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News Slideshows (03/26/2020 15 hours)


  • 1/81   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


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    Press Review


    Congratulations America   3.28 Million   Triscuits   Kathy Griffin   Labor Department   Howard University   Paul Tudor Jones   D'Souza   Happy Friday Eve   We're in Disaster Mode   Dr. Jonas Salk   happy birthday madam speaker   Neanderthals   Fed Chairman Jerome Powell   Exponential Threat   senate oks   
  • 2/81   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


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  • 3/81   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


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  • 4/81   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


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  • 5/81   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


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  • 6/81   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


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  • 7/81   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


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  • 8/81   Do star athletes make too much money?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    With athletes in America's biggest sports leagues raking in salaries worth $300 million and more, is it time to reign in the big spending or do superstars deserve the big bucks they make?

    With athletes in America's biggest sports leagues raking in salaries worth $300 million and more, is it time to reign in the big spending or do superstars deserve the big bucks they make?


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  • 9/81   Live animal mascots: Cute or exploitative?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?


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  • 10/81   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


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  • 11/81   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


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  • 12/81   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


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  • 13/81   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


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  • 14/81   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


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  • 15/81   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


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  • 16/81   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


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  • 17/81   PHOTOS: Fluorescent turtle embryo wins forty-fifth annual Nikon Small World Competition

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.


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  • 18/81   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


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  • 19/81   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


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  • 20/81   What the CIA thinks of your anti-virus program

    PARIS (AP) — Peppering the 8,000 pages of purported Central Intelligence Agency hacking data released Tuesday by WikiLeaks are reviews of some of the world's most popular anti-virus products.

    PARIS (AP) — Peppering the 8,000 pages of purported Central Intelligence Agency hacking data released Tuesday by WikiLeaks are reviews of some of the world's most popular anti-virus products.


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  • 21/81   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


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  • 22/81   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


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  • 23/81   Were Hedge Funds Right About Selling Ingredion Inc (INGR)?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    We hate to say this but, we told you so. On February 27th we published an article with the title Recession is Imminent: We Need A Travel Ban NOW and predicted a US recession when the S&P 500 Index was trading at the 3150 level. We also told you to short the market and buy […]

    We hate to say this but, we told you so. On February 27th we published an article with the title Recession is Imminent: We Need A Travel Ban NOW and predicted a US recession when the S&P 500 Index was trading at the 3150 level. We also told you to short the market and buy […]


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  • 24/81   Here is What Hedge Funds Think About Sealed Air Corporation (SEE)
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Coronavirus is probably the 1 concern in investors' minds right now. It should be. On February 27th we published an article with the title Recession is Imminent: We Need A Travel Ban NOW. We predicted that a US recession is imminent and US stocks will go down by at least 20% in the next 3-6 […]

    Coronavirus is probably the 1 concern in investors' minds right now. It should be. On February 27th we published an article with the title Recession is Imminent: We Need A Travel Ban NOW. We predicted that a US recession is imminent and US stocks will go down by at least 20% in the next 3-6 […]


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  • 25/81   Hedge Funds Have Never Been This Bullish On The Middleby Corporation (MIDD)
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    We hate to say this but, we told you so. On February 27th we published an article with the title Recession is Imminent: We Need A Travel Ban NOW and predicted a US recession when the S&P 500 Index was trading at the 3150 level. We also told you to short the market and buy […]

    We hate to say this but, we told you so. On February 27th we published an article with the title Recession is Imminent: We Need A Travel Ban NOW and predicted a US recession when the S&P 500 Index was trading at the 3150 level. We also told you to short the market and buy […]


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  • 26/81   How long does Coronavirus live on surfaces?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Coronavirus can survive on common materials for hours or even days. Here's what you need to know and how to protect yourself.

    Coronavirus can survive on common materials for hours or even days. Here's what you need to know and how to protect yourself.


