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News Slideshows (03/26/2020 03 hours)


  • 1/81   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


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    Press Review


    Michael Bay   Cheesecake Factory   Sam Rockwell   Kevin James   The Jeffersons   Lindsey Graham   Scorsese   Tarantino   Taika Waititi   Malcolm Bivens   Shyamalan   David Hogg   Kenny Omega   Darby Allin   Boston Rob   Jake Roberts   Andy Samberg   Draya   Barney Miller   Middle West   Jessica Chastain   austin theory   13 Deaths in a Day   Manu   Hill Street Blues   
  • 2/81   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


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  • 3/81   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


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  • 4/81   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


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  • 5/81   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


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  • 6/81   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


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  • 7/81   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


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  • 8/81   Do star athletes make too much money?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    With athletes in America's biggest sports leagues raking in salaries worth $300 million and more, is it time to reign in the big spending or do superstars deserve the big bucks they make?

    With athletes in America's biggest sports leagues raking in salaries worth $300 million and more, is it time to reign in the big spending or do superstars deserve the big bucks they make?


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  • 9/81   Live animal mascots: Cute or exploitative?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?


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  • 10/81   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


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  • 11/81   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


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  • 12/81   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


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  • 13/81   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


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  • 14/81   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


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  • 15/81   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


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  • 16/81   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


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  • 17/81   PHOTOS: Fluorescent turtle embryo wins forty-fifth annual Nikon Small World Competition

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.


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  • 18/81   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


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  • 19/81   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


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  • 20/81   What the CIA thinks of your anti-virus program

    PARIS (AP) — Peppering the 8,000 pages of purported Central Intelligence Agency hacking data released Tuesday by WikiLeaks are reviews of some of the world's most popular anti-virus products.

    PARIS (AP) — Peppering the 8,000 pages of purported Central Intelligence Agency hacking data released Tuesday by WikiLeaks are reviews of some of the world's most popular anti-virus products.


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  • 21/81   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


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  • 22/81   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


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  • 23/81   Singapore flags deep recession as coronavirus shrinks economy in first quarter
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Singapore's economy suffered its biggest contraction in a decade in the first quarter, data showed on Thursday, as the coronavirus pandemic prompted the city-state to cut its full-year GDP forecast and plan for a deep recession.  Singapore is one of the world's most open economies and one of the first to report growth data since the virus spread from China at the start of the year.  The data prompted the trade ministry to cut its 2020 GDP forecast range to -4% to -1%, from a previous range of -0.5% to 1.5%, and firmed up investors' bets for major fiscal and monetary stimulus.

    Singapore's economy suffered its biggest contraction in a decade in the first quarter, data showed on Thursday, as the coronavirus pandemic prompted the city-state to cut its full-year GDP forecast and plan for a deep recession. Singapore is one of the world's most open economies and one of the first to report growth data since the virus spread from China at the start of the year. The data prompted the trade ministry to cut its 2020 GDP forecast range to -4% to -1%, from a previous range of -0.5% to 1.5%, and firmed up investors' bets for major fiscal and monetary stimulus.


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  • 24/81   TUFIN ALERT: ROSEN, A LEADING LAW FIRM, Reminds Tufin Software Technologies Ltd. Investors of Securities Class Action
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Rosen Law Firm, a global investor rights law firm, reminds Tufin Software Technologies Ltd. shareholders pursuant and/or traceable to the Company's initial public offering conducted on or about April 11, 2019 (the "IPO" or "Offering") of the recently filed securities class action. The lawsuit seeks to recover damages for Tufin investors under the federal securities laws.

    Rosen Law Firm, a global investor rights law firm, reminds Tufin Software Technologies Ltd. shareholders pursuant and/or traceable to the Company's initial public offering conducted on or about April 11, 2019 (the "IPO" or "Offering") of the recently filed securities class action. The lawsuit seeks to recover damages for Tufin investors under the federal securities laws.


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  • 25/81   XABT donates 2019-nCoV nucleic acid detection kits to Italy
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    On March 19, the 2019-nCoV Detection Kit and Nucleic Acid Extraction Donation & Shipment Ceremony was held in Beijing. Beijing Applied Biological Technologies Co., Ltd. (XABT) was invited to the event at which the biologics maker donated an allotment of nucleic acid detection kits that it had produced to Italy. Chinese People's Association for Friendship with Foreign Countries president and China Peace and Development Foundation honorary president Li Xiaolin, as well as Italian ambassador to China Luca Ferrari delivered speeches at the event.

    On March 19, the 2019-nCoV Detection Kit and Nucleic Acid Extraction Donation & Shipment Ceremony was held in Beijing. Beijing Applied Biological Technologies Co., Ltd. (XABT) was invited to the event at which the biologics maker donated an allotment of nucleic acid detection kits that it had produced to Italy. Chinese People's Association for Friendship with Foreign Countries president and China Peace and Development Foundation honorary president Li Xiaolin, as well as Italian ambassador to China Luca Ferrari delivered speeches at the event.


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  • 26/81   Asian markets tread cautiously ahead of U.S. stimulus, jobs
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Asian stock markets made a cautious start on Thursday following two days of rallies, as investors await the passage and details of a $2 trillion stimulus package in the United States to combat  the economic fallout from the coronavirus.  It cannot come soon enough, with potentially enormous weekly U.S. initial jobless claims to appear in data due at 1230 GMT.  Japan's Nikkei fell 2.2%.

    Asian stock markets made a cautious start on Thursday following two days of rallies, as investors await the passage and details of a $2 trillion stimulus package in the United States to combat the economic fallout from the coronavirus. It cannot come soon enough, with potentially enormous weekly U.S. initial jobless claims to appear in data due at 1230 GMT. Japan's Nikkei fell 2.2%.


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  • 27/81   Global CBD Brand Elixinol Appoints New CEO Americas
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Elixinol, a global hemp derived CBD brand, announced it has named Tom Siciliano as the organization's new CEO Americas effective immediately. Siciliano is charged with leading Elixinol's refined strategy on hemp derived CBD in the Americas region.

    Elixinol, a global hemp derived CBD brand, announced it has named Tom Siciliano as the organization's new CEO Americas effective immediately. Siciliano is charged with leading Elixinol's refined strategy on hemp derived CBD in the Americas region.


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  • 28/81   Stocks Slip After Rally; Treasuries, Yen Rise: Markets Wrap
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Asian stocks mostly fell on Thursday, following the first back-to-back gains for global equities since mid-February, as investors digested the text of the U.S. stimulus bill.Japanese shares sank more than 2% amid further efforts to contain the movement of people. South Korean equities and those in Hong Kong were also lower, while shares in Australia saw modest gains. S&P 500 futures dipped after the benchmark’s rally of more than 5% fizzled. Senate negotiators circulated what was labeled a final draft of the negotiated agreement. The Australian and New Zealand dollars declined more than 1%. Treasuries and the yen rose.“While exact details are still emerging, the support package should help to assuage the fears about the worst possible economic outcomes for individuals and companies,” said Oliver Blackbourn, a multi-asset portfolio manager at Janus Henderson Investors. “Investors need to remain vigilant about how the growth rate of new cases develops and how governments respond going forward.”The Senate bill text may still not be the final deal, following intense negotiations on the $2 trillion aid package of spending and tax breaks. In Europe, leaders are inching toward a fiscal package of their own.The first consecutive daily gains for global equities since Feb. 12 come as cities from Milan to Seattle reel from the deepening pandemic. With the world’s cases now topping 451,000 and more than 20,000 deaths, traders are cognizant of the ongoing threat to the global economy.“Liquidity wise, we should be fine, we just have to go through this as quickly as possible, containing it and of course repressing the population from moving,” Alicia Garcia Herrero, chief economist for Asia-Pacific at Natixis. “I hope the whole world can basically do that quickly. This is the key question: how quickly can we do this?”Elsewhere, oil slipped after three days of gains. Gold retreated.These are the main moves in markets:StocksJapan’s Topix index fell 2.8% as of 10:28 a.m. in Tokyo.S&P 500 futures lost 1%. The S&P 500 Index rose 1.2% on Wednesday.South Korea’s Kospi declined 0.9%.Hong Kong’s Hang Seng Index added 0.3%.The Shanghai Composite Index dipped 0.7%.Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 Index gained 0.3%.CurrenciesThe yen rose 0.6% to 110.57 per dollar.The offshore yuan was at 7.1151 per dollar, up 0.2%.The euro bought $1.0905, rising 0.2%.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries fell six basis points to 0.82%.Australia’s 10-year bond yield fell about six basis points to 0.92%.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude dropped 1.5% to $24.10 a barrel.Gold slipped 0.8% to $1,604.28 an ounce.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Asian stocks mostly fell on Thursday, following the first back-to-back gains for global equities since mid-February, as investors digested the text of the U.S. stimulus bill.Japanese shares sank more than 2% amid further efforts to contain the movement of people. South Korean equities and those in Hong Kong were also lower, while shares in Australia saw modest gains. S&P 500 futures dipped after the benchmark’s rally of more than 5% fizzled. Senate negotiators circulated what was labeled a final draft of the negotiated agreement. The Australian and New Zealand dollars declined more than 1%. Treasuries and the yen rose.“While exact details are still emerging, the support package should help to assuage the fears about the worst possible economic outcomes for individuals and companies,” said Oliver Blackbourn, a multi-asset portfolio manager at Janus Henderson Investors. “Investors need to remain vigilant about how the growth rate of new cases develops and how governments respond going forward.”The Senate bill text may still not be the final deal, following intense negotiations on the $2 trillion aid package of spending and tax breaks. In Europe, leaders are inching toward a fiscal package of their own.The first consecutive daily gains for global equities since Feb. 12 come as cities from Milan to Seattle reel from the deepening pandemic. With the world’s cases now topping 451,000 and more than 20,000 deaths, traders are cognizant of the ongoing threat to the global economy.“Liquidity wise, we should be fine, we just have to go through this as quickly as possible, containing it and of course repressing the population from moving,” Alicia Garcia Herrero, chief economist for Asia-Pacific at Natixis. “I hope the whole world can basically do that quickly. This is the key question: how quickly can we do this?”Elsewhere, oil slipped after three days of gains. Gold retreated.These are the main moves in markets:StocksJapan’s Topix index fell 2.8% as of 10:28 a.m. in Tokyo.S&P 500 futures lost 1%. The S&P 500 Index rose 1.2% on Wednesday.South Korea’s Kospi declined 0.9%.Hong Kong’s Hang Seng Index added 0.3%.The Shanghai Composite Index dipped 0.7%.Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 Index gained 0.3%.CurrenciesThe yen rose 0.6% to 110.57 per dollar.The offshore yuan was at 7.1151 per dollar, up 0.2%.The euro bought $1.0905, rising 0.2%.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries fell six basis points to 0.82%.Australia’s 10-year bond yield fell about six basis points to 0.92%.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude dropped 1.5% to $24.10 a barrel.Gold slipped 0.8% to $1,604.28 an ounce.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 29/81   Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: Daily Roundup
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: Daily RoundupPR NewswireSILVER SPRING, Md., March 25, 2020SILVER SPRING, Md.

    Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: Daily RoundupPR NewswireSILVER SPRING, Md., March 25, 2020SILVER SPRING, Md.


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  • 30/81   Coronavirus: $2tn coronavirus bill held up by US Senate snag
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    A row over jobless benefits holds up the largest government economic stimulus in US history.

    A row over jobless benefits holds up the largest government economic stimulus in US history.


