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News Slideshows (03/25/2020 15 hours)


  • 1/81   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


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    Press Review


    Prince Charles   RINO   Stuart Gordon   Karl-Anthony Towns   Trump to New York   Re-Animator   Hump Day   Prince William   Floyd Cardoz   Bindi Irwin   Fran Drescher   $2 Trillion   Bernie Kosar   Tabla   Home Cream   Ronnie Lott   Sean Taylor   Kenny Britt   the white house and senate   Listen to The Doctor   Mr. Mamas   Classical Gas   Road Navy   
  • 2/81   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


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  • 3/81   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


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  • 4/81   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


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  • 5/81   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


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  • 6/81   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


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  • 7/81   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


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  • 8/81   Do star athletes make too much money?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    With athletes in America's biggest sports leagues raking in salaries worth $300 million and more, is it time to reign in the big spending or do superstars deserve the big bucks they make?

    With athletes in America's biggest sports leagues raking in salaries worth $300 million and more, is it time to reign in the big spending or do superstars deserve the big bucks they make?


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  • 9/81   Live animal mascots: Cute or exploitative?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?


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  • 10/81   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


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  • 11/81   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


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  • 12/81   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


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  • 13/81   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


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  • 14/81   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


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  • 15/81   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


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  • 16/81   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


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  • 17/81   PHOTOS: Fluorescent turtle embryo wins forty-fifth annual Nikon Small World Competition

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.


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  • 18/81   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


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  • 19/81   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


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  • 20/81   What the CIA thinks of your anti-virus program

    PARIS (AP) — Peppering the 8,000 pages of purported Central Intelligence Agency hacking data released Tuesday by WikiLeaks are reviews of some of the world's most popular anti-virus products.

    PARIS (AP) — Peppering the 8,000 pages of purported Central Intelligence Agency hacking data released Tuesday by WikiLeaks are reviews of some of the world's most popular anti-virus products.


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  • 21/81   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


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  • 22/81   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


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  • 23/81   China suspends Bristol-Myers' cancer drug over findings at U.S. plant
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The suspension by China National Medical Products Administration is based on inspection findings at Bristol-Myers' contract manufacturing facility in the United States, partner Beigene Ltd said.  Beigene and Bristol-Myers were working to restore supply as soon as possible, said the China-based drugmaker, which signed an agreement with Bristol-Myers' Celgene unit in 2017 to market and distribute Abraxane.

    The suspension by China National Medical Products Administration is based on inspection findings at Bristol-Myers' contract manufacturing facility in the United States, partner Beigene Ltd said. Beigene and Bristol-Myers were working to restore supply as soon as possible, said the China-based drugmaker, which signed an agreement with Bristol-Myers' Celgene unit in 2017 to market and distribute Abraxane.


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  • 24/81   Afghanistan conflict: Militants in deadly attack on Sikh temple in Kabul
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    At least 25 people are killed in an attack on a packed gurdwara by Islamic State militants.

    At least 25 people are killed in an attack on a packed gurdwara by Islamic State militants.


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  • 25/81   Spanish Deaths Surge; Prince Charles Is Infected: Virus Update
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Spain had its deadliest day yet, and Germany’s public health authority warned that the nation is just starting its fight against the coronavirus. In Britain, the government moved to shut Parliament and Prince Charles, heir to the throne, tested positive.U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration reached a deal on a package to combat the fallout, while European Union leaders inched toward a rescue package and Germany closed in on a historic bailout.In Brazil, President Jair Bolsonaro, echoing Trump, urged the country to resume normal life to protect the economy. India locked down 1.3 billion people, the most far-reaching measure undertaken by any government.Key Developments:Cases top 435,000; 19,625 dead, 111,822 recovered: Johns HopkinsTrump will stop using the term ‘Chinese virus,’ easing blame gameTokyo asks people to stay inside as new cases spur lockdown riskIndia locked down, U.K. shuts Parliament; Iran, Singapore tighten curbsFired Americans send state unemployment websites crashingWorld leaders get sweeping powers they may never give upThe humming of Chinese plants returns as rest of world reelsSubscribe to a daily update on the virus from Bloomberg’s Prognosis team here.Click VRUS on the terminal for news and data on the coronavirus and here for maps and charts. For analysis of the impact from Bloomberg Economics, click here. To see the impact on oil and commodities demand, click here.Putin Delays Vote on Plan to Stay in Power (9:50 a.m. NY)President Vladimir Putin postponed a public vote on constitutional changes next month that would allow him to rule to 2036 as Russia attempts to stem the spread of the coronavirus.Putin, who has promised Russians final say on amendments to the constitution he has rushed through, said the vote planned for April 22 would be rescheduled at a later date.Saying Russia couldn’t cut itself off from the pandemic, he said that people wouldn’t work next week, though workers would still get paid. He announced the delay during a hastily arranged national address Wednesday.Though its totals remain well below those in some big European countries, Russia reported that coronavirus cases jumped by a third over the past day to 658.Ackman Puts Part of His Fortune in Covid-19 Testing (9:04 a.m. NY)Billionaire Bill Ackman said he invested a portion of his personal wealth to help manufacture antibody testing kits produced by Covaxx, a newly formed subsidiary of closely-held United Biomedical Inc.Ackman has repeatedly called for a complete shutdown of the U.S. for 30 days to help combat the spread of the virus. He has also called for antibody testing, like the one Covaxx develops, across the country to determine who has already contracted the virus.Bullard Says 2Q Will See Most Pandemic Disruption (8:52 a.m. NY)St. Louis Fed President James Bullard told CNBC the second quarter is likely to see the most disruption from the coronavirus outbreak, but the economy should bounce back by year’s end. “If we can get this to work right, everything will snap back to normal once this is over,” he said.Bullard tempered earlier remarks predicting that the U.S. unemployment rate may hit 30% in the second quarter. “This number will be unparalleled, but don’t get discouraged.”Switzerland Expands Entry Curbs (8:47 a.m. NY)Switzerland on Wednesday stepped up the curbs on incoming travel to include all countries within the Schengen area. It previously had limited arrivals from Spain, Italy, Germany, France and Austria.The Schengen area is a passport-free travel zone among 26 European nations.Portugal Confirmed Coronavirus Cases Rise (8:35 a.m. NY)The number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Portugal increased 27% to 2,995 on Wednesday from 2,362. That compares with a daily increase of 15% reported on Tuesday and a 29% gain on Monday.The total number of deaths increased to 43 on Wednesday from 33 reported through Tuesday morning; 22 patients have now recovered, unchanged from Tuesday. Almost 80% of coronavirus-related deaths in Portugal so far are of people aged 70 or older.Schumer Expects Senate to Pass Stimulus Deal Today (8:34 a.m. NY)Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer calls the stimulus deal the “art of compromise” and says help is on the way for American workers, state and local governments and small businesses. He told CNN he expects the Senate to pass the bill today.U.K. Support for Self-Employed Coming Soon (8:29 a.m. NY)U.K. Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak will announce measures to support self-employed workers “in the next couple of days,” Prime Minister Boris Johnson said. “There are particular complexities about the self-employed which do need to be addressed; they are not all in the same position,” Johnson said.One in 20 Britons has lost a job because of the outbreak and 9% experienced a reduction in hours or pay, according to YouGov. The survey was taken on the first two days of the U.K.’s official lockdown, with the government banning all unnecessary movement of people for at least three weeks and requiring the closure of non-essential businesses. There have been about 477,000 new claims for state support payments, according to the Department for Work and Pensions.EU Leaders Call for Corona Bonds (8:26 a.m. NY)Nine EU leaders, including Emmanuel Macron and Giuseppe Conte, urged the introduction of so-called coronabonds in a letter cited by AFP on Wednesday.India Delays Plans for Population Register (7:50 a.m. NY)The government has indefinitely postponed plans to begin surveys leading to its next census and a comprehensive population register. The process was to have begun in April and was seen as a precursor to a national citizens register that, along with a new citizenship law, had led to angry protests across India since December.India is likely to agree on an economic stimulus package of more than 1.5 trillion rupees (about $20 billion), Reuters reported, citing two unidentified people familiar with the plans.Italian Opposition Pushes Takeover Protection for Weakened Banks (7:50 a.m. NY)Italy must toughen the rules shielding strategic sectors from hostile takeovers because the coronavirus has left banks, insurance companies and pharmaceutical firms vulnerable to foreign predators, according to a senior opposition lawmaker.Senator Adolfo Urso, vice-president of the parliament’s security and intelligence committee, said in an interview Wednesday that he will file amendments to the government’s decree on a 25 billion-euro ($27 billion) stimulus package for the economy by Friday afternoon.Stock Rebound Fades (7:45 a.m. NY)European equities swung between gains and losses in a volatile session as optimism about a U.S. stimulus package dimmed amid renewed worries over the economic blow from the coronavirus outbreak. The Stoxx Europe 600 Index was up 0.6% after having earlier risen as much as 4.8%. U.S. stock futures declined and Treasuries gained.Amazon, Walmart Struggle to Cope as India Enters Lockdown (7:45 a.m. NY)The country’s 1.3 billion people are in a three-week lockdown, sending many to scour the web for food and daily essentials. But unlike in China, where online fresh grocery services offered a lifeline during its Covid-19 outbreak, Indian authorities are stopping food trucks on highways, and shutting down warehouses and rice mills. They’re also preventing delivery and supply-chain workers from doing their jobs.Europe Working to Unleash Bailout Fund to Aid States (7:44 a.m. NY)EU leaders are expected to endorse a proposal to set up credit lines with the euro area’s bailout fund worth as much as 2% of each country’s output to help them deal with the outbreak. Leaders “will welcome progress made by the Eurogroup to set up a Pandemic Crisis Support instrument, within the provisions of the ESM Treaty,” according to a draft of a joint statement seen by Bloomberg. The statement is subject to changes.Stockpiling Gives U.K. Grocers a Bumper Month (7:23 a.m. NY)An index of grocery sales surged to the highest since 2009, and specialist food and drink stores also posted a strong increase. But retailers’ expectations overall plummeted to the lowest for 11 years, as consumers postponed discretionary purchases in the face of uncertainty about their jobs and health. Clothing and furniture are being especially hard hit, while car sales fell for the first time since November. Even online sales growth, which has boomed in recent years, slowed to below average.Credit Suisse Suspends Buyback (7:10 a.m. NY)Credit Suisse Group AG froze its plan to buy back as much as 1.5 billion francs ($1.53 billion) of shares this year. Shareholder and executive compensation has come under scrutiny as governments plan to spend an unprecedented amount of public money to help companies weather the economic disruption caused by the virus.Europe’s top banking lobby is trying to find common ground among lenders in the region on whether to scrap dividends to conserve capital as the coronavirus batters the economy.U.K. Health System Can Withstand Pressure, Researcher Says (7 a.m. NY)Stringent quarantine and social distancing measures the U.K. has taken to suppress the coronavirus should help keep the country’s intensive-care capacity from being overwhelmed, according to Neil Ferguson, an Imperial College London researcher who makes mathematical projections of viral outbreaks. Pressure on ICUs should peak in about two to three weeks, and some hospitals and units will be more strained than others, he told a parliamentary committee on science and technology Wednesday.U.S. Mortgage Applications Plunge (7 a.m. NY)U.S. loan applications for buying and refinancing homes plunged last week by the most since the global financial crisis, amid coronavirus shutdowns and related financial turmoil that pushed borrowing costs higher.Putin Plans Statement to Nation As Cases Soar (6:45 a.m. NY)Russian President Vladimir Putin is preparing a statement to the nation at around 3 p.m. local time. Putin canceled a planned trip to St. Petersburg on Wednesday and officials are discussing possible changes to an April 22 referendum vote and May 9 military parade. Earlier, Russia reported a 33% jump in coronavirus cases in a day to 658.Saudi Arabia Locks Down in Riyadh, Two Holy Cities (6:41 a.m. NY)Saudi Arabia locked down its capital Riyadh and Islamic holy cities of Mecca and Medina. People in the three cities will be prohibited entry or exit, while curfew times there will be extended by four hours, the Saudi Press Agency reported. The country also imposed further travel restrictions on 13 regions.Deaths Surge in Spain (6:40 a.m. NY)Spain reported its deadliest day yet with 738 fatalities, taking the total death toll to 3,434. Total cases rose to 47,610 from 39,673. Spain has been rocked by the second-worst outbreak in Europe after Italy, which had its second-deadliest day Tuesday. That dashed hopes the toll of Italian fatalities is declining. Hospitals there are overflowing and the government is struggling to bring the crisis under control.Still, the latest Italian data showed active cases rose the least in nearly a week -- a possible early indication that severe restrictions on movement are slowing the spread of the disease. Confirmed cases in the country now total 69,176.Virus Hits U.K. State With Charles Sick and Parliament to Shut (6:40 a.m. NY)The coronavirus crisis hit the highest levels of the British state with the heir to the throne, Prince Charles, testing positive for the disease as the government moved to shut down parliament for four weeks. The U.K. outbreak is most advanced in London and several politicians have fallen ill, including a health minister.Parliament had been scheduled to break for Easter on March 31, but the House of Commons will close on Wednesday if -- as expected -- lawmakers vote for the move, British officials said. The Commons would reopen on April 21.Target Ditches Guidance, Halts Buybacks (6:30 a.m. NY)Target Corp. dumped the full-year sales and profit forecast it gave just three weeks ago even as sales in March have soared, underscoring the difficulty retailers face in navigating the unfolding crisis.Citing an “unusually wide range of potential outcomes” for its first-quarter performance and $300 million in additional costs as it scurries to keep shelves stocked, the retailer withdrew its sales, operating profit and earnings-per-share guidance for the first quarter and the full year. It suspended share buybacks and will reduce the number of stores it remodels and opens this year, while giving no update on when testing for Covid-19 will begin in its parking lots.Death Toll Surges in Belgium (6:15 a.m. NY)Deaths in Belgium jumped by almost 46% from the prior day to 178, though experts have warned the processing of these numbers can sometimes take a few days. Total cases rose by less than 16% from the prior day to 4,937. Belgian hospitals were treating a total of 2,152 people, more than 470 of them in ICU units.World Ventilator Demand Now 10-Fold What’s Available (6:10 a.m. NY)The growing number of patients critically sick with the coronavirus is fueling demand for ventilators to at least 10 times of what’s available at hospitals around the world, said China’s top medical device maker. Shenzhen Mindray Bio-Medical Electronics Co., along with other Chinese ventilator makers, has seen overseas orders surge as countries scramble for more of the machines used in intensive care units.Iran Tightens Curbs as Cases Rise (6 a.m. NY)President Hassan Rouhani said the country could face a new wave of infections and the government announced tighter social distancing measures on Wednesday, including a ban on non-essential travel between cities and plans to shutter parks and public gathering spaces.Fatalities in Iran reached 2,077 after 143 people died from the virus in the last 24 hours. With more than 2,200 new confirmed cases since Tuesday, total infections surged to 27,017.Germany Sees Beginning of Epidemic (5:33 p.m HK)Germany is just starting its fight against the new coronavirus, the country’s public health authority said. “I want to emphasize, as I have been doing for a long time, that we are at the beginning of the epidemic,” Lothar Wieler, president of the Robert Koch Institute, said at a press briefing on Wednesday. “Naturally the number of deaths will also rise in Germany.”Some 32,705 patients have been confirmed with the virus in Germany, up from 28,942 yesterday, according to data from regional health authorities compiled by Bloomberg. So far 154 have died, compared with 118 yesterday.Germany Closes In on Historic Bailout (4:45 p.m. HK)Finance Minister Olaf Scholz urged lawmakers to open up debt limits. New borrowing of 156 billion euros ($169 billion), equivalent to half of Germany’s normal annual spending, will be used to fund social benefits and direct aid to virus-hit companies. “There is no blueprint for countering such a crisis,” Scholz said.Germany’s ruling coalition cast aside infighting to push for emergency powers, abandoning its long-standing balanced-budget policy. Lawmakers will vote on the legislation later on Wednesday. Backed by broad political support, the government plans to unleash a barrage of debt-financed measures totaling more than 750 billion euros. Business confidence in the country collapsed the most in three decades after restrictions to slow the spread of the coronavirus forced mass closures of companies and stores across Europe’s largest economy.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Spain had its deadliest day yet, and Germany’s public health authority warned that the nation is just starting its fight against the coronavirus. In Britain, the government moved to shut Parliament and Prince Charles, heir to the throne, tested positive.U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration reached a deal on a package to combat the fallout, while European Union leaders inched toward a rescue package and Germany closed in on a historic bailout.In Brazil, President Jair Bolsonaro, echoing Trump, urged the country to resume normal life to protect the economy. India locked down 1.3 billion people, the most far-reaching measure undertaken by any government.Key Developments:Cases top 435,000; 19,625 dead, 111,822 recovered: Johns HopkinsTrump will stop using the term ‘Chinese virus,’ easing blame gameTokyo asks people to stay inside as new cases spur lockdown riskIndia locked down, U.K. shuts Parliament; Iran, Singapore tighten curbsFired Americans send state unemployment websites crashingWorld leaders get sweeping powers they may never give upThe humming of Chinese plants returns as rest of world reelsSubscribe to a daily update on the virus from Bloomberg’s Prognosis team here.Click VRUS on the terminal for news and data on the coronavirus and here for maps and charts. For analysis of the impact from Bloomberg Economics, click here. To see the impact on oil and commodities demand, click here.Putin Delays Vote on Plan to Stay in Power (9:50 a.m. NY)President Vladimir Putin postponed a public vote on constitutional changes next month that would allow him to rule to 2036 as Russia attempts to stem the spread of the coronavirus.Putin, who has promised Russians final say on amendments to the constitution he has rushed through, said the vote planned for April 22 would be rescheduled at a later date.Saying Russia couldn’t cut itself off from the pandemic, he said that people wouldn’t work next week, though workers would still get paid. He announced the delay during a hastily arranged national address Wednesday.Though its totals remain well below those in some big European countries, Russia reported that coronavirus cases jumped by a third over the past day to 658.Ackman Puts Part of His Fortune in Covid-19 Testing (9:04 a.m. NY)Billionaire Bill Ackman said he invested a portion of his personal wealth to help manufacture antibody testing kits produced by Covaxx, a newly formed subsidiary of closely-held United Biomedical Inc.Ackman has repeatedly called for a complete shutdown of the U.S. for 30 days to help combat the spread of the virus. He has also called for antibody testing, like the one Covaxx develops, across the country to determine who has already contracted the virus.Bullard Says 2Q Will See Most Pandemic Disruption (8:52 a.m. NY)St. Louis Fed President James Bullard told CNBC the second quarter is likely to see the most disruption from the coronavirus outbreak, but the economy should bounce back by year’s end. “If we can get this to work right, everything will snap back to normal once this is over,” he said.Bullard tempered earlier remarks predicting that the U.S. unemployment rate may hit 30% in the second quarter. “This number will be unparalleled, but don’t get discouraged.”Switzerland Expands Entry Curbs (8:47 a.m. NY)Switzerland on Wednesday stepped up the curbs on incoming travel to include all countries within the Schengen area. It previously had limited arrivals from Spain, Italy, Germany, France and Austria.The Schengen area is a passport-free travel zone among 26 European nations.Portugal Confirmed Coronavirus Cases Rise (8:35 a.m. NY)The number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Portugal increased 27% to 2,995 on Wednesday from 2,362. That compares with a daily increase of 15% reported on Tuesday and a 29% gain on Monday.The total number of deaths increased to 43 on Wednesday from 33 reported through Tuesday morning; 22 patients have now recovered, unchanged from Tuesday. Almost 80% of coronavirus-related deaths in Portugal so far are of people aged 70 or older.Schumer Expects Senate to Pass Stimulus Deal Today (8:34 a.m. NY)Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer calls the stimulus deal the “art of compromise” and says help is on the way for American workers, state and local governments and small businesses. He told CNN he expects the Senate to pass the bill today.U.K. Support for Self-Employed Coming Soon (8:29 a.m. NY)U.K. Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak will announce measures to support self-employed workers “in the next couple of days,” Prime Minister Boris Johnson said. “There are particular complexities about the self-employed which do need to be addressed; they are not all in the same position,” Johnson said.One in 20 Britons has lost a job because of the outbreak and 9% experienced a reduction in hours or pay, according to YouGov. The survey was taken on the first two days of the U.K.’s official lockdown, with the government banning all unnecessary movement of people for at least three weeks and requiring the closure of non-essential businesses. There have been about 477,000 new claims for state support payments, according to the Department for Work and Pensions.EU Leaders Call for Corona Bonds (8:26 a.m. NY)Nine EU leaders, including Emmanuel Macron and Giuseppe Conte, urged the introduction of so-called coronabonds in a letter cited by AFP on Wednesday.India Delays Plans for Population Register (7:50 a.m. NY)The government has indefinitely postponed plans to begin surveys leading to its next census and a comprehensive population register. The process was to have begun in April and was seen as a precursor to a national citizens register that, along with a new citizenship law, had led to angry protests across India since December.India is likely to agree on an economic stimulus package of more than 1.5 trillion rupees (about $20 billion), Reuters reported, citing two unidentified people familiar with the plans.Italian Opposition Pushes Takeover Protection for Weakened Banks (7:50 a.m. NY)Italy must toughen the rules shielding strategic sectors from hostile takeovers because the coronavirus has left banks, insurance companies and pharmaceutical firms vulnerable to foreign predators, according to a senior opposition lawmaker.Senator Adolfo Urso, vice-president of the parliament’s security and intelligence committee, said in an interview Wednesday that he will file amendments to the government’s decree on a 25 billion-euro ($27 billion) stimulus package for the economy by Friday afternoon.Stock Rebound Fades (7:45 a.m. NY)European equities swung between gains and losses in a volatile session as optimism about a U.S. stimulus package dimmed amid renewed worries over the economic blow from the coronavirus outbreak. The Stoxx Europe 600 Index was up 0.6% after having earlier risen as much as 4.8%. U.S. stock futures declined and Treasuries gained.Amazon, Walmart Struggle to Cope as India Enters Lockdown (7:45 a.m. NY)The country’s 1.3 billion people are in a three-week lockdown, sending many to scour the web for food and daily essentials. But unlike in China, where online fresh grocery services offered a lifeline during its Covid-19 outbreak, Indian authorities are stopping food trucks on highways, and shutting down warehouses and rice mills. They’re also preventing delivery and supply-chain workers from doing their jobs.Europe Working to Unleash Bailout Fund to Aid States (7:44 a.m. NY)EU leaders are expected to endorse a proposal to set up credit lines with the euro area’s bailout fund worth as much as 2% of each country’s output to help them deal with the outbreak. Leaders “will welcome progress made by the Eurogroup to set up a Pandemic Crisis Support instrument, within the provisions of the ESM Treaty,” according to a draft of a joint statement seen by Bloomberg. The statement is subject to changes.Stockpiling Gives U.K. Grocers a Bumper Month (7:23 a.m. NY)An index of grocery sales surged to the highest since 2009, and specialist food and drink stores also posted a strong increase. But retailers’ expectations overall plummeted to the lowest for 11 years, as consumers postponed discretionary purchases in the face of uncertainty about their jobs and health. Clothing and furniture are being especially hard hit, while car sales fell for the first time since November. Even online sales growth, which has boomed in recent years, slowed to below average.Credit Suisse Suspends Buyback (7:10 a.m. NY)Credit Suisse Group AG froze its plan to buy back as much as 1.5 billion francs ($1.53 billion) of shares this year. Shareholder and executive compensation has come under scrutiny as governments plan to spend an unprecedented amount of public money to help companies weather the economic disruption caused by the virus.Europe’s top banking lobby is trying to find common ground among lenders in the region on whether to scrap dividends to conserve capital as the coronavirus batters the economy.U.K. Health System Can Withstand Pressure, Researcher Says (7 a.m. NY)Stringent quarantine and social distancing measures the U.K. has taken to suppress the coronavirus should help keep the country’s intensive-care capacity from being overwhelmed, according to Neil Ferguson, an Imperial College London researcher who makes mathematical projections of viral outbreaks. Pressure on ICUs should peak in about two to three weeks, and some hospitals and units will be more strained than others, he told a parliamentary committee on science and technology Wednesday.U.S. Mortgage Applications Plunge (7 a.m. NY)U.S. loan applications for buying and refinancing homes plunged last week by the most since the global financial crisis, amid coronavirus shutdowns and related financial turmoil that pushed borrowing costs higher.Putin Plans Statement to Nation As Cases Soar (6:45 a.m. NY)Russian President Vladimir Putin is preparing a statement to the nation at around 3 p.m. local time. Putin canceled a planned trip to St. Petersburg on Wednesday and officials are discussing possible changes to an April 22 referendum vote and May 9 military parade. Earlier, Russia reported a 33% jump in coronavirus cases in a day to 658.Saudi Arabia Locks Down in Riyadh, Two Holy Cities (6:41 a.m. NY)Saudi Arabia locked down its capital Riyadh and Islamic holy cities of Mecca and Medina. People in the three cities will be prohibited entry or exit, while curfew times there will be extended by four hours, the Saudi Press Agency reported. The country also imposed further travel restrictions on 13 regions.Deaths Surge in Spain (6:40 a.m. NY)Spain reported its deadliest day yet with 738 fatalities, taking the total death toll to 3,434. Total cases rose to 47,610 from 39,673. Spain has been rocked by the second-worst outbreak in Europe after Italy, which had its second-deadliest day Tuesday. That dashed hopes the toll of Italian fatalities is declining. Hospitals there are overflowing and the government is struggling to bring the crisis under control.Still, the latest Italian data showed active cases rose the least in nearly a week -- a possible early indication that severe restrictions on movement are slowing the spread of the disease. Confirmed cases in the country now total 69,176.Virus Hits U.K. State With Charles Sick and Parliament to Shut (6:40 a.m. NY)The coronavirus crisis hit the highest levels of the British state with the heir to the throne, Prince Charles, testing positive for the disease as the government moved to shut down parliament for four weeks. The U.K. outbreak is most advanced in London and several politicians have fallen ill, including a health minister.Parliament had been scheduled to break for Easter on March 31, but the House of Commons will close on Wednesday if -- as expected -- lawmakers vote for the move, British officials said. The Commons would reopen on April 21.Target Ditches Guidance, Halts Buybacks (6:30 a.m. NY)Target Corp. dumped the full-year sales and profit forecast it gave just three weeks ago even as sales in March have soared, underscoring the difficulty retailers face in navigating the unfolding crisis.Citing an “unusually wide range of potential outcomes” for its first-quarter performance and $300 million in additional costs as it scurries to keep shelves stocked, the retailer withdrew its sales, operating profit and earnings-per-share guidance for the first quarter and the full year. It suspended share buybacks and will reduce the number of stores it remodels and opens this year, while giving no update on when testing for Covid-19 will begin in its parking lots.Death Toll Surges in Belgium (6:15 a.m. NY)Deaths in Belgium jumped by almost 46% from the prior day to 178, though experts have warned the processing of these numbers can sometimes take a few days. Total cases rose by less than 16% from the prior day to 4,937. Belgian hospitals were treating a total of 2,152 people, more than 470 of them in ICU units.World Ventilator Demand Now 10-Fold What’s Available (6:10 a.m. NY)The growing number of patients critically sick with the coronavirus is fueling demand for ventilators to at least 10 times of what’s available at hospitals around the world, said China’s top medical device maker. Shenzhen Mindray Bio-Medical Electronics Co., along with other Chinese ventilator makers, has seen overseas orders surge as countries scramble for more of the machines used in intensive care units.Iran Tightens Curbs as Cases Rise (6 a.m. NY)President Hassan Rouhani said the country could face a new wave of infections and the government announced tighter social distancing measures on Wednesday, including a ban on non-essential travel between cities and plans to shutter parks and public gathering spaces.Fatalities in Iran reached 2,077 after 143 people died from the virus in the last 24 hours. With more than 2,200 new confirmed cases since Tuesday, total infections surged to 27,017.Germany Sees Beginning of Epidemic (5:33 p.m HK)Germany is just starting its fight against the new coronavirus, the country’s public health authority said. “I want to emphasize, as I have been doing for a long time, that we are at the beginning of the epidemic,” Lothar Wieler, president of the Robert Koch Institute, said at a press briefing on Wednesday. “Naturally the number of deaths will also rise in Germany.”Some 32,705 patients have been confirmed with the virus in Germany, up from 28,942 yesterday, according to data from regional health authorities compiled by Bloomberg. So far 154 have died, compared with 118 yesterday.Germany Closes In on Historic Bailout (4:45 p.m. HK)Finance Minister Olaf Scholz urged lawmakers to open up debt limits. New borrowing of 156 billion euros ($169 billion), equivalent to half of Germany’s normal annual spending, will be used to fund social benefits and direct aid to virus-hit companies. “There is no blueprint for countering such a crisis,” Scholz said.Germany’s ruling coalition cast aside infighting to push for emergency powers, abandoning its long-standing balanced-budget policy. Lawmakers will vote on the legislation later on Wednesday. Backed by broad political support, the government plans to unleash a barrage of debt-financed measures totaling more than 750 billion euros. Business confidence in the country collapsed the most in three decades after restrictions to slow the spread of the coronavirus forced mass closures of companies and stores across Europe’s largest economy.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 26/81   'An unprecedented situation': Coronavirus clamps down on statehouses as legislatures scramble to adapt
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Thousands of pieces of legislation will have to wait. But the biggest challenge could be balancing state budgets amid a national recession.