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  • 27/81   Coronavirus economic updates: Record 3.28 million people file for unemployment
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The coronavirus pandemic has quickly evolved from a health crisis to a financial one, shuttering businesses, upending entire industries and sending financial markets reeling.Here's the latest news on how the COVID-19 crisis is affecting the economy. For more on financial resources available during the pandemic, click here.MORE: Coronavirus live updates: Diagnosed cases approach half a million worldwideMarkets continue their uptick after stimulus bill passageU.S. financial markets marched higher Thursday morning despite the soaring unemployment numbers. ...

    The coronavirus pandemic has quickly evolved from a health crisis to a financial one, shuttering businesses, upending entire industries and sending financial markets reeling.Here's the latest news on how the COVID-19 crisis is affecting the economy. For more on financial resources available during the pandemic, click here.MORE: Coronavirus live updates: Diagnosed cases approach half a million worldwideMarkets continue their uptick after stimulus bill passageU.S. financial markets marched higher Thursday morning despite the soaring unemployment numbers. ...


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  • 28/81   Is Sabre Corporation (SABR) A Good Stock To Buy?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    We hate to say this but, we told you so. On February 27th we published an article with the title Recession is Imminent: We Need A Travel Ban NOW and predicted a US recession when the S&P 500 Index was trading at the 3150 level. We also told you to short the market and buy […]

    We hate to say this but, we told you so. On February 27th we published an article with the title Recession is Imminent: We Need A Travel Ban NOW and predicted a US recession when the S&P 500 Index was trading at the 3150 level. We also told you to short the market and buy […]


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  • 29/81   Hedge Funds Have Never Been This Bullish On Lumentum Holdings Inc (LITE)
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Coronavirus is probably the 1 concern in investors' minds right now. It should be. On February 27th we published an article with the title Recession is Imminent: We Need A Travel Ban NOW. We predicted that a US recession is imminent and US stocks will go down by at least 20% in the next 3-6 […]

    Coronavirus is probably the 1 concern in investors' minds right now. It should be. On February 27th we published an article with the title Recession is Imminent: We Need A Travel Ban NOW. We predicted that a US recession is imminent and US stocks will go down by at least 20% in the next 3-6 […]


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  • 30/81   House ready to OK $2 trillion coronavirus package on Friday after approval by Senate - live updates
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Trump plans to sign the bill once it clears the House, where it is expected to passed when the body reconvenes at 9 a.m. EDT on  Friday.

    Trump plans to sign the bill once it clears the House, where it is expected to passed when the body reconvenes at 9 a.m. EDT on  Friday.


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  • 31/81   HSBC delays job cuts in face of coronavirus
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    HSBC has said it is delaying the 'vast majority' of its planned redundancies to deal with the fallout from the coronavirus pandemic, a memo sent to staff seen by Reuters said.  'Because of the extraordinary impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, we have decided to pause, for the time being, the vast majority of redundancies associated with this programme where notices have not already been issued,' HSBC CEO Noel Quinn said.

    HSBC has said it is delaying the 'vast majority' of its planned redundancies to deal with the fallout from the coronavirus pandemic, a memo sent to staff seen by Reuters said. 'Because of the extraordinary impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, we have decided to pause, for the time being, the vast majority of redundancies associated with this programme where notices have not already been issued,' HSBC CEO Noel Quinn said.


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  • 32/81   First National Financial Corporation's (TSE:FN) Could Be A Buy For Its Upcoming Dividend
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    First National Financial Corporation (TSE:FN) is about to trade ex-dividend in the next 3 days. You will need to...

    First National Financial Corporation (TSE:FN) is about to trade ex-dividend in the next 3 days. You will need to...


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  • 33/81   Hedge Funds Got Out Of BOK Financial Corporation (BOKF) Just In Time
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    We hate to say this but, we told you so. On February 27th we published an article with the title Recession is Imminent: We Need A Travel Ban NOW and predicted a US recession when the S&P 500 Index was trading at the 3150 level. We also told you to short the market and buy […]

    We hate to say this but, we told you so. On February 27th we published an article with the title Recession is Imminent: We Need A Travel Ban NOW and predicted a US recession when the S&P 500 Index was trading at the 3150 level. We also told you to short the market and buy […]


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  • 34/81   Huawei P40 flagship phones launch amid Covid-19 crisis
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Experts say demand outside of China is likely to be weak because of the virus pandemic and absent apps.