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  • 31/81   Brazil’s State Governors Defy Bolsonaro in Coronavirus Fight
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Brazil’s state governors continued to defy President Jair Bolsonaro’s call for the country to resume normal routines and safeguard the economy by doubling down on the social distancing measures they imposed to battle the coronavirus outbreak.The clash between states and the federal government started Tuesday night when Bolsonaro lashed out at the governors during a nationally televised speech, describing their decision to shut down shops and schools as a “scorched-earth policy” aimed at the next presidential election. The situation quickly deteriorated Wednesday when they met for a video conference call that saw barbs exchanged and no consensus reached.“We can resurrect the economy, but to resurrect those who have already died is impossible,” Rio de Janeiro Governor Wilson Witzel said after the meeting, repeating his call for people to “stay home.”Underscoring the gravity of the situation, 26 of the country’s 27 governors met again later Wednesday, without the president, to discuss their joint strategy for addressing the crisis. When the meeting broke up, the governors issued a statement calling upon the president to suspend state debts to the federal government for 12 months and adopt a basic minimum income for the nation’s poor while reaffirming their commitment to maintaining the polciy of social distancing.WHO Issues a Rare Public Scolding, Saying Countries Wasting Time”We will continue to adopt measures based on what science says, following the guidance of health professionals and, above all, the protocols guided by the WHO,” the governors said in their statement.Meanwhile, Bolsonaro said he would ask his health minister to change quarantine recommendations, ensuring they only apply to the elderly and those who are more at risk from a coronavirus infection.“There’s no other way,” the president told reporters, forecasting job losses and economic catastrophe if the restrictions continue for too long. “People should go back to work and the elderly should be spared.”Bolsonaro is embarking on a high-stakes gamble to avoid a looming recession that would be very painful for Brazilians still reeling from a previous economic crisis just three years ago. His strategy risks straining the country’s health system, which is underfunded and ill-equipped to handle the potential influx of sick people if coronavirus spreads too quickly. Yet he is not alone in prioritizing the economy: Donald Trump is pushing to reopen the U.S. economy by Easter, even as the number of cases of Covid-19 in the country soars.Raging DebateThe president’s stance is also sending confusing signals to the country of some 210 million, and debate is raging across social media on whether people should stay home or keep the economy running. After endorsing social distancing measures, Health Minister Luiz Henrique Mandetta struck a more balanced tone, saying quarantine “is a very bitter medicine” that’s being imposed in a “messy and rushed fashion.” He said he wouldn’t quit the government either.As Bolsonaro spoke Tuesday evening, Brazilians banged pots and pans from their windows in several neighborhoods of the country’s main cities, a traditional form of protest in the region which has been going on for days now as criticism of the president mounts.So far the governors have taken the lead in imposing lockdowns aimed at slowing the spread of the virus. Sao Paulo brought in a full quarantine starting March 24 and Rio de Janeiro restricted public transportation while shutting down shopping malls and even the beach. Bolsonaro has no power to interfere with their decision unless he decrees a state of exception in the country.As well as deploying police to enforce the measures, firefighters are joining the campaign to persuade the public to observe the guidelines, using megaphones to implore beachgoers to return home and “do your part and help control the coronavirus.”By contrast, during his Tuesday night speech Bolsonaro said those under 40 rarely die of coronavirus and that even he, at 65, shouldn’t be worried because he was “an athlete” in the past.Brazil had 2,433 cases identified and 57 deaths due to coronavirus as of Wednesday afternoon. Among those to test positive are Bolsonaro’s press secretary and members of the Senate.(Updates to add governor’s meeting in fourth, fifth paragraphs)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Brazil’s state governors continued to defy President Jair Bolsonaro’s call for the country to resume normal routines and safeguard the economy by doubling down on the social distancing measures they imposed to battle the coronavirus outbreak.The clash between states and the federal government started Tuesday night when Bolsonaro lashed out at the governors during a nationally televised speech, describing their decision to shut down shops and schools as a “scorched-earth policy” aimed at the next presidential election. The situation quickly deteriorated Wednesday when they met for a video conference call that saw barbs exchanged and no consensus reached.“We can resurrect the economy, but to resurrect those who have already died is impossible,” Rio de Janeiro Governor Wilson Witzel said after the meeting, repeating his call for people to “stay home.”Underscoring the gravity of the situation, 26 of the country’s 27 governors met again later Wednesday, without the president, to discuss their joint strategy for addressing the crisis. When the meeting broke up, the governors issued a statement calling upon the president to suspend state debts to the federal government for 12 months and adopt a basic minimum income for the nation’s poor while reaffirming their commitment to maintaining the polciy of social distancing.WHO Issues a Rare Public Scolding, Saying Countries Wasting Time”We will continue to adopt measures based on what science says, following the guidance of health professionals and, above all, the protocols guided by the WHO,” the governors said in their statement.Meanwhile, Bolsonaro said he would ask his health minister to change quarantine recommendations, ensuring they only apply to the elderly and those who are more at risk from a coronavirus infection.“There’s no other way,” the president told reporters, forecasting job losses and economic catastrophe if the restrictions continue for too long. “People should go back to work and the elderly should be spared.”Bolsonaro is embarking on a high-stakes gamble to avoid a looming recession that would be very painful for Brazilians still reeling from a previous economic crisis just three years ago. His strategy risks straining the country’s health system, which is underfunded and ill-equipped to handle the potential influx of sick people if coronavirus spreads too quickly. Yet he is not alone in prioritizing the economy: Donald Trump is pushing to reopen the U.S. economy by Easter, even as the number of cases of Covid-19 in the country soars.Raging DebateThe president’s stance is also sending confusing signals to the country of some 210 million, and debate is raging across social media on whether people should stay home or keep the economy running. After endorsing social distancing measures, Health Minister Luiz Henrique Mandetta struck a more balanced tone, saying quarantine “is a very bitter medicine” that’s being imposed in a “messy and rushed fashion.” He said he wouldn’t quit the government either.As Bolsonaro spoke Tuesday evening, Brazilians banged pots and pans from their windows in several neighborhoods of the country’s main cities, a traditional form of protest in the region which has been going on for days now as criticism of the president mounts.So far the governors have taken the lead in imposing lockdowns aimed at slowing the spread of the virus. Sao Paulo brought in a full quarantine starting March 24 and Rio de Janeiro restricted public transportation while shutting down shopping malls and even the beach. Bolsonaro has no power to interfere with their decision unless he decrees a state of exception in the country.As well as deploying police to enforce the measures, firefighters are joining the campaign to persuade the public to observe the guidelines, using megaphones to implore beachgoers to return home and “do your part and help control the coronavirus.”By contrast, during his Tuesday night speech Bolsonaro said those under 40 rarely die of coronavirus and that even he, at 65, shouldn’t be worried because he was “an athlete” in the past.Brazil had 2,433 cases identified and 57 deaths due to coronavirus as of Wednesday afternoon. Among those to test positive are Bolsonaro’s press secretary and members of the Senate.(Updates to add governor’s meeting in fourth, fifth paragraphs)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 32/81   Is There Now An Opportunity In Yuexiu Property Company Limited (HKG:123)?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Yuexiu Property Company Limited (HKG:123), which is in the real estate business, and is based in Hong Kong, saw a...

    Yuexiu Property Company Limited (HKG:123), which is in the real estate business, and is based in Hong Kong, saw a...


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  • 33/81   McDonald's to trim U.S. menu during coronavirus pandemic
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Restaurants in the United States have been forced to either shut doors or limit service to delivery and takeaway, pressuring operators that are struggling with staffing and plunging traffic, among other issues.  'To simplify operations in our kitchens and for our crew ... we are working with our franchisees and local restaurants to focus on serving our most popular choices and will begin temporarily removing some items from the menu over the next few weeks,' said Bill Garrett, senior vice president of operations for McDonald's USA in a statement to Reuters.  The world's largest burger chain, McDonald's, was also considering deferring rent and service fees for its franchisees, who operate a majority of the company's restaurants in the United States.

    Restaurants in the United States have been forced to either shut doors or limit service to delivery and takeaway, pressuring operators that are struggling with staffing and plunging traffic, among other issues. 'To simplify operations in our kitchens and for our crew ... we are working with our franchisees and local restaurants to focus on serving our most popular choices and will begin temporarily removing some items from the menu over the next few weeks,' said Bill Garrett, senior vice president of operations for McDonald's USA in a statement to Reuters. The world's largest burger chain, McDonald's, was also considering deferring rent and service fees for its franchisees, who operate a majority of the company's restaurants in the United States.


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  • 34/81   Cash-strapped rural hospitals face 'imminent closure' as coronavirus bears down
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Instead of gearing up as the coronavirus spreads to rural areas of the Pacific Northwest, outlying hospitals face critical cash shortages that could force some to go out of business.

    Instead of gearing up as the coronavirus spreads to rural areas of the Pacific Northwest, outlying hospitals face critical cash shortages that could force some to go out of business.


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  • 35/81   In California: 1 million unemployment claims filed in less than two weeks
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    1 million Californians have applied for unemployment claims since March 13. And two people aboard the Grand Princess cruise ship died; 103 tested positive for coronavirus. Plus: I talk with one of the Census 2020 ambassadors working to spread the word about why every Golden Stater must be counted.

    1 million Californians have applied for unemployment claims since March 13. And two people aboard the Grand Princess cruise ship died; 103 tested positive for coronavirus. Plus: I talk with one of the Census 2020 ambassadors working to spread the word about why every Golden Stater must be counted.


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  • 36/81   Is Midland Holdings Limited (HKG:1200) Excessively Paying Its CEO?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Pierre Wong became the CEO of Midland Holdings Limited (HKG:1200) in 2012. First, this article will compare CEO...

    Pierre Wong became the CEO of Midland Holdings Limited (HKG:1200) in 2012. First, this article will compare CEO...


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  • 37/81   Coronavirus live updates: Half of New Yorkers face infection; 1 million jobless in Calif.; US death toll surges past 900
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Amid another swell in U.S. deaths, White House and Senate leaders are close to a $2 trillion stimulus deal to ease financial pain across the country.

    Amid another swell in U.S. deaths, White House and Senate leaders are close to a $2 trillion stimulus deal to ease financial pain across the country.


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  • 38/81   Danaher Announces Pricing of Euro-Denominated Senior Notes Offering
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Danaher Corporation (NYSE: DHR) ("Danaher") announced today that it has priced an offering of:

    Danaher Corporation (NYSE: DHR) ("Danaher") announced today that it has priced an offering of:


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  • 39/81   SoftBank’s Big Bet on Sharing Economy Backfires With Coronavirus
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Masayoshi Son has been among the most fervent believers in the sharing economy, investing billions in startups that help people split the use of cars, rooms and offices. But as the coronavirus curtails unnecessary human interaction, it’s hammering such businesses and rattling the foundations of Son’s SoftBank Group Corp.In New York City, the co-working space of SoftBank-backed WeWork stands practically empty as tenants stay home for fear of infection. In Shanghai, drivers for the ride-hailing service Didi Chuxing have seen their pay plummet as customers avoid shared automobiles. In San Francisco, Dara Khosrowshahi, chief executive officer of Uber Technologies Inc., another SoftBank investment, said “I wouldn’t put my kids in an Uber.”Investors are increasingly spooked about the stability of Son’s empire and its $100 billion Vision Fund amid the pandemic. Before this week, SoftBank shares had tumbled about 50% in a single month, including their worst one-day decline since the Japanese billionaire listed his company in 1994. In response, the SoftBank impresario launched one of the most audacious deals of his career: sell part of Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. and other assets to raise $41 billion to buy back shares and slash debt.While that envisioned deal put a floor under the share price, it hasn’t changed the fundamental vulnerability of an edifice built on sharing-economy standouts that’ve been walloped since sheltering in place became the norm. SoftBank gained more than 40% since Son revealed that blueprint, which is said to include unloading $14 billion of Alibaba stock for starters. But it remains down about 30% from a February peak. In fact, Moody’s Corp. questioned the wisdom of selling prized assets into a market downturn and pushed SoftBank’s debt deeper into junk territory. SoftBank fired back by accusing Moody’s of bias.“Right now, investments sensitive to sharing and the economy are not where you want to be, with the pandemic encouraging a stay-at-home mentality,” said Pelham Smithers, whose London-based firm offers research on Asian technology companies, in a note to clients. Companies such as WeWork, Uber and the hotel-booking Oyo “weren’t profitable when times were (relatively) good, begging the question, what will their economics look like in 2020?”Read more: Masa Son Unveils a $41 Billion Asset Sale to Silence His CriticsDespite the stock bounce, SoftBank’s credit default swaps -- the cost of insuring debt against default -- are still near their highest levels in a decade. The concern isn’t so much that the Japanese giant won’t be able to pay its own debts -- its cash will cover money due for at least the next two years. Rather, investors fret that Son’s 80-plus portfolio companies will struggle in the current environment, triggering negative headlines and massive writedowns.Most worrisome for investors, Son -- who saw $70 billion wiped from his net worth in the dot-com crash -- may feel compelled to step in to support some of his startups rather than see them fail. The litany of woes surrounding SoftBank’s highest-profile startups threatens to tarnish Son’s reputation as a tech investor -- one built largely on an early bet on Alibaba before it came to dominate Chinese e-commerce, which he’s struggled to replicate.Last year, after WeWork’s effort to go public fell apart, SoftBank stepped in to organize a $9.5 billion bailout. Son had to choose between financial aid or bankruptcy, at a time when risk aversion is straining global tech investment.“SoftBank frustrated investors already with its assistance to WeWork last year,” said Makoto Kikuchi, chief investment officer at Myojo Asset Management Co. in Tokyo. “SoftBank owns many investments such as tech companies that get hit particularly in this situation.”SoftBank and Vision Fund representatives declined to comment for the story.Read more: SoftBank Blasts Moody’s for ‘Biased’ Ratings DowngradeSon did vow he wouldn’t step in to rescue any more portfolio companies after WeWork and called for more financial discipline. Among SoftBank startups, Brandless Inc. said in February it would close down while satellite operator OneWeb is mulling a possible bankruptcy filing.“It’s unlikely that SoftBank portfolio companies will see any of that money, because the announcement was pretty clear on the purpose of the asset sale,” said Justin Tang at United First Partners. “In fact, it would be an opportune time for SoftBank to get rid of its weaker portfolio companies and stick with the leaders.”On Wednesday, Moody’s said it will watch SoftBank and the extent to which tumbling valuations will hurt its tech-heavy portfolio. Son’s biggest bet to date has been on ride-hailing, with stakes in Uber and the leading companies in China, India and Southeast Asia. The latest to exhibit signs of trouble was European player Getaround, which is now said to be dangerously short of cash and actively seeking a buyer.Beijing-based Didi Chuxing is another prime example of how the virus is walloping these operations. The startup, once tagged at $56 billion, had struggled to justify its valuation even before the latest crisis because of a government crackdown on its services. Ridership tumbled during the outbreak in China and Didi cut driver subsidies.Sheng Gang, a 34-year-old Shanghai resident, said he used to earn a 36 yuan ($5) bonus for every four rides during the morning rush hour; now that’s been lowered to just 6 yuan for every three. He expects his income to drop by about half this month to around 10,000 yuan.“I don’t have a Plan B since I just bought a new car,” Sheng said.Wen Peng, a 35-year-old Hebei native, earned around 6,000 yuan a month as a part-time driver. But when the coronavirus hit, most people chose to stay inside and he couldn’t sustain himself. He quit in February.“People didn’t leave their homes, almost no one wanted rides,” he said. “Many others quit for similar reasons.”A Didi spokeswoman said ridership has rebounded significantly in recent weeks as people went back to work.Read more: WeWork’s New Crisis: ‘Workplaces Will Never Be the Same’WeWork is another question mark: SoftBank is said to be considering scaling back its bailout. WeWork has kept its offices open despite the virus, even while other co-working operators have closed them. That may be because revenue would disappear otherwise, just as SoftBank is trying to engineer a turnaround.One executive who usually uses a WeWork office on Park Avenue in New York said hardly anyone shows up anymore. His WeWork representative has stopped coming to the site and works remotely. He figures customers may be canceling their leases or simply not paying, which would leave WeWork on the hook for rent owed to the landlord, Tishman Speyer. “None of us are going to the office,” he said. “But we’ve decided for now to just kick any decisions down the road for six months.”Then there’s Oyo, which is in a particularly tricky spot. The Indian company has been expanding rapidly by guaranteeing a certain amount of revenue to hotels if they sign on as franchisees. But with few travelers anywhere, Oyo has to pay hotels even when their rooms are mostly empty.At the Kawasaki Hotel Park in Japan, more than 400 reservations were canceled for February to April. The result was a drop in revenue of about 25 million yen ($226,000), according to Sanho Miyamoto, the owner.“Overseas customers disappeared and Japanese businessmen halted business trips. I had to ask our employees to take a vacation for a while,“ Miyamoto said. “I am worried whether Oyo can manage because it guarantees the revenue fall for its members.”He wouldn’t comment on arrangements with Oyo. But if the startup paid the entire shortfall, it would lose about $240,000 on a single hotel.Read more: Masayoshi Son’s Other Big Real Estate Bet Has Some Real ProblemThere’s opportunity in the downturn too. SoftBank-backed Slack Technologies Inc., a popular work communications tool among home workers, has surged following lockdowns from New York to California. And after a difficult first year in Japan, Oyo has turned to promising cash for hotels that join its platform as bookings plunged. While the company didn’t say how much it was prepared to spend, that kind of opportunism can only shorten its runway of available cash.Investors fear that companies like Oyo have become too big to fail for SoftBank, Atul Goyal, senior analyst at Jefferies Group, wrote in a report. The WeWork rescue showed that “zero is not a floor” for any SoftBank investment and that Son is willing to throw more good money after bad, he wrote.SoftBank may soon prove Goyal right. The company is seeking to raise an additional $10 billion so its first Vision Fund can support portfolio companies, according to people with knowledge of the matter. And the list of SoftBank portfolio firms that may soon need help also includes gym company Gympass, Getaround and travel startups Klook and GetYourRide.“These startups are geared for high growth and high cash burn,” Goyal said. “As revenues fall, they will need further infusions of capital to keep the lights on.”Read more: SoftBank Seeks $10 Billion to Support Vision Fund CompaniesFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Masayoshi Son has been among the most fervent believers in the sharing economy, investing billions in startups that help people split the use of cars, rooms and offices. But as the coronavirus curtails unnecessary human interaction, it’s hammering such businesses and rattling the foundations of Son’s SoftBank Group Corp.In New York City, the co-working space of SoftBank-backed WeWork stands practically empty as tenants stay home for fear of infection. In Shanghai, drivers for the ride-hailing service Didi Chuxing have seen their pay plummet as customers avoid shared automobiles. In San Francisco, Dara Khosrowshahi, chief executive officer of Uber Technologies Inc., another SoftBank investment, said “I wouldn’t put my kids in an Uber.”Investors are increasingly spooked about the stability of Son’s empire and its $100 billion Vision Fund amid the pandemic. Before this week, SoftBank shares had tumbled about 50% in a single month, including their worst one-day decline since the Japanese billionaire listed his company in 1994. In response, the SoftBank impresario launched one of the most audacious deals of his career: sell part of Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. and other assets to raise $41 billion to buy back shares and slash debt.While that envisioned deal put a floor under the share price, it hasn’t changed the fundamental vulnerability of an edifice built on sharing-economy standouts that’ve been walloped since sheltering in place became the norm. SoftBank gained more than 40% since Son revealed that blueprint, which is said to include unloading $14 billion of Alibaba stock for starters. But it remains down about 30% from a February peak. In fact, Moody’s Corp. questioned the wisdom of selling prized assets into a market downturn and pushed SoftBank’s debt deeper into junk territory. SoftBank fired back by accusing Moody’s of bias.“Right now, investments sensitive to sharing and the economy are not where you want to be, with the pandemic encouraging a stay-at-home mentality,” said Pelham Smithers, whose London-based firm offers research on Asian technology companies, in a note to clients. Companies such as WeWork, Uber and the hotel-booking Oyo “weren’t profitable when times were (relatively) good, begging the question, what will their economics look like in 2020?”Read more: Masa Son Unveils a $41 Billion Asset Sale to Silence His CriticsDespite the stock bounce, SoftBank’s credit default swaps -- the cost of insuring debt against default -- are still near their highest levels in a decade. The concern isn’t so much that the Japanese giant won’t be able to pay its own debts -- its cash will cover money due for at least the next two years. Rather, investors fret that Son’s 80-plus portfolio companies will struggle in the current environment, triggering negative headlines and massive writedowns.Most worrisome for investors, Son -- who saw $70 billion wiped from his net worth in the dot-com crash -- may feel compelled to step in to support some of his startups rather than see them fail. The litany of woes surrounding SoftBank’s highest-profile startups threatens to tarnish Son’s reputation as a tech investor -- one built largely on an early bet on Alibaba before it came to dominate Chinese e-commerce, which he’s struggled to replicate.Last year, after WeWork’s effort to go public fell apart, SoftBank stepped in to organize a $9.5 billion bailout. Son had to choose between financial aid or bankruptcy, at a time when risk aversion is straining global tech investment.“SoftBank frustrated investors already with its assistance to WeWork last year,” said Makoto Kikuchi, chief investment officer at Myojo Asset Management Co. in Tokyo. “SoftBank owns many investments such as tech companies that get hit particularly in this situation.”SoftBank and Vision Fund representatives declined to comment for the story.Read more: SoftBank Blasts Moody’s for ‘Biased’ Ratings DowngradeSon did vow he wouldn’t step in to rescue any more portfolio companies after WeWork and called for more financial discipline. Among SoftBank startups, Brandless Inc. said in February it would close down while satellite operator OneWeb is mulling a possible bankruptcy filing.“It’s unlikely that SoftBank portfolio companies will see any of that money, because the announcement was pretty clear on the purpose of the asset sale,” said Justin Tang at United First Partners. “In fact, it would be an opportune time for SoftBank to get rid of its weaker portfolio companies and stick with the leaders.”On Wednesday, Moody’s said it will watch SoftBank and the extent to which tumbling valuations will hurt its tech-heavy portfolio. Son’s biggest bet to date has been on ride-hailing, with stakes in Uber and the leading companies in China, India and Southeast Asia. The latest to exhibit signs of trouble was European player Getaround, which is now said to be dangerously short of cash and actively seeking a buyer.Beijing-based Didi Chuxing is another prime example of how the virus is walloping these operations. The startup, once tagged at $56 billion, had struggled to justify its valuation even before the latest crisis because of a government crackdown on its services. Ridership tumbled during the outbreak in China and Didi cut driver subsidies.Sheng Gang, a 34-year-old Shanghai resident, said he used to earn a 36 yuan ($5) bonus for every four rides during the morning rush hour; now that’s been lowered to just 6 yuan for every three. He expects his income to drop by about half this month to around 10,000 yuan.“I don’t have a Plan B since I just bought a new car,” Sheng said.Wen Peng, a 35-year-old Hebei native, earned around 6,000 yuan a month as a part-time driver. But when the coronavirus hit, most people chose to stay inside and he couldn’t sustain himself. He quit in February.“People didn’t leave their homes, almost no one wanted rides,” he said. “Many others quit for similar reasons.”A Didi spokeswoman said ridership has rebounded significantly in recent weeks as people went back to work.Read more: WeWork’s New Crisis: ‘Workplaces Will Never Be the Same’WeWork is another question mark: SoftBank is said to be considering scaling back its bailout. WeWork has kept its offices open despite the virus, even while other co-working operators have closed them. That may be because revenue would disappear otherwise, just as SoftBank is trying to engineer a turnaround.One executive who usually uses a WeWork office on Park Avenue in New York said hardly anyone shows up anymore. His WeWork representative has stopped coming to the site and works remotely. He figures customers may be canceling their leases or simply not paying, which would leave WeWork on the hook for rent owed to the landlord, Tishman Speyer. “None of us are going to the office,” he said. “But we’ve decided for now to just kick any decisions down the road for six months.”Then there’s Oyo, which is in a particularly tricky spot. The Indian company has been expanding rapidly by guaranteeing a certain amount of revenue to hotels if they sign on as franchisees. But with few travelers anywhere, Oyo has to pay hotels even when their rooms are mostly empty.At the Kawasaki Hotel Park in Japan, more than 400 reservations were canceled for February to April. The result was a drop in revenue of about 25 million yen ($226,000), according to Sanho Miyamoto, the owner.“Overseas customers disappeared and Japanese businessmen halted business trips. I had to ask our employees to take a vacation for a while,“ Miyamoto said. “I am worried whether Oyo can manage because it guarantees the revenue fall for its members.”He wouldn’t comment on arrangements with Oyo. But if the startup paid the entire shortfall, it would lose about $240,000 on a single hotel.Read more: Masayoshi Son’s Other Big Real Estate Bet Has Some Real ProblemThere’s opportunity in the downturn too. SoftBank-backed Slack Technologies Inc., a popular work communications tool among home workers, has surged following lockdowns from New York to California. And after a difficult first year in Japan, Oyo has turned to promising cash for hotels that join its platform as bookings plunged. While the company didn’t say how much it was prepared to spend, that kind of opportunism can only shorten its runway of available cash.Investors fear that companies like Oyo have become too big to fail for SoftBank, Atul Goyal, senior analyst at Jefferies Group, wrote in a report. The WeWork rescue showed that “zero is not a floor” for any SoftBank investment and that Son is willing to throw more good money after bad, he wrote.SoftBank may soon prove Goyal right. The company is seeking to raise an additional $10 billion so its first Vision Fund can support portfolio companies, according to people with knowledge of the matter. And the list of SoftBank portfolio firms that may soon need help also includes gym company Gympass, Getaround and travel startups Klook and GetYourRide.“These startups are geared for high growth and high cash burn,” Goyal said. “As revenues fall, they will need further infusions of capital to keep the lights on.”Read more: SoftBank Seeks $10 Billion to Support Vision Fund CompaniesFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 40/81   Mexicans fear looting spree as shops robbed, online messages incite theft
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Mexicans on Wednesday feared measures to contain the coronavirus outbreak would lead to widespread looting after criminals robbed stores that were closed and posted calls on social media for people to ransack businesses.  Police in Mexico City arrested 10 people on Tuesday night who tried to rob shops in four neighborhoods, the city's security ministry said in a statement.  Authorities have tried to reassure residents that this is not the beginning of a wave of looting, saying the supply of supply of food and medicine is guaranteed.

    Mexicans on Wednesday feared measures to contain the coronavirus outbreak would lead to widespread looting after criminals robbed stores that were closed and posted calls on social media for people to ransack businesses. Police in Mexico City arrested 10 people on Tuesday night who tried to rob shops in four neighborhoods, the city's security ministry said in a statement. Authorities have tried to reassure residents that this is not the beginning of a wave of looting, saying the supply of supply of food and medicine is guaranteed.