    Thousands of pieces of legislation will have to wait. But the biggest challenge could be balancing state budgets amid a national recession.


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  • 27/81   Preventing coronavirus spread: Walmart, Kroger, Albertsons among grocers adding sneeze guards
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Walmart and the nation's largest grocery store chains, Kroger and Albertsons, announced they are installing "sneeze guards" to stores nationwide.

    Walmart and the nation's largest grocery store chains, Kroger and Albertsons, announced they are installing "sneeze guards" to stores nationwide.


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  • 28/81   Factbox: What's in the $2 trillion U.S. Senate coronavirus rescue package
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    U.S. senators will vote on Wednesday on a $2 trillion bipartisan package of legislation to alleviate the devastating economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic, hoping it will become law quickly so they can get out of Washington.  - About $500 billion in direct payments to people, in two waves of checks of up to $1,200 each.  Additional payments for families with children could push the total to $3,000 for a family of four, according to Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, who has played a key role in the negotiations.

    U.S. senators will vote on Wednesday on a $2 trillion bipartisan package of legislation to alleviate the devastating economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic, hoping it will become law quickly so they can get out of Washington. - About $500 billion in direct payments to people, in two waves of checks of up to $1,200 each. Additional payments for families with children could push the total to $3,000 for a family of four, according to Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, who has played a key role in the negotiations.


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  • 29/81   Indian coronavirus: Why lock down 1.3bn people?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    India's intensely crowded public and private spaces make it very vulnerable to the spread of coronavirus.

    India's intensely crowded public and private spaces make it very vulnerable to the spread of coronavirus.


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  • 30/81   Tanner Foust jumps and drifts his VW race cars in 'Quantum Drift 2'
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Tanner Foust is back with a follow-up to his stunt-driving video 'Quantum Drift.' It has been four years since that first video, but the basic idea is the same: It's a spoof of the Scott Bakula show 'Quantum Leap,' but instead of jumping from person to person to save lives, Foust jumps from person to person to drive different vehicles.  Some of those are his own VW race cars.  The exciting parts are when Foust is actually doing his own driving in his cars.

    Tanner Foust is back with a follow-up to his stunt-driving video 'Quantum Drift.' It has been four years since that first video, but the basic idea is the same: It's a spoof of the Scott Bakula show 'Quantum Leap,' but instead of jumping from person to person to save lives, Foust jumps from person to person to drive different vehicles. Some of those are his own VW race cars. The exciting parts are when Foust is actually doing his own driving in his cars.


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  • 31/81   Harborside Inc. Addresses COVID-19 and Provides Business Update
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Harborside Inc. ("Harborside" or the "Company") (CSE: HBOR), a California-focused, vertically integrated cannabis enterprise, today provided a business update in response to the impact of the outbreak of COVID-19.

    Harborside Inc. ("Harborside" or the "Company") (CSE: HBOR), a California-focused, vertically integrated cannabis enterprise, today provided a business update in response to the impact of the outbreak of COVID-19.


