with major or moderate floods in 23 states. California has already been hit by nine wildfires this year; the National Interagency Fire Center reported 11 new large fires around the country this week alone.A major storm stretched across much of the country this week, with FEMA warning Friday of heavy rain from the southern plains to the Tennessee Valley. And hurricane season is just 10 weeks away.The coronavirus has the potential to turn the shelters from a refuge into a danger of their own.The American Red Cross, which runs most of the temporary shelters around the U.S., has set new guidelines for their operation, trying to curb the risk of transmission by screening evacuees and isolating those who show symptoms, as well as spacing cots 6 feet apart and emphasizing good hygiene.Officials with the organization said they knew that wasn't a perfect solution.Amid a pandemic, "a congregate shelter is not the best environment," said Trevor Riggen, senior vice president for disaster services for the Red Cross, using the term for shelters that place groups of people in a single shared space. He said the Red Cross would try to move more people into hotels or motels, but added that there weren't always enough available rooms close to a disaster, particularly if the number of people who need shelter extends into the hundreds.Public health officials said it would be better to house disaster victims separately, despite the additional cost and logistical hurdles."Congregate settings are clearly a higher infection-control risk, especially when dealing with a novel respiratory virus," said Lucy Wilson, who ran infection control for Maryland and is now a professor in the emergency health services department at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. She compared group shelters to other crowded settings like dormitories, barracks, prisons and cruise ships, where "respiratory diseases are known to rapidly spread."Arnold Monto, a professor of epidemiology and global health at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, said he thought the Red Cross was taking reasonable steps to protect the health of people in its shelters. But he said it seemed likely, based on what is known so far about COVID-19, that people who don't have symptoms may nonetheless have the disease -- and, more important, can probably spread it to others."Being in a motel would give them more distance," Monto said. "The more people you have, the more likely that one of them might be affected."The federal government's Thursday announcement that states can seek federal reimbursement for the cost of sheltering people individually -- provided it's at the direction of a public health official -- could help address that concern, assuming the rooms are available. Keeping people out of group shelters "may be necessary in this Public Health Emergency to save lives," the agency said in a fact sheet, "as well as to lessen or avert the threat of a catastrophe."Riggen said the Red Cross would try to get people into hotels when the risk of contagion is particularly high. Following an apartment fire this month in Jacksonville, Florida, a state with a large number of coronavirus cases, the organization put 45 people in hotels on the advice of local health officials, he said.In the meantime, the Red Cross is continuing to rely on shelters, but with a few changes.Its new guidelines call for taking the temperature of everyone coming into shelters, whether evacuees or volunteers, as well as checking for other symptoms of COVID-19. Once inside, everyone is supposed to be checked three times a day. Other steps include hand-washing stations, along with "enhanced cleaning of all hard surfaces."People are also told not to pull their cots together.The Red Cross has already applied its new guidelines at two shelters, according to Riggen. One is in Hawaii, which was hit this week by flooding. That shelter housed 150 people on Tuesday night.The other was at a school in Salt Lake City, which was set up following a 5.7-magnitude earthquake Wednesday. A Red Cross spokeswoman, Greta Gustafson, said Friday that no one had stayed at the shelter. Workers at the shelter denied entry Thursday to a photographer for The New York Times."We are not aware of any positive tests" for COVID-19 at either of the two shelters, Gustafson said.Despite the risk of the coronavirus, switching from a shelter model to putting people in hotels is more challenging that it might seem. And money isn't the only problem.In addition to being expensive, having people dispersed across different locations makes it harder to provide them with food and supplies, Riggen said. In some places, particularly rural areas, there may not be enough hotels nearby. And it's not always possible to get a hotel room if somebody is pushed from their home in the middle of the night."We don't want to leave people standing out on the curb waiting," Riggen said.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company


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  • 60/81   I Spent a Year in Space, and I Have Tips on Isolation to Share
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Being stuck at home can be challenging. When I lived on the International Space Station for nearly a year, it wasn't easy. When I went to sleep, I was at work. When I woke up, I was still at work. Flying in space is probably the only job you absolutely cannot quit.But I learned some things during my time up there that I'd like to share -- because they are about to come in handy again, as we all confine ourselves at home to help stop the spread of the coronavirus. Here are a few tips on living in isolation, from someone who has been there.Follow a scheduleOn the space station, my time was scheduled tightly, from the moment I woke up to when I went to sleep. Sometimes this involved a spacewalk that could last up to eight hours; other times, it involved a five minute task, like checking on the experimental flowers I was growing in space. You will find maintaining a plan will help you and your family adjust to a different work and home life environment. When I returned to Earth, I missed the structure it provided and found it hard to live without.But pace yourselfWhen you are living and working in the same place for days on end, work can have a way of taking over everything if you let it. Living in space, I deliberately paced myself because I knew I was in it for the long haul -- just like we all are today. Take time for fun activities: I met up with crewmates for movie nights, complete with snacks, and binge watched all of "Game of Thrones" -- twice.And don't forget to include in your schedule a consistent bedtime. NASA scientists closely study astronauts' sleep when we are in space, and they have found that quality of sleep relates to cognition, mood, and interpersonal relations -- all essential to getting through a mission in space or a quarantine at home.Go outsideOne of the things I missed most while living in space was being able to go outside and experience nature. After being confined to a small space for months, I actually started to crave nature -- the color green, the smell of fresh dirt, and the feel of warm sun on my face. That flower experiment became more important to me than I could have ever imagined. My colleagues liked to play a recording of Earth sounds, like birds and rustling trees, and even mosquitoes, over and over. It brought me back to earth. (Although occasionally I found myself swatting my ears at the mosquitoes.)For an astronaut, going outside is a dangerous undertaking that requires days of preparation, so I appreciate that in our current predicament, I can step outside any time I want for a walk or a hike -- no spacesuit needed. Research has shown that spending time in nature is beneficial for our mental and physical health, as is exercise. You don't need to work out two and a half hours a day, as astronauts on the space station do, but getting moving once a day should be part of your quarantine schedule (just stay at least six feet away from others).You need a hobbyWhen you are confined in a small space you need an outlet that isn't work or maintaining your environment.Some people are surprised to learn I brought books with me to space. The quiet and absorption you can find in a physical book -- one that doesn't ping you with notifications or tempt you to open a new tab -- is priceless. Many small bookstores are currently offering curbside pickup or home delivery service, which means you can support a local business while also cultivating some much-needed unplugged time.You can also practice an instrument (I just bought a digital guitar trainer online), try a craft, or make some art. Astronauts take time for all of these while in space. (Remember Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield's famous cover of David Bowie's Space Oddity?)Keep a journalNASA has been studying the effects of isolation on humans for decades, and one surprising finding they have made is the value of keeping a journal. Throughout my yearlong mission, I took the time to write about my experiences almost every day. If you find yourself just chronicling the days' events (which, under the circumstances, might get repetitive) instead try describing what you are experiencing through your five senses or write about memories. Even if you don't wind up writing a book based on your journal like I did, writing about your days will help put your experiences in perspective and let you look back later on what this unique time in history has meant.Take time to connectEven with all the responsibilities of serving as commander of a space station, I never missed the chance to have a videoconference with family and friends. Scientists have found that isolation is damaging not only to our mental health, but to our physical health as well, especially our immune systems. Technology makes it easier than ever to keep in touch, so it's worth making time to connect with someone every day -- it might actually help you fight off viruses.Listen to expertsI've found that most problems aren't rocket science, but when they are rocket science, you should ask a rocket scientist. Living in space taught me a lot about the importance of trusting the advice of people who knew more than I did about their subjects, whether it was science, engineering, medicine, or the design of the incredibly complex space station that was keeping me alive.Especially in a challenging moment like the one we are living through now, we have to seek out knowledge from those who know the most about it and listen to them. Social media and other poorly vetted sources can be transmitters of misinformation just as handshakes transmit viruses, so we have to make a point of seeking out reputable sources of facts, like the World Health Organization and the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center.We are all connectedSeen from space, the Earth has no borders. The spread of the coronavirus is showing us that what we share is much more powerful than what keeps us apart, for better or for worse. All people are inescapably interconnected, and the more we can come together to solve our problems, the better off we will all be.One of the side effects of seeing Earth from a the perspective of space, at least for me, is feeling more compassion for others. As helpless as we may feel stuck inside our homes, there are always things we can do -- I've seen people reading to children via videoconference, donating their time and dollars to charities online, and running errands for elderly or immuno-compromised neighbors. The benefits for the volunteer are just as great as for those helped.I've seen humans work together to prevail over some of the toughest challenges imaginable, and I know we can prevail over this one if we all do our part and work together as a team.Oh, and wash your hands -- often.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company