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  • 41/81   Singapore’s Economy Plunges in Early Sign of Pain in Asia
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Singapore’s economy contracted the most in a decade in the first quarter, a bellwether for the rest of Asia as the fast-spreading coronavirus continues to shut down vast parts of the world.Gross domestic product fell an annualized 10.6% in the first quarter from the previous three months, far worse than the median forecast of an 8.2% decline in a Bloomberg survey of economists. The government said it now sees a sharp contraction in the economy of 1%-4% for the full year.“As the global Covid-19 situation is still evolving rapidly, there remains a significant degree of uncertainty over the severity and duration of the global outbreak, and the trajectory of the global economic recovery once the outbreak has been contained,” the Ministry of Trade and Industry said in a statement. “The balance of risks, however, is tilted to the downside.”The Singapore dollar erased losses from the GDP report, and was little changed on the day as of 8:50 a.m. local time.As the first Asian economy to publish quarterly GDP data, the slump in Singapore’s output is a sign of what others in the region can expect. Purchasing managers surveys are already showing severe contractions in global output at the beginning of the year, with more pain likely to come.What Bloomberg’s Economists SayAs large as the contraction in Singapore’s economy was in 1Q, it will likely deepen in 2Q. Within Southeast Asia, though, Singapore may escape the worst this year, despite being the most open economy. The government is staying on top of the virus, which eases fear and keeps more businesses open.Click here to read the full report.Tamara Mast Henderson, Asean economistSingapore’s government had previously forecast full-year growth around the 0.5% midpoint of its forecast range of -0.5% to 1.5%.The MTI said the downward revision reflected a worsening of the anticipated effects from the outbreak, including the spread of the virus to many more countries, Singapore’s tightened border controls, and safe-distancing measures that would hit consumer sectors like retail and food and beverage.The trade-reliant economy has been on especially high alert for weakness after key trading partners, like Malaysia, shut their borders, reduce production schedules and enforce restrictions on consumers’ movements.“The second quarter will be weak as well with global demand for goods and services to take a hit from the lockdowns in Europe and the U.S.,” said Steve Cochrane, chief Asia-Pacific economist for Moody’s Analytics Inc. in Singapore. “International travel will remain weak as well. We will need to look to the third quarter for a significant improvement.”MAS EasingDeputy Prime Minister Heng Swee Keat is set to unveil a second stimulus package in Parliament later Thursday to shore up the flailing economy, likely focused on the especially hard-hit tourism and transport sectors. The central bank has brought forward its policy decision to March 30, with analysts betting on an easing.“There is a high chance the government will dip into the reserves to fund the second stimulus, which could be larger than what was announced in Budget 2020,” said Khoon Goh, head of Asia research at Australia & New Zealand Banking Group Ltd. in Singapore. The Monetary Authority of Singapore “will surely need to ease aggressively on Monday.”Other DetailsCompared with a year earlier, GDP fell 2.2% in the first quarter versus a median forecast of -1.4%Manufacturing rose an annualized 4.2% in the first quarter compared to the fourth, construction plunged 22.9%, and services shrank 15.9%Advance GDP estimates are computed largely from data in the first two months of the quarter, and often are revised once the full quarter’s data are available(Updates with further details throughout.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Singapore’s economy contracted the most in a decade in the first quarter, a bellwether for the rest of Asia as the fast-spreading coronavirus continues to shut down vast parts of the world.Gross domestic product fell an annualized 10.6% in the first quarter from the previous three months, far worse than the median forecast of an 8.2% decline in a Bloomberg survey of economists. The government said it now sees a sharp contraction in the economy of 1%-4% for the full year.“As the global Covid-19 situation is still evolving rapidly, there remains a significant degree of uncertainty over the severity and duration of the global outbreak, and the trajectory of the global economic recovery once the outbreak has been contained,” the Ministry of Trade and Industry said in a statement. “The balance of risks, however, is tilted to the downside.”The Singapore dollar erased losses from the GDP report, and was little changed on the day as of 8:50 a.m. local time.As the first Asian economy to publish quarterly GDP data, the slump in Singapore’s output is a sign of what others in the region can expect. Purchasing managers surveys are already showing severe contractions in global output at the beginning of the year, with more pain likely to come.What Bloomberg’s Economists SayAs large as the contraction in Singapore’s economy was in 1Q, it will likely deepen in 2Q. Within Southeast Asia, though, Singapore may escape the worst this year, despite being the most open economy. The government is staying on top of the virus, which eases fear and keeps more businesses open.Click here to read the full report.Tamara Mast Henderson, Asean economistSingapore’s government had previously forecast full-year growth around the 0.5% midpoint of its forecast range of -0.5% to 1.5%.The MTI said the downward revision reflected a worsening of the anticipated effects from the outbreak, including the spread of the virus to many more countries, Singapore’s tightened border controls, and safe-distancing measures that would hit consumer sectors like retail and food and beverage.The trade-reliant economy has been on especially high alert for weakness after key trading partners, like Malaysia, shut their borders, reduce production schedules and enforce restrictions on consumers’ movements.“The second quarter will be weak as well with global demand for goods and services to take a hit from the lockdowns in Europe and the U.S.,” said Steve Cochrane, chief Asia-Pacific economist for Moody’s Analytics Inc. in Singapore. “International travel will remain weak as well. We will need to look to the third quarter for a significant improvement.”MAS EasingDeputy Prime Minister Heng Swee Keat is set to unveil a second stimulus package in Parliament later Thursday to shore up the flailing economy, likely focused on the especially hard-hit tourism and transport sectors. The central bank has brought forward its policy decision to March 30, with analysts betting on an easing.“There is a high chance the government will dip into the reserves to fund the second stimulus, which could be larger than what was announced in Budget 2020,” said Khoon Goh, head of Asia research at Australia & New Zealand Banking Group Ltd. in Singapore. The Monetary Authority of Singapore “will surely need to ease aggressively on Monday.”Other DetailsCompared with a year earlier, GDP fell 2.2% in the first quarter versus a median forecast of -1.4%Manufacturing rose an annualized 4.2% in the first quarter compared to the fourth, construction plunged 22.9%, and services shrank 15.9%Advance GDP estimates are computed largely from data in the first two months of the quarter, and often are revised once the full quarter’s data are available(Updates with further details throughout.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 42/81   Trump's desire to restart the economy alarms officials in states hit hard by coronavirus
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    For the past three days, President Trump has publicly embraced the view that the measures taken to slow the spread of the coronavirus outbreak should not come at the expense of the U.S. economy.

    For the past three days, President Trump has publicly embraced the view that the measures taken to slow the spread of the coronavirus outbreak should not come at the expense of the U.S. economy.


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  • 43/81   Cuomo rips Senate's coronavirus stimulus bill as just 'a drop in the bucket'
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) is no fan of the Senate's coronavirus relief bill.Cuomo in his daily press briefing on Wednesday ripped the new $2 trillion economic stimulus package from the Senate responding to the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic, saying it would be "terrible for the state of New York" because the $3.8 billion it offers the state government is far too little. He also said the $1.3 billion New York City would get in the bill, which Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) negotiated, is insufficient. "That is a drop in the bucket as to need," Cuomo said, explaining New York is facing a revenue shortfall of up to $15 billion while swiping the coronavirus package as offering "quote-unquote relief." New York has reported by far the highest number of coronavirus cases in the United States with more than 30,000 as of Wednesday. The governor has taken his concerns about the stimulus package to the House of Representatives, he explained."We need the House to make adjustments," Cuomo said. "...I'm telling you, these numbers don't work, and I told the House members that we really need their help." Later in the press conference, Cuomo again called the bill "troublesome" and reiterated, "We need more federal help than this bill gives us. The House bill would have given us $17 billion. The Senate bill gives us $3 billion. I mean, that's a dramatic, dramatic difference." > Cuomo says the Senate's $2 trillion coronavirus relief bill would be "terrible" for New York, with only $3.8 billion for the state and $1.3 billion for New York City. "$3.8 billion sounds like a lot of money....that is a drop in the bucket, as to need." https://t.co/OsrqPNm9RO pic.twitter.com/bZRy2VHnIk> > -- CBS News (@CBSNews) March 25, 2020More stories from theweek.com  Elton John to host 'Living Room Concert for America' with stars performing from home  A G-7 joint statement on coronavirus failed because the U.S. insisted on calling it the 'Wuhan virus'  Nearly half of New York City's coronavirus cases found in adults under 45

    New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) is no fan of the Senate's coronavirus relief bill.Cuomo in his daily press briefing on Wednesday ripped the new $2 trillion economic stimulus package from the Senate responding to the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic, saying it would be "terrible for the state of New York" because the $3.8 billion it offers the state government is far too little. He also said the $1.3 billion New York City would get in the bill, which Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) negotiated, is insufficient. "That is a drop in the bucket as to need," Cuomo said, explaining New York is facing a revenue shortfall of up to $15 billion while swiping the coronavirus package as offering "quote-unquote relief." New York has reported by far the highest number of coronavirus cases in the United States with more than 30,000 as of Wednesday. The governor has taken his concerns about the stimulus package to the House of Representatives, he explained."We need the House to make adjustments," Cuomo said. "...I'm telling you, these numbers don't work, and I told the House members that we really need their help." Later in the press conference, Cuomo again called the bill "troublesome" and reiterated, "We need more federal help than this bill gives us. The House bill would have given us $17 billion. The Senate bill gives us $3 billion. I mean, that's a dramatic, dramatic difference." > Cuomo says the Senate's $2 trillion coronavirus relief bill would be "terrible" for New York, with only $3.8 billion for the state and $1.3 billion for New York City. "$3.8 billion sounds like a lot of money....that is a drop in the bucket, as to need." https://t.co/OsrqPNm9RO pic.twitter.com/bZRy2VHnIk> > -- CBS News (@CBSNews) March 25, 2020More stories from theweek.com Elton John to host 'Living Room Concert for America' with stars performing from home A G-7 joint statement on coronavirus failed because the U.S. insisted on calling it the 'Wuhan virus' Nearly half of New York City's coronavirus cases found in adults under 45


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  • 44/81   Why are so few Germans dying from the coronavirus? Experts wonder
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    "I would be happy if we can come back in two months' time and still be able to talk about what Germany did right," one expert said.

    "I would be happy if we can come back in two months' time and still be able to talk about what Germany did right," one expert said.


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  • 45/81   Military Imposes 60-Day Coronavirus Ban on Troops Coming Home From Overseas
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The novel coronavirus outbreak has prompted the U.S. military to order troops scheduled to return home from the Middle East to stay where they are for the next 60 days, three sources tell The Daily Beast. U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM), which is in charge of U.S. military operations in the Mideast, had prepared a limited order on the pause that exempted service members returning from Afghanistan. But a U.S. defense official said Wednesday morning that CENTCOM’s order was upended by a late-breaking order from the Pentagon that paused movement even more broadly. “The CENTCOM order has been superseded by higher authorities,” the defense official said. Pentagon officials have yet to respond to The Daily Beast’s questions. A different defense official, speaking on background hours after this story first ran, confirmed the Pentagon order, which CNN also reported applies to all troop movements overseas. Sources anticipated it would hit the pause button on many rotations while defense officials deal with the impact of the pandemic.In Iraq, where training missions for the Iraqi Security Forces have paused during the COVID-19 outbreak, commanders had anticipated sending about 200 U.S. trainers back home.Service members in Afghanistan were going to be allowed to transit through Kuwait for a maximum of 72 hours before returning home.They still will–in theory. The order, formally issued by Defense Secretary Mark Esper and released in summary late Wednesday, exempts the Afghanistan drawdown, like its CENTCOM predecessor. But worldwide, all U.S. military, Defense Department civilians and their families are frozen in place overseas. The Pentagon said in a statement that it will affect an anticipated 90,000 servicemembers.In Kuwait, a logistical hub for service members transiting in and out of the Mideast war zones, confusion and frustration mounted among people who expected to go home after their rotations ended. “It is pretty awful here. We are rationing food. Lines are pretty long. Cannot go anywhere. Everything is closed down except the DFAC [dining facility] and a couple stores,” a U.S. service member at Kuwait’s Camp Arifjan told The Daily Beast. Earlier, CENTCOM said in a Wednesday statement that it had paused U.S. service member deployments into the Mideast and South Asia. When, at an unspecified point, deployments resume, service members must first undergo a 14-day quarantine at their home station, CENTCOM said. “Some units and service members [in the] U.S. Central Command area of responsibility will be temporarily held on station while their replacements are quarantined, but this policy is not intended to otherwise delay or prevent the flow of service members or units out of the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility,” CENTCOM said in the statement. “This policy is also not expected to delay the drawdown in forces from Afghanistan as part of the U.S. agreement with the Taliban.”It’s the latest upheaval for the U.S. military as it scrambles to deal with a global pandemic that respects neither borders nor fortifications. Back in the U.S., commanders on Army bases like Fort Hood and Fort Bliss in Texas are dealing with the logistical and health challenges of implementing quarantines for service members returning from overseas. The Pentagon ordered those quarantines on Mar. 12. In February, CENTCOM canceled travel and restricted movement within the Middle East as a precaution against COVID-19.Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

    The novel coronavirus outbreak has prompted the U.S. military to order troops scheduled to return home from the Middle East to stay where they are for the next 60 days, three sources tell The Daily Beast. U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM), which is in charge of U.S. military operations in the Mideast, had prepared a limited order on the pause that exempted service members returning from Afghanistan. But a U.S. defense official said Wednesday morning that CENTCOM’s order was upended by a late-breaking order from the Pentagon that paused movement even more broadly. “The CENTCOM order has been superseded by higher authorities,” the defense official said. Pentagon officials have yet to respond to The Daily Beast’s questions. A different defense official, speaking on background hours after this story first ran, confirmed the Pentagon order, which CNN also reported applies to all troop movements overseas. Sources anticipated it would hit the pause button on many rotations while defense officials deal with the impact of the pandemic.In Iraq, where training missions for the Iraqi Security Forces have paused during the COVID-19 outbreak, commanders had anticipated sending about 200 U.S. trainers back home.Service members in Afghanistan were going to be allowed to transit through Kuwait for a maximum of 72 hours before returning home.They still will–in theory. The order, formally issued by Defense Secretary Mark Esper and released in summary late Wednesday, exempts the Afghanistan drawdown, like its CENTCOM predecessor. But worldwide, all U.S. military, Defense Department civilians and their families are frozen in place overseas. The Pentagon said in a statement that it will affect an anticipated 90,000 servicemembers.In Kuwait, a logistical hub for service members transiting in and out of the Mideast war zones, confusion and frustration mounted among people who expected to go home after their rotations ended. “It is pretty awful here. We are rationing food. Lines are pretty long. Cannot go anywhere. Everything is closed down except the DFAC [dining facility] and a couple stores,” a U.S. service member at Kuwait’s Camp Arifjan told The Daily Beast. Earlier, CENTCOM said in a Wednesday statement that it had paused U.S. service member deployments into the Mideast and South Asia. When, at an unspecified point, deployments resume, service members must first undergo a 14-day quarantine at their home station, CENTCOM said. “Some units and service members [in the] U.S. Central Command area of responsibility will be temporarily held on station while their replacements are quarantined, but this policy is not intended to otherwise delay or prevent the flow of service members or units out of the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility,” CENTCOM said in the statement. “This policy is also not expected to delay the drawdown in forces from Afghanistan as part of the U.S. agreement with the Taliban.”It’s the latest upheaval for the U.S. military as it scrambles to deal with a global pandemic that respects neither borders nor fortifications. Back in the U.S., commanders on Army bases like Fort Hood and Fort Bliss in Texas are dealing with the logistical and health challenges of implementing quarantines for service members returning from overseas. The Pentagon ordered those quarantines on Mar. 12. In February, CENTCOM canceled travel and restricted movement within the Middle East as a precaution against COVID-19.Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


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  • 46/81   Iran fears second wave of coronavirus as death toll rises to 2,077
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Iran may face a second outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic, a government spokesman said on Wednesday, as the Islamic Republic banned internal travel and traditional gatherings in parks during the Persian New Year holiday period.  'Unfortunately some Iranians have ignored advice from health ministry officials and traveled during the New Year holidays ... This could cause a second wave of the coronavirus,' spokesman Ali Rabiei said, according to state TV.  President Hassan Rouhani has banned any new trips between cities, Rabiei said, and 'violators will be confronted legally'.

    Iran may face a second outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic, a government spokesman said on Wednesday, as the Islamic Republic banned internal travel and traditional gatherings in parks during the Persian New Year holiday period. 'Unfortunately some Iranians have ignored advice from health ministry officials and traveled during the New Year holidays ... This could cause a second wave of the coronavirus,' spokesman Ali Rabiei said, according to state TV. President Hassan Rouhani has banned any new trips between cities, Rabiei said, and 'violators will be confronted legally'.