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  • 32/81   U.S. Stocks Build on Gains After Stimulus Deal: Markets Wrap
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- U.S. stocks looked headed for their first back-to-back gain since the coronavirus crisis began as investors awaited details on the unprecedented government spending packages aimed at countering the hit from the pandemic. Treasuries adavnced.The S&P 500 rose at the open, following Tuesday’s 9.4% surge in anticipation of the deal between the White House and Congress. After overnight negotiations, the bill is slated for a vote later Wednesday. A 20% rally in Boeing Co. lifted the price-weighted Dow Jones Industrial Average more than 2%.“Investors have been looking for monetary policy and now fiscal policy to stem the bleeding from this crisis,” said Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst for Bankrate. “The Fed was first at that and has done much of what investors are looking for it to do. Now the fiscal authorities have unleashed their version of that bazooka.”Equities rose in Europe, where leaders are inching toward a fiscal package of their own. In Asia, a regional stock benchmark is posting the best one-day increase since 2008. WTI crude oil turned lower after failing to hold $25 a barrel. The dollar fell for a second day versus its biggest peers.Investors are hoping for U.S. and global equity indexes to post their first back-to-back daily gains since just before the rout began a month ago, even as economies from Milan to Seattle begin to reel from the deepening pandemic. With the number of infections globally continuing to mount and Spain reporting more than 700 deaths in a single day, traders are reminded that the threat to the global economy is well alive.The Dow Industrials rose on Tuesday by more than 11%, their biggest advance since 1933, while the S&P 500 climbed the most in 12 years. Still, key gauges of U.S. manufacturing and services in March fell the most on record, showing the deep toll the outbreak has already taken.“We still need to see a slowing of the virus cases and a peaking in the U.S.,” Carol Pepper, chief executive officer at Pepper International, told Bloomberg TV. “Because until then we’ll have these huge relief-rally days -- then we’ll get a scary day and the market will plunge down again.”Spot gold drifted lower after a squeeze of historic proportions pushed its prices to the biggest one-day gain since November 2008 on Tuesday. The closing of refineries and demand for physical gold had caused a disconnect between prices in London and New York.These are the main moves in markets:StocksThe S&P 500 Index rose 1.1% as of 9:47 a.m. New York time.The Stoxx Europe 600 Index gained 0.7%.The MSCI Asia Pacific Index rose 5.6%.CurrenciesThe Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index declined 0.7%.The euro climbed 0.2% to $1.0814.The British pound gained 0.3% to $1.1802.The Japanese yen decreased 0.2% to 111.44 per dollar.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries fell three basis points 0.82%.Germany’s 10-year yield climbed two basis points to -0.31%.Britain’s 10-year yield dipped three basis points to 0.45%.CommoditiesGold declined 0.9% to $1,617.33 an ounce.West Texas Intermediate crude decreased 1.4% to $23.68 a barrel.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- U.S. stocks looked headed for their first back-to-back gain since the coronavirus crisis began as investors awaited details on the unprecedented government spending packages aimed at countering the hit from the pandemic. Treasuries adavnced.The S&P 500 rose at the open, following Tuesday’s 9.4% surge in anticipation of the deal between the White House and Congress. After overnight negotiations, the bill is slated for a vote later Wednesday. A 20% rally in Boeing Co. lifted the price-weighted Dow Jones Industrial Average more than 2%.“Investors have been looking for monetary policy and now fiscal policy to stem the bleeding from this crisis,” said Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst for Bankrate. “The Fed was first at that and has done much of what investors are looking for it to do. Now the fiscal authorities have unleashed their version of that bazooka.”Equities rose in Europe, where leaders are inching toward a fiscal package of their own. In Asia, a regional stock benchmark is posting the best one-day increase since 2008. WTI crude oil turned lower after failing to hold $25 a barrel. The dollar fell for a second day versus its biggest peers.Investors are hoping for U.S. and global equity indexes to post their first back-to-back daily gains since just before the rout began a month ago, even as economies from Milan to Seattle begin to reel from the deepening pandemic. With the number of infections globally continuing to mount and Spain reporting more than 700 deaths in a single day, traders are reminded that the threat to the global economy is well alive.The Dow Industrials rose on Tuesday by more than 11%, their biggest advance since 1933, while the S&P 500 climbed the most in 12 years. Still, key gauges of U.S. manufacturing and services in March fell the most on record, showing the deep toll the outbreak has already taken.“We still need to see a slowing of the virus cases and a peaking in the U.S.,” Carol Pepper, chief executive officer at Pepper International, told Bloomberg TV. “Because until then we’ll have these huge relief-rally days -- then we’ll get a scary day and the market will plunge down again.”Spot gold drifted lower after a squeeze of historic proportions pushed its prices to the biggest one-day gain since November 2008 on Tuesday. The closing of refineries and demand for physical gold had caused a disconnect between prices in London and New York.These are the main moves in markets:StocksThe S&P 500 Index rose 1.1% as of 9:47 a.m. New York time.The Stoxx Europe 600 Index gained 0.7%.The MSCI Asia Pacific Index rose 5.6%.CurrenciesThe Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index declined 0.7%.The euro climbed 0.2% to $1.0814.The British pound gained 0.3% to $1.1802.The Japanese yen decreased 0.2% to 111.44 per dollar.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries fell three basis points 0.82%.Germany’s 10-year yield climbed two basis points to -0.31%.Britain’s 10-year yield dipped three basis points to 0.45%.CommoditiesGold declined 0.9% to $1,617.33 an ounce.West Texas Intermediate crude decreased 1.4% to $23.68 a barrel.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 33/81   Coronavirus live updates: $2 trillion stimulus deal reached; Prince Charles sick; US deaths top 800
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Amid another swell in U.S. deaths, White House and Senate leaders reached a $2 trillion stimulus deal to ease financial pain across the country.

    Amid another swell in U.S. deaths, White House and Senate leaders reached a $2 trillion stimulus deal to ease financial pain across the country.


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  • 34/81   Exclusive: UK industry expects ventilator production go-ahead on Wednesday - sources
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    British industry expects the government to give the go-ahead to an emergency ventilator production plan on Wednesday that will see a number of firms join forces to tackle the coronavirus outbreak, three sources told Reuters.  Airbus, Smiths, Ford and Mclaren are among a number of different firms which will be involved in the process, with the idea that some degree of output, whether that is making components or full ventilators, should ideally begin next week, said a source close to the process.  'It will be upscaling, on more of an industrial scale, existing ventilator designs,' one of the sources said.

    British industry expects the government to give the go-ahead to an emergency ventilator production plan on Wednesday that will see a number of firms join forces to tackle the coronavirus outbreak, three sources told Reuters. Airbus, Smiths, Ford and Mclaren are among a number of different firms which will be involved in the process, with the idea that some degree of output, whether that is making components or full ventilators, should ideally begin next week, said a source close to the process. 'It will be upscaling, on more of an industrial scale, existing ventilator designs,' one of the sources said.


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  • 35/81   Global Fire Detector Market: Trends, Forecast and Competitive Analysis (2020-2025)
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The "Fire Detector Market Report: Trends, Forecast and Competitive Analysis" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.

    The "Fire Detector Market Report: Trends, Forecast and Competitive Analysis" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.


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  • 36/81   Nike shares rise as Wall Street lauds recovery in China sales
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    At least seven brokerages took a positive view on the stock, with some raising their price targets to as high as $95, well above its current share price of about $80.  Nike shares have fallen 28% since the start of the year on worries about a substantial dent to its sales due to the pandemic, which has also led to the cancellation or postponement of major sporting events to make matters worse for the company.  On Tuesday, Nike settled those nerves saying it was experiencing double-digit percentage growth in its digital business in China and that operations in Greater China were normalizing.

    At least seven brokerages took a positive view on the stock, with some raising their price targets to as high as $95, well above its current share price of about $80. Nike shares have fallen 28% since the start of the year on worries about a substantial dent to its sales due to the pandemic, which has also led to the cancellation or postponement of major sporting events to make matters worse for the company. On Tuesday, Nike settled those nerves saying it was experiencing double-digit percentage growth in its digital business in China and that operations in Greater China were normalizing.


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  • 37/81   Rep. Amash Signals He May Single-Handedly Delay Coronavirus Relief Bill
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Representative Justin Amash signaled Wednesday that he may delay the $2 trillion coronavirus stimulus package Senate leaders reached with the Trump administration hours earlier, calling the plan "a raw deal for the people."The Michigan independent, who left the Republican Party last year, suggested he may block unanimous consent should the House choose to use it for the coronavirus package, forcing a roll call vote on the emergency funding bill that would require lawmakers to return to Washington. Such a move would delay consideration in the lower chamber of the package, which was agreed to after five days of marathon negotiations between Senate leaders and the Trump administration."This bipartisan deal is a raw deal for the people," Amash wrote in a Wednesday morning tweet. "It does far too little for those who need the most help, while providing hundreds of billions in corporate welfare, massively growing government, inhibiting economic adaptation, and widening the gap between the rich and the poor."The bill, the third coronavirus stimulus package passed by Congress, provides $367 billion in loans to help small businesses hit hard by the outbreak to keep making payroll, $100 billion for hospitals, and $150 billion for state and local governments. The plan also provides for Americans who make up to $75,000 to receive a one-time payment of $1,200. A $500 billion fund earmarked for corporations that have been economically damaged by the pandemic will be overseen by an inspector general and a congressional panel in accordance with Democrats' demands.Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, who negotiated the funding package with senators, urged House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to pass the Senate version of the funding package without changing it, adding that President Trump would "absolutely" sign it as is."House Democrats will now review the final provisions and legislative text of the agreement to determine a course of action,” Pelosi said Wednesday in a statement.Amash's office did not respond immediately to request for comment.

    Representative Justin Amash signaled Wednesday that he may delay the $2 trillion coronavirus stimulus package Senate leaders reached with the Trump administration hours earlier, calling the plan "a raw deal for the people."The Michigan independent, who left the Republican Party last year, suggested he may block unanimous consent should the House choose to use it for the coronavirus package, forcing a roll call vote on the emergency funding bill that would require lawmakers to return to Washington. Such a move would delay consideration in the lower chamber of the package, which was agreed to after five days of marathon negotiations between Senate leaders and the Trump administration."This bipartisan deal is a raw deal for the people," Amash wrote in a Wednesday morning tweet. "It does far too little for those who need the most help, while providing hundreds of billions in corporate welfare, massively growing government, inhibiting economic adaptation, and widening the gap between the rich and the poor."The bill, the third coronavirus stimulus package passed by Congress, provides $367 billion in loans to help small businesses hit hard by the outbreak to keep making payroll, $100 billion for hospitals, and $150 billion for state and local governments. The plan also provides for Americans who make up to $75,000 to receive a one-time payment of $1,200. A $500 billion fund earmarked for corporations that have been economically damaged by the pandemic will be overseen by an inspector general and a congressional panel in accordance with Democrats' demands.Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, who negotiated the funding package with senators, urged House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to pass the Senate version of the funding package without changing it, adding that President Trump would "absolutely" sign it as is."House Democrats will now review the final provisions and legislative text of the agreement to determine a course of action,” Pelosi said Wednesday in a statement.Amash's office did not respond immediately to request for comment.


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  • 38/81   Goldman Sachs: 3 Tech Stocks That Could Climb Over 20%
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Investment firm Goldman Sachs has revised its 2020 economic forecast, and the outlook is decidedly grim. Where just 10 days ago, Goldman was predicting that GDP would experience a 5% contraction in Q2, the update puts the forecast at a 24% second-quarter contraction. That’s a depression-style number, and Goldman does not sugar-coat it.What the bank does do, however, is to try and extend its reading into 2H20, and looking forward the chances may not be as bad. The economy was strong as 2019 ended, and even in January and February the jobs numbers remained highly positive – and Goldman sees that underlying strength coming back in the second half. The bank predicts a sharp rebound in the third and fourth quarters, with growth hitting 12% in Q3 and 10% in Q4. Investors should expect, however, an economic contraction for the full year.Goldman doesn’t leave their forecasts at the macro level. In a report on COVID-19’s impact on the tech sector, analyst Brian Essex adjusts his outlook on an array of stocks, in an attempt to sort the wheat from the chaff. Of the potential growth stocks, positioned to expand despite the developing recession, Essex says, “We generally prefer companies with subscription and recurring revenue models which provide durable revenue and a high degree of visibility. We also prefer a high percentage of domestic revenue with large enterprise and/or (U.S.) government exposure.”We’ve taken three of Goldman Sachs’s Buy-side calls, and pulled their data from the TipRanks database. These are tech companies, mostly in the mid- to large- market cap range, and strong profiles in cybersecurity and data analysis. Their footprint makes them suited for remote work, giving them a step up on survival in the coronavirus epidemic, while their firm position in the information economy gives them a steady flow of business, even as economies stutter.FireEye, Inc. (FEYE)The first GS stock pick we’ll examine is FireEye, a cybersecurity provider for the high-end blue-chips, counting among its clients Target, JPMorgan, and Sony Pictures. Like the economy generally, FireEye ended 2019 on a high note, clearly shown by the company’s Q4 earnings. EPS came in 75% above estimates, at 7 cents, and grew 17% year-over-year. Revenue also beat both the forecasts and year-ago number, coming in at $235 million.FireEye’s success was built on its services, which are very much in demand in a tech-based information economy. The Silicon Valley company offers its customers protection against cybersecurity and malware attacks, and analytic software to find security risks. The company brought in $889 million in revenues last year, and showed sequential earnings gains in each quarter.In his notes on FEYE, Goldman’s Essex notes the company’s exposure to current economic strains, with potential declines in product revenue, but goes on to point out FireEye’s larger strengths: “We expect Incident Response and Threat Intelligence to gain traction as organizations look to investigate and secure their IT infrastructure without the need for physical intervention. Additionally, approximately 25% of the company’s revenue is government related, which we view as one of the more stable sources of revenue in this environment.”In mild deference to the current hard times, Essex lowers his price target on FEYE by $2, to $16, but still sees an impressive 65% upside to the stock. His Buy rating is an upgrade from neutral, reflecting that growth potential. (To watch Essex’s track record, click here)FireEye has a Moderate Buy analyst consensus rating, based on an even split between 4 Buys and 4 Holds. The share price is down to $11, making this tech company highly affordable, and the average price target of $19 suggests room for 74% growth in the next 12 months. (See FireEye stock analysis on TipRanks)Palo Alto Networks (PANW)The second cybersecurity company on Goldman Sachs’ list is another Silicon Valley denizen. Palo Alto Networks develops secure cloud systems and advanced firewalls, essential software in the growing cloud computing segment. Malware attacks were up in 2019, and PANW’s services were in high demand.That demand can be seen in the company’s recent fiscal Q2 report. The results are interesting, because they cover a period including both the end of 2019 and January 2020, and so include the beginning of the coronavirus epidemic. Q2 earnings were solid, at $1.19 per share they beat the forecast by 6.3%, but also down year-over-year. Revenue missed the estimate by 3.1%, but the $816.7 reported showed strong yoy growth. At the end of Palo Alto’s fiscal Q2, PANW shares were up 5.1% year-to-date; but as the bottom fell out of the market, the stock is now down 36% ytd.Still Palo Alto Networks is a well-established company in an essential software niche, and Essex sees that foundation as the key point. He reiterates his Buy rating on the stock, although he does reduce his price target by 26% to $195. The new target still implies a 21% upside for the stock. (To watch Essex’s track record, click here)In his comments, Essex outlines the company’s strong points, saying “[A] meaningful installed base continues to drive maintenance revenue growth, and we believe this revenue is durable over time. We expect the stock to re-rate higher once fundamentals normalize, and view suf?cient runway for multiple expansion for PANW, driven by traction with next-gen security solutions and in?ection in product revenue growth.”This stock has attracted plenty of interest from Wall Street’s analysts. PANW’s analyst consensus rating is a Moderate Buy based on 29 reviews, which include 17 Buys against 11 Holds and 1 Sell. The stock is not cheap – it sells for $166.28. The $232 average price target indicates a potential upside of 43% for the shares. (See Palo Alto Networks stock analysis on TipRanks)Verint Systems (VRNT)Last on today’s list of tech recommendations from Goldman Sachs is data analysis company Verint Systems. Verint produces both software and hardware for business intelligence, customer engagement, security, and surveillance analytic systems. The company caters to thousands of corporate clients in 150 countries worldwide.In a fascinating move, Verint announced in December that it will be splitting into two independent public companies. The move will separate Verint’s $1 billion customer engagement business from its $500 million cyber intelligence segment, as the current combination is considered too large and unwieldy by management. The planned split will be conducted in stages through 2020, with completion scheduled just after the fiscal quarter ending in January 2021. As part of the split, VRNT is initiating a $300 million share buyback program.At the same time it announced the planned split, Verint also announced fiscal Q3 earnings. EPS beat both the forecast and the yoy number, coming in at 94 cents. Revenues, at $331 million, edged over expectations and grew 7.4% year-over-year.In his comments on Verint, Essex acknowledges that the planned split of the business segments is a risk factor – but it is a known risk factor. He points out Verint’s current status: “Our numbers are not changing materially as we believe our numbers were previously relatively conservative and the company has already migrated away from more volatile hardware and integration revenue.”As with the other stocks on this list, Essex is lowering his price target. At $49, the new target suggests room for a 22% upside and supports his Buy rating. (To watch Essex’s track record, click here)This stock is another Moderate Buy from analyst consensus view, based on 2 recent Buy ratings. At $58, the average price target implies a premium of 45% from the current share price of $41. (See Verint stock analysis on TipRanks)