    Being stuck at home can be challenging. When I lived on the International Space Station for nearly a year, it wasn't easy. When I went to sleep, I was at work. When I woke up, I was still at work. Flying in space is probably the only job you absolutely cannot quit.But I learned some things during my time up there that I'd like to share -- because they are about to come in handy again, as we all confine ourselves at home to help stop the spread of the coronavirus. Here are a few tips on living in isolation, from someone who has been there.Follow a scheduleOn the space station, my time was scheduled tightly, from the moment I woke up to when I went to sleep. Sometimes this involved a spacewalk that could last up to eight hours; other times, it involved a five minute task, like checking on the experimental flowers I was growing in space. You will find maintaining a plan will help you and your family adjust to a different work and home life environment. When I returned to Earth, I missed the structure it provided and found it hard to live without.But pace yourselfWhen you are living and working in the same place for days on end, work can have a way of taking over everything if you let it. Living in space, I deliberately paced myself because I knew I was in it for the long haul -- just like we all are today. Take time for fun activities: I met up with crewmates for movie nights, complete with snacks, and binge watched all of "Game of Thrones" -- twice.And don't forget to include in your schedule a consistent bedtime. NASA scientists closely study astronauts' sleep when we are in space, and they have found that quality of sleep relates to cognition, mood, and interpersonal relations -- all essential to getting through a mission in space or a quarantine at home.Go outsideOne of the things I missed most while living in space was being able to go outside and experience nature. After being confined to a small space for months, I actually started to crave nature -- the color green, the smell of fresh dirt, and the feel of warm sun on my face. That flower experiment became more important to me than I could have ever imagined. My colleagues liked to play a recording of Earth sounds, like birds and rustling trees, and even mosquitoes, over and over. It brought me back to earth. (Although occasionally I found myself swatting my ears at the mosquitoes.)For an astronaut, going outside is a dangerous undertaking that requires days of preparation, so I appreciate that in our current predicament, I can step outside any time I want for a walk or a hike -- no spacesuit needed. Research has shown that spending time in nature is beneficial for our mental and physical health, as is exercise. You don't need to work out two and a half hours a day, as astronauts on the space station do, but getting moving once a day should be part of your quarantine schedule (just stay at least six feet away from others).You need a hobbyWhen you are confined in a small space you need an outlet that isn't work or maintaining your environment.Some people are surprised to learn I brought books with me to space. The quiet and absorption you can find in a physical book -- one that doesn't ping you with notifications or tempt you to open a new tab -- is priceless. Many small bookstores are currently offering curbside pickup or home delivery service, which means you can support a local business while also cultivating some much-needed unplugged time.You can also practice an instrument (I just bought a digital guitar trainer online), try a craft, or make some art. Astronauts take time for all of these while in space. (Remember Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield's famous cover of David Bowie's Space Oddity?)Keep a journalNASA has been studying the effects of isolation on humans for decades, and one surprising finding they have made is the value of keeping a journal. Throughout my yearlong mission, I took the time to write about my experiences almost every day. If you find yourself just chronicling the days' events (which, under the circumstances, might get repetitive) instead try describing what you are experiencing through your five senses or write about memories. Even if you don't wind up writing a book based on your journal like I did, writing about your days will help put your experiences in perspective and let you look back later on what this unique time in history has meant.Take time to connectEven with all the responsibilities of serving as commander of a space station, I never missed the chance to have a videoconference with family and friends. Scientists have found that isolation is damaging not only to our mental health, but to our physical health as well, especially our immune systems. Technology makes it easier than ever to keep in touch, so it's worth making time to connect with someone every day -- it might actually help you fight off viruses.Listen to expertsI've found that most problems aren't rocket science, but when they are rocket science, you should ask a rocket scientist. Living in space taught me a lot about the importance of trusting the advice of people who knew more than I did about their subjects, whether it was science, engineering, medicine, or the design of the incredibly complex space station that was keeping me alive.Especially in a challenging moment like the one we are living through now, we have to seek out knowledge from those who know the most about it and listen to them. Social media and other poorly vetted sources can be transmitters of misinformation just as handshakes transmit viruses, so we have to make a point of seeking out reputable sources of facts, like the World Health Organization and the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center.We are all connectedSeen from space, the Earth has no borders. The spread of the coronavirus is showing us that what we share is much more powerful than what keeps us apart, for better or for worse. All people are inescapably interconnected, and the more we can come together to solve our problems, the better off we will all be.One of the side effects of seeing Earth from a the perspective of space, at least for me, is feeling more compassion for others. As helpless as we may feel stuck inside our homes, there are always things we can do -- I've seen people reading to children via videoconference, donating their time and dollars to charities online, and running errands for elderly or immuno-compromised neighbors. The benefits for the volunteer are just as great as for those helped.I've seen humans work together to prevail over some of the toughest challenges imaginable, and I know we can prevail over this one if we all do our part and work together as a team.Oh, and wash your hands -- often.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company