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  • 47/81   With China gunning for aircraft carriers, US Navy says it must change how it fights
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The U.S. Navy can't afford to throw up its hands when it come to the vulnerability of aircraft carriers, its new top officer says.

    The U.S. Navy can't afford to throw up its hands when it come to the vulnerability of aircraft carriers, its new top officer says.


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  • 48/81   Mnuchin says stimulus package will keep economy running for 3 months
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The White House and bipartisan Senate leaders have agreed on a sweeping $2 trillion financial relief package to help workers, businesses and the strained health care system survive the pandemic.

    The White House and bipartisan Senate leaders have agreed on a sweeping $2 trillion financial relief package to help workers, businesses and the strained health care system survive the pandemic.


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  • 49/81   Former CDC director: China travel ban 'made a difference' but US didn't prepare enough for coronavirus
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The former CDC director is lauding America's China travel ban, but says the U.S. didn't do enough to prepare for the COVID-19 outbreak.

    The former CDC director is lauding America's China travel ban, but says the U.S. didn't do enough to prepare for the COVID-19 outbreak.


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  • 50/81   Family: US believes ex-FBI agent Robert Levinson has died
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The U.S. government has concluded that retired FBI agent Robert Levinson, who vanished more than a decade ago, died while in the custody of Iran, his family and administration officials said Wednesday.  The circumstances and timing of Levinson's death was unclear, but White House national security adviser Robert O'Brien said Wednesday evening that the U.S. believes Levinson “may have passed away some time ago.'  Hours earlier, his family said information that U.S. officials had received had led them to conclude that he was dead, though it did not describe the nature of the information.

    The U.S. government has concluded that retired FBI agent Robert Levinson, who vanished more than a decade ago, died while in the custody of Iran, his family and administration officials said Wednesday. The circumstances and timing of Levinson's death was unclear, but White House national security adviser Robert O'Brien said Wednesday evening that the U.S. believes Levinson “may have passed away some time ago.' Hours earlier, his family said information that U.S. officials had received had led them to conclude that he was dead, though it did not describe the nature of the information.


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  • 51/81   Chuck Schumer made sure businesses controlled by Trump, his family, and top US officials couldn't get money from the government's $2 trillion coronavirus bailout fund
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Under Schumer's proviso, businesses owned by Trump, Vice President Pence, top government officials, and members of Congress wouldn't receive a dime.

    Under Schumer's proviso, businesses owned by Trump, Vice President Pence, top government officials, and members of Congress wouldn't receive a dime.


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  • 52/81   Climate change: Green energy plant threat to wilderness areas
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Solar, wind and hydro electric installations are often built in conservation areas.

    Solar, wind and hydro electric installations are often built in conservation areas.


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  • 53/81   Calling all kids: Send Blue Origin a space postcard while you’re stuck at home
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Are you looking for educational activities to occupy the kids while you're cooped up due to the coronavirus outbreak? One option is to make space postcards for the Club for the Future, an educational campaign created by Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin space venture. Last year, Blue Origin collected thousands of student-decorated cards, and sent them to space and back on its New Shepard suborbital craft. After the flight, the cards were stamped "Flown in Space" (in some cases, by Bezos himself) and then mailed back to their senders. Now Blue Origin is inviting students, educators and parents to… Read More

    Are you looking for educational activities to occupy the kids while you're cooped up due to the coronavirus outbreak? One option is to make space postcards for the Club for the Future, an educational campaign created by Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin space venture. Last year, Blue Origin collected thousands of student-decorated cards, and sent them to space and back on its New Shepard suborbital craft. After the flight, the cards were stamped "Flown in Space" (in some cases, by Bezos himself) and then mailed back to their senders. Now Blue Origin is inviting students, educators and parents to… Read More


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  • 54/81   How are you doing during the COVID-19 crisis? Scientists want to hear your story
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Researchers at the University of Washington are launching a study aimed at answering the question that's on a lot of people's minds as the coronavirus epidemic spreads through the Seattle area: How are you holding up? The King County COVID-19 Community Study, a.k.a. KC3S, is recruiting King County residents to tell their stories. The study is scheduled to collect data through April 19. “We want to start collecting this information now — as the COVID-19 pandemic is unfolding — about how families and communities are being impacted, and how they are adapting,” Nicole Errett, a lecturer in the UW Department… Read More

    Researchers at the University of Washington are launching a study aimed at answering the question that's on a lot of people's minds as the coronavirus epidemic spreads through the Seattle area: How are you holding up? The King County COVID-19 Community Study, a.k.a. KC3S, is recruiting King County residents to tell their stories. The study is scheduled to collect data through April 19. “We want to start collecting this information now — as the COVID-19 pandemic is unfolding — about how families and communities are being impacted, and how they are adapting,” Nicole Errett, a lecturer in the UW Department… Read More


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  • 55/81   Mammal study explains 'why females live longer'
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Across wild mammal species, females live over 18% longer than males because of genetics and environment.

    Across wild mammal species, females live over 18% longer than males because of genetics and environment.


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  • 56/81   Fossil worm shows us our evolutionary beginnings
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    A tiny, 555-million-year-old seafloor creature reveals why our bodies are organised the way they are.

    A tiny, 555-million-year-old seafloor creature reveals why our bodies are organised the way they are.


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  • 57/81   OceanGate chooses Toray CMA to make carbon fiber for its Titanic submersibles
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Everett, Wash.-based OceanGate says Toray Composite Materials America is its preferred provider for the carbon fiber material that will be used in the company's next-generation submersibles. Toray CMA is the world's largest supplier of carbon fiber and the leader in providing fibers for numerous aircraft, including the Boeing 777 and 787. The company's U.S. head office is in Tacoma, Wash. OceanGate CEO Stockton Rush said in a statement that Toray CMA "will play a critical role as we develop the next generation of manned submersible, to usher in a new era of exploration using aerospace-quality composites." Toray CMA's vice president… Read More

    Everett, Wash.-based OceanGate says Toray Composite Materials America is its preferred provider for the carbon fiber material that will be used in the company's next-generation submersibles. Toray CMA is the world's largest supplier of carbon fiber and the leader in providing fibers for numerous aircraft, including the Boeing 777 and 787. The company's U.S. head office is in Tacoma, Wash. OceanGate CEO Stockton Rush said in a statement that Toray CMA "will play a critical role as we develop the next generation of manned submersible, to usher in a new era of exploration using aerospace-quality composites." Toray CMA's vice president… Read More


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  • 58/81   Climate change: Earth's deepest ice canyon vulnerable to melting
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Nasa scientists probe Denman Glacier which fills the deepest land gorge on Earth.

    Nasa scientists probe Denman Glacier which fills the deepest land gorge on Earth.


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  • 59/81   Electric car emissions myth 'busted'
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Fears that electric cars could actually increase carbon emissions are a baseless, a study suggests.

    Fears that electric cars could actually increase carbon emissions are a baseless, a study suggests.


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  • 60/81   As Natural Disasters Strike, a New Fear: Relief Shelters May Spread Virus
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    WASHINGTON -- Coast-to-coast storms. A spate of wildfires. Flooding in Hawaii. As the United States rushes into disaster season, federal officials now have an added crisis to worry about: How to stop tightly packed disaster-response shelters from becoming hot spots of coronavirus transmission.The virus is forcing emergency managers to rethink long-held procedures for operating shelters like these in real time. That challenge comes as the nation's crisis-response workforce is already taxed by three years of brutal hurricanes, floods and wildfires, a trend that climate change promises to accelerate."All of these activities that we do during and after disasters are activities that require a lot of people to be in close proximity to each other," said Samantha Montano, assistant professor of emergency management and disaster science at the University of Nebraska, Omaha. "And that is the exact opposite of what we need to do to keep people safe from COVID-19.""Any hazards that we're concerned about on an annual basis, we need to be twice as concerned about them now," she said.The Federal Emergency Management Agency has begun encouraging workers to "practice social distancing" and to limit to four the number of disaster victims who can be in one of its field offices at any given time, a spokeswoman said Thursday. The agency has also halted training at its National Fire Academy and Emergency Management Institute, as well as other facilities.It also said Thursday that it would let states seek reimbursement for sheltering victims individually, for example in hotels. However, in a disaster scenario, hotels themselves might be damaged or unusable because of the crisis, or simply not close enough to serve the immediate needs.So one of the most pressing challenges remains: What to do about shelters?When Americans are forced to leave their homes because of flooding or fires and have nowhere else to go, charitable organizations routinely open temporary shelters that usually consist of rows of cots in school gymnasiums, churches, convention centers or other large indoor spaces.Those shelters have offered a place of refuge, one that has become increasingly important as climate change causes more frequent and intense disasters.On Thursday, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration issued data predicting widespread flooding between now and the end of May, with major or moderate floods in 23 states. California has already been hit by nine wildfires this year; the National Interagency Fire Center reported 11 new large fires around the country this week alone.A major storm stretched across much of the country this week, with FEMA warning Friday of heavy rain from the southern plains to the Tennessee Valley. And hurricane season is just 10 weeks away.The coronavirus has the potential to turn the shelters from a refuge into a danger of their own.The American Red Cross, which runs most of the temporary shelters around the U.S., has set new guidelines for their operation, trying to curb the risk of transmission by screening evacuees and isolating those who show symptoms, as well as spacing cots 6 feet apart and emphasizing good hygiene.Officials with the organization said they knew that wasn't a perfect solution.Amid a pandemic, "a congregate shelter is not the best environment," said Trevor Riggen, senior vice president for disaster services for the Red Cross, using the term for shelters that place groups of people in a single shared space. He said the Red Cross would try to move more people into hotels or motels, but added that there weren't always enough available rooms close to a disaster, particularly if the number of people who need shelter extends into the hundreds.Public health officials said it would be better to house disaster victims separately, despite the additional cost and logistical hurdles."Congregate settings are clearly a higher infection-control risk, especially when dealing with a novel respiratory virus," said Lucy Wilson, who ran infection control for Maryland and is now a professor in the emergency health services department at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. She compared group shelters to other crowded settings like dormitories, barracks, prisons and cruise ships, where "respiratory diseases are known to rapidly spread."Arnold Monto, a professor of epidemiology and global health at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, said he thought the Red Cross was taking reasonable steps to protect the health of people in its shelters. But he said it seemed likely, based on what is known so far about COVID-19, that people who don't have symptoms may nonetheless have the disease -- and, more important, can probably spread it to others."Being in a motel would give them more distance," Monto said. "The more people you have, the more likely that one of them might be affected."The federal government's Thursday announcement that states can seek federal reimbursement for the cost of sheltering people individually -- provided it's at the direction of a public health official -- could help address that concern, assuming the rooms are available. Keeping people out of group shelters "may be necessary in this Public Health Emergency to save lives," the agency said in a fact sheet, "as well as to lessen or avert the threat of a catastrophe."Riggen said the Red Cross would try to get people into hotels when the risk of contagion is particularly high. Following an apartment fire this month in Jacksonville, Florida, a state with a large number of coronavirus cases, the organization put 45 people in hotels on the advice of local health officials, he said.In the meantime, the Red Cross is continuing to rely on shelters, but with a few changes.Its new guidelines call for taking the temperature of everyone coming into shelters, whether evacuees or volunteers, as well as checking for other symptoms of COVID-19. Once inside, everyone is supposed to be checked three times a day. Other steps include hand-washing stations, along with "enhanced cleaning of all hard surfaces."People are also told not to pull their cots together.The Red Cross has already applied its new guidelines at two shelters, according to Riggen. One is in Hawaii, which was hit this week by flooding. That shelter housed 150 people on Tuesday night.The other was at a school in Salt Lake City, which was set up following a 5.7-magnitude earthquake Wednesday. A Red Cross spokeswoman, Greta Gustafson, said Friday that no one had stayed at the shelter. Workers at the shelter denied entry Thursday to a photographer for The New York Times."We are not aware of any positive tests" for COVID-19 at either of the two shelters, Gustafson said.Despite the risk of the coronavirus, switching from a shelter model to putting people in hotels is more challenging that it might seem. And money isn't the only problem.In addition to being expensive, having people dispersed across different locations makes it harder to provide them with food and supplies, Riggen said. In some places, particularly rural areas, there may not be enough hotels nearby. And it's not always possible to get a hotel room if somebody is pushed from their home in the middle of the night."We don't want to leave people standing out on the curb waiting," Riggen said.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company