    Investment firm Goldman Sachs has revised its 2020 economic forecast, and the outlook is decidedly grim. Where just 10 days ago, Goldman was predicting that GDP would experience a 5% contraction in Q2, the update puts the forecast at a 24% second-quarter contraction. That’s a depression-style number, and Goldman does not sugar-coat it.What the bank does do, however, is to try and extend its reading into 2H20, and looking forward the chances may not be as bad. The economy was strong as 2019 ended, and even in January and February the jobs numbers remained highly positive – and Goldman sees that underlying strength coming back in the second half. The bank predicts a sharp rebound in the third and fourth quarters, with growth hitting 12% in Q3 and 10% in Q4. Investors should expect, however, an economic contraction for the full year.Goldman doesn’t leave their forecasts at the macro level. In a report on COVID-19’s impact on the tech sector, analyst Brian Essex adjusts his outlook on an array of stocks, in an attempt to sort the wheat from the chaff. Of the potential growth stocks, positioned to expand despite the developing recession, Essex says, “We generally prefer companies with subscription and recurring revenue models which provide durable revenue and a high degree of visibility. We also prefer a high percentage of domestic revenue with large enterprise and/or (U.S.) government exposure.”We’ve taken three of Goldman Sachs’s Buy-side calls, and pulled their data from the TipRanks database. These are tech companies, mostly in the mid- to large- market cap range, and strong profiles in cybersecurity and data analysis. Their footprint makes them suited for remote work, giving them a step up on survival in the coronavirus epidemic, while their firm position in the information economy gives them a steady flow of business, even as economies stutter.FireEye, Inc. (FEYE)The first GS stock pick we’ll examine is FireEye, a cybersecurity provider for the high-end blue-chips, counting among its clients Target, JPMorgan, and Sony Pictures. Like the economy generally, FireEye ended 2019 on a high note, clearly shown by the company’s Q4 earnings. EPS came in 75% above estimates, at 7 cents, and grew 17% year-over-year. Revenue also beat both the forecasts and year-ago number, coming in at $235 million.FireEye’s success was built on its services, which are very much in demand in a tech-based information economy. The Silicon Valley company offers its customers protection against cybersecurity and malware attacks, and analytic software to find security risks. The company brought in $889 million in revenues last year, and showed sequential earnings gains in each quarter.In his notes on FEYE, Goldman’s Essex notes the company’s exposure to current economic strains, with potential declines in product revenue, but goes on to point out FireEye’s larger strengths: “We expect Incident Response and Threat Intelligence to gain traction as organizations look to investigate and secure their IT infrastructure without the need for physical intervention. Additionally, approximately 25% of the company’s revenue is government related, which we view as one of the more stable sources of revenue in this environment.”In mild deference to the current hard times, Essex lowers his price target on FEYE by $2, to $16, but still sees an impressive 65% upside to the stock. His Buy rating is an upgrade from neutral, reflecting that growth potential. (To watch Essex’s track record, click here)FireEye has a Moderate Buy analyst consensus rating, based on an even split between 4 Buys and 4 Holds. The share price is down to $11, making this tech company highly affordable, and the average price target of $19 suggests room for 74% growth in the next 12 months. (See FireEye stock analysis on TipRanks)Palo Alto Networks (PANW)The second cybersecurity company on Goldman Sachs’ list is another Silicon Valley denizen. Palo Alto Networks develops secure cloud systems and advanced firewalls, essential software in the growing cloud computing segment. Malware attacks were up in 2019, and PANW’s services were in high demand.That demand can be seen in the company’s recent fiscal Q2 report. The results are interesting, because they cover a period including both the end of 2019 and January 2020, and so include the beginning of the coronavirus epidemic. Q2 earnings were solid, at $1.19 per share they beat the forecast by 6.3%, but also down year-over-year. Revenue missed the estimate by 3.1%, but the $816.7 reported showed strong yoy growth. At the end of Palo Alto’s fiscal Q2, PANW shares were up 5.1% year-to-date; but as the bottom fell out of the market, the stock is now down 36% ytd.Still Palo Alto Networks is a well-established company in an essential software niche, and Essex sees that foundation as the key point. He reiterates his Buy rating on the stock, although he does reduce his price target by 26% to $195. The new target still implies a 21% upside for the stock. (To watch Essex’s track record, click here)In his comments, Essex outlines the company’s strong points, saying “[A] meaningful installed base continues to drive maintenance revenue growth, and we believe this revenue is durable over time. We expect the stock to re-rate higher once fundamentals normalize, and view suf?cient runway for multiple expansion for PANW, driven by traction with next-gen security solutions and in?ection in product revenue growth.”This stock has attracted plenty of interest from Wall Street’s analysts. PANW’s analyst consensus rating is a Moderate Buy based on 29 reviews, which include 17 Buys against 11 Holds and 1 Sell. The stock is not cheap – it sells for $166.28. The $232 average price target indicates a potential upside of 43% for the shares. (See Palo Alto Networks stock analysis on TipRanks)Verint Systems (VRNT)Last on today’s list of tech recommendations from Goldman Sachs is data analysis company Verint Systems. Verint produces both software and hardware for business intelligence, customer engagement, security, and surveillance analytic systems. The company caters to thousands of corporate clients in 150 countries worldwide.In a fascinating move, Verint announced in December that it will be splitting into two independent public companies. The move will separate Verint’s $1 billion customer engagement business from its $500 million cyber intelligence segment, as the current combination is considered too large and unwieldy by management. The planned split will be conducted in stages through 2020, with completion scheduled just after the fiscal quarter ending in January 2021. As part of the split, VRNT is initiating a $300 million share buyback program.At the same time it announced the planned split, Verint also announced fiscal Q3 earnings. EPS beat both the forecast and the yoy number, coming in at 94 cents. Revenues, at $331 million, edged over expectations and grew 7.4% year-over-year.In his comments on Verint, Essex acknowledges that the planned split of the business segments is a risk factor – but it is a known risk factor. He points out Verint’s current status: “Our numbers are not changing materially as we believe our numbers were previously relatively conservative and the company has already migrated away from more volatile hardware and integration revenue.”As with the other stocks on this list, Essex is lowering his price target. At $49, the new target suggests room for a 22% upside and supports his Buy rating. (To watch Essex’s track record, click here)This stock is another Moderate Buy from analyst consensus view, based on 2 recent Buy ratings. At $58, the average price target implies a premium of 45% from the current share price of $41. (See Verint stock analysis on TipRanks)


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  • 39/81   Coronavirus: Millions yet to receive UK government's Covid-19 text
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Vodafone has yet to deliver all the text messages urging the public to stay indoors when possible.

    Vodafone has yet to deliver all the text messages urging the public to stay indoors when possible.


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  • 40/81   U.S. Senate coronavirus bill to help airlines with grants: CNBC
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    U.S. airlines would receive direct grants and would not be able to lay off employees for a set time under the coronavirus relief legislation agreed to by the U.S. Senate on Wednesday, according to a CNBC report.  The U.S. government would take an equity share in airlines receiving federal funds, according to the report.  The Senate bill also contains provisions to prohibit entities controlled by President Donald Trump from taking advantage of aid.

    U.S. airlines would receive direct grants and would not be able to lay off employees for a set time under the coronavirus relief legislation agreed to by the U.S. Senate on Wednesday, according to a CNBC report. The U.S. government would take an equity share in airlines receiving federal funds, according to the report. The Senate bill also contains provisions to prohibit entities controlled by President Donald Trump from taking advantage of aid.


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  • 41/81   Target Dumps 2020 Guidance, Halts Buybacks Amid Uncertainty
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Target Corp. dumped the full-year sales and profit forecast it gave just three weeks ago even as sales in March have soared, underscoring the difficulty retailers face in navigating the unfolding coronavirus crisis.Citing an “unusually wide range of potential outcomes” for its first-quarter performance and $300 million in additional costs as it scurries to keep shelves stocked, the retailer withdrew its sales, operating profit and earnings-per-share guidance for the first quarter and the full year. It also suspended share buybacks and said it will reduce the number of stores it remodels and opens this year, while giving no update on when testing for Covid-19 will begin in its parking lots.“It’s difficult to provide guidance with any precision in this environment,” Chief Executive Officer Brian Cornell said on a call with reporters. “America is largely out of business. There’s no playbook, and we are writing the script each and every day.”What’s clear is that Target’s sales have risen dramatically as Americans stockpile everything from toilet paper to tequila, pushing sales of household essentials and food and beverages up more than 50% in March so far, Target said Wednesday. But demand for apparel has simultaneously plunged, leaving overall comparable sales, a closely watched retail metric, up more than 20% for the month. Since clothing is more profitable than food, Target said its profit margins could narrow in the quarter ending April 30.“In-store shopping behavior is unprecedented,” said Cornell, adding that the company is installing checkout lane markers to maintain 6 feet of distance between shoppers, and will now clean checkouts after every transaction. Kroger Co., the supermarket chain, has gone even further, adding plexiglass partitions at cash registers.No ReturnsTarget will also stop accepting returns, and stop packing items in reusable bags for fear of transmitting the virus. Shoppers who bring their own reusable shopping bags will have to bag their own goods.Analysts have noted that Target, along with fellow discounters Walmart Inc., Costco Wholesale Corp. and Dollar General Corp., could benefit in the short term as shoppers adjust their buying patterns, keep a close eye on their spending and trade down from, say, steak to chicken.“Consumers are reacting very quickly to the change in economic conditions, even when it comes to purchasing consumables,” Scott Mushkin of R5 Capital said in a research note. “The swiftness of this is somewhat surprising to us and may reflect that more economic hardship is already taking place than is widely understood.”Target fell as much as 3.9% in New York trading Wednesday while the S&P 500 Index gained. The stock has declined more than 20% this year.Meanwhile, Cornell declined to say whether he agreed with President Donald Trump’s desire to reopen the U.S. economy by Easter, saying “I will leave that to the experts.”He also could not say when Target will start offering testing for Covid-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, in store parking lots, saying only that it was in the early stages. Rival Walmart, in conjunction with Walgreens Boots Alliance, has already opened a few testing sites in the Chicago area. Target’s pharmacies are operated by CVS Health Corp., and Cornell said CVS is “providing the technical expertise” and would work directly with health officials.As for the well-chronicled shortages of toilet paper, Cornell said manufacturers are adding production shifts to meet the unprecedented demand, which retail supply-chain experts have equated to Thanksgiving and Christmas happening every day for weeks, with none of the usual lead times to stock up.Shifting DemandCornell said demand has come in waves for different types of products, starting with everyday cleaning products and then shifting to food and beverages and now items like games, crafts and small kitchen appliances.The volatile environment has left retailers in the dark, prompting Moody’s Investors Service to cut its outlook on the entire sector.“The U.S. retail industry is battening down for an unprecedented mix of woes,” the credit-ratings company said in a report on Tuesday.(Updates with shares and analyst comment beginning in seventh paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Target Corp. dumped the full-year sales and profit forecast it gave just three weeks ago even as sales in March have soared, underscoring the difficulty retailers face in navigating the unfolding coronavirus crisis.Citing an “unusually wide range of potential outcomes” for its first-quarter performance and $300 million in additional costs as it scurries to keep shelves stocked, the retailer withdrew its sales, operating profit and earnings-per-share guidance for the first quarter and the full year. It also suspended share buybacks and said it will reduce the number of stores it remodels and opens this year, while giving no update on when testing for Covid-19 will begin in its parking lots.“It’s difficult to provide guidance with any precision in this environment,” Chief Executive Officer Brian Cornell said on a call with reporters. “America is largely out of business. There’s no playbook, and we are writing the script each and every day.”What’s clear is that Target’s sales have risen dramatically as Americans stockpile everything from toilet paper to tequila, pushing sales of household essentials and food and beverages up more than 50% in March so far, Target said Wednesday. But demand for apparel has simultaneously plunged, leaving overall comparable sales, a closely watched retail metric, up more than 20% for the month. Since clothing is more profitable than food, Target said its profit margins could narrow in the quarter ending April 30.“In-store shopping behavior is unprecedented,” said Cornell, adding that the company is installing checkout lane markers to maintain 6 feet of distance between shoppers, and will now clean checkouts after every transaction. Kroger Co., the supermarket chain, has gone even further, adding plexiglass partitions at cash registers.No ReturnsTarget will also stop accepting returns, and stop packing items in reusable bags for fear of transmitting the virus. Shoppers who bring their own reusable shopping bags will have to bag their own goods.Analysts have noted that Target, along with fellow discounters Walmart Inc., Costco Wholesale Corp. and Dollar General Corp., could benefit in the short term as shoppers adjust their buying patterns, keep a close eye on their spending and trade down from, say, steak to chicken.“Consumers are reacting very quickly to the change in economic conditions, even when it comes to purchasing consumables,” Scott Mushkin of R5 Capital said in a research note. “The swiftness of this is somewhat surprising to us and may reflect that more economic hardship is already taking place than is widely understood.”Target fell as much as 3.9% in New York trading Wednesday while the S&P 500 Index gained. The stock has declined more than 20% this year.Meanwhile, Cornell declined to say whether he agreed with President Donald Trump’s desire to reopen the U.S. economy by Easter, saying “I will leave that to the experts.”He also could not say when Target will start offering testing for Covid-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, in store parking lots, saying only that it was in the early stages. Rival Walmart, in conjunction with Walgreens Boots Alliance, has already opened a few testing sites in the Chicago area. Target’s pharmacies are operated by CVS Health Corp., and Cornell said CVS is “providing the technical expertise” and would work directly with health officials.As for the well-chronicled shortages of toilet paper, Cornell said manufacturers are adding production shifts to meet the unprecedented demand, which retail supply-chain experts have equated to Thanksgiving and Christmas happening every day for weeks, with none of the usual lead times to stock up.Shifting DemandCornell said demand has come in waves for different types of products, starting with everyday cleaning products and then shifting to food and beverages and now items like games, crafts and small kitchen appliances.The volatile environment has left retailers in the dark, prompting Moody’s Investors Service to cut its outlook on the entire sector.“The U.S. retail industry is battening down for an unprecedented mix of woes,” the credit-ratings company said in a report on Tuesday.(Updates with shares and analyst comment beginning in seventh paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 42/81   Joe Biden makes virtual campaign trail debut after several days of public absence
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Former Vice President and Democratic frontrunner Joe Biden made his first video address after four days of cable news silence to address the coronavirus pandemic from his family home in Wilmington, Del.

    Former Vice President and Democratic frontrunner Joe Biden made his first video address after four days of cable news silence to address the coronavirus pandemic from his family home in Wilmington, Del.


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  • 43/81   "I hope to be roaming outside freely and without a face mask very soon," says an American quarantined in Beijing
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Patrick, who is an American citizen, returned back to his current home in Beijing recently and per law is being quarantined in his apartment for 14 days since his arrival back to China. “Right now, [I’m] keeping my spirits up and enjoying it. I hope to be roaming outside freely and without a face mask very soon.”

    Patrick, who is an American citizen, returned back to his current home in Beijing recently and per law is being quarantined in his apartment for 14 days since his arrival back to China. “Right now, [I’m] keeping my spirits up and enjoying it. I hope to be roaming outside freely and without a face mask very soon.”


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  • 44/81   FDA will allow doctors to treat critically ill coronavirus patients with blood from survivors
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Experts say the treatment might be the best hope for some patients until more sophisticated drugs are developed.

    Experts say the treatment might be the best hope for some patients until more sophisticated drugs are developed.