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  • 61/81   OneWeb increases mega-constellation to 74 satellites
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The London-based start-up expands its network with a Soyuz launch from Baikonur in Kazakhstan

    The London-based start-up expands its network with a Soyuz launch from Baikonur in Kazakhstan


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  • 62/81   A Public Health Expert’s 5 Point Plan to Combat the Coronavirus
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Dr. Ezekiel J. Emanuel, an oncologist at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School and one of the architects of the Affordable Care Act in the Obama administration, outlined a proposal in The New York Times Tuesday for fighting the coronavirus – a battle he says we are currently losing.  Emanuel recognizes there’s reason to worry about the economic cost of the current approach, but we must keep in mind the millions of deaths that could occur in the next year if we fail to “flatten the curve” of infections as quickly as possible.“[T]he economy cannot be fixed without solving the pandemic,” Emanuel says. “Only after the virus is contained can we reopen restaurants, bars, gyms and stores; allow people to travel, attend conferences and visit museums; and persuade them to buy cars and houses.”To get to that point, Emanuel calls for a seven to 14-day period of mobilization to confront the pandemic. “If the United States intervenes immediately on the scale that China did, our death toll could be under 100,000,” he says. “Within three to four months we might be able to begin a return to more normal lives.”Here’s Emanuel’s plan:  1. President Trump should immediately issue a shelter-in-place order for the whole country, closing all schools and non-essential businesses. The policy could be lifted gradually over two or three months.  2. The federal government should take over all testing for the virus, with the aim of analyzing the entire population on an on-going basis.  3. Coordinate production of medical equipment at the federal level, paid for by Congress on a cost-plus basis, similar to defense contractors.  4. Publicly-funded assistance for hospitals, with a national overseer to manage care, equipment and personnel.  5. Grants to businesses to maintain payrolls, and use of the unemployed to help combat the pandemic, with tasks such as contact tracing and disinfecting public spaces.In the end, the country needs to mobilize as it has rarely done before, Emanuel says. If successful, “in two to three months the country can begin to return to normal, stores can reopen, people can work, and the United States will have a rapid, V-shaped economic recovery.” But if the country fails to act quickly and decisively, he warns, the U.S. “will follow Italy’s course or, worse, that of Iran, and recovery may take a decade or more with extraordinary levels of death and dislocation.”Like what you're reading? Sign up for our free newsletter.

    Dr. Ezekiel J. Emanuel, an oncologist at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School and one of the architects of the Affordable Care Act in the Obama administration, outlined a proposal in The New York Times Tuesday for fighting the coronavirus – a battle he says we are currently losing.  Emanuel recognizes there’s reason to worry about the economic cost of the current approach, but we must keep in mind the millions of deaths that could occur in the next year if we fail to “flatten the curve” of infections as quickly as possible.“[T]he economy cannot be fixed without solving the pandemic,” Emanuel says. “Only after the virus is contained can we reopen restaurants, bars, gyms and stores; allow people to travel, attend conferences and visit museums; and persuade them to buy cars and houses.”To get to that point, Emanuel calls for a seven to 14-day period of mobilization to confront the pandemic. “If the United States intervenes immediately on the scale that China did, our death toll could be under 100,000,” he says. “Within three to four months we might be able to begin a return to more normal lives.”Here’s Emanuel’s plan: 1. President Trump should immediately issue a shelter-in-place order for the whole country, closing all schools and non-essential businesses. The policy could be lifted gradually over two or three months. 2. The federal government should take over all testing for the virus, with the aim of analyzing the entire population on an on-going basis. 3. Coordinate production of medical equipment at the federal level, paid for by Congress on a cost-plus basis, similar to defense contractors. 4. Publicly-funded assistance for hospitals, with a national overseer to manage care, equipment and personnel. 5. Grants to businesses to maintain payrolls, and use of the unemployed to help combat the pandemic, with tasks such as contact tracing and disinfecting public spaces.In the end, the country needs to mobilize as it has rarely done before, Emanuel says. If successful, “in two to three months the country can begin to return to normal, stores can reopen, people can work, and the United States will have a rapid, V-shaped economic recovery.” But if the country fails to act quickly and decisively, he warns, the U.S. “will follow Italy’s course or, worse, that of Iran, and recovery may take a decade or more with extraordinary levels of death and dislocation.”Like what you're reading? Sign up for our free newsletter.


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  • 63/81   Arizona appeals court upholds Jodi Arias' murder conviction
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The Arizona Court of Appeals on Tuesday upheld Jodi Arias’ first-degree murder conviction and life prison sentence in the 2008 killing of her former boyfriend.  'We conclude that Arias was convicted based upon the overwhelming evidence of her guilt, not as a result of prosecutorial misconduct,” the ruling said.  The panel condemned Martinez's “argumentative phrasing of questions' to defense witnesses, adding that his “aggressive tone and combative, bullying behavior' were recurring issues in the trial and Arias' attorneys moved for a mistrial six times.

    The Arizona Court of Appeals on Tuesday upheld Jodi Arias’ first-degree murder conviction and life prison sentence in the 2008 killing of her former boyfriend. 'We conclude that Arias was convicted based upon the overwhelming evidence of her guilt, not as a result of prosecutorial misconduct,” the ruling said. The panel condemned Martinez's “argumentative phrasing of questions' to defense witnesses, adding that his “aggressive tone and combative, bullying behavior' were recurring issues in the trial and Arias' attorneys moved for a mistrial six times.


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  • 64/81   'Cacophony of coughing': Inside NYC's virus-besieged ERs
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Overworked, sleep-deprived doctors and nurses rationed to one face mask a day and wracked by worry about a dwindling number of available ventilators.  Such is the reality inside New York City’s hospitals, which have become the war-zone-like epicenter of the nation’s coronavirus crisis.  Faced with an infection rate that is five times that of the rest of the country, health workers are putting themselves at risk to fight a tide of sickness that’s getting worse by the day amid a shortage of needed supplies and promises of help from the federal government that have yet to fully materialize.

    Overworked, sleep-deprived doctors and nurses rationed to one face mask a day and wracked by worry about a dwindling number of available ventilators. Such is the reality inside New York City’s hospitals, which have become the war-zone-like epicenter of the nation’s coronavirus crisis. Faced with an infection rate that is five times that of the rest of the country, health workers are putting themselves at risk to fight a tide of sickness that’s getting worse by the day amid a shortage of needed supplies and promises of help from the federal government that have yet to fully materialize.


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  • 65/81   'Imaginary clock': Governors reject Trump's virus timeline
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Governors across the nation on Tuesday rejected President Donald Trump's new accelerated timeline for reopening the U.S. economy, as they continued to impose more restrictions on travel and public life in an attempt to curb the spread of the coronavirus.  The dismissal of Trump's mid-April timeframe for a national reopening came from Republicans and Democrats, from leaders struggling to manage hot spots of the outbreak and those still bracing for the worst.  Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan, the head of the National Governors Association and a Republican, called the messaging confusing since most leaders are still focused on enforcing the restrictions, not easing them.