    Experts say demand outside of China is likely to be weak because of the virus pandemic and absent apps.


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  • 35/81   Future Forests + Jobs Launches Research Directory Documenting Positive Climate & Sustainability Contributions of Wood Bioenergy
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Leading climate researchers and international authorities agree that sustainable, renewable wood bioenergy is a key tool in the global effort to mitigate global climate change. Today, Future Forest + Jobs is launching the FFJ Research Directory, a repository of academic research, papers, and studies that document the GHG benefits, forest growth statistics, and other positive contributions wood bioenergy is making to the energy sector.

    Leading climate researchers and international authorities agree that sustainable, renewable wood bioenergy is a key tool in the global effort to mitigate global climate change. Today, Future Forest + Jobs is launching the FFJ Research Directory, a repository of academic research, papers, and studies that document the GHG benefits, forest growth statistics, and other positive contributions wood bioenergy is making to the energy sector.


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  • 36/81   Hedge Funds Have Never Been This Bullish On Hexcel Corporation (HXL)
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    We hate to say this but, we told you so. On February 27th we published an article with the title Recession is Imminent: We Need A Travel Ban NOW and predicted a US recession when the S&P 500 Index was trading at the 3150 level. We also told you to short the market and buy […]

    We hate to say this but, we told you so. On February 27th we published an article with the title Recession is Imminent: We Need A Travel Ban NOW and predicted a US recession when the S&P 500 Index was trading at the 3150 level. We also told you to short the market and buy […]


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  • 37/81   Are Hedge Funds Done Buying Wyndham Hotels & Resorts, Inc. (WH)?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    We hate to say this but, we told you so. On February 27th we published an article with the title Recession is Imminent: We Need A Travel Ban NOW and predicted a US recession when the S&P 500 Index was trading at the 3150 level. We also told you to short the market and buy […]

    We hate to say this but, we told you so. On February 27th we published an article with the title Recession is Imminent: We Need A Travel Ban NOW and predicted a US recession when the S&P 500 Index was trading at the 3150 level. We also told you to short the market and buy […]