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  • 45/81   Pence’s Idea Is a Good Way to ‘Kill Hundreds & Thousands,’ Expert Says
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The White House coronavirus task force on Sunday dangled new CDC guidance that might suggest some Americans with exposure to the 2019 novel coronavirus could return to work wearing a mask.Vice President Pence on Sunday said the guidance “will make it possible for people that have been exposed to return to work more quickly with—by wearing a mask for a certain period of time.” He suggested it would be spelled out in more detail this week.When asked about the potential guidance on Monday, Pence said it was still in the works, and might be targeted at a small subset of workers deemed critical.“We're specifically looking at people that work in critical infrastructure—people in law enforcement, people in critical transportation,” he said. “The guidance we're looking for unpacking is how the people who may have come into contact with someone who tested positive for coronavirus, if they have no symptoms, [may] be able to return to work [and] wear a mask for a certain period of time.”Pence said the proposed guidance would be before the president and possibly even before the public on Tuesday. But experts had already begun to blast Pence’s floated proposal as a dangerous one.William Haseltine, president of the global health think tank ACCESS Health International, who recently chaired the U.S.-China Health Summit in Wuhan, called the potential guidance “deadly, deadly advice” as U.S. cases of the virus climbed to more than 40,000 infections and more than 500 deaths.What Happens When All the Doctors Get Sick?Most Americans have been told by federal agencies to avoid large gatherings—even if they have not been exposed to the deadly virus. Orders to stay inside except for essential needs like grocery runs and trips to the pharmacy have also been issued in a slew of states.“That is so bad,” said Haseltine, of the prospect of the guidance. “If you want to really spread this infection like crazy, that’s what to do. It’s near insanity.” “No health expert would have ever told them that, unless it’s a Trump sycophant,” continued Haseltine. “If you want to kill hundreds and thousands of Americans, he’s found a good way to do it.”Pence’s idea, if it came to fruition, would also surely raise eyebrows considering the widely reported nationwide shortage of key supplies for medical professionals, including surgical masks. But even if there were enough to provide to every American who might be exposed, they aren’t a cure-all for contagiousness.Masks aren’t perfect for preventing exposure, mainly because of user error, according to Dr. Jeffrey Klausner, an adjunct professor of epidemiology at the University of California Los Angeles who previously worked for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He noted that someone who is infected and paying close attention may still, without thinking, touch their mouths or nose.Klausner said “true exposure” should be met with a quarantine and then a test, for which access is improving “every single day.”“That’s basic public health 101—that someone who has been exposed to a contagious disease be quarantined,” said Klausner. “That’s a much more scientifically rigorous approach.”Still, it was clear from the briefing Monday the president remained fixated on the prospect of long-term damage to the economy. Just how that might impact future guidance from the nation's leading health authority remained to be seen.“It would be much better and scientifically sound to test people before they return back to work, particularly if they’re in a work setting where they may come into close contact with other individuals,” said Klausner. “My concern with the masking is just that it’s not an evidence-based, scientifically sound approach.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

    The White House coronavirus task force on Sunday dangled new CDC guidance that might suggest some Americans with exposure to the 2019 novel coronavirus could return to work wearing a mask.Vice President Pence on Sunday said the guidance “will make it possible for people that have been exposed to return to work more quickly with—by wearing a mask for a certain period of time.” He suggested it would be spelled out in more detail this week.When asked about the potential guidance on Monday, Pence said it was still in the works, and might be targeted at a small subset of workers deemed critical.“We're specifically looking at people that work in critical infrastructure—people in law enforcement, people in critical transportation,” he said. “The guidance we're looking for unpacking is how the people who may have come into contact with someone who tested positive for coronavirus, if they have no symptoms, [may] be able to return to work [and] wear a mask for a certain period of time.”Pence said the proposed guidance would be before the president and possibly even before the public on Tuesday. But experts had already begun to blast Pence’s floated proposal as a dangerous one.William Haseltine, president of the global health think tank ACCESS Health International, who recently chaired the U.S.-China Health Summit in Wuhan, called the potential guidance “deadly, deadly advice” as U.S. cases of the virus climbed to more than 40,000 infections and more than 500 deaths.What Happens When All the Doctors Get Sick?Most Americans have been told by federal agencies to avoid large gatherings—even if they have not been exposed to the deadly virus. Orders to stay inside except for essential needs like grocery runs and trips to the pharmacy have also been issued in a slew of states.“That is so bad,” said Haseltine, of the prospect of the guidance. “If you want to really spread this infection like crazy, that’s what to do. It’s near insanity.” “No health expert would have ever told them that, unless it’s a Trump sycophant,” continued Haseltine. “If you want to kill hundreds and thousands of Americans, he’s found a good way to do it.”Pence’s idea, if it came to fruition, would also surely raise eyebrows considering the widely reported nationwide shortage of key supplies for medical professionals, including surgical masks. But even if there were enough to provide to every American who might be exposed, they aren’t a cure-all for contagiousness.Masks aren’t perfect for preventing exposure, mainly because of user error, according to Dr. Jeffrey Klausner, an adjunct professor of epidemiology at the University of California Los Angeles who previously worked for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He noted that someone who is infected and paying close attention may still, without thinking, touch their mouths or nose.Klausner said “true exposure” should be met with a quarantine and then a test, for which access is improving “every single day.”“That’s basic public health 101—that someone who has been exposed to a contagious disease be quarantined,” said Klausner. “That’s a much more scientifically rigorous approach.”Still, it was clear from the briefing Monday the president remained fixated on the prospect of long-term damage to the economy. Just how that might impact future guidance from the nation's leading health authority remained to be seen.“It would be much better and scientifically sound to test people before they return back to work, particularly if they’re in a work setting where they may come into close contact with other individuals,” said Klausner. “My concern with the masking is just that it’s not an evidence-based, scientifically sound approach.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


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  • 46/81   Mexico calls for halt to business that puts people in street
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Mexican health officials on Tuesday called on all businesses and organizations to suspend work that requires the movement of people.  Deputy health secretary Hugo López-Gatell said at a news conference hosted by President Andrés Manuel López Obrador that work that requires people to travel between home and work sites or be in public spaces must stop.  “The moment has arrived where we can make a greater impact with collective strategies,” López-Gatell said, now that the virus is being transmitted within the community rather than just imported.

    Mexican health officials on Tuesday called on all businesses and organizations to suspend work that requires the movement of people. Deputy health secretary Hugo López-Gatell said at a news conference hosted by President Andrés Manuel López Obrador that work that requires people to travel between home and work sites or be in public spaces must stop. “The moment has arrived where we can make a greater impact with collective strategies,” López-Gatell said, now that the virus is being transmitted within the community rather than just imported.


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  • 47/81   Spanish army finds dead bodies in nursing home
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Spanish army troops disinfecting nursing homes have found some residents living in squalor among the infectious bodies of people who authorities suspect have died from the coronavirus.

    Spanish army troops disinfecting nursing homes have found some residents living in squalor among the infectious bodies of people who authorities suspect have died from the coronavirus.


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  • 48/81   Iran fears second wave of coronavirus as death toll rises to 2,077
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Iran may face a second outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic, a government spokesman said on Wednesday, as the Islamic Republic banned internal travel and traditional gatherings in parks during the Persian New Year holiday period.  'Unfortunately some Iranians have ignored advice from health ministry officials and traveled during the New Year holidays ... This could cause a second wave of the coronavirus,' spokesman Ali Rabiei said, according to state TV.  President Hassan Rouhani has banned any new trips between cities, Rabiei said, and 'violators will be confronted legally'.

    Iran may face a second outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic, a government spokesman said on Wednesday, as the Islamic Republic banned internal travel and traditional gatherings in parks during the Persian New Year holiday period. 'Unfortunately some Iranians have ignored advice from health ministry officials and traveled during the New Year holidays ... This could cause a second wave of the coronavirus,' spokesman Ali Rabiei said, according to state TV. President Hassan Rouhani has banned any new trips between cities, Rabiei said, and 'violators will be confronted legally'.


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  • 49/81   As coronavirus cases increase, Defense Secretary Mark Esper places new restriction on Pentagon
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Defense Secretary Mark Esper said Monday he is again raising the protection condition on the Pentagon, which will further restrict access to one of the world’s largest office buildings. The Pentagon will now be at Level C, the second highest of the military’s five health protection conditions.

    Defense Secretary Mark Esper said Monday he is again raising the protection condition on the Pentagon, which will further restrict access to one of the world’s largest office buildings. The Pentagon will now be at Level C, the second highest of the military’s five health protection conditions.


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  • 50/81   Hawley, Stefanik Introduce Bill to Investigate China for Coronavirus Coverup
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Senator Josh Hawley (R., Mo.) and Representative Elise Stefanik (R., N.Y.) on Tuesday introduced a bicameral resolution to condemn the Chinese Communist Party for its initial handling of the coronavirus outbreak, and called for an international investigation to determine how the coverup hastened the emergence of a global pandemic.“Since day one, the Chinese Communist Party intentionally lied to the world about the origin of this pandemic. The CCP was aware of the reality of the virus as early as December but ordered laboratories to destroy samples and forced doctors to keep silent,” Hawley, who first called for an investigation last week, said in a press release.“There is no doubt that China’s unconscionable decision to orchestrate an elaborate coverup of the wide-ranging and deadly implications of coronavirus led to the death of thousands of people, including hundreds of Americans and climbing,” Stefanik added. “This Resolution calls for China to provide compensation for the harm, loss, and destruction their arrogance brought upon the rest of the world. Simply put China must, and will, be held accountable.”The bill calls the international community to “quantify the harm caused” by China’s actions and to “design a mechanism for delivering compensation” from the CCP to those affected.Reports have detailed how Wuhan laboratories in December discovered that coronavirus was related to the deadly SARS virus which broke out in 2002-2003, but were subsequently gagged by government authorities, who ordered them to turn over or destroy evidence.China has also promoted a propaganda campaign to push a conspiracy theory that the virus originated in the U.S., which experts have called “a counteroffensive” and “a kind of blame-shifting.”

    Senator Josh Hawley (R., Mo.) and Representative Elise Stefanik (R., N.Y.) on Tuesday introduced a bicameral resolution to condemn the Chinese Communist Party for its initial handling of the coronavirus outbreak, and called for an international investigation to determine how the coverup hastened the emergence of a global pandemic.“Since day one, the Chinese Communist Party intentionally lied to the world about the origin of this pandemic. The CCP was aware of the reality of the virus as early as December but ordered laboratories to destroy samples and forced doctors to keep silent,” Hawley, who first called for an investigation last week, said in a press release.“There is no doubt that China’s unconscionable decision to orchestrate an elaborate coverup of the wide-ranging and deadly implications of coronavirus led to the death of thousands of people, including hundreds of Americans and climbing,” Stefanik added. “This Resolution calls for China to provide compensation for the harm, loss, and destruction their arrogance brought upon the rest of the world. Simply put China must, and will, be held accountable.”The bill calls the international community to “quantify the harm caused” by China’s actions and to “design a mechanism for delivering compensation” from the CCP to those affected.Reports have detailed how Wuhan laboratories in December discovered that coronavirus was related to the deadly SARS virus which broke out in 2002-2003, but were subsequently gagged by government authorities, who ordered them to turn over or destroy evidence.China has also promoted a propaganda campaign to push a conspiracy theory that the virus originated in the U.S., which experts have called “a counteroffensive” and “a kind of blame-shifting.”


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  • 51/81   White House press corps confirms 'suspected case' of coronavirus in the briefing room
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A member of the White House press corps who has been in the briefing room several times with President Trump has come down with a suspected case of coronavirus. 

    A member of the White House press corps who has been in the briefing room several times with President Trump has come down with a suspected case of coronavirus. 


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  • 52/81   Scientists discover an ancient wormlike creature that's the ancestor of all animals – including us
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Scientists have discovered a fossil of our earliest ancestor: A tiny, wormlike creature that lived about 555 million years ago.

    Scientists have discovered a fossil of our earliest ancestor: A tiny, wormlike creature that lived about 555 million years ago.


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  • 53/81   Mammal study explains 'why females live longer'
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Across wild mammal species, females live over 18% longer than males because of genetics and environment.

    Across wild mammal species, females live over 18% longer than males because of genetics and environment.


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  • 54/81   Climate change: Green energy plant threat to wilderness areas
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Solar, wind and hydro electric installations are often built in conservation areas.

    Solar, wind and hydro electric installations are often built in conservation areas.


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  • 55/81   How are you doing during the COVID-19 crisis? Scientists want to hear your story
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Researchers at the University of Washington are launching a study aimed at answering the question that's on a lot of people's minds as the coronavirus epidemic spreads through the Seattle area: How are you holding up? The King County COVID-19 Community Study, a.k.a. KC3S, is recruiting King County residents to tell their stories. The study is scheduled to collect data through April 19. “We want to start collecting this information now — as the COVID-19 pandemic is unfolding — about how families and communities are being impacted, and how they are adapting,” Nicole Errett, a lecturer in the UW Department… Read More

    Researchers at the University of Washington are launching a study aimed at answering the question that's on a lot of people's minds as the coronavirus epidemic spreads through the Seattle area: How are you holding up? The King County COVID-19 Community Study, a.k.a. KC3S, is recruiting King County residents to tell their stories. The study is scheduled to collect data through April 19. “We want to start collecting this information now — as the COVID-19 pandemic is unfolding — about how families and communities are being impacted, and how they are adapting,” Nicole Errett, a lecturer in the UW Department… Read More


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  • 56/81   Fossil worm shows us our evolutionary beginnings
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    A tiny, 555-million-year-old seafloor creature reveals why our bodies are organised the way they are.

    A tiny, 555-million-year-old seafloor creature reveals why our bodies are organised the way they are.


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  • 57/81   OceanGate chooses Toray CMA to make carbon fiber for its Titanic submersibles
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Everett, Wash.-based OceanGate says Toray Composite Materials America is its preferred provider for the carbon fiber material that will be used in the company's next-generation submersibles. Toray CMA is the world's largest supplier of carbon fiber and the leader in providing fibers for numerous aircraft, including the Boeing 777 and 787. The company's U.S. head office is in Tacoma, Wash. OceanGate CEO Stockton Rush said in a statement that Toray CMA "will play a critical role as we develop the next generation of manned submersible, to usher in a new era of exploration using aerospace-quality composites." Toray CMA's vice president… Read More

    Everett, Wash.-based OceanGate says Toray Composite Materials America is its preferred provider for the carbon fiber material that will be used in the company's next-generation submersibles. Toray CMA is the world's largest supplier of carbon fiber and the leader in providing fibers for numerous aircraft, including the Boeing 777 and 787. The company's U.S. head office is in Tacoma, Wash. OceanGate CEO Stockton Rush said in a statement that Toray CMA "will play a critical role as we develop the next generation of manned submersible, to usher in a new era of exploration using aerospace-quality composites." Toray CMA's vice president… Read More


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  • 58/81   Climate change: Earth's deepest ice canyon vulnerable to melting
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Nasa scientists probe Denman Glacier which fills the deepest land gorge on Earth.

    Nasa scientists probe Denman Glacier which fills the deepest land gorge on Earth.


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  • 59/81   Electric car emissions myth 'busted'
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Fears that electric cars could actually increase carbon emissions are a baseless, a study suggests.

    Fears that electric cars could actually increase carbon emissions are a baseless, a study suggests.