    Governors across the nation on Tuesday rejected President Donald Trump's new accelerated timeline for reopening the U.S. economy, as they continued to impose more restrictions on travel and public life in an attempt to curb the spread of the coronavirus. The dismissal of Trump's mid-April timeframe for a national reopening came from Republicans and Democrats, from leaders struggling to manage hot spots of the outbreak and those still bracing for the worst. Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan, the head of the National Governors Association and a Republican, called the messaging confusing since most leaders are still focused on enforcing the restrictions, not easing them.


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  • 66/81   Biden's challenge: Breaking through with virus response
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Joe Biden is working to reassert himself in national politics three weeks after taking command of the Democratic presidential primary.  Like most Americans, Biden has stayed close to home recently to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.  In an interview with CNN, Biden took an increasingly aggressive stance against the president's coronavirus response, urging him to “stop talking and start listening to the medical experts.”

    Joe Biden is working to reassert himself in national politics three weeks after taking command of the Democratic presidential primary. Like most Americans, Biden has stayed close to home recently to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. In an interview with CNN, Biden took an increasingly aggressive stance against the president's coronavirus response, urging him to “stop talking and start listening to the medical experts.”


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  • 67/81   Falwell Misled Me on Reopening Liberty University, City Manager Says
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    When Liberty University president Jerry Falwell Jr. announced on Monday that he was reopening the school’s residence halls to students amid the coronavirus pandemic, he implied that he had received the blessing of officials in Lynchburg, Virginia, to do so. “They thanked us for making that decision,” Falwell told the Liberty University News Service, describing a call to move classes online but also, in his words, to get his students “back as soon as we can—the ones who want to come back.”In fact, Lynchburg city manager Bonnie Svrcek says that while she did thank Falwell for moving to online classrooms, she was led to believe that the school was also abandoning plans to invite students back into residence halls following spring break. Neither she nor Lynchburg Mayor Treney Tweedy said they signed off on Falwell’s decision to re-open Liberty’s dorms. On Tuesday, Svrcek told The Daily Beast that Falwell was not “totally transparent” with her or Tweedy during an exchange on March 16 in which, according to Svrcek, Falwell told the two leaders that his school would “move to an online platform.”“He added that some food services would remain open for on-campus international students who have not gone home and some lab classes and the school of aviation will continue,” Svrcek told The Daily Beast. “The mayor and I thanked him for this shift that we believed meant that students would be told to not come back to campus with a few exceptions.”Jerry Falwell Jr. Suggests to ‘Fox & Friends’ That North Korea Created the CoronavirusThat Falwell chose to go forward without the blessing of the city officials wasn’t surprising. He is perhaps Donald Trump’s most unapologetic ally in evangelical circles, and the president himself is eager for schools, businesses, and public establishments to reopen and get the country past its coronavirus-induced economic slump. But for some students at Liberty, the notion that they will now be coming back from various parts of the country to mix and mingle in one shared campus was less than appealing, and yet another sign that their college president was putting loyalty to Trump over other considerations. “It seems like [Falwell] wants everything to be open pretty quickly, following Trump. I saw this morning that [Trump] wants businesses to reopen,” said one Liberty senior, who asked to remain anonymous due to fears of retaliation by Liberty administrators. “Jerry literally follows anything that Trump says.”Falwell has consistently downplayed the severity of the coronavirus crisis, even suggesting that nationwide efforts to control its spread represent a plot to undermine the Trump presidency. Last week, however, he did move the school to online classes while keeping it open for students who wished to return to campus or who, in the cases of some international students, simply had nowhere else to go. Student: Jerry Falwell Jr. Axed Anti-Trump Story from Liberty University’s School NewspaperSvrcek said that she had implored Falwell to keep students away until the public health crisis abated. And, initially, it looked like the school would stay open but would encourage students not to return. “While students are currently allowed to return to live in the residence halls, we are encouraging you to consider staying home,” Liberty’s office of residential life wrote in a March 17 campus-wide email.But three days later, the office walked back that pronouncement. “The intent of encouraging students to consider remaining at home was to simply advise students to think carefully about their choice and discuss the matter with their parents,” the school wrote, according to the emails, which were obtained by The Daily Beast. “It was not an endorsement or recommendation of that particular course of action.”It’s that vagueness towards the threat posed by the coronavirus that has some students frustrated and concerned. “It’s the constant overemphasis of the effectiveness of the university’s mitigation measures and a constant downplaying of the dangers posed by this virus,” said Liberty senior Calum Best in an interview with The Daily Beast. “I don't envy [Falwell’s] decision, it’s a tough one to make and ultimately he’s going to be criticized no matter what he does. But he can work through that decision without being misleading.”Liberty’s plan currently is to reopen the school’s dormitories to incoming students, but classes and other campus gatherings will be held online or canceled altogether. Nonetheless, experts told The Daily Beast that clustering students in on-campus housing poses extreme and unnecessary risks and will almost surely lead to more cases of the virus among the student body.“If Liberty University reopens, people will die,” said Dr. Max Cooper, an emergency room doctor at Crozer-Chester Medical Center in Pennsylvania who served in the U.S. Navy and is now leading his area’s Emergency COVID-19 Task Force. “To say nothing of the many educators and university support staff whose age and mortality likely skews older and higher. It’s imperative that Liberty and other universities stay closed."Lawrence Gostin, who directs the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law at Georgetown University and the World Health Organization’s Collaborating Center on National and Global Health Law, called Liberty’s decision to reopen “utterly irresponsible.”Some faculty at Liberty, which just last year received a federal research grant from the National Institutes of Health, have gone further than to downplay the dangers of the virus. One professor even suggested that students disregard state government measures designed to limit the virus’ spread.“There is no evidence that quarantine works, just ask Italy or Spain right now about that,” Liberty University history professor Benjamin Esswein told his class on Tuesday morning, according to a copy of digital classroom chat logs obtained by The Daily Beast. The statement came in response to a student who said she wouldn’t be able to complete an assignment requiring her to visit a museum due to the mandated closure of non-essential businesses in both Virginia and her home state. “We’re not even supposed to leave our houses,” she said.Asked whether students could “visit” a virtual museum to satisfy the requirement, Esswein denied the request. “Be safe about it, but remaining active is the best way to fight off the virus, you should try to go to a park or other area that might have a free-standing exhibit,” Esswein told his class. “You should leave your house, it’s unhealthy to stay inside for the rest of the semester.”Esswein did not return a request for comment. But shown a copy of that exchange, Gostin scoffed. The “discussion just isn't fact-based,” he said. “Quarantines do work and for every student that is infected, he or she will infect two others, and so forth. The rise in cases could be exponential.”That’s to say nothing of the faculty and staff who could be exposed to the virus and then return to their off-campus homes, potentially exposing individuals who never even set foot on campus, noted Dr. Adrian Hyzler, the chief medical officer for Healix International, which provides medical information to organizations whose clients travel internationally. Hyzler called Falwell’s decision to reopen the school “nuts.”“We have seen how gatherings to people at conventions, prisons, religious meetings, and teaching facilities can be breeding grounds for transmission and this could well become another of those epicenters,” said Hyzler.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