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  • 38/81   How Coronavirus Has Upended Economics in Just a Few Weeks
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- In the heat of a global crisis more sudden and severe than anything in living memory, economic orthodoxies are getting tossed aside at a furious pace. Some of them may be gone for good.Public debt, for example, has often been seen as a drag on economies -- but right now it’s their lifeline. The coronavirus has shut down swaths of private business. In the U.S. alone, it threw about 3 million people out of work in just a week.Whatever their prior views on budget deficits, leaders have been forced to fill the gap by channeling cash to households, businesses and markets -- strengthening safety nets that are paid for out of the public purse, and improvising some new ones.With government spending helping to steer countries through the pandemic, it may not be easy to turn off the taps afterward. Politicians will have little incentive for belt-tightening measures that could endanger a rebound. Economists, especially from the rising Modern Monetary Theory school, will argue that in a low-inflation world there’s no need to try.Even when the acute phase of the health crisis has passed, “political pressures for large fiscal stimulus to be deployed whenever possible will remain strong and open-ended,” says Stephen Jen, who runs hedge fund and advisory firm Eurizon SLJ Capital.That’s what happened to monetary policy after the last crisis in 2008, he points out, with central banks still struggling to remove their unconventional stimulus more than a decade later. For the few parts of the developed world, like the U.S., that managed to move away from emergency settings, the pandemic has sent them crashing back there.In the low-rates era, governments are already the biggest borrowers. Now they’re about to go into overdrive.The U.S. is poised to smash records with a fiscal package worth about $2 trillion making its way through Congress, and lawmakers expect more measures to follow. Other governments, when measured against the size of their economies, aren’t far behind.The European Union and its powerhouse Germany have ditched once-sacred spending caps. The U.K. government has pledged to cover 80% of the wage bill for workers whose jobs are at risk because lockdowns have shuttered entire industries. Countries from South Korea to Australia have torn up their budget plans and pivoted to more spending.What Bloomberg’s Economists Say...“A one-off fiscal stimulus, even of the size the U.S. and major European countries are planning, doesn’t fundamentally alter debt dynamics. It’s wide deficits sustained over a number of years that do that. If the outbreak comes quickly under control, and economies spring rapidly back to life, fiscal sustainability won’t be an issue. If either of those conditions don’t hold, policy makers could quickly find themselves running out of options.”\-- Tom Orlik, chief economistMany economists say that even more fiscal firepower may be needed, because it won’t be possible to assess the full extent of economic damage until the virus is contained. Once that happens, support for the spending bonanza may be tested -- on the markets, and in politics.The surge in supply of government bonds is likely to push yields higher, though central-bank buying can help keep a lid on them. That’s already an explicit goal of the Bank of Japan, and other countries are set to follow.In the U.S., investors may rethink the risks lurking in the longest-duration bonds -- but that’s likely a problem for down the road, with much of the initial burst of borrowing set to be financed by short-term paper.Turn It Off?Governments may also face political pressure to unwind their largesse, and at least some economists are likely to join in.In the crisis moment, there’s been a shift among even conservative economists and they’ve united behind “rapid and large fiscal stimulus,” said Adam Posen, who heads the Peterson Institute for International Economics in Washington.“Whether that is an ongoing turning point remains to be seen,” he said. “If we see a recovery, God willing in months, people will want to turn off the taps.”Germany, for one, signaled this week that it aims to return to its customary frugal stance -- though officials acknowledged further stimulus may be needed first, if the economy is stuck in a deep slump after the public health emergency has abated.A pickup in inflation –- a risk given the epidemic has shut down so much production -- could also make conditions tougher for the borrowers.‘Austerity Drive’But there’s an alternative post-virus future in which politicians are reluctant to balance the books -- and some economists question whether it makes sense to even try.James Knightley, chief international economist at ING, cites the U.S. case as an example. “I really cannot see Donald Trump, assuming he gets re-elected, embarking on an austerity drive to get the fiscal position on a sounder footing,” he says.For progressive Democrats too, the fiscal debate “should have changed forever,” according to Nobel prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz. After Trump’s trillion-dollar deficits, it’ll be hard to make the case that “somehow we can’t afford healthcare and education,” he says. “That argument is going to look very different.”It’s in this scenario that the once-strict dividing lines between fiscal and monetary policy, already looking a bit blurry of late, are likely to get even more so.“There could be pressure to come up with a plan to see central banks cancel a proportion of government debts around the world,” said Knightley. “There will be more calls for these sorts of extreme measures.”While deficits and debt have surged to much higher levels during major wars, Deutsche Bank strategists found that public-debt-to-GDP ratios “as a median across the major developed economies” are currently at peace-time records.Since 2008, central banks have been buying more of that debt, while ultra-low rates made it easier for the governments to keep borrowing. The coronavirus has accelerated their purchases to a new level.‘Toward MMT’The transactions typically occur in secondary bond markets, allowing monetary policy makers to claim they’re not directly financing deficit-spending -- a traditional taboo in policy circles. It’s one that serves no useful purpose, according to MMT.MMTers think the traditional fear of budget deficits is overblown. Governments that borrow in their own currencies can’t go broke, their argument goes, so they can spend provided inflation remains subdued -- and there’s no reason why central banks shouldn’t finance them.That’s a recipe for over-spending, according to the mainstream of modern economics. The consensus for decades has been that central banks should be independent from budget-setting governments, and thus able to rein them in.Jen says that tide may be turning, and “large fiscal deficits fully underwritten by central banks” are likely to become the new normal.“Whether intentional or not,” he says, “we are collectively moving toward MMT.”