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  • 60/81   As Natural Disasters Strike, a New Fear: Relief Shelters May Spread Virus
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    WASHINGTON -- Coast-to-coast storms. A spate of wildfires. Flooding in Hawaii. As the United States rushes into disaster season, federal officials now have an added crisis to worry about: How to stop tightly packed disaster-response shelters from becoming hot spots of coronavirus transmission.The virus is forcing emergency managers to rethink long-held procedures for operating shelters like these in real time. That challenge comes as the nation's crisis-response workforce is already taxed by three years of brutal hurricanes, floods and wildfires, a trend that climate change promises to accelerate."All of these activities that we do during and after disasters are activities that require a lot of people to be in close proximity to each other," said Samantha Montano, assistant professor of emergency management and disaster science at the University of Nebraska, Omaha. "And that is the exact opposite of what we need to do to keep people safe from COVID-19.""Any hazards that we're concerned about on an annual basis, we need to be twice as concerned about them now," she said.The Federal Emergency Management Agency has begun encouraging workers to "practice social distancing" and to limit to four the number of disaster victims who can be in one of its field offices at any given time, a spokeswoman said Thursday. The agency has also halted training at its National Fire Academy and Emergency Management Institute, as well as other facilities.It also said Thursday that it would let states seek reimbursement for sheltering victims individually, for example in hotels. However, in a disaster scenario, hotels themselves might be damaged or unusable because of the crisis, or simply not close enough to serve the immediate needs.So one of the most pressing challenges remains: What to do about shelters?When Americans are forced to leave their homes because of flooding or fires and have nowhere else to go, charitable organizations routinely open temporary shelters that usually consist of rows of cots in school gymnasiums, churches, convention centers or other large indoor spaces.Those shelters have offered a place of refuge, one that has become increasingly important as climate change causes more frequent and intense disasters.On Thursday, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration issued data predicting widespread flooding between now and the end of May, with major or moderate floods in 23 states. California has already been hit by nine wildfires this year; the National Interagency Fire Center reported 11 new large fires around the country this week alone.A major storm stretched across much of the country this week, with FEMA warning Friday of heavy rain from the southern plains to the Tennessee Valley. And hurricane season is just 10 weeks away.The coronavirus has the potential to turn the shelters from a refuge into a danger of their own.The American Red Cross, which runs most of the temporary shelters around the U.S., has set new guidelines for their operation, trying to curb the risk of transmission by screening evacuees and isolating those who show symptoms, as well as spacing cots 6 feet apart and emphasizing good hygiene.Officials with the organization said they knew that wasn't a perfect solution.Amid a pandemic, "a congregate shelter is not the best environment," said Trevor Riggen, senior vice president for disaster services for the Red Cross, using the term for shelters that place groups of people in a single shared space. He said the Red Cross would try to move more people into hotels or motels, but added that there weren't always enough available rooms close to a disaster, particularly if the number of people who need shelter extends into the hundreds.Public health officials said it would be better to house disaster victims separately, despite the additional cost and logistical hurdles."Congregate settings are clearly a higher infection-control risk, especially when dealing with a novel respiratory virus," said Lucy Wilson, who ran infection control for Maryland and is now a professor in the emergency health services department at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. She compared group shelters to other crowded settings like dormitories, barracks, prisons and cruise ships, where "respiratory diseases are known to rapidly spread."Arnold Monto, a professor of epidemiology and global health at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, said he thought the Red Cross was taking reasonable steps to protect the health of people in its shelters. But he said it seemed likely, based on what is known so far about COVID-19, that people who don't have symptoms may nonetheless have the disease -- and, more important, can probably spread it to others."Being in a motel would give them more distance," Monto said. "The more people you have, the more likely that one of them might be affected."The federal government's Thursday announcement that states can seek federal reimbursement for the cost of sheltering people individually -- provided it's at the direction of a public health official -- could help address that concern, assuming the rooms are available. Keeping people out of group shelters "may be necessary in this Public Health Emergency to save lives," the agency said in a fact sheet, "as well as to lessen or avert the threat of a catastrophe."Riggen said the Red Cross would try to get people into hotels when the risk of contagion is particularly high. Following an apartment fire this month in Jacksonville, Florida, a state with a large number of coronavirus cases, the organization put 45 people in hotels on the advice of local health officials, he said.In the meantime, the Red Cross is continuing to rely on shelters, but with a few changes.Its new guidelines call for taking the temperature of everyone coming into shelters, whether evacuees or volunteers, as well as checking for other symptoms of COVID-19. Once inside, everyone is supposed to be checked three times a day. Other steps include hand-washing stations, along with "enhanced cleaning of all hard surfaces."People are also told not to pull their cots together.The Red Cross has already applied its new guidelines at two shelters, according to Riggen. One is in Hawaii, which was hit this week by flooding. That shelter housed 150 people on Tuesday night.The other was at a school in Salt Lake City, which was set up following a 5.7-magnitude earthquake Wednesday. A Red Cross spokeswoman, Greta Gustafson, said Friday that no one had stayed at the shelter. Workers at the shelter denied entry Thursday to a photographer for The New York Times."We are not aware of any positive tests" for COVID-19 at either of the two shelters, Gustafson said.Despite the risk of the coronavirus, switching from a shelter model to putting people in hotels is more challenging that it might seem. And money isn't the only problem.In addition to being expensive, having people dispersed across different locations makes it harder to provide them with food and supplies, Riggen said. In some places, particularly rural areas, there may not be enough hotels nearby. And it's not always possible to get a hotel room if somebody is pushed from their home in the middle of the night."We don't want to leave people standing out on the curb waiting," Riggen said.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company

    WASHINGTON -- Coast-to-coast storms. A spate of wildfires. Flooding in Hawaii. As the United States rushes into disaster season, federal officials now have an added crisis to worry about: How to stop tightly packed disaster-response shelters from becoming hot spots of coronavirus transmission.The virus is forcing emergency managers to rethink long-held procedures for operating shelters like these in real time. That challenge comes as the nation's crisis-response workforce is already taxed by three years of brutal hurricanes, floods and wildfires, a trend that climate change promises to accelerate."All of these activities that we do during and after disasters are activities that require a lot of people to be in close proximity to each other," said Samantha Montano, assistant professor of emergency management and disaster science at the University of Nebraska, Omaha. "And that is the exact opposite of what we need to do to keep people safe from COVID-19.""Any hazards that we're concerned about on an annual basis, we need to be twice as concerned about them now," she said.The Federal Emergency Management Agency has begun encouraging workers to "practice social distancing" and to limit to four the number of disaster victims who can be in one of its field offices at any given time, a spokeswoman said Thursday. The agency has also halted training at its National Fire Academy and Emergency Management Institute, as well as other facilities.It also said Thursday that it would let states seek reimbursement for sheltering victims individually, for example in hotels. However, in a disaster scenario, hotels themselves might be damaged or unusable because of the crisis, or simply not close enough to serve the immediate needs.So one of the most pressing challenges remains: What to do about shelters?When Americans are forced to leave their homes because of flooding or fires and have nowhere else to go, charitable organizations routinely open temporary shelters that usually consist of rows of cots in school gymnasiums, churches, convention centers or other large indoor spaces.Those shelters have offered a place of refuge, one that has become increasingly important as climate change causes more frequent and intense disasters.On Thursday, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration issued data predicting widespread flooding between now and the end of May, with major or moderate floods in 23 states. California has already been hit by nine wildfires this year; the National Interagency Fire Center reported 11 new large fires around the country this week alone.A major storm stretched across much of the country this week, with FEMA warning Friday of heavy rain from the southern plains to the Tennessee Valley. And hurricane season is just 10 weeks away.The coronavirus has the potential to turn the shelters from a refuge into a danger of their own.The American Red Cross, which runs most of the temporary shelters around the U.S., has set new guidelines for their operation, trying to curb the risk of transmission by screening evacuees and isolating those who show symptoms, as well as spacing cots 6 feet apart and emphasizing good hygiene.Officials with the organization said they knew that wasn't a perfect solution.Amid a pandemic, "a congregate shelter is not the best environment," said Trevor Riggen, senior vice president for disaster services for the Red Cross, using the term for shelters that place groups of people in a single shared space. He said the Red Cross would try to move more people into hotels or motels, but added that there weren't always enough available rooms close to a disaster, particularly if the number of people who need shelter extends into the hundreds.Public health officials said it would be better to house disaster victims separately, despite the additional cost and logistical hurdles."Congregate settings are clearly a higher infection-control risk, especially when dealing with a novel respiratory virus," said Lucy Wilson, who ran infection control for Maryland and is now a professor in the emergency health services department at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. She compared group shelters to other crowded settings like dormitories, barracks, prisons and cruise ships, where "respiratory diseases are known to rapidly spread."Arnold Monto, a professor of epidemiology and global health at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, said he thought the Red Cross was taking reasonable steps to protect the health of people in its shelters. But he said it seemed likely, based on what is known so far about COVID-19, that people who don't have symptoms may nonetheless have the disease -- and, more important, can probably spread it to others."Being in a motel would give them more distance," Monto said. "The more people you have, the more likely that one of them might be affected."The federal government's Thursday announcement that states can seek federal reimbursement for the cost of sheltering people individually -- provided it's at the direction of a public health official -- could help address that concern, assuming the rooms are available. Keeping people out of group shelters "may be necessary in this Public Health Emergency to save lives," the agency said in a fact sheet, "as well as to lessen or avert the threat of a catastrophe."Riggen said the Red Cross would try to get people into hotels when the risk of contagion is particularly high. Following an apartment fire this month in Jacksonville, Florida, a state with a large number of coronavirus cases, the organization put 45 people in hotels on the advice of local health officials, he said.In the meantime, the Red Cross is continuing to rely on shelters, but with a few changes.Its new guidelines call for taking the temperature of everyone coming into shelters, whether evacuees or volunteers, as well as checking for other symptoms of COVID-19. Once inside, everyone is supposed to be checked three times a day. Other steps include hand-washing stations, along with "enhanced cleaning of all hard surfaces."People are also told not to pull their cots together.The Red Cross has already applied its new guidelines at two shelters, according to Riggen. One is in Hawaii, which was hit this week by flooding. That shelter housed 150 people on Tuesday night.The other was at a school in Salt Lake City, which was set up following a 5.7-magnitude earthquake Wednesday. A Red Cross spokeswoman, Greta Gustafson, said Friday that no one had stayed at the shelter. Workers at the shelter denied entry Thursday to a photographer for The New York Times."We are not aware of any positive tests" for COVID-19 at either of the two shelters, Gustafson said.Despite the risk of the coronavirus, switching from a shelter model to putting people in hotels is more challenging that it might seem. And money isn't the only problem.In addition to being expensive, having people dispersed across different locations makes it harder to provide them with food and supplies, Riggen said. In some places, particularly rural areas, there may not be enough hotels nearby. And it's not always possible to get a hotel room if somebody is pushed from their home in the middle of the night."We don't want to leave people standing out on the curb waiting," Riggen said.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company


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  • 61/81   I Spent a Year in Space, and I Have Tips on Isolation to Share
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Being stuck at home can be challenging. When I lived on the International Space Station for nearly a year, it wasn't easy. When I went to sleep, I was at work. When I woke up, I was still at work. Flying in space is probably the only job you absolutely cannot quit.But I learned some things during my time up there that I'd like to share -- because they are about to come in handy again, as we all confine ourselves at home to help stop the spread of the coronavirus. Here are a few tips on living in isolation, from someone who has been there.Follow a scheduleOn the space station, my time was scheduled tightly, from the moment I woke up to when I went to sleep. Sometimes this involved a spacewalk that could last up to eight hours; other times, it involved a five minute task, like checking on the experimental flowers I was growing in space. You will find maintaining a plan will help you and your family adjust to a different work and home life environment. When I returned to Earth, I missed the structure it provided and found it hard to live without.But pace yourselfWhen you are living and working in the same place for days on end, work can have a way of taking over everything if you let it. Living in space, I deliberately paced myself because I knew I was in it for the long haul -- just like we all are today. Take time for fun activities: I met up with crewmates for movie nights, complete with snacks, and binge watched all of "Game of Thrones" -- twice.And don't forget to include in your schedule a consistent bedtime. NASA scientists closely study astronauts' sleep when we are in space, and they have found that quality of sleep relates to cognition, mood, and interpersonal relations -- all essential to getting through a mission in space or a quarantine at home.Go outsideOne of the things I missed most while living in space was being able to go outside and experience nature. After being confined to a small space for months, I actually started to crave nature -- the color green, the smell of fresh dirt, and the feel of warm sun on my face. That flower experiment became more important to me than I could have ever imagined. My colleagues liked to play a recording of Earth sounds, like birds and rustling trees, and even mosquitoes, over and over. It brought me back to earth. (Although occasionally I found myself swatting my ears at the mosquitoes.)For an astronaut, going outside is a dangerous undertaking that requires days of preparation, so I appreciate that in our current predicament, I can step outside any time I want for a walk or a hike -- no spacesuit needed. Research has shown that spending time in nature is beneficial for our mental and physical health, as is exercise. You don't need to work out two and a half hours a day, as astronauts on the space station do, but getting moving once a day should be part of your quarantine schedule (just stay at least six feet away from others).You need a hobbyWhen you are confined in a small space you need an outlet that isn't work or maintaining your environment.Some people are surprised to learn I brought books with me to space. The quiet and absorption you can find in a physical book -- one that doesn't ping you with notifications or tempt you to open a new tab -- is priceless. Many small bookstores are currently offering curbside pickup or home delivery service, which means you can support a local business while also cultivating some much-needed unplugged time.You can also practice an instrument (I just bought a digital guitar trainer online), try a craft, or make some art. Astronauts take time for all of these while in space. (Remember Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield's famous cover of David Bowie's Space Oddity?)Keep a journalNASA has been studying the effects of isolation on humans for decades, and one surprising finding they have made is the value of keeping a journal. Throughout my yearlong mission, I took the time to write about my experiences almost every day. If you find yourself just chronicling the days' events (which, under the circumstances, might get repetitive) instead try describing what you are experiencing through your five senses or write about memories. Even if you don't wind up writing a book based on your journal like I did, writing about your days will help put your experiences in perspective and let you look back later on what this unique time in history has meant.Take time to connectEven with all the responsibilities of serving as commander of a space station, I never missed the chance to have a videoconference with family and friends. Scientists have found that isolation is damaging not only to our mental health, but to our physical health as well, especially our immune systems. Technology makes it easier than ever to keep in touch, so it's worth making time to connect with someone every day -- it might actually help you fight off viruses.Listen to expertsI've found that most problems aren't rocket science, but when they are rocket science, you should ask a rocket scientist. Living in space taught me a lot about the importance of trusting the advice of people who knew more than I did about their subjects, whether it was science, engineering, medicine, or the design of the incredibly complex space station that was keeping me alive.Especially in a challenging moment like the one we are living through now, we have to seek out knowledge from those who know the most about it and listen to them. Social media and other poorly vetted sources can be transmitters of misinformation just as handshakes transmit viruses, so we have to make a point of seeking out reputable sources of facts, like the World Health Organization and the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center.We are all connectedSeen from space, the Earth has no borders. The spread of the coronavirus is showing us that what we share is much more powerful than what keeps us apart, for better or for worse. All people are inescapably interconnected, and the more we can come together to solve our problems, the better off we will all be.One of the side effects of seeing Earth from a the perspective of space, at least for me, is feeling more compassion for others. As helpless as we may feel stuck inside our homes, there are always things we can do -- I've seen people reading to children via videoconference, donating their time and dollars to charities online, and running errands for elderly or immuno-compromised neighbors. The benefits for the volunteer are just as great as for those helped.I've seen humans work together to prevail over some of the toughest challenges imaginable, and I know we can prevail over this one if we all do our part and work together as a team.Oh, and wash your hands -- often.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company

    Being stuck at home can be challenging. When I lived on the International Space Station for nearly a year, it wasn't easy. When I went to sleep, I was at work. When I woke up, I was still at work. Flying in space is probably the only job you absolutely cannot quit.But I learned some things during my time up there that I'd like to share -- because they are about to come in handy again, as we all confine ourselves at home to help stop the spread of the coronavirus. Here are a few tips on living in isolation, from someone who has been there.Follow a scheduleOn the space station, my time was scheduled tightly, from the moment I woke up to when I went to sleep. Sometimes this involved a spacewalk that could last up to eight hours; other times, it involved a five minute task, like checking on the experimental flowers I was growing in space. You will find maintaining a plan will help you and your family adjust to a different work and home life environment. When I returned to Earth, I missed the structure it provided and found it hard to live without.But pace yourselfWhen you are living and working in the same place for days on end, work can have a way of taking over everything if you let it. Living in space, I deliberately paced myself because I knew I was in it for the long haul -- just like we all are today. Take time for fun activities: I met up with crewmates for movie nights, complete with snacks, and binge watched all of "Game of Thrones" -- twice.And don't forget to include in your schedule a consistent bedtime. NASA scientists closely study astronauts' sleep when we are in space, and they have found that quality of sleep relates to cognition, mood, and interpersonal relations -- all essential to getting through a mission in space or a quarantine at home.Go outsideOne of the things I missed most while living in space was being able to go outside and experience nature. After being confined to a small space for months, I actually started to crave nature -- the color green, the smell of fresh dirt, and the feel of warm sun on my face. That flower experiment became more important to me than I could have ever imagined. My colleagues liked to play a recording of Earth sounds, like birds and rustling trees, and even mosquitoes, over and over. It brought me back to earth. (Although occasionally I found myself swatting my ears at the mosquitoes.)For an astronaut, going outside is a dangerous undertaking that requires days of preparation, so I appreciate that in our current predicament, I can step outside any time I want for a walk or a hike -- no spacesuit needed. Research has shown that spending time in nature is beneficial for our mental and physical health, as is exercise. You don't need to work out two and a half hours a day, as astronauts on the space station do, but getting moving once a day should be part of your quarantine schedule (just stay at least six feet away from others).You need a hobbyWhen you are confined in a small space you need an outlet that isn't work or maintaining your environment.Some people are surprised to learn I brought books with me to space. The quiet and absorption you can find in a physical book -- one that doesn't ping you with notifications or tempt you to open a new tab -- is priceless. Many small bookstores are currently offering curbside pickup or home delivery service, which means you can support a local business while also cultivating some much-needed unplugged time.You can also practice an instrument (I just bought a digital guitar trainer online), try a craft, or make some art. Astronauts take time for all of these while in space. (Remember Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield's famous cover of David Bowie's Space Oddity?)Keep a journalNASA has been studying the effects of isolation on humans for decades, and one surprising finding they have made is the value of keeping a journal. Throughout my yearlong mission, I took the time to write about my experiences almost every day. If you find yourself just chronicling the days' events (which, under the circumstances, might get repetitive) instead try describing what you are experiencing through your five senses or write about memories. Even if you don't wind up writing a book based on your journal like I did, writing about your days will help put your experiences in perspective and let you look back later on what this unique time in history has meant.Take time to connectEven with all the responsibilities of serving as commander of a space station, I never missed the chance to have a videoconference with family and friends. Scientists have found that isolation is damaging not only to our mental health, but to our physical health as well, especially our immune systems. Technology makes it easier than ever to keep in touch, so it's worth making time to connect with someone every day -- it might actually help you fight off viruses.Listen to expertsI've found that most problems aren't rocket science, but when they are rocket science, you should ask a rocket scientist. Living in space taught me a lot about the importance of trusting the advice of people who knew more than I did about their subjects, whether it was science, engineering, medicine, or the design of the incredibly complex space station that was keeping me alive.Especially in a challenging moment like the one we are living through now, we have to seek out knowledge from those who know the most about it and listen to them. Social media and other poorly vetted sources can be transmitters of misinformation just as handshakes transmit viruses, so we have to make a point of seeking out reputable sources of facts, like the World Health Organization and the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center.We are all connectedSeen from space, the Earth has no borders. The spread of the coronavirus is showing us that what we share is much more powerful than what keeps us apart, for better or for worse. All people are inescapably interconnected, and the more we can come together to solve our problems, the better off we will all be.One of the side effects of seeing Earth from a the perspective of space, at least for me, is feeling more compassion for others. As helpless as we may feel stuck inside our homes, there are always things we can do -- I've seen people reading to children via videoconference, donating their time and dollars to charities online, and running errands for elderly or immuno-compromised neighbors. The benefits for the volunteer are just as great as for those helped.I've seen humans work together to prevail over some of the toughest challenges imaginable, and I know we can prevail over this one if we all do our part and work together as a team.Oh, and wash your hands -- often.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company


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  • 62/81   'We are collapsing': Virus pummels medics in Spain and Italy
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    “We were fed up of hearing it at the hospital, so it was just a matter of time before I would contract it,” said Núñez, a 32-year-old nurse who tested positive for the new coronavirus about a week ago.  Speaking via video call from her home, Núñez said she is eager to recover, so she can relieve overworked colleagues dealing with a rising wave of patients and dwindling numbers of healthy nurses and doctors.  The coronavirus is waging a war of attrition against health care workers throughout the world, but nowhere is it winning more battles at the moment than in Italy and in Spain, where protective equipment and tests have been in severely short supply for weeks.