    WASHINGTON -- Coast-to-coast storms. A spate of wildfires. Flooding in Hawaii. As the United States rushes into disaster season, federal officials now have an added crisis to worry about: How to stop tightly packed disaster-response shelters from becoming hot spots of coronavirus transmission.The virus is forcing emergency managers to rethink long-held procedures for operating shelters like these in real time. That challenge comes as the nation's crisis-response workforce is already taxed by three years of brutal hurricanes, floods and wildfires, a trend that climate change promises to accelerate."All of these activities that we do during and after disasters are activities that require a lot of people to be in close proximity to each other," said Samantha Montano, assistant professor of emergency management and disaster science at the University of Nebraska, Omaha. "And that is the exact opposite of what we need to do to keep people safe from COVID-19.""Any hazards that we're concerned about on an annual basis, we need to be twice as concerned about them now," she said.The Federal Emergency Management Agency has begun encouraging workers to "practice social distancing" and to limit to four the number of disaster victims who can be in one of its field offices at any given time, a spokeswoman said Thursday. The agency has also halted training at its National Fire Academy and Emergency Management Institute, as well as other facilities.It also said Thursday that it would let states seek reimbursement for sheltering victims individually, for example in hotels. However, in a disaster scenario, hotels themselves might be damaged or unusable because of the crisis, or simply not close enough to serve the immediate needs.So one of the most pressing challenges remains: What to do about shelters?When Americans are forced to leave their homes because of flooding or fires and have nowhere else to go, charitable organizations routinely open temporary shelters that usually consist of rows of cots in school gymnasiums, churches, convention centers or other large indoor spaces.Those shelters have offered a place of refuge, one that has become increasingly important as climate change causes more frequent and intense disasters.On Thursday, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration issued data predicting widespread flooding between now and the end of May, with major or moderate floods in 23 states. California has already been hit by nine wildfires this year; the National Interagency Fire Center reported 11 new large fires around the country this week alone.A major storm stretched across much of the country this week, with FEMA warning Friday of heavy rain from the southern plains to the Tennessee Valley. And hurricane season is just 10 weeks away.The coronavirus has the potential to turn the shelters from a refuge into a danger of their own.The American Red Cross, which runs most of the temporary shelters around the U.S., has set new guidelines for their operation, trying to curb the risk of transmission by screening evacuees and isolating those who show symptoms, as well as spacing cots 6 feet apart and emphasizing good hygiene.Officials with the organization said they knew that wasn't a perfect solution.Amid a pandemic, "a congregate shelter is not the best environment," said Trevor Riggen, senior vice president for disaster services for the Red Cross, using the term for shelters that place groups of people in a single shared space. He said the Red Cross would try to move more people into hotels or motels, but added that there weren't always enough available rooms close to a disaster, particularly if the number of people who need shelter extends into the hundreds.Public health officials said it would be better to house disaster victims separately, despite the additional cost and logistical hurdles."Congregate settings are clearly a higher infection-control risk, especially when dealing with a novel respiratory virus," said Lucy Wilson, who ran infection control for Maryland and is now a professor in the emergency health services department at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. She compared group shelters to other crowded settings like dormitories, barracks, prisons and cruise ships, where "respiratory diseases are known to rapidly spread."Arnold Monto, a professor of epidemiology and global health at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, said he thought the Red Cross was taking reasonable steps to protect the health of people in its shelters. But he said it seemed likely, based on what is known so far about COVID-19, that people who don't have symptoms may nonetheless have the disease -- and, more important, can probably spread it to others."Being in a motel would give them more distance," Monto said. "The more people you have, the more likely that one of them might be affected."The federal government's Thursday announcement that states can seek federal reimbursement for the cost of sheltering people individually -- provided it's at the direction of a public health official -- could help address that concern, assuming the rooms are available. Keeping people out of group shelters "may be necessary in this Public Health Emergency to save lives," the agency said in a fact sheet, "as well as to lessen or avert the threat of a catastrophe."Riggen said the Red Cross would try to get people into hotels when the risk of contagion is particularly high. Following an apartment fire this month in Jacksonville, Florida, a state with a large number of coronavirus cases, the organization put 45 people in hotels on the advice of local health officials, he said.In the meantime, the Red Cross is continuing to rely on shelters, but with a few changes.Its new guidelines call for taking the temperature of everyone coming into shelters, whether evacuees or volunteers, as well as checking for other symptoms of COVID-19. Once inside, everyone is supposed to be checked three times a day. Other steps include hand-washing stations, along with "enhanced cleaning of all hard surfaces."People are also told not to pull their cots together.The Red Cross has already applied its new guidelines at two shelters, according to Riggen. One is in Hawaii, which was hit this week by flooding. That shelter housed 150 people on Tuesday night.The other was at a school in Salt Lake City, which was set up following a 5.7-magnitude earthquake Wednesday. A Red Cross spokeswoman, Greta Gustafson, said Friday that no one had stayed at the shelter. Workers at the shelter denied entry Thursday to a photographer for The New York Times."We are not aware of any positive tests" for COVID-19 at either of the two shelters, Gustafson said.Despite the risk of the coronavirus, switching from a shelter model to putting people in hotels is more challenging that it might seem. And money isn't the only problem.In addition to being expensive, having people dispersed across different locations makes it harder to provide them with food and supplies, Riggen said. In some places, particularly rural areas, there may not be enough hotels nearby. And it's not always possible to get a hotel room if somebody is pushed from their home in the middle of the night."We don't want to leave people standing out on the curb waiting," Riggen said.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company


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  • 61/81   I Spent a Year in Space, and I Have Tips on Isolation to Share
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Being stuck at home can be challenging. When I lived on the International Space Station for nearly a year, it wasn't easy. When I went to sleep, I was at work. When I woke up, I was still at work. Flying in space is probably the only job you absolutely cannot quit.But I learned some things during my time up there that I'd like to share -- because they are about to come in handy again, as we all confine ourselves at home to help stop the spread of the coronavirus. Here are a few tips on living in isolation, from someone who has been there.Follow a scheduleOn the space station, my time was scheduled tightly, from the moment I woke up to when I went to sleep. Sometimes this involved a spacewalk that could last up to eight hours; other times, it involved a five minute task, like checking on the experimental flowers I was growing in space. You will find maintaining a plan will help you and your family adjust to a different work and home life environment. When I returned to Earth, I missed the structure it provided and found it hard to live without.But pace yourselfWhen you are living and working in the same place for days on end, work can have a way of taking over everything if you let it. Living in space, I deliberately paced myself because I knew I was in it for the long haul -- just like we all are today. Take time for fun activities: I met up with crewmates for movie nights, complete with snacks, and binge watched all of "Game of Thrones" -- twice.And don't forget to include in your schedule a consistent bedtime. NASA scientists closely study astronauts' sleep when we are in space, and they have found that quality of sleep relates to cognition, mood, and interpersonal relations -- all essential to getting through a mission in space or a quarantine at home.Go outsideOne of the things I missed most while living in space was being able to go outside and experience nature. After being confined to a small space for months, I actually started to crave nature -- the color green, the smell of fresh dirt, and the feel of warm sun on my face. That flower experiment became more important to me than I could have ever imagined. My colleagues liked to play a recording of Earth sounds, like birds and rustling trees, and even mosquitoes, over and over. It brought me back to earth. (Although occasionally I found myself swatting my ears at the mosquitoes.)For an astronaut, going outside is a dangerous undertaking that requires days of preparation, so I appreciate that in our current predicament, I can step outside any time I want for a walk or a hike -- no spacesuit needed. Research has shown that spending time in nature is beneficial for our mental and physical health, as is exercise. You don't need to work out two and a half hours a day, as astronauts on the space station do, but getting moving once a day should be part of your quarantine schedule (just stay at least six feet away from others).You need a hobbyWhen you are confined in a small space you need an outlet that isn't work or maintaining your environment.Some people are surprised to learn I brought books with me to space. The quiet and absorption you can find in a physical book -- one that doesn't ping you with notifications or tempt you to open a new tab -- is priceless. Many small bookstores are currently offering curbside pickup or home delivery service, which means you can support a local business while also cultivating some much-needed unplugged time.You can also practice an instrument (I just bought a digital guitar trainer online), try a craft, or make some art. Astronauts take time for all of these while in space. (Remember Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield's famous cover of David Bowie's Space Oddity?)Keep a journalNASA has been studying the effects of isolation on humans for decades, and one surprising finding they have made is the value of keeping a journal. Throughout my yearlong mission, I took the time to write about my experiences almost every day. If you find yourself just chronicling the days' events (which, under the circumstances, might get repetitive) instead try describing what you are experiencing through your five senses or write about memories. Even if you don't wind up writing a book based on your journal like I did, writing about your days will help put your experiences in perspective and let you look back later on what this unique time in history has meant.Take time to connectEven with all the responsibilities of serving as commander of a space station, I never missed the chance to have a videoconference with family and friends. Scientists have found that isolation is damaging not only to our mental health, but to our physical health as well, especially our immune systems. Technology makes it easier than ever to keep in touch, so it's worth making time to connect with someone every day -- it might actually help you fight off viruses.Listen to expertsI've found that most problems aren't rocket science, but when they are rocket science, you should ask a rocket scientist. Living in space taught me a lot about the importance of trusting the advice of people who knew more than I did about their subjects, whether it was science, engineering, medicine, or the design of the incredibly complex space station that was keeping me alive.Especially in a challenging moment like the one we are living through now, we have to seek out knowledge from those who know the most about it and listen to them. Social media and other poorly vetted sources can be transmitters of misinformation just as handshakes transmit viruses, so we have to make a point of seeking out reputable sources of facts, like the World Health Organization and the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center.We are all connectedSeen from space, the Earth has no borders. The spread of the coronavirus is showing us that what we share is much more powerful than what keeps us apart, for better or for worse. All people are inescapably interconnected, and the more we can come together to solve our problems, the better off we will all be.One of the side effects of seeing Earth from a the perspective of space, at least for me, is feeling more compassion for others. As helpless as we may feel stuck inside our homes, there are always things we can do -- I've seen people reading to children via videoconference, donating their time and dollars to charities online, and running errands for elderly or immuno-compromised neighbors. The benefits for the volunteer are just as great as for those helped.I've seen humans work together to prevail over some of the toughest challenges imaginable, and I know we can prevail over this one if we all do our part and work together as a team.Oh, and wash your hands -- often.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company

    Being stuck at home can be challenging. When I lived on the International Space Station for nearly a year, it wasn't easy. When I went to sleep, I was at work. When I woke up, I was still at work. Flying in space is probably the only job you absolutely cannot quit.But I learned some things during my time up there that I'd like to share -- because they are about to come in handy again, as we all confine ourselves at home to help stop the spread of the coronavirus. Here are a few tips on living in isolation, from someone who has been there.Follow a scheduleOn the space station, my time was scheduled tightly, from the moment I woke up to when I went to sleep. Sometimes this involved a spacewalk that could last up to eight hours; other times, it involved a five minute task, like checking on the experimental flowers I was growing in space. You will find maintaining a plan will help you and your family adjust to a different work and home life environment. When I returned to Earth, I missed the structure it provided and found it hard to live without.But pace yourselfWhen you are living and working in the same place for days on end, work can have a way of taking over everything if you let it. Living in space, I deliberately paced myself because I knew I was in it for the long haul -- just like we all are today. Take time for fun activities: I met up with crewmates for movie nights, complete with snacks, and binge watched all of "Game of Thrones" -- twice.And don't forget to include in your schedule a consistent bedtime. NASA scientists closely study astronauts' sleep when we are in space, and they have found that quality of sleep relates to cognition, mood, and interpersonal relations -- all essential to getting through a mission in space or a quarantine at home.Go outsideOne of the things I missed most while living in space was being able to go outside and experience nature. After being confined to a small space for months, I actually started to crave nature -- the color green, the smell of fresh dirt, and the feel of warm sun on my face. That flower experiment became more important to me than I could have ever imagined. My colleagues liked to play a recording of Earth sounds, like birds and rustling trees, and even mosquitoes, over and over. It brought me back to earth. (Although occasionally I found myself swatting my ears at the mosquitoes.)For an astronaut, going outside is a dangerous undertaking that requires days of preparation, so I appreciate that in our current predicament, I can step outside any time I want for a walk or a hike -- no spacesuit needed. Research has shown that spending time in nature is beneficial for our mental and physical health, as is exercise. You don't need to work out two and a half hours a day, as astronauts on the space station do, but getting moving once a day should be part of your quarantine schedule (just stay at least six feet away from others).You need a hobbyWhen you are confined in a small space you need an outlet that isn't work or maintaining your environment.Some people are surprised to learn I brought books with me to space. The quiet and absorption you can find in a physical book -- one that doesn't ping you with notifications or tempt you to open a new tab -- is priceless. Many small bookstores are currently offering curbside pickup or home delivery service, which means you can support a local business while also cultivating some much-needed unplugged time.You can also practice an instrument (I just bought a digital guitar trainer online), try a craft, or make some art. Astronauts take time for all of these while in space. (Remember Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield's famous cover of David Bowie's Space Oddity?)Keep a journalNASA has been studying the effects of isolation on humans for decades, and one surprising finding they have made is the value of keeping a journal. Throughout my yearlong mission, I took the time to write about my experiences almost every day. If you find yourself just chronicling the days' events (which, under the circumstances, might get repetitive) instead try describing what you are experiencing through your five senses or write about memories. Even if you don't wind up writing a book based on your journal like I did, writing about your days will help put your experiences in perspective and let you look back later on what this unique time in history has meant.Take time to connectEven with all the responsibilities of serving as commander of a space station, I never missed the chance to have a videoconference with family and friends. Scientists have found that isolation is damaging not only to our mental health, but to our physical health as well, especially our immune systems. Technology makes it easier than ever to keep in touch, so it's worth making time to connect with someone every day -- it might actually help you fight off viruses.Listen to expertsI've found that most problems aren't rocket science, but when they are rocket science, you should ask a rocket scientist. Living in space taught me a lot about the importance of trusting the advice of people who knew more than I did about their subjects, whether it was science, engineering, medicine, or the design of the incredibly complex space station that was keeping me alive.Especially in a challenging moment like the one we are living through now, we have to seek out knowledge from those who know the most about it and listen to them. Social media and other poorly vetted sources can be transmitters of misinformation just as handshakes transmit viruses, so we have to make a point of seeking out reputable sources of facts, like the World Health Organization and the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center.We are all connectedSeen from space, the Earth has no borders. The spread of the coronavirus is showing us that what we share is much more powerful than what keeps us apart, for better or for worse. All people are inescapably interconnected, and the more we can come together to solve our problems, the better off we will all be.One of the side effects of seeing Earth from a the perspective of space, at least for me, is feeling more compassion for others. As helpless as we may feel stuck inside our homes, there are always things we can do -- I've seen people reading to children via videoconference, donating their time and dollars to charities online, and running errands for elderly or immuno-compromised neighbors. The benefits for the volunteer are just as great as for those helped.I've seen humans work together to prevail over some of the toughest challenges imaginable, and I know we can prevail over this one if we all do our part and work together as a team.Oh, and wash your hands -- often.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company


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  • 62/81   Ex-FBI agent missing for 13 years died in Iran custody, family says
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    A former FBI agent who mysteriously vanished in 2007 died in Iranian custody, his family concluded Wednesday, saying US intelligence had made them give up 13 years of hope.  President Donald Trump did not confirm Bob Levinson's death, saying that Iran had not communicated any news on the former agent, who would have turned 72 this month.  'We recently received information from US officials that has led both them and us to conclude that our wonderful husband and father died while in Iranian custody,' the family said in a statement.