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- In the heat of a global crisis more sudden and severe than anything in living memory, economic orthodoxies are getting tossed aside at a furious pace. Some of them may be gone for good.Public debt, for example, has often been seen as a drag on economies -- but right now it’s their lifeline. The coronavirus has shut down swaths of private business. In the U.S. alone, it threw about 3 million people out of work in just a week.Whatever their prior views on budget deficits, leaders have been forced to fill the gap by channeling cash to households, businesses and markets -- strengthening safety nets that are paid for out of the public purse, and improvising some new ones.With government spending helping to steer countries through the pandemic, it may not be easy to turn off the taps afterward. Politicians will have little incentive for belt-tightening measures that could endanger a rebound. Economists, especially from the rising Modern Monetary Theory school, will argue that in a low-inflation world there’s no need to try.Even when the acute phase of the health crisis has passed, “political pressures for large fiscal stimulus to be deployed whenever possible will remain strong and open-ended,” says Stephen Jen, who runs hedge fund and advisory firm Eurizon SLJ Capital.That’s what happened to monetary policy after the last crisis in 2008, he points out, with central banks still struggling to remove their unconventional stimulus more than a decade later. For the few parts of the developed world, like the U.S., that managed to move away from emergency settings, the pandemic has sent them crashing back there.In the low-rates era, governments are already the biggest borrowers. Now they’re about to go into overdrive.The U.S. is poised to smash records with a fiscal package worth about $2 trillion making its way through Congress, and lawmakers expect more measures to follow. Other governments, when measured against the size of their economies, aren’t far behind.The European Union and its powerhouse Germany have ditched once-sacred spending caps. The U.K. government has pledged to cover 80% of the wage bill for workers whose jobs are at risk because lockdowns have shuttered entire industries. Countries from South Korea to Australia have torn up their budget plans and pivoted to more spending.What Bloomberg’s Economists Say...“A one-off fiscal stimulus, even of the size the U.S. and major European countries are planning, doesn’t fundamentally alter debt dynamics. It’s wide deficits sustained over a number of years that do that. If the outbreak comes quickly under control, and economies spring rapidly back to life, fiscal sustainability won’t be an issue. If either of those conditions don’t hold, policy makers could quickly find themselves running out of options.”\-- Tom Orlik, chief economistMany economists say that even more fiscal firepower may be needed, because it won’t be possible to assess the full extent of economic damage until the virus is contained. Once that happens, support for the spending bonanza may be tested -- on the markets, and in politics.The surge in supply of government bonds is likely to push yields higher, though central-bank buying can help keep a lid on them. That’s already an explicit goal of the Bank of Japan, and other countries are set to follow.In the U.S., investors may rethink the risks lurking in the longest-duration bonds -- but that’s likely a problem for down the road, with much of the initial burst of borrowing set to be financed by short-term paper.Turn It Off?Governments may also face political pressure to unwind their largesse, and at least some economists are likely to join in.In the crisis moment, there’s been a shift among even conservative economists and they’ve united behind “rapid and large fiscal stimulus,” said Adam Posen, who heads the Peterson Institute for International Economics in Washington.“Whether that is an ongoing turning point remains to be seen,” he said. “If we see a recovery, God willing in months, people will want to turn off the taps.”Germany, for one, signaled this week that it aims to return to its customary frugal stance -- though officials acknowledged further stimulus may be needed first, if the economy is stuck in a deep slump after the public health emergency has abated.A pickup in inflation –- a risk given the epidemic has shut down so much production -- could also make conditions tougher for the borrowers.‘Austerity Drive’But there’s an alternative post-virus future in which politicians are reluctant to balance the books -- and some economists question whether it makes sense to even try.James Knightley, chief international economist at ING, cites the U.S. case as an example. “I really cannot see Donald Trump, assuming he gets re-elected, embarking on an austerity drive to get the fiscal position on a sounder footing,” he says.For progressive Democrats too, the fiscal debate “should have changed forever,” according to Nobel prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz. After Trump’s trillion-dollar deficits, it’ll be hard to make the case that “somehow we can’t afford healthcare and education,” he says. “That argument is going to look very different.”It’s in this scenario that the once-strict dividing lines between fiscal and monetary policy, already looking a bit blurry of late, are likely to get even more so.“There could be pressure to come up with a plan to see central banks cancel a proportion of government debts around the world,” said Knightley. “There will be more calls for these sorts of extreme measures.”While deficits and debt have surged to much higher levels during major wars, Deutsche Bank strategists found that public-debt-to-GDP ratios “as a median across the major developed economies” are currently at peace-time records.Since 2008, central banks have been buying more of that debt, while ultra-low rates made it easier for the governments to keep borrowing. The coronavirus has accelerated their purchases to a new level.‘Toward MMT’The transactions typically occur in secondary bond markets, allowing monetary policy makers to claim they’re not directly financing deficit-spending -- a traditional taboo in policy circles. It’s one that serves no useful purpose, according to MMT.MMTers think the traditional fear of budget deficits is overblown. Governments that borrow in their own currencies can’t go broke, their argument goes, so they can spend provided inflation remains subdued -- and there’s no reason why central banks shouldn’t finance them.That’s a recipe for over-spending, according to the mainstream of modern economics. The consensus for decades has been that central banks should be independent from budget-setting governments, and thus able to rein them in.Jen says that tide may be turning, and “large fiscal deficits fully underwritten by central banks” are likely to become the new normal.“Whether intentional or not,” he says, “we are collectively moving toward MMT.”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 39/81   Imagine Owning Plaza Centers (LON:PLAZ) And Trying To Stomach The 92% Share Price Drop
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    We're definitely into long term investing, but some companies are simply bad investments over any time frame. We...