    When Liberty University president Jerry Falwell Jr. announced on Monday that he was reopening the school’s residence halls to students amid the coronavirus pandemic, he implied that he had received the blessing of officials in Lynchburg, Virginia, to do so. “They thanked us for making that decision,” Falwell told the Liberty University News Service, describing a call to move classes online but also, in his words, to get his students “back as soon as we can—the ones who want to come back.”In fact, Lynchburg city manager Bonnie Svrcek says that while she did thank Falwell for moving to online classrooms, she was led to believe that the school was also abandoning plans to invite students back into residence halls following spring break. Neither she nor Lynchburg Mayor Treney Tweedy said they signed off on Falwell’s decision to re-open Liberty’s dorms. On Tuesday, Svrcek told The Daily Beast that Falwell was not “totally transparent” with her or Tweedy during an exchange on March 16 in which, according to Svrcek, Falwell told the two leaders that his school would “move to an online platform.”“He added that some food services would remain open for on-campus international students who have not gone home and some lab classes and the school of aviation will continue,” Svrcek told The Daily Beast. “The mayor and I thanked him for this shift that we believed meant that students would be told to not come back to campus with a few exceptions.”Jerry Falwell Jr. Suggests to ‘Fox & Friends’ That North Korea Created the CoronavirusThat Falwell chose to go forward without the blessing of the city officials wasn’t surprising. He is perhaps Donald Trump’s most unapologetic ally in evangelical circles, and the president himself is eager for schools, businesses, and public establishments to reopen and get the country past its coronavirus-induced economic slump. But for some students at Liberty, the notion that they will now be coming back from various parts of the country to mix and mingle in one shared campus was less than appealing, and yet another sign that their college president was putting loyalty to Trump over other considerations. “It seems like [Falwell] wants everything to be open pretty quickly, following Trump. I saw this morning that [Trump] wants businesses to reopen,” said one Liberty senior, who asked to remain anonymous due to fears of retaliation by Liberty administrators. “Jerry literally follows anything that Trump says.”Falwell has consistently downplayed the severity of the coronavirus crisis, even suggesting that nationwide efforts to control its spread represent a plot to undermine the Trump presidency. Last week, however, he did move the school to online classes while keeping it open for students who wished to return to campus or who, in the cases of some international students, simply had nowhere else to go. Student: Jerry Falwell Jr. Axed Anti-Trump Story from Liberty University’s School NewspaperSvrcek said that she had implored Falwell to keep students away until the public health crisis abated. And, initially, it looked like the school would stay open but would encourage students not to return. “While students are currently allowed to return to live in the residence halls, we are encouraging you to consider staying home,” Liberty’s office of residential life wrote in a March 17 campus-wide email.But three days later, the office walked back that pronouncement. “The intent of encouraging students to consider remaining at home was to simply advise students to think carefully about their choice and discuss the matter with their parents,” the school wrote, according to the emails, which were obtained by The Daily Beast. “It was not an endorsement or recommendation of that particular course of action.”It’s that vagueness towards the threat posed by the coronavirus that has some students frustrated and concerned. “It’s the constant overemphasis of the effectiveness of the university’s mitigation measures and a constant downplaying of the dangers posed by this virus,” said Liberty senior Calum Best in an interview with The Daily Beast. “I don't envy [Falwell’s] decision, it’s a tough one to make and ultimately he’s going to be criticized no matter what he does. But he can work through that decision without being misleading.”Liberty’s plan currently is to reopen the school’s dormitories to incoming students, but classes and other campus gatherings will be held online or canceled altogether. Nonetheless, experts told The Daily Beast that clustering students in on-campus housing poses extreme and unnecessary risks and will almost surely lead to more cases of the virus among the student body.“If Liberty University reopens, people will die,” said Dr. Max Cooper, an emergency room doctor at Crozer-Chester Medical Center in Pennsylvania who served in the U.S. Navy and is now leading his area’s Emergency COVID-19 Task Force. “To say nothing of the many educators and university support staff whose age and mortality likely skews older and higher. It’s imperative that Liberty and other universities stay closed."Lawrence Gostin, who directs the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law at Georgetown University and the World Health Organization’s Collaborating Center on National and Global Health Law, called Liberty’s decision to reopen “utterly irresponsible.”Some faculty at Liberty, which just last year received a federal research grant from the National Institutes of Health, have gone further than to downplay the dangers of the virus. One professor even suggested that students disregard state government measures designed to limit the virus’ spread.“There is no evidence that quarantine works, just ask Italy or Spain right now about that,” Liberty University history professor Benjamin Esswein told his class on Tuesday morning, according to a copy of digital classroom chat logs obtained by The Daily Beast. The statement came in response to a student who said she wouldn’t be able to complete an assignment requiring her to visit a museum due to the mandated closure of non-essential businesses in both Virginia and her home state. “We’re not even supposed to leave our houses,” she said.Asked whether students could “visit” a virtual museum to satisfy the requirement, Esswein denied the request. “Be safe about it, but remaining active is the best way to fight off the virus, you should try to go to a park or other area that might have a free-standing exhibit,” Esswein told his class. “You should leave your house, it’s unhealthy to stay inside for the rest of the semester.”Esswein did not return a request for comment. But shown a copy of that exchange, Gostin scoffed. The “discussion just isn't fact-based,” he said. “Quarantines do work and for every student that is infected, he or she will infect two others, and so forth. The rise in cases could be exponential.”That’s to say nothing of the faculty and staff who could be exposed to the virus and then return to their off-campus homes, potentially exposing individuals who never even set foot on campus, noted Dr. Adrian Hyzler, the chief medical officer for Healix International, which provides medical information to organizations whose clients travel internationally. Hyzler called Falwell’s decision to reopen the school “nuts.”“We have seen how gatherings to people at conventions, prisons, religious meetings, and teaching facilities can be breeding grounds for transmission and this could well become another of those epicenters,” said Hyzler.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


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  • 68/81   Virtual volunteers offer help to strangers amid virus stress
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Sitting cross-legged in her living room, Donna Borak rested her palm on her heart as she guided a small group of virtual participants in meditation and deep breathing.  From her Washington, D.C., home, Borak has been hosting a free virtual meditation class daily for anyone who wants “a respite during such a moment of uncertainty.”  As social distancing has emerged as a key tool to staunch the spread of the coronavirus, ordinary people around the globe have turned to technology to overcome physical barriers.