    A former FBI agent who mysteriously vanished in 2007 died in Iranian custody, his family concluded Wednesday, saying US intelligence had made them give up 13 years of hope. President Donald Trump did not confirm Bob Levinson's death, saying that Iran had not communicated any news on the former agent, who would have turned 72 this month. 'We recently received information from US officials that has led both them and us to conclude that our wonderful husband and father died while in Iranian custody,' the family said in a statement.


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  • 63/81   American man, missing in Iran since 2007, died in captivity: Family
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The family of retired FBI Special Agent Bob Levinson, who vanished in Iran 13 years ago, said Wednesday they are now convinced he died in captivity, though when is not clear.  In a statement, the Levinson family -- all tireless advocates including his daughter Sarah Moriarty, who testified in Congress again last month to press lawmakers to help bring him home -- said they had grudgingly heard the news they've dreaded for 13 years.

    The family of retired FBI Special Agent Bob Levinson, who vanished in Iran 13 years ago, said Wednesday they are now convinced he died in captivity, though when is not clear. In a statement, the Levinson family -- all tireless advocates including his daughter Sarah Moriarty, who testified in Congress again last month to press lawmakers to help bring him home -- said they had grudgingly heard the news they've dreaded for 13 years.


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  • 64/81   Coronavirus: Why Ghana has gone into mourning after mass funeral ban
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    How the measures against the coronavirus in Ghana are challenging the country's religious way of life.

    How the measures against the coronavirus in Ghana are challenging the country's religious way of life.


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  • 65/81   Family of ex-FBI agent who vanished in 2007 says U.S. officials believe he is dead
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The family of Robert Levinson, a former FBI agent who disappeared in 2007, said on Wednesday the U.S. government has concluded that Levinson died while in Iranian custody.In a statement on Twitter, the family said it is "impossible to describe our pain." They did not share any information on when Levinson is believed to have died or how, but did say U.S. officials received information that points to Levinson's death.Levinson vanished on March 9, 2007, while on his way to meet a source on Kish Island, Iran. The Levinson family received proof-of-life photographs and videos in 2010 and 2011, and for several years, U.S. officials said Levinson was in Iran working on a private investigation. A 2013 Associated Press investigation uncovered that Levinson was actually sent on a mission by CIA analysts who did not have authorization to conduct such an operation.In their statement, the Levinson family vowed that "those who are responsible for what happened to Bob Levinson, including those in the U.S. government who for many years repeatedly left him behind, will ultimately receive justice for what they have done."More stories from theweek.com  Elton John to host 'Living Room Concert for America' with stars performing from home  A G-7 joint statement on coronavirus failed because the U.S. insisted on calling it the 'Wuhan virus'  Nearly half of New York City's coronavirus cases found in adults under 45

    The family of Robert Levinson, a former FBI agent who disappeared in 2007, said on Wednesday the U.S. government has concluded that Levinson died while in Iranian custody.In a statement on Twitter, the family said it is "impossible to describe our pain." They did not share any information on when Levinson is believed to have died or how, but did say U.S. officials received information that points to Levinson's death.Levinson vanished on March 9, 2007, while on his way to meet a source on Kish Island, Iran. The Levinson family received proof-of-life photographs and videos in 2010 and 2011, and for several years, U.S. officials said Levinson was in Iran working on a private investigation. A 2013 Associated Press investigation uncovered that Levinson was actually sent on a mission by CIA analysts who did not have authorization to conduct such an operation.In their statement, the Levinson family vowed that "those who are responsible for what happened to Bob Levinson, including those in the U.S. government who for many years repeatedly left him behind, will ultimately receive justice for what they have done."More stories from theweek.com Elton John to host 'Living Room Concert for America' with stars performing from home A G-7 joint statement on coronavirus failed because the U.S. insisted on calling it the 'Wuhan virus' Nearly half of New York City's coronavirus cases found in adults under 45


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  • 66/81   'He's an American hero': Trump confirms American FBI agent Robert Levinson likely dead in Iran
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Trump has admitted it is not “looking good” for retired FBI agent Robert Levinson, now presumed dead in Iran.In a coronavirus taskforce press conference on Wednesday evening, the president said that he assumed the American had died in custody.

    Trump has admitted it is not “looking good” for retired FBI agent Robert Levinson, now presumed dead in Iran.In a coronavirus taskforce press conference on Wednesday evening, the president said that he assumed the American had died in custody.


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  • 67/81   New Zealand mosque gunman pleads guilty to murder, terrorism
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The man who committed the worst atrocity in New Zealand's modern history when he slaughtered 51 worshippers at two Christchurch mosques unexpectedly pleaded guilty to all charges Thursday.  The sudden turn in the case took survivors and relatives by surprise, and brought relief to people across New Zealand.  Many had feared Australian white supremacist Brenton Harrison Tarrant would try to use his trial as a platform to promote his views.

    The man who committed the worst atrocity in New Zealand's modern history when he slaughtered 51 worshippers at two Christchurch mosques unexpectedly pleaded guilty to all charges Thursday. The sudden turn in the case took survivors and relatives by surprise, and brought relief to people across New Zealand. Many had feared Australian white supremacist Brenton Harrison Tarrant would try to use his trial as a platform to promote his views.


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  • 68/81   Robert Levinson's family confirms former FBI agent died in Iranian custody
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Levinson disappeared 13 years ago after being sent on a mission to Kish island by CIA analysts who had no authority to do soRobert Levinson, a former FBI agent who disappeared in Iran in 2007, died in Iranian custody, according to a statement from his family.The statement said Levinson’s family received the news from US officials but did not know how or when he died, only that his death preceded the coronavirus outbreak that has ravaged Iran.“It is impossible to describe our pain,” the statement said. “If not for the cruel, heartless actions of the Iranian regime, Robert Levinson would be alive and home with us today. It has been 13 years waiting for answers.”The family added they did not know if or when his body would be returned.“This is the very definition of cruelty,” the statement said.Levinson disappeared 13 years ago on Iran’s Kish island. The US initially claimed he was there on his own initiative, but in 2013, the Associated Press revealed he had been sent on a mission there by CIA analysts who had no authority to run espionage operations. Levinson was a specialist on Russian organised crime and had not had much previous involvement in Iran.Tehran denied knowledge of Levinson’s whereabouts until November last year when it acknowledged that there was an ongoing case involving him before its revolutionary court.Levinson, who suffered from diabetes, was last seen in a hostage video sent anonymously to the family in 2010, and then in still photographs three years later in which he was wearing an orange jumpsuit, of the kind used in the US detention camp on Guantánamo Bay. The images did not make clear who was detaining him.Levinson’s family thanked Donald Trump and his administration for doing all they could “to make our family whole again” but they blamed other, unnamed US officials for their lack of action.“Those who are responsible for what happened to Bob Levinson, including those in the US government who for many years repeatedly left him behind, will ultimately receive justice for what they have done,” their statement said.“We will spend the rest of our lives making sure of this, and the Iranian regime must know we will not be going away. We expect American officials, as well as officials around the world, to continue to press Iran to seek Bob’s return, and to ensure those Iranian officials involved are held accountable.”

    Levinson disappeared 13 years ago after being sent on a mission to Kish island by CIA analysts who had no authority to do soRobert Levinson, a former FBI agent who disappeared in Iran in 2007, died in Iranian custody, according to a statement from his family.The statement said Levinson’s family received the news from US officials but did not know how or when he died, only that his death preceded the coronavirus outbreak that has ravaged Iran.“It is impossible to describe our pain,” the statement said. “If not for the cruel, heartless actions of the Iranian regime, Robert Levinson would be alive and home with us today. It has been 13 years waiting for answers.”The family added they did not know if or when his body would be returned.“This is the very definition of cruelty,” the statement said.Levinson disappeared 13 years ago on Iran’s Kish island. The US initially claimed he was there on his own initiative, but in 2013, the Associated Press revealed he had been sent on a mission there by CIA analysts who had no authority to run espionage operations. Levinson was a specialist on Russian organised crime and had not had much previous involvement in Iran.Tehran denied knowledge of Levinson’s whereabouts until November last year when it acknowledged that there was an ongoing case involving him before its revolutionary court.Levinson, who suffered from diabetes, was last seen in a hostage video sent anonymously to the family in 2010, and then in still photographs three years later in which he was wearing an orange jumpsuit, of the kind used in the US detention camp on Guantánamo Bay. The images did not make clear who was detaining him.Levinson’s family thanked Donald Trump and his administration for doing all they could “to make our family whole again” but they blamed other, unnamed US officials for their lack of action.“Those who are responsible for what happened to Bob Levinson, including those in the US government who for many years repeatedly left him behind, will ultimately receive justice for what they have done,” their statement said.“We will spend the rest of our lives making sure of this, and the Iranian regime must know we will not be going away. We expect American officials, as well as officials around the world, to continue to press Iran to seek Bob’s return, and to ensure those Iranian officials involved are held accountable.”