    “We were fed up of hearing it at the hospital, so it was just a matter of time before I would contract it,” said Núñez, a 32-year-old nurse who tested positive for the new coronavirus about a week ago. Speaking via video call from her home, Núñez said she is eager to recover, so she can relieve overworked colleagues dealing with a rising wave of patients and dwindling numbers of healthy nurses and doctors. The coronavirus is waging a war of attrition against health care workers throughout the world, but nowhere is it winning more battles at the moment than in Italy and in Spain, where protective equipment and tests have been in severely short supply for weeks.


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  • 63/81   Putin Delays Referendum on Plan to Stay in Power Over Virus Fear
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- President Vladimir Putin postponed a planned public vote on constitutional changes next month that would allow him to rule to 2036 as the country attempts to stem the spread of the coronavirus, a setback for the Russian leader.Saying Russia couldn’t cut itself off from the pandemic, he announced next week would be a non-working one, though said workers would still be paid. Putin, 67, has rushed through the amendments to the constitution and promised Russians the final say, but the vote scheduled for April 22 will now be held at a date to be determined later, the president announced in a hastily arranged national address Wednesday.Though its totals remain well below those in some big European countries, Russia reported coronavirus cases jumped by a third over the past day to 658. Moscow Mayor Sergei Sobyanin told Putin Tuesday that the official numbers don’t reflect the “full picture” given a lack of testing.Authorities have closed the borders to foreigners and restricted international flights, shut schools, closed some public venues and confined elderly people to their homes in Moscow. While the government so far has ruled out a lock-down in the capital, state news service RIA Novosti reported Sunday that the government is leaning toward imposing stricter quarantine measures, citing an unidentified official.Putin Wednesday ordered the military to conduct checks of its readiness to help with virus-containment efforts, the Defense Ministry said.Recession RiskThe delay to the vote slows the momentum behind a vital initiative for Putin, who has put his weight behind a move that would allow him two more six-year presidential terms once his current mandate ends in 2024. Prior to this month, the Russian leader had repeatedly ruled out changes that would allow him to remain president.While Putin was reluctant to delay the vote, holding it in the midst of a public health scare is impossible, said Olga Kryshtanovskaya, a sociologist who studies the elite at the State University of Management in Moscow. “People are focused on survival right now, they’re not even thinking about politics,” she said.Russian consumers have been stripping stores bare of supplies like buckwheat and canned meat amid growing alarm about the spread of coronavirus.Officials said last week that Russia’s health system is stepping up efforts to offer testing more widely, with 100,000 new test kits being produced a day.Russia’s economy could slide into recession this year as it’s set to suffer a double shock from the fallout from coronavirus and Putin’s break with the OPEC oil cartel over efforts to control output, which has sent crude prices into a tailspin.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- President Vladimir Putin postponed a planned public vote on constitutional changes next month that would allow him to rule to 2036 as the country attempts to stem the spread of the coronavirus, a setback for the Russian leader.Saying Russia couldn’t cut itself off from the pandemic, he announced next week would be a non-working one, though said workers would still be paid. Putin, 67, has rushed through the amendments to the constitution and promised Russians the final say, but the vote scheduled for April 22 will now be held at a date to be determined later, the president announced in a hastily arranged national address Wednesday.Though its totals remain well below those in some big European countries, Russia reported coronavirus cases jumped by a third over the past day to 658. Moscow Mayor Sergei Sobyanin told Putin Tuesday that the official numbers don’t reflect the “full picture” given a lack of testing.Authorities have closed the borders to foreigners and restricted international flights, shut schools, closed some public venues and confined elderly people to their homes in Moscow. While the government so far has ruled out a lock-down in the capital, state news service RIA Novosti reported Sunday that the government is leaning toward imposing stricter quarantine measures, citing an unidentified official.Putin Wednesday ordered the military to conduct checks of its readiness to help with virus-containment efforts, the Defense Ministry said.Recession RiskThe delay to the vote slows the momentum behind a vital initiative for Putin, who has put his weight behind a move that would allow him two more six-year presidential terms once his current mandate ends in 2024. Prior to this month, the Russian leader had repeatedly ruled out changes that would allow him to remain president.While Putin was reluctant to delay the vote, holding it in the midst of a public health scare is impossible, said Olga Kryshtanovskaya, a sociologist who studies the elite at the State University of Management in Moscow. “People are focused on survival right now, they’re not even thinking about politics,” she said.Russian consumers have been stripping stores bare of supplies like buckwheat and canned meat amid growing alarm about the spread of coronavirus.Officials said last week that Russia’s health system is stepping up efforts to offer testing more widely, with 100,000 new test kits being produced a day.Russia’s economy could slide into recession this year as it’s set to suffer a double shock from the fallout from coronavirus and Putin’s break with the OPEC oil cartel over efforts to control output, which has sent crude prices into a tailspin.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 64/81   Deal with ransomware the way police deal with hostage situations
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    When faced with a ransomware attack, a person or company or government agency finds its digital data encrypted by an unknown person, and then gets a demand for a ransom. As that type of digital hijacking has become more common in recent years, there have been two major ways people have chosen to respond: pay the ransom, which can be in the hundreds of thousands of dollars, or hire computer security consultants to recover the data independently.Those approaches are missing another option that we have identified in our cybersecurity policy studies. Police have a long history of successful crisis and hostage negotiation – experience that offers lessons that could be useful for people and organizations facing ransomware attacks. Understanding the problemIn the first nine months of 2019, more than 600 U.S. government agencies – including entire municipal governments – suffered ransomware attacks. Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards was forced to declare a state of emergency following ransomware attacks on state government servers that caused widespread network outages at many state agencies, including the Office of Motor Vehicles and the departments of Public Health and Public Safety.Many of those victims chose to pay the ransom demanded by whoever hijacked their data. Lake City, Florida, for instance, paid US$460,000 to unlock its data. Other targets, like the city of Baltimore, chose to fight back instead of paying the ransom. Rather than handing the attackers the $76,000 they demanded, Baltimore paid more than $10 million to purchase new equipment and absorbed more than $8 million in lost revenue from taxes and fees that went unpaid while systems were down. Those moves were in line with FBI advice saying that paying the ransom could increase the likelihood of additional attacks, both on previous targets and new ones.More recently, the FBI has softened its stance to open the door to the paying of ransom in certain cases, but to always report doing so to law enforcement. Although the agency still underscores that paying a ransom does not guarantee that the encrypted files will be recovered, or that the victim will not be targeted again, it does recognize that “all options” should be considered in these cases. Preventing ransomwareThe best protection against ransomware is prevention. Learn, and teach your coworkers and employees, how best to protect yourselves, both personally and professionally, from hackers. Keep software up-to-date with the latest security upgrades. In addition, ensure your data is backed up regularly. That way, if a ransomware attack happens, the victims can get professional help removing the malware from their systems, restore their data and move on. Many companies have purchased insurance coverage to help pay the costs of recovering from ransomware – but some of those policies also include paying ransoms in the event of an attack.Getting the data back isn’t a sure thing. Of the organizations that have paid the ransom, 20% haven’t actually recovered their data.That presents victims with the certainty of spending some amount of money – whether it’s a ransom payment or a bill for a cybersecurity specialist – and not necessarily getting their data back.  An opportunity to engageWe have found another approach that could reduce the amount of money spent and simultaneously increase the certainty of data recovery.Negotiating with hostage takers is tricky business, both online and offline. But many cybercriminals are often willing to bargain over the price of a ransomware payout. In fact, nearly three out of four ransomware hackers would return stolen data for a discounted price. With cybercrime overall – of which ransomware is a large and growing component – slated to cost the global economy $6 trillion a year by 2021, the opportunity to lower costs could be very valuable. For people or organizations without insurance coverage, there is little to lose by trying.When a ransomware attack begins, affected computers’ screens normally announce the attack, include a demand for payment, and show a countdown clock, after which, allegedly, the hijacked data will become irretrievable.That time is a window of opportunity to negotiate with the attackers. Usually, ransomware attackers require their victims to buy bitcoin, a form of digital currency, in order to pay the ransom. Most people don’t know how to buy bitcoin in the first place, so often an attacker has to teach the victim what to do. This opens a channel of communication between the victim and the attacker, which is analogous to the starting point police experts use to defuse hostage situations. Negotiating with cybercriminalsIn general, the less the victim knows about how to purchase bitcoin, the more time the victim has to build up rapport and trust with the cybercriminal. During a negotiation, an attacker may extend payment deadlines, lower the ransom, decrypt some data as a show of “good faith” or provide step-by-step assistance in purchasing bitcoin.These steps may be understood as offers to gain the hostage’s trust and may reveal the hacker’s willingness to be flexible. A victim can request some data be restored, in part to prove that the hacker actually controls the files. If the attacker doesn’t provide any decrypted data, it may be a sign that the ransomware is one that just erases data, rather than holding it hostage. That type of attack cannot be reversed, even if a ransom is paid. If that’s the case, then it may be smart to terminate negotiation and not consider paying the ransom, either. A risky businessNo strategy for dealing with a ransomware attack is without risk. Paying the ransom appears to increase the chances of being targeted again in the future, according to one 2018 report. In a future attack, the attackers will be less likely to believe that you don’t know how to buy or send bitcoin.Paying the ransom also lets the criminals, and at times rogue nations like North Korea who also mount ransomware attacks, earn significant amounts with minimal risk, possibly increasing the likelihood of others being targeted as well.Declaring that you won’t pay the ransom has its own dangers, as Baltimore saw, paying millions in fees to recover data and rebuild systems. That data could, at least potentially, have been reclaimed for just thousands of dollars. In a similar situation, the city of Atlanta was hit by “GoldenEye” ransomware, with cyberextortionists demanding $51,000 in bitcoin. Atlanta, like Baltimore, refused to pay. The city ended up spending more than $9.5 million in taxpayer dollars for recovery. These events make clear the moral and ethical dilemma around fueling crime and efficiently using public resources, a quandary that can be lessened, if not relieved entirely, by negotiating.More organizations are trying this new approach, seeking to lower ransom payments and recover data less expensively. For example, the municipal government of Mekinac, Quebec, Canada, managed to lower its ransomware payment by 55% through negotiations. In our view, it’s worth a try – and while certainly not risk-free, it could help.[Deep knowledge, daily. Sign up for The Conversation’s newsletter.]This article is republished from The Conversation, a nonprofit news site dedicated to sharing ideas from academic experts.Read more:    * Hackers seek ransoms from Baltimore and communities across the US  * ‘NotPetya’ ransomware attack shows corporate social responsibility should include cybersecurityScott Shackelford is a principal investigator on grants from the Hewlett Foundation, Indiana Economic Development Corporation, and the Microsoft Corporation supporting both the Ostrom Workshop Program on Cybersecurity and Internet Governance and the Indiana University Cybersecurity Clinic. Megan Wade does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

    When faced with a ransomware attack, a person or company or government agency finds its digital data encrypted by an unknown person, and then gets a demand for a ransom. As that type of digital hijacking has become more common in recent years, there have been two major ways people have chosen to respond: pay the ransom, which can be in the hundreds of thousands of dollars, or hire computer security consultants to recover the data independently.Those approaches are missing another option that we have identified in our cybersecurity policy studies. Police have a long history of successful crisis and hostage negotiation – experience that offers lessons that could be useful for people and organizations facing ransomware attacks. Understanding the problemIn the first nine months of 2019, more than 600 U.S. government agencies – including entire municipal governments – suffered ransomware attacks. Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards was forced to declare a state of emergency following ransomware attacks on state government servers that caused widespread network outages at many state agencies, including the Office of Motor Vehicles and the departments of Public Health and Public Safety.Many of those victims chose to pay the ransom demanded by whoever hijacked their data. Lake City, Florida, for instance, paid US$460,000 to unlock its data. Other targets, like the city of Baltimore, chose to fight back instead of paying the ransom. Rather than handing the attackers the $76,000 they demanded, Baltimore paid more than $10 million to purchase new equipment and absorbed more than $8 million in lost revenue from taxes and fees that went unpaid while systems were down. Those moves were in line with FBI advice saying that paying the ransom could increase the likelihood of additional attacks, both on previous targets and new ones.More recently, the FBI has softened its stance to open the door to the paying of ransom in certain cases, but to always report doing so to law enforcement. Although the agency still underscores that paying a ransom does not guarantee that the encrypted files will be recovered, or that the victim will not be targeted again, it does recognize that “all options” should be considered in these cases. Preventing ransomwareThe best protection against ransomware is prevention. Learn, and teach your coworkers and employees, how best to protect yourselves, both personally and professionally, from hackers. Keep software up-to-date with the latest security upgrades. In addition, ensure your data is backed up regularly. That way, if a ransomware attack happens, the victims can get professional help removing the malware from their systems, restore their data and move on. Many companies have purchased insurance coverage to help pay the costs of recovering from ransomware – but some of those policies also include paying ransoms in the event of an attack.Getting the data back isn’t a sure thing. Of the organizations that have paid the ransom, 20% haven’t actually recovered their data.That presents victims with the certainty of spending some amount of money – whether it’s a ransom payment or a bill for a cybersecurity specialist – and not necessarily getting their data back. An opportunity to engageWe have found another approach that could reduce the amount of money spent and simultaneously increase the certainty of data recovery.Negotiating with hostage takers is tricky business, both online and offline. But many cybercriminals are often willing to bargain over the price of a ransomware payout. In fact, nearly three out of four ransomware hackers would return stolen data for a discounted price. With cybercrime overall – of which ransomware is a large and growing component – slated to cost the global economy $6 trillion a year by 2021, the opportunity to lower costs could be very valuable. For people or organizations without insurance coverage, there is little to lose by trying.When a ransomware attack begins, affected computers’ screens normally announce the attack, include a demand for payment, and show a countdown clock, after which, allegedly, the hijacked data will become irretrievable.That time is a window of opportunity to negotiate with the attackers. Usually, ransomware attackers require their victims to buy bitcoin, a form of digital currency, in order to pay the ransom. Most people don’t know how to buy bitcoin in the first place, so often an attacker has to teach the victim what to do. This opens a channel of communication between the victim and the attacker, which is analogous to the starting point police experts use to defuse hostage situations. Negotiating with cybercriminalsIn general, the less the victim knows about how to purchase bitcoin, the more time the victim has to build up rapport and trust with the cybercriminal. During a negotiation, an attacker may extend payment deadlines, lower the ransom, decrypt some data as a show of “good faith” or provide step-by-step assistance in purchasing bitcoin.These steps may be understood as offers to gain the hostage’s trust and may reveal the hacker’s willingness to be flexible. A victim can request some data be restored, in part to prove that the hacker actually controls the files. If the attacker doesn’t provide any decrypted data, it may be a sign that the ransomware is one that just erases data, rather than holding it hostage. That type of attack cannot be reversed, even if a ransom is paid. If that’s the case, then it may be smart to terminate negotiation and not consider paying the ransom, either. A risky businessNo strategy for dealing with a ransomware attack is without risk. Paying the ransom appears to increase the chances of being targeted again in the future, according to one 2018 report. In a future attack, the attackers will be less likely to believe that you don’t know how to buy or send bitcoin.Paying the ransom also lets the criminals, and at times rogue nations like North Korea who also mount ransomware attacks, earn significant amounts with minimal risk, possibly increasing the likelihood of others being targeted as well.Declaring that you won’t pay the ransom has its own dangers, as Baltimore saw, paying millions in fees to recover data and rebuild systems. That data could, at least potentially, have been reclaimed for just thousands of dollars. In a similar situation, the city of Atlanta was hit by “GoldenEye” ransomware, with cyberextortionists demanding $51,000 in bitcoin. Atlanta, like Baltimore, refused to pay. The city ended up spending more than $9.5 million in taxpayer dollars for recovery. These events make clear the moral and ethical dilemma around fueling crime and efficiently using public resources, a quandary that can be lessened, if not relieved entirely, by negotiating.More organizations are trying this new approach, seeking to lower ransom payments and recover data less expensively. For example, the municipal government of Mekinac, Quebec, Canada, managed to lower its ransomware payment by 55% through negotiations. In our view, it’s worth a try – and while certainly not risk-free, it could help.[Deep knowledge, daily. Sign up for The Conversation’s newsletter.]This article is republished from The Conversation, a nonprofit news site dedicated to sharing ideas from academic experts.Read more: * Hackers seek ransoms from Baltimore and communities across the US * ‘NotPetya’ ransomware attack shows corporate social responsibility should include cybersecurityScott Shackelford is a principal investigator on grants from the Hewlett Foundation, Indiana Economic Development Corporation, and the Microsoft Corporation supporting both the Ostrom Workshop Program on Cybersecurity and Internet Governance and the Indiana University Cybersecurity Clinic. Megan Wade does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.