    Sitting cross-legged in her living room, Donna Borak rested her palm on her heart as she guided a small group of virtual participants in meditation and deep breathing. From her Washington, D.C., home, Borak has been hosting a free virtual meditation class daily for anyone who wants “a respite during such a moment of uncertainty.” As social distancing has emerged as a key tool to staunch the spread of the coronavirus, ordinary people around the globe have turned to technology to overcome physical barriers.


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  • 69/81   With isolation, abuse activists fear an 'explosive cocktail'
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    As the world's families hunker down, there's another danger, less obvious but just as insidious, that worries advocates and officials: a potential spike in domestic violence as victims spend day and night trapped at home with their abusers, with tensions rising, nowhere to escape, limited or no access to friends or relatives — and no idea when it will end.  “An abuser will use anything in their toolbox to exert their power and control, and COVID-19 is one of those tools,' said Crystal Justice, who oversees development at the National Domestic Violence Hotline, a 24/7 national hotline in the United States.  On a normal day, 1,800 to 2,000 people will call that national hotline.

    As the world's families hunker down, there's another danger, less obvious but just as insidious, that worries advocates and officials: a potential spike in domestic violence as victims spend day and night trapped at home with their abusers, with tensions rising, nowhere to escape, limited or no access to friends or relatives — and no idea when it will end. “An abuser will use anything in their toolbox to exert their power and control, and COVID-19 is one of those tools,' said Crystal Justice, who oversees development at the National Domestic Violence Hotline, a 24/7 national hotline in the United States. On a normal day, 1,800 to 2,000 people will call that national hotline.


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  • 70/81   Know the terms: A complete COVID-19 pandemic glossary
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Amid the constant flow of new findings, breaking news and widespread fear surrounding SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, a flurry of vocabulary words has turned some important briefings into a dash to the dictionary. The difference between the terms may sound benign, but the implications could be life-altering for millions.Terms such as lockdown and shelter-in-place incited fear after looking at the examples set by other countries such as China and Italy, after confusion temporarily surrounded the terminology of a pandemic earlier in the outbreak.Citizens have been urged to practice social distancing while others have been put in quarantine and others yet have been isolated. What's the difference?    A nurse puts on protective gear in the isolation area of Honved Hospital in Budapest, Hungary, Monday, March 16, 2020. All future inpatients and outpatients must go through a health screening, which consists of having their body temperature taken and filling in a medical questionnaire before they can enter the hospital to minimize the risk of transferring the novel coronavirus infection. (Zoltan Balogh/MTI via AP)    Further yet, knowing the meanings of values such as case fatality rate, mortality rate and attack rate can help you be better informed while knowing the difference between containment and mitigation can help you better understand policies.Knowing the meanings of the different words and using the correct terms is important for individuals to be best informed and communicate effectively in this age of misinformation. Here is your guide:    The WHO says an epidemic can simply be defined as an occurrence of health-related events in a specific region that exceeds the normal expectancy. Because of the different factors surrounding population, previous experience, exposure, time and location (among many other variables), the number of cases needed to qualify for an epidemic varies.Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director General of the WHO, spent numerous weeks in February and early March saying COVID-19 had 'pandemic potential' but stopping short of using the official term before officially making the assessment on March 11.A pandemic is recognized officially as a worldwide spread of a new disease. The recognition of COVID-19 as a pandemic was initially held up due to uncertainty surrounding the global scope of the virus's impact. A pandemic refers to how many parts of the world deal with the rate of a disease and doesn't say anything about the disease's seriousness.    Tedros Adhanom, Director General of the World Health Organization, left, meets with Chinese President Xi Jinping before a meeting at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2020. (Naohiko Hatta/Pool Photo via AP)    There have been many different utilities of the word lockdown, but during the current coronavirus pandemic, the standard set by countries like China, Italy and France shows a lockdown as a government-imposed ban on any movement inside the country and the closing of all non-essential businesses. This month, police squads in Rome have checked citizens' documents and imposed fines for individuals that did not have valid excuses, even those out on walks or seen taking pictures outside.Prior to COVID-19, the term 'Lockdown' was used to respond to a threat such as a shooting or bombing while 'Shelter-in-Place' was used for environmental concerns such as hurricanes or chemical spills. Those differences have been muddied with the coronavirus.California Gov. Gavin Newsom announced a shelter-in-place, or stay-at-home, order on March 19, mandating social distancing and enforcing home isolation. However, in media briefings, Newsom also said residents can still take walks and have restaurant meals delivered, urging people to use common sense. He also said he didn't expect police presence and law enforcement to be necessary and instead relied on social pressure to enforce the severity of the order.According to the WHO, the idea of flattening the curve is for collective action to be taken in order to slow the number of new cases. This is important in order to give people better access to proper care. Social distancing practices are intended to accomplish this and to slow transmission and spread the infections as thinly as possible over time so health systems can cope.    Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker listens to a question after announcing a shelter in place order to combat the spread of the Covid-19 virus, during a news conference Friday, March 20, 2020, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)    While it is generally up to individual states and municipalities to determine what qualifies as an essential vs. nonessential business, the Department of Homeland Security issued a guidance on workers who are essential to infrastructure. Those businesses include grocery markets, pharmacies, convenience stores, sanitation services, healthcare operations, daycare centers, gas stations, banks, post offices and transportation services, among others.Businesses that are recreational in nature are generally considered nonessential. These include theaters, gyms, museums, casinos, sports venues and others.CLICK HERE FOR THE FREE ACCUWEATHER APPTravel bans imposed by governments and businesses around the world have consistently touted the need to cut down on nonessential travel, whether it is by car or plane. The specifics of the definition can differ by organization. In order to keep faculty healthy, some universities like Colorado State have deemed essential travel to solely be travel that is required to preserve the safety or results of a research activity that cannot be postponed.    An MTA employee sanitizes surfaces at the Classon Ave. and Lafayette Ave. subway station with bleach solutions due to COVID-19 concerns, Friday, March 20, 2020, in the Brooklyn Borough in New York. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is ordering all workers in non-essential businesses to stay home and banning gatherings statewide. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)    People who are at risk of COVID-19 due to potential exposure are recommended by health experts to self-quarantine for at least 14 days in order to determine whether or not they will become ill and contagious. Self-quarantining involves staying at home at all times, not having visitors, staying at least 6 feet away from all people in your household and not sharing things like towels and utensils.Self-isolation is necessary for individuals who have been confirmed to have COVID-19. Isolation is a health care term that means keeping infected people away from the uninfected.Social distancing is deliberately increasing the physical space between people in order to avoid spreading illnesses. Also known as physically distancing, examples of social distancing practices include working from home, closing schools, canceling in-person meetings or hangouts and visiting others electronically rather than in person. In guidelines set by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), social distancing means maintaining a distance of about 6 feet from others.    People stand spaced apart while waiting outside a Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles location, Tuesday, March 24, 2020, in Boston. People observe social distancing out of concern about the spread of the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)    Case fatality rate (CFR), or the fatality ratio, is the proportion of people who died from a disease among the total infected population. It is different from mortality rate in that CFR only measures against the total infected number, where as mortality rate is the measure of deaths in a total population.The attack rate is a helpful measurement to determine the frequency of deaths and the speed of spread in a specific population. In the United States, this has been helpful to examine which states have observed the quickest spread. It is calculated by the number of people infected by the total number of people at risk (or the total population of that specific area).Containment is the effort by a community to determine who is infected and isolate them in order to contain the threat while keeping the healthy population separated.United States Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams said on March 8 that the country was shifting from a containment strategy to a mitigation focus. A mitigation effort means that the focus is no longer solely on getting rid of the virus, but more so on limiting its effect and severity."Now we're shifting into a mitigation phase, which means we're helping communities understand, 'You're going to see more cases. Unfortunately, you're going to see more deaths.' But that doesn't mean we should panic," Adams told CNN.Keep checking back on AccuWeather.com and stay tuned to the AccuWeather Network on DirecTV, Frontier and Verizon Fios.