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  • 69/81   Five Things You Need to Know to Start Your Day
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- The Federal Reserve could now have as much as $4.5 trillion to keep credit flowing. Spain has its deadliest day yet. And central banks are looking to Japan for lessons on rolling out quantitative easing. Here are some of the things people in markets are talking about today. Anti-Virus StimulusThe Federal Reserve could now have as much as $4.5 trillion to keep credit flowing and make direct loans to U.S. businesses through the massive coronavirus stimulus bill being considered by U.S. lawmakers. The bipartisan agreement, which still needs to be passed by the Senate and House and signed into law by President Donald Trump, will include $454 billion in funds for the Treasury to backstop emergency actions by the Fed to support the U.S. economy, Senator Patrick Toomey said on Wednesday. The central bank will work with the U.S. Treasury to use that money as a backstop against credit risk as it supports markets for corporate and short-term state and local debt, while also loaning directly to businesses. Its lending facilities have typically required a loss-absorbing cushion of around 10% from the Treasury to protect it from loans that don’t get paid back. Congress’s stimulus package, meanwhile, keeps meeting snags. A dispute in the Senate over expanded unemployment benefits for lower wage workers is threatening to delay passage of the $2 trillion coronavirus relief package as several Republicans demanded changes. Independent Senator Bernie Sanders said he would hold up a vote if the legislation is altered.Markets Mixed Stocks in Asia were poised for a mixed start, following the first back-to-back gains for global equities since mid-February, as negotiations in Congress continued toward a vote on the U.S. stimulus bill later this week. Earlier, the S&P 500 ended about 1% higher after a rally of more than 5% fizzled amid a dispute in the Senate. Futures in Japan slipped, while contracts gained in Hong Kong and Australia. Republican senators raised objections to the unemployment benefits section of the stimulus bill, and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders threatened to hold up the legislation unless those objections were dropped. The dollar declined for a second day against its major peers. Treasuries edged lower. Elsewhere, gold drifted lower after a squeeze of historic proportions pushed its prices to the biggest one-day gain since November 2008 on Tuesday. The closing of refineries and demand for physical gold had caused a disconnect between prices in London and New York. Just Like JapanAs central banks around the world reignite quantitative easing programs or adopt them for the first time, Japan’s key focus of controlling bond yields rather than a quota of purchases is being explored. When the Reserve Bank of Australia broke the emergency glass on March 19, it set a target for the yield on three-year Australian government bonds of around 0.25%, in line with its benchmark policy rate that was lowered to this level. The advantage of targeting a yield rather than promising to buy a specific amount of bonds is the greater flexibility it allows monetary authorities. If bond markets behave and yields fall into line with the targets, the program can be easier to manage with fewer purchases needed. That’s an approach the BOJ adopted in late 2016 — it targets a 10-year yield around zero — after its earlier QE program appeared on an unsustainable path given the huge volume of bond buying and resulting market distortions that were involved. Federal Reserve Governor Lael Brainard has floated the prospect for yield curve control in the U.S. recently too. Here’s what central banks should be considering.Virus SpreadAs the virus’s spread expands, here’s the latest on how countries are coping. Spain had its deadliest day yet, while in Britain, the government moved to shut Parliament and Prince Charles tested positive. European Union leaders inched toward a rescue package. Germany unleashed a historic bailout. Russian President Vladimir Putin even postponed a public vote on constitutional changes next month that would allow him to rule to 2036. In the U.S. Governor Andrew Cuomo of New York said the stimulus package working its way through Congress is inadequate. He also restricted access to a malaria drug that President Donald Trump has touted as a treatment for the novel coronavirus. In Brazil, President Jair Bolsonaro, echoing Trump, urged the country to resume normal life to protect the economy. That may be too late for Thailand, which faces its biggest economic contraction since the Asian crisis. Singapore reported its biggest daily jump in new cases. Meanwhile, U.S. President Donald Trump said he would stop using the “China virus” label to deescalate the blame game with Beijing.Balancing ActAustralian Prime Minister Scott Morrison is trying to thread the needle as he battles to save the country’s economy and contain a health crisis as coronavirus cases surge. As leaders the world over are discovering, something may have to give. The conservative leader’s response to the outbreak so far appears to fall somewhere between the total lockdowns announced by New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and India’s Narendra Modi, and that of U.S. President Donald Trump, who says he wants his economy re-opened by Easter despite warnings that would create a human catastrophe. He’s faced criticism from some who believe the government is over-reacting and from those who want more stringent controls. Confirmed cases have surged five-fold in the past week to more than 2,400, while thousands have already lost their jobs — sending waves of newly unemployed into long queues outside welfare agencies nationwide. Meanwhile, here’s how the virus is impacting Australian firms’ guidance. What We’ve Been ReadingThis is what’s caught our eye over the past 24 hours.Wall Street bonuses could fall 40% this year. The Olympics delay means the $12 billion games just got a whole lot more expensive. Amazon and Walmart are struggling to cope as India enters lockdown. Desperate airlines are switching passengers for cargo to stay alive. Netflix has reduced its video quality in more countries to handle the “stay at home” surge. SoftBank blasts Moody’s for “biased” ratings downgrade. A gaming boom is hiding the industry’s struggle to develop new titles.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- The Federal Reserve could now have as much as $4.5 trillion to keep credit flowing. Spain has its deadliest day yet. And central banks are looking to Japan for lessons on rolling out quantitative easing. Here are some of the things people in markets are talking about today. Anti-Virus StimulusThe Federal Reserve could now have as much as $4.5 trillion to keep credit flowing and make direct loans to U.S. businesses through the massive coronavirus stimulus bill being considered by U.S. lawmakers. The bipartisan agreement, which still needs to be passed by the Senate and House and signed into law by President Donald Trump, will include $454 billion in funds for the Treasury to backstop emergency actions by the Fed to support the U.S. economy, Senator Patrick Toomey said on Wednesday. The central bank will work with the U.S. Treasury to use that money as a backstop against credit risk as it supports markets for corporate and short-term state and local debt, while also loaning directly to businesses. Its lending facilities have typically required a loss-absorbing cushion of around 10% from the Treasury to protect it from loans that don’t get paid back. Congress’s stimulus package, meanwhile, keeps meeting snags. A dispute in the Senate over expanded unemployment benefits for lower wage workers is threatening to delay passage of the $2 trillion coronavirus relief package as several Republicans demanded changes. Independent Senator Bernie Sanders said he would hold up a vote if the legislation is altered.Markets Mixed Stocks in Asia were poised for a mixed start, following the first back-to-back gains for global equities since mid-February, as negotiations in Congress continued toward a vote on the U.S. stimulus bill later this week. Earlier, the S&P 500 ended about 1% higher after a rally of more than 5% fizzled amid a dispute in the Senate. Futures in Japan slipped, while contracts gained in Hong Kong and Australia. Republican senators raised objections to the unemployment benefits section of the stimulus bill, and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders threatened to hold up the legislation unless those objections were dropped. The dollar declined for a second day against its major peers. Treasuries edged lower. Elsewhere, gold drifted lower after a squeeze of historic proportions pushed its prices to the biggest one-day gain since November 2008 on Tuesday. The closing of refineries and demand for physical gold had caused a disconnect between prices in London and New York. Just Like JapanAs central banks around the world reignite quantitative easing programs or adopt them for the first time, Japan’s key focus of controlling bond yields rather than a quota of purchases is being explored. When the Reserve Bank of Australia broke the emergency glass on March 19, it set a target for the yield on three-year Australian government bonds of around 0.25%, in line with its benchmark policy rate that was lowered to this level. The advantage of targeting a yield rather than promising to buy a specific amount of bonds is the greater flexibility it allows monetary authorities. If bond markets behave and yields fall into line with the targets, the program can be easier to manage with fewer purchases needed. That’s an approach the BOJ adopted in late 2016 — it targets a 10-year yield around zero — after its earlier QE program appeared on an unsustainable path given the huge volume of bond buying and resulting market distortions that were involved. Federal Reserve Governor Lael Brainard has floated the prospect for yield curve control in the U.S. recently too. Here’s what central banks should be considering.Virus SpreadAs the virus’s spread expands, here’s the latest on how countries are coping. Spain had its deadliest day yet, while in Britain, the government moved to shut Parliament and Prince Charles tested positive. European Union leaders inched toward a rescue package. Germany unleashed a historic bailout. Russian President Vladimir Putin even postponed a public vote on constitutional changes next month that would allow him to rule to 2036. In the U.S. Governor Andrew Cuomo of New York said the stimulus package working its way through Congress is inadequate. He also restricted access to a malaria drug that President Donald Trump has touted as a treatment for the novel coronavirus. In Brazil, President Jair Bolsonaro, echoing Trump, urged the country to resume normal life to protect the economy. That may be too late for Thailand, which faces its biggest economic contraction since the Asian crisis. Singapore reported its biggest daily jump in new cases. Meanwhile, U.S. President Donald Trump said he would stop using the “China virus” label to deescalate the blame game with Beijing.Balancing ActAustralian Prime Minister Scott Morrison is trying to thread the needle as he battles to save the country’s economy and contain a health crisis as coronavirus cases surge. As leaders the world over are discovering, something may have to give. The conservative leader’s response to the outbreak so far appears to fall somewhere between the total lockdowns announced by New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and India’s Narendra Modi, and that of U.S. President Donald Trump, who says he wants his economy re-opened by Easter despite warnings that would create a human catastrophe. He’s faced criticism from some who believe the government is over-reacting and from those who want more stringent controls. Confirmed cases have surged five-fold in the past week to more than 2,400, while thousands have already lost their jobs — sending waves of newly unemployed into long queues outside welfare agencies nationwide. Meanwhile, here’s how the virus is impacting Australian firms’ guidance. What We’ve Been ReadingThis is what’s caught our eye over the past 24 hours.Wall Street bonuses could fall 40% this year. The Olympics delay means the $12 billion games just got a whole lot more expensive. Amazon and Walmart are struggling to cope as India enters lockdown. Desperate airlines are switching passengers for cargo to stay alive. Netflix has reduced its video quality in more countries to handle the “stay at home” surge. SoftBank blasts Moody’s for “biased” ratings downgrade. A gaming boom is hiding the industry’s struggle to develop new titles.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 70/81   Trump Says He ‘Won’t Accept’ That Ex-FBI Agent Robert Levinson Died in Iran, Despite Family’s Statement
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The family of Robert Levinson, a former FBI agent and CIA contractor who vanished in Iran over 10 years ago, said on Wednesday that they believe he is dead based on “information from U.S. officials.” “We recently received information from U.S. officials that has led both them and us to conclude that our wonderful husband and father died while in Iranian custody,” a statement from the family read. “We don't know when or how he died, only that it was prior to the COVID-19 pandemic.” Levinson disappeared in 2007 while working in Iran. He reappeared in a video and series of photos three years later, but has not been seen or heard from since. “It is impossible to describe our pain,” the family’s statement read, adding that they would have to adjust to a “new reality that is inconceivable” to them. “His grandchildren will never meet him. They will only know him through the stories we tell them,” they wrote. The statement also said those responsible for what happened to Levinson and the “U.S. government who for many years repeatedly left him behind” would eventually “receive justice” for what they did. “We expect American officials, as well as officials around the world, to continue to press Iran to seek Bob's return, and to ensure those Iranian officials involved are held accountable,” they wrote.The family thanked President Trump and several other Trump administration officials, who they said have “done all they could to make [their] family whole again.”But in a Wednesday press conference, Trump appeared to express doubt about the information the family said they had received, saying, “They haven’t told us that he’s dead.” At the same time, Trump acknowledged that “it’s not looking great” for Levinson, whom he described as a “great gentleman.”“We’ve gotten so many people back … but uh, Robert Levinson, who was outstanding, he’s been sick for a long time. He had some rough problems prior to his detainment or capture. We feel terribly for the family,” the president said. “It’s not looking great but I won’t accept that he’s dead,” he said. The Daily Beast previously reported that the Obama Administraiton, at the time, did not make any public statements calling for Iran to free Levinson because they didn't believe the country knew where the ex-FBI agent was.Theories posited that Levinson had been kidnapped by organized criminals, or factions in either Iranian security services or the Revolutionary Guard Corps.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

    The family of Robert Levinson, a former FBI agent and CIA contractor who vanished in Iran over 10 years ago, said on Wednesday that they believe he is dead based on “information from U.S. officials.” “We recently received information from U.S. officials that has led both them and us to conclude that our wonderful husband and father died while in Iranian custody,” a statement from the family read. “We don't know when or how he died, only that it was prior to the COVID-19 pandemic.” Levinson disappeared in 2007 while working in Iran. He reappeared in a video and series of photos three years later, but has not been seen or heard from since. “It is impossible to describe our pain,” the family’s statement read, adding that they would have to adjust to a “new reality that is inconceivable” to them. “His grandchildren will never meet him. They will only know him through the stories we tell them,” they wrote. The statement also said those responsible for what happened to Levinson and the “U.S. government who for many years repeatedly left him behind” would eventually “receive justice” for what they did. “We expect American officials, as well as officials around the world, to continue to press Iran to seek Bob's return, and to ensure those Iranian officials involved are held accountable,” they wrote.The family thanked President Trump and several other Trump administration officials, who they said have “done all they could to make [their] family whole again.”But in a Wednesday press conference, Trump appeared to express doubt about the information the family said they had received, saying, “They haven’t told us that he’s dead.” At the same time, Trump acknowledged that “it’s not looking great” for Levinson, whom he described as a “great gentleman.”“We’ve gotten so many people back … but uh, Robert Levinson, who was outstanding, he’s been sick for a long time. He had some rough problems prior to his detainment or capture. We feel terribly for the family,” the president said. “It’s not looking great but I won’t accept that he’s dead,” he said. The Daily Beast previously reported that the Obama Administraiton, at the time, did not make any public statements calling for Iran to free Levinson because they didn't believe the country knew where the ex-FBI agent was.Theories posited that Levinson had been kidnapped by organized criminals, or factions in either Iranian security services or the Revolutionary Guard Corps.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


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  • 71/81   UN chief says some warring groups heed call for cease-fires
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres on Wednesday welcomed calls by some groups for immediate cease-fires in their conflicts because of the coronavirus, saying he sees “a clear conscience emerging” that it is time to concentrate on the war against the pandemic.  U.N. spokesman Stephane Dujarric also noted the humanitarian truce called for by the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces in the country’s northeast to deal with the virus.  It was allied with the United States in the fight against Islamic State extremists.

    U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres on Wednesday welcomed calls by some groups for immediate cease-fires in their conflicts because of the coronavirus, saying he sees “a clear conscience emerging” that it is time to concentrate on the war against the pandemic. U.N. spokesman Stephane Dujarric also noted the humanitarian truce called for by the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces in the country’s northeast to deal with the virus. It was allied with the United States in the fight against Islamic State extremists.


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  • 72/81   Liberty University students split over decision to reopen school
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Liberty University president Jerry Falwell Jr.’s decision to reopen the school this week was met with wide-ranging reactions. While many critics feel Falwell is endangering the lives of students and faculty, others think it was the right decision.

    Liberty University president Jerry Falwell Jr.’s decision to reopen the school this week was met with wide-ranging reactions. While many critics feel Falwell is endangering the lives of students and faculty, others think it was the right decision.


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  • 73/81   False or just misleading? Trump claims U.S. has tested 'far more' for coronavirus than any other country.
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    President Trump’s boast about the U.S. testing more people for the coronavirus than any other country is  likely untrue, and certainly misleading.

    President Trump’s boast about the U.S. testing more people for the coronavirus than any other country is likely untrue, and certainly misleading.


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  • 74/81   Should the airlines get a bailout?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    The major U.S. airlines have asked for upwards of $50 billion from Congress to save their industry amid the coronavirus pandemic. Should taxpayer money be used to rescue them?

    The major U.S. airlines have asked for upwards of $50 billion from Congress to save their industry amid the coronavirus pandemic. Should taxpayer money be used to rescue them?


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  • 75/81   While coronavirus reigns, Trump can't jump-start the economy by himself
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    The White House is pushing to return things back to normal by Easter, but there is only so much the federal government can do amid the pandemic if local leaders maintain shutdowns.

    The White House is pushing to return things back to normal by Easter, but there is only so much the federal government can do amid the pandemic if local leaders maintain shutdowns.


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  • 76/81   Coronavirus: Yahoo answers your questions
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    TUNE IN LIVE: Yahoo medical contributor Dr. Kavita Patel will answer readers’ questions about the coronavirus here on Thursday, March 26, at 5 p.m. ET.

    TUNE IN LIVE: Yahoo medical contributor Dr. Kavita Patel will answer readers’ questions about the coronavirus here on Thursday, March 26, at 5 p.m. ET.


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  • 77/81   Doctors and nurses on their risks, fears — and hard decisions — in coronavirus pandemic
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    While the general public is being strongly advised to stay indoors, doctors, nurses and other health care providers can’t work from home. They are facing a new reality of their own, as hospitals and clinics prepare for an imminent influx of coronavirus patients.

    While the general public is being strongly advised to stay indoors, doctors, nurses and other health care providers can’t work from home. They are facing a new reality of their own, as hospitals and clinics prepare for an imminent influx of coronavirus patients.


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  • 78/81   As more government workers are sent home, coronavirus risks hobbling U.S. intelligence
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    The spread of the coronavirus has sent a large number of federal workers home to telework, in some cases limiting government services, raising concerns that some of the nation’s highly sensitive national security work, which can often only be done in secure facilities, could suffer.

    The spread of the coronavirus has sent a large number of federal workers home to telework, in some cases limiting government services, raising concerns that some of the nation’s highly sensitive national security work, which can often only be done in secure facilities, could suffer.


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  • 79/81   Coronavirus: News and live updates
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    The latest news and information on the pandemic from Yahoo News reporters in the United States and around the world.

    The latest news and information on the pandemic from Yahoo News reporters in the United States and around the world.


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  • 80/81   In coronavirus pandemic, Trump allies say they're ready to die for the economy
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Some conservatives are urging Americans to ignore the advice of public health experts and get back to work in order to avoid an extended market downturn.

    Some conservatives are urging Americans to ignore the advice of public health experts and get back to work in order to avoid an extended market downturn.


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  • 81/81   Should prisoners be freed to stop outbreaks behind bars?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Health experts are concerned about the possibility of devastating coronavirus outbreaks inside America's jails and prisons. Are drastic steps needed to prevent the virus from wreaking havoc behind bars?

    Health experts are concerned about the possibility of devastating coronavirus outbreaks inside America's jails and prisons. Are drastic steps needed to prevent the virus from wreaking havoc behind bars?


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