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  • 65/81   'Nightline's' original anchor Ted Koppel reflects on show's 40th anniversary, fighting COPD and the coronavirus
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Ted Koppel, who hosted ABC News’ 'Nightline' for 25 years from its inception in 1980, said it was a 'national obsession' with the Iran hostage crisis that drew people to tune in to the show, which first began as a special report called 'America Held Hostage.'  On Tuesday, exactly 40 years after 'Nightline' first aired, 'Nightline' co-anchor Juju Chang interviewed Koppel, who pointed to another 'much bigger' crisis capturing much of the U.S. public’s attention: the coronavirus pandemic.

    Ted Koppel, who hosted ABC News’ 'Nightline' for 25 years from its inception in 1980, said it was a 'national obsession' with the Iran hostage crisis that drew people to tune in to the show, which first began as a special report called 'America Held Hostage.' On Tuesday, exactly 40 years after 'Nightline' first aired, 'Nightline' co-anchor Juju Chang interviewed Koppel, who pointed to another 'much bigger' crisis capturing much of the U.S. public’s attention: the coronavirus pandemic.


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  • 66/81   Virus pandemic an unprecedented test for a young generation
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    For Jalen Grimes, the virus pandemic is stirring up a slew of emotions. Studies have shown that “kids in these circumstances are thrust into growing up faster than is typical,” said Pallas, a professor of sociology and education.

    For Jalen Grimes, the virus pandemic is stirring up a slew of emotions. Studies have shown that “kids in these circumstances are thrust into growing up faster than is typical,” said Pallas, a professor of sociology and education.


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  • 67/81   They already had an anxiety disorder. Now comes a pandemic.
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    At first, Jonathon Seidl wasn't worried about the coronavirus despite his anxiety disorder. The 33-year-old digital media strategist from Dallas, who takes medication, said his concern was less about getting sick than about the battering the economy could sustain. The pandemic is worrisome enough for most people.

    At first, Jonathon Seidl wasn't worried about the coronavirus despite his anxiety disorder. The 33-year-old digital media strategist from Dallas, who takes medication, said his concern was less about getting sick than about the battering the economy could sustain. The pandemic is worrisome enough for most people.


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  • 68/81   UK hauliers demand Boris Johnson extends the Brexit transition period so they can cope with the coronavirus pandemic
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The coronavirus pandemic is a "once in a lifetime emergency" which means Brexit must now be delayed, says the UK haulage industry.

    The coronavirus pandemic is a "once in a lifetime emergency" which means Brexit must now be delayed, says the UK haulage industry.


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  • 69/81   Tripoli officials say clashes escalating over Libyan capital
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The renewed fighting comes despite increased international pressure on both sides to halt the violence over concerns about the spread of the new coronavirus.  Libya reported its first case of the virus on Tuesday.  The fighting has been raging for nearly a year between military commander Khalifa Hifter's forces, allied with a rival government based in eastern Libya, and an array of militia loosely linked to Tripoli authorities in the west.

    The renewed fighting comes despite increased international pressure on both sides to halt the violence over concerns about the spread of the new coronavirus. Libya reported its first case of the virus on Tuesday. The fighting has been raging for nearly a year between military commander Khalifa Hifter's forces, allied with a rival government based in eastern Libya, and an array of militia loosely linked to Tripoli authorities in the west.


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  • 70/81   U.S. sanctions on Iran hinder global coronavirus response: Iranian U.N. ambassador
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The people of Iran are not immune to the ravages of this virus and we need help.

    The people of Iran are not immune to the ravages of this virus and we need help.


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  • 71/81   Worried Businesses Left Hanging for State Aid
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- After days of arguing, Democrats and Republicans have agreed on a blockbuster $2 trillion in spending and tax breaks to buffer the U.S. economy against the coronavirus outbreak.That's a much-needed win for President Donald Trump, whose electoral fortunes move in correlated fashion with the ups and downs of the stock market and U.S. economy.Keeping the U.S. economy off life support is also beneficial to the rest of the world. Alongside China, it’s the main engine of global growth.But the key question remains how to funnel much-needed aid to where it is required, and fast.Even as the numbers stack up with dizzying speed (including outside the U.S., with European leaders meeting tomorrow to sign off on more), small and medium-sized business owners remain confused and anxious about how to tap the assistance.We spoke with companies around the world and heard similar things (click here to read the story). They are grateful that governments want to help them via loans, direct payments and covering salaries. But some are hearing that money may only start coming in late April, when they need to pay staff next week. Others say the criteria on who qualifies for special loans is unclear and somewhat random.Take James Hart, director of IT support firm Purple Computing in the English city of Bristol. He spent seven hours waiting on the phone to apply for a business interruption loan, before eventually giving up. “I’ll be dreaming of the hold music tonight,” he says.Global HeadlinesJust in: Russian President Vladimir Putin will make a statement to the nation today about the coronavirus, the Kremlin told reporters, after he canceled a planned trip to St. Petersburg.Toning it down | Trump will stop saying “Chinese virus” amid signs the U.S. and China are seeking to cool a spat over the pandemic. The president said that while it’s generally known the virus emerged in China, his use of the term was provoked by a Chinese official suggesting that U.S. soldiers had spread it. Trump, who faces an election in November, has previously blamed China as the outbreak threatens to push the world into recession.Parliament shutdown | British lawmakers are set to vote to close the House of Commons tonight instead of March 31, in the latest attempt to stifle the spread of the coronavirus. While Prime Minister Boris Johnson has put the country on lockdown he’s faced criticism for being too slow to act, with London's Underground trains and famous red buses still running and its parks packed with people.Factory restarts | While output elsewhere is grinding to a halt, China is slowly resuming production at factories and restoring flights. Employees are returning to work, with original outbreak epicenter Wuhan set to end its lockdown on April 8. Chinese subway traffic increased 21% last week, while online sales of large appliances rebounded, say analysts at Sanford C. Bernstein.Eastern upside | One region that may get some economic offset from the pandemic is Europe’s eastern bloc. As the virus wreaks havoc on supply chains and disrupts goods from China, Aaron Eglitis reports, some companies may turn to the region to secure back-up capacity. Its countries are on the doorstep of the continent’s more developed west, its workers generally highly skilled, and many nations are European Union members.Call for normalcy | President Jair Bolsonaro, a strong Trump fan, is echoing his northern counterpart in urging Brazilians to return to work and lashing out at state governors who’ve ordered shops and schools closed. But the stance carries risks: During his nationally televised address, people banged pots and pans from windows in neighborhoods in key cities to protest his handling of the virus crisis.What to WatchGroup of Seven foreign ministers meet today via teleconference after an in-person summit in Pittsburgh was canceled. Islamic State claimed responsibility for Monday’s attack on a northern Mozambican town near natural-gas projects built by Exxon Mobil and Total at a cost of nearly $60 billion.Tell us how we’re doing or what we’re missing at balancepower@bloomberg.net.And finally ... Becoming the first world leader to postpone the Olympic Games could’ve been a disaster for Japan’s Shinzo Abe, yet it might play to his advantage. The deferral means disappointed participants, increased costs and deprives Abe of a chance to showcase his efforts to overhaul Japan’s economy. But the decision also frees him to call an election when he sees fit — potentially as soon as this summer — with the ruling party's support holding steady and the opposition mired in disarray. For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- After days of arguing, Democrats and Republicans have agreed on a blockbuster $2 trillion in spending and tax breaks to buffer the U.S. economy against the coronavirus outbreak.That's a much-needed win for President Donald Trump, whose electoral fortunes move in correlated fashion with the ups and downs of the stock market and U.S. economy.Keeping the U.S. economy off life support is also beneficial to the rest of the world. Alongside China, it’s the main engine of global growth.But the key question remains how to funnel much-needed aid to where it is required, and fast.Even as the numbers stack up with dizzying speed (including outside the U.S., with European leaders meeting tomorrow to sign off on more), small and medium-sized business owners remain confused and anxious about how to tap the assistance.We spoke with companies around the world and heard similar things (click here to read the story). They are grateful that governments want to help them via loans, direct payments and covering salaries. But some are hearing that money may only start coming in late April, when they need to pay staff next week. Others say the criteria on who qualifies for special loans is unclear and somewhat random.Take James Hart, director of IT support firm Purple Computing in the English city of Bristol. He spent seven hours waiting on the phone to apply for a business interruption loan, before eventually giving up. “I’ll be dreaming of the hold music tonight,” he says.Global HeadlinesJust in: Russian President Vladimir Putin will make a statement to the nation today about the coronavirus, the Kremlin told reporters, after he canceled a planned trip to St. Petersburg.Toning it down | Trump will stop saying “Chinese virus” amid signs the U.S. and China are seeking to cool a spat over the pandemic. The president said that while it’s generally known the virus emerged in China, his use of the term was provoked by a Chinese official suggesting that U.S. soldiers had spread it. Trump, who faces an election in November, has previously blamed China as the outbreak threatens to push the world into recession.Parliament shutdown | British lawmakers are set to vote to close the House of Commons tonight instead of March 31, in the latest attempt to stifle the spread of the coronavirus. While Prime Minister Boris Johnson has put the country on lockdown he’s faced criticism for being too slow to act, with London's Underground trains and famous red buses still running and its parks packed with people.Factory restarts | While output elsewhere is grinding to a halt, China is slowly resuming production at factories and restoring flights. Employees are returning to work, with original outbreak epicenter Wuhan set to end its lockdown on April 8. Chinese subway traffic increased 21% last week, while online sales of large appliances rebounded, say analysts at Sanford C. Bernstein.Eastern upside | One region that may get some economic offset from the pandemic is Europe’s eastern bloc. As the virus wreaks havoc on supply chains and disrupts goods from China, Aaron Eglitis reports, some companies may turn to the region to secure back-up capacity. Its countries are on the doorstep of the continent’s more developed west, its workers generally highly skilled, and many nations are European Union members.Call for normalcy | President Jair Bolsonaro, a strong Trump fan, is echoing his northern counterpart in urging Brazilians to return to work and lashing out at state governors who’ve ordered shops and schools closed. But the stance carries risks: During his nationally televised address, people banged pots and pans from windows in neighborhoods in key cities to protest his handling of the virus crisis.What to WatchGroup of Seven foreign ministers meet today via teleconference after an in-person summit in Pittsburgh was canceled. Islamic State claimed responsibility for Monday’s attack on a northern Mozambican town near natural-gas projects built by Exxon Mobil and Total at a cost of nearly $60 billion.Tell us how we’re doing or what we’re missing at balancepower@bloomberg.net.And finally ... Becoming the first world leader to postpone the Olympic Games could’ve been a disaster for Japan’s Shinzo Abe, yet it might play to his advantage. The deferral means disappointed participants, increased costs and deprives Abe of a chance to showcase his efforts to overhaul Japan’s economy. But the decision also frees him to call an election when he sees fit — potentially as soon as this summer — with the ruling party's support holding steady and the opposition mired in disarray. For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 72/81   Should prisoners be freed to stop outbreaks behind bars?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Health experts are concerned about the possibility of devastating coronavirus outbreaks inside America's jails and prisons. Are drastic steps needed to prevent the virus from wreaking havoc behind bars?

    Health experts are concerned about the possibility of devastating coronavirus outbreaks inside America's jails and prisons. Are drastic steps needed to prevent the virus from wreaking havoc behind bars?


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  • 73/81   Coronavirus strikes Navy carrier at sea, three sailors evacuated
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Three sailors aboard the carrier Theodore Roosevelt tested positive for coronavirus after coming down with symptoms of COVID-19 and have been evacuated from the ship.

    Three sailors aboard the carrier Theodore Roosevelt tested positive for coronavirus after coming down with symptoms of COVID-19 and have been evacuated from the ship.


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  • 74/81   Cuomo calls on Trump to invoke Defense Production Act in fight against coronavirus
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    President Trump has been reluctant to use the Cold War-era Defense Production Act, which allows the president to pressure or even force private industries to produce products deemed necessary for the nation’s defense.

    President Trump has been reluctant to use the Cold War-era Defense Production Act, which allows the president to pressure or even force private industries to produce products deemed necessary for the nation’s defense.


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  • 75/81   Growing impatient, Trump says he hopes to have 'the country opened up' by Easter amid coronavirus fears
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    The president told Fox News on Tuesday that he hopes to "have the country opened up and just raring to go by Easter," which falls this year on April 12.

    The president told Fox News on Tuesday that he hopes to "have the country opened up and just raring to go by Easter," which falls this year on April 12.


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  • 76/81   Rural counties face their own challenges in the coronavirus pandemic. Here's how one is coping.
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Although the scale of the coronavirus outbreak, at least so far, is much lower in rural counties than in some big cities, they face distinctive challenges in coping with an epidemic of a life-threatening disease.

    Although the scale of the coronavirus outbreak, at least so far, is much lower in rural counties than in some big cities, they face distinctive challenges in coping with an epidemic of a life-threatening disease.


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  • 77/81   Coronavirus: News and live updates
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    The latest news and information on the pandemic from Yahoo News reporters in the United States and around the world.

    The latest news and information on the pandemic from Yahoo News reporters in the United States and around the world.


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  • 78/81   Fox News' coronavirus denial means 'viewers will die,' media critic says
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    As the coronavirus threat intensified in the U.S., Fox News viewers received different information than Americans who got their news from other sources. Ben Smith, the media critic at the New York Times, set out to understand why. His conclusion: Fox anchors consistently downplayed and even denied the existence of the virus.

    As the coronavirus threat intensified in the U.S., Fox News viewers received different information than Americans who got their news from other sources. Ben Smith, the media critic at the New York Times, set out to understand why. His conclusion: Fox anchors consistently downplayed and even denied the existence of the virus.


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  • 79/81   Trump downplays coronavirus threat again, even as number of cases in U.S. surges
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    President Trump continued to downplay the exponential spread of the coronavirus in the United States on Monday, comparing the rising death toll to the number of Americans killed in car crashes and by the seasonal flu.

    President Trump continued to downplay the exponential spread of the coronavirus in the United States on Monday, comparing the rising death toll to the number of Americans killed in car crashes and by the seasonal flu.


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  • 80/81   Broadway community comes together to start sewing and delivering protective gear to New York City hospitals
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    A former "Hamilton" star joins forces with the larger Broadway community to make protective equipment for health care workers and patients.

    A former "Hamilton" star joins forces with the larger Broadway community to make protective equipment for health care workers and patients.


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  • 81/81   First responders under strain due to lack of protective equipment, coronavirus test
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    A lack of protective equipment combined with a lack of testing for the coronavirus is putting a huge strain on those first responders who are on the frontlines of helping pick up sick patients from their homes or off the street.

    A lack of protective equipment combined with a lack of testing for the coronavirus is putting a huge strain on those first responders who are on the frontlines of helping pick up sick patients from their homes or off the street.


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