    Amid the constant flow of new findings, breaking news and widespread fear surrounding SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, a flurry of vocabulary words has turned some important briefings into a dash to the dictionary. The difference between the terms may sound benign, but the implications could be life-altering for millions.Terms such as lockdown and shelter-in-place incited fear after looking at the examples set by other countries such as China and Italy, after confusion temporarily surrounded the terminology of a pandemic earlier in the outbreak.Citizens have been urged to practice social distancing while others have been put in quarantine and others yet have been isolated. What's the difference? A nurse puts on protective gear in the isolation area of Honved Hospital in Budapest, Hungary, Monday, March 16, 2020. All future inpatients and outpatients must go through a health screening, which consists of having their body temperature taken and filling in a medical questionnaire before they can enter the hospital to minimize the risk of transferring the novel coronavirus infection. (Zoltan Balogh/MTI via AP) Further yet, knowing the meanings of values such as case fatality rate, mortality rate and attack rate can help you be better informed while knowing the difference between containment and mitigation can help you better understand policies.Knowing the meanings of the different words and using the correct terms is important for individuals to be best informed and communicate effectively in this age of misinformation. Here is your guide: The WHO says an epidemic can simply be defined as an occurrence of health-related events in a specific region that exceeds the normal expectancy. Because of the different factors surrounding population, previous experience, exposure, time and location (among many other variables), the number of cases needed to qualify for an epidemic varies.Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director General of the WHO, spent numerous weeks in February and early March saying COVID-19 had 'pandemic potential' but stopping short of using the official term before officially making the assessment on March 11.A pandemic is recognized officially as a worldwide spread of a new disease. The recognition of COVID-19 as a pandemic was initially held up due to uncertainty surrounding the global scope of the virus's impact. A pandemic refers to how many parts of the world deal with the rate of a disease and doesn't say anything about the disease's seriousness. Tedros Adhanom, Director General of the World Health Organization, left, meets with Chinese President Xi Jinping before a meeting at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2020. (Naohiko Hatta/Pool Photo via AP) There have been many different utilities of the word lockdown, but during the current coronavirus pandemic, the standard set by countries like China, Italy and France shows a lockdown as a government-imposed ban on any movement inside the country and the closing of all non-essential businesses. This month, police squads in Rome have checked citizens' documents and imposed fines for individuals that did not have valid excuses, even those out on walks or seen taking pictures outside.Prior to COVID-19, the term 'Lockdown' was used to respond to a threat such as a shooting or bombing while 'Shelter-in-Place' was used for environmental concerns such as hurricanes or chemical spills. Those differences have been muddied with the coronavirus.California Gov. Gavin Newsom announced a shelter-in-place, or stay-at-home, order on March 19, mandating social distancing and enforcing home isolation. However, in media briefings, Newsom also said residents can still take walks and have restaurant meals delivered, urging people to use common sense. He also said he didn't expect police presence and law enforcement to be necessary and instead relied on social pressure to enforce the severity of the order.According to the WHO, the idea of flattening the curve is for collective action to be taken in order to slow the number of new cases. This is important in order to give people better access to proper care. Social distancing practices are intended to accomplish this and to slow transmission and spread the infections as thinly as possible over time so health systems can cope. Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker listens to a question after announcing a shelter in place order to combat the spread of the Covid-19 virus, during a news conference Friday, March 20, 2020, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast) While it is generally up to individual states and municipalities to determine what qualifies as an essential vs. nonessential business, the Department of Homeland Security issued a guidance on workers who are essential to infrastructure. Those businesses include grocery markets, pharmacies, convenience stores, sanitation services, healthcare operations, daycare centers, gas stations, banks, post offices and transportation services, among others.Businesses that are recreational in nature are generally considered nonessential. These include theaters, gyms, museums, casinos, sports venues and others.CLICK HERE FOR THE FREE ACCUWEATHER APPTravel bans imposed by governments and businesses around the world have consistently touted the need to cut down on nonessential travel, whether it is by car or plane. The specifics of the definition can differ by organization. In order to keep faculty healthy, some universities like Colorado State have deemed essential travel to solely be travel that is required to preserve the safety or results of a research activity that cannot be postponed. An MTA employee sanitizes surfaces at the Classon Ave. and Lafayette Ave. subway station with bleach solutions due to COVID-19 concerns, Friday, March 20, 2020, in the Brooklyn Borough in New York. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is ordering all workers in non-essential businesses to stay home and banning gatherings statewide. (AP Photo/John Minchillo) People who are at risk of COVID-19 due to potential exposure are recommended by health experts to self-quarantine for at least 14 days in order to determine whether or not they will become ill and contagious. Self-quarantining involves staying at home at all times, not having visitors, staying at least 6 feet away from all people in your household and not sharing things like towels and utensils.Self-isolation is necessary for individuals who have been confirmed to have COVID-19. Isolation is a health care term that means keeping infected people away from the uninfected.Social distancing is deliberately increasing the physical space between people in order to avoid spreading illnesses. Also known as physically distancing, examples of social distancing practices include working from home, closing schools, canceling in-person meetings or hangouts and visiting others electronically rather than in person. In guidelines set by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), social distancing means maintaining a distance of about 6 feet from others. People stand spaced apart while waiting outside a Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles location, Tuesday, March 24, 2020, in Boston. People observe social distancing out of concern about the spread of the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Steven Senne) Case fatality rate (CFR), or the fatality ratio, is the proportion of people who died from a disease among the total infected population. It is different from mortality rate in that CFR only measures against the total infected number, where as mortality rate is the measure of deaths in a total population.The attack rate is a helpful measurement to determine the frequency of deaths and the speed of spread in a specific population. In the United States, this has been helpful to examine which states have observed the quickest spread. It is calculated by the number of people infected by the total number of people at risk (or the total population of that specific area).Containment is the effort by a community to determine who is infected and isolate them in order to contain the threat while keeping the healthy population separated.United States Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams said on March 8 that the country was shifting from a containment strategy to a mitigation focus. A mitigation effort means that the focus is no longer solely on getting rid of the virus, but more so on limiting its effect and severity."Now we're shifting into a mitigation phase, which means we're helping communities understand, 'You're going to see more cases. Unfortunately, you're going to see more deaths.' But that doesn't mean we should panic," Adams told CNN.Keep checking back on AccuWeather.com and stay tuned to the AccuWeather Network on DirecTV, Frontier and Verizon Fios.


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  • 71/81   States differ on exempting worship from coronavirus closures
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    As multiple governors issue orders to curb large gatherings and implore residents to stay home in a bid to slow the spread of the coronavirus, at least a half-dozen states have exempted some level of religious activity.  The divergent treatment of faith in some states' pandemic-fighting orders comes as a few houses of worship across the nation continue to greet people in person, despite federal public health guidance to avoid gatherings larger than 10 people and decisions by most religious leaders to shift services online.  While the pandemic has heightened political tensions, the states including religious exceptions in their orders designed to combat the pandemic are led by governors in both parties.

    As multiple governors issue orders to curb large gatherings and implore residents to stay home in a bid to slow the spread of the coronavirus, at least a half-dozen states have exempted some level of religious activity. The divergent treatment of faith in some states' pandemic-fighting orders comes as a few houses of worship across the nation continue to greet people in person, despite federal public health guidance to avoid gatherings larger than 10 people and decisions by most religious leaders to shift services online. While the pandemic has heightened political tensions, the states including religious exceptions in their orders designed to combat the pandemic are led by governors in both parties.


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  • 72/81   Should prisoners be freed to stop outbreaks behind bars?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Health experts are concerned about the possibility of devastating coronavirus outbreaks inside America's jails and prisons. Are drastic steps needed to prevent the virus from wreaking havoc behind bars?

    Health experts are concerned about the possibility of devastating coronavirus outbreaks inside America's jails and prisons. Are drastic steps needed to prevent the virus from wreaking havoc behind bars?


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  • 73/81   Coronavirus strikes Navy carrier at sea, three sailors evacuated
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Three sailors aboard the carrier Theodore Roosevelt tested positive for coronavirus after coming down with symptoms of COVID-19 and have been evacuated from the ship.

    Three sailors aboard the carrier Theodore Roosevelt tested positive for coronavirus after coming down with symptoms of COVID-19 and have been evacuated from the ship.


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  • 74/81   Cuomo calls on Trump to invoke Defense Production Act in fight against coronavirus
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    President Trump has been reluctant to use the Cold War-era Defense Production Act, which allows the president to pressure or even force private industries to produce products deemed necessary for the nation’s defense.

    President Trump has been reluctant to use the Cold War-era Defense Production Act, which allows the president to pressure or even force private industries to produce products deemed necessary for the nation’s defense.


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  • 75/81   Growing impatient, Trump says he hopes to have 'the country opened up' by Easter amid coronavirus fears
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    The president told Fox News on Tuesday that he hopes to "have the country opened up and just raring to go by Easter," which falls this year on April 12.

    The president told Fox News on Tuesday that he hopes to "have the country opened up and just raring to go by Easter," which falls this year on April 12.


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  • 76/81   Rural counties face their own challenges in the coronavirus pandemic. Here's how one is coping.
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Although the scale of the coronavirus outbreak, at least so far, is much lower in rural counties than in some big cities, they face distinctive challenges in coping with an epidemic of a life-threatening disease.

    Although the scale of the coronavirus outbreak, at least so far, is much lower in rural counties than in some big cities, they face distinctive challenges in coping with an epidemic of a life-threatening disease.


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  • 77/81   Coronavirus: News and live updates
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    The latest news and information on the pandemic from Yahoo News reporters in the United States and around the world.

    The latest news and information on the pandemic from Yahoo News reporters in the United States and around the world.


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  • 78/81   Fox News' coronavirus denial means 'viewers will die,' media critic says
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    As the coronavirus threat intensified in the U.S., Fox News viewers received different information than Americans who got their news from other sources. Ben Smith, the media critic at the New York Times, set out to understand why. His conclusion: Fox anchors consistently downplayed and even denied the existence of the virus.

    As the coronavirus threat intensified in the U.S., Fox News viewers received different information than Americans who got their news from other sources. Ben Smith, the media critic at the New York Times, set out to understand why. His conclusion: Fox anchors consistently downplayed and even denied the existence of the virus.


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  • 79/81   Broadway community comes together to start sewing and delivering protective gear to New York City hospitals
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    A former "Hamilton" star joins forces with the larger Broadway community to make protective equipment for health care workers and patients.

    A former "Hamilton" star joins forces with the larger Broadway community to make protective equipment for health care workers and patients.


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  • 80/81   First responders under strain due to lack of protective equipment, coronavirus test
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    A lack of protective equipment combined with a lack of testing for the coronavirus is putting a huge strain on those first responders who are on the frontlines of helping pick up sick patients from their homes or off the street.

    A lack of protective equipment combined with a lack of testing for the coronavirus is putting a huge strain on those first responders who are on the frontlines of helping pick up sick patients from their homes or off the street.


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  • 81/81   ‘We’re all in this together’: American describes lockdown in Spain, one of the world’s coronavirus hot spots
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Native New Yorker Giselle Abinader thought she'd be spending weekends traveling around Europe while studying abroad in Barcelona for the year. But the coronavirus pandemic has upended her plans because she's now quarantined to her flat. In a video diary, she shares with Yahoo News her firsthand account of what it's like under lockdown in the country with the third most coronavirus fatalities.

    Native New Yorker Giselle Abinader thought she'd be spending weekends traveling around Europe while studying abroad in Barcelona for the year. But the coronavirus pandemic has upended her plans because she's now quarantined to her flat. In a video diary, she shares with Yahoo News her firsthand account of what it's like under lockdown in the country with the third most coronavirus fatalities.


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Voice Sythesis
The Microsoft SAPI 5 ActiveX object is needed.
In the security option of your browser, you must not disable the initialization of non signed ActiveX controls.
You can install and use any English voice compatible with SAPI 5.
(such as the speech component of Microsoft).
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No Voice Title Title and Description
Voice and Output



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