    We're definitely into long term investing, but some companies are simply bad investments over any time frame. We...


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  • 40/81   Stock market attempts a rally, amid record-shattering unemployment figures
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    “I just think these numbers right now are not relevant,” Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said of the outsize unemployment total.

    “I just think these numbers right now are not relevant,” Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said of the outsize unemployment total.


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  • 41/81   Hedge Funds Have Never Been This Bullish On ADT Inc. (ADT)
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    We hate to say this but, we told you so. On February 27th we published an article with the title Recession is Imminent: We Need A Travel Ban NOW and predicted a US recession when the S&P 500 Index was trading at the 3150 level. We also told you to short the market and buy […]

    We hate to say this but, we told you so. On February 27th we published an article with the title Recession is Imminent: We Need A Travel Ban NOW and predicted a US recession when the S&P 500 Index was trading at the 3150 level. We also told you to short the market and buy […]


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  • 42/81   In coronavirus pandemic, Trump allies say they're ready to die for the economy
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Some conservatives are urging Americans to ignore the advice of public health experts and get back to work in order to avoid an extended market downturn.

    Some conservatives are urging Americans to ignore the advice of public health experts and get back to work in order to avoid an extended market downturn.


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  • 43/81   Republicans block most aid to help states plan for presidential election amid coronavirus pandemic
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Voting reforms that would make it much easier to cast ballots by mail in the fall presidential election were left out of the $2 trillion rescue package that was unveiled Wednesday.

    Voting reforms that would make it much easier to cast ballots by mail in the fall presidential election were left out of the $2 trillion rescue package that was unveiled Wednesday.


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  • 44/81   India bans export of drug being tested for coronavirus treatment
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    India said on Wednesday it had banned the export of hydroxychloroquine and formulations of the malaria drug while experts test its efficacy in helping treat patients infected with coronavirus.  There are currently no approved treatments, or preventive vaccines for COVID-19, the highly contagious, sometimes deadly respiratory illness caused by coronavirus.  Hydroxychloroquine, a malaria drug, is among the medications undergoing testing as a potential treatment for patients with the disease.

    India said on Wednesday it had banned the export of hydroxychloroquine and formulations of the malaria drug while experts test its efficacy in helping treat patients infected with coronavirus. There are currently no approved treatments, or preventive vaccines for COVID-19, the highly contagious, sometimes deadly respiratory illness caused by coronavirus. Hydroxychloroquine, a malaria drug, is among the medications undergoing testing as a potential treatment for patients with the disease.


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  • 45/81   NY Gov. Cuomo blasts the coronavirus stimulus package as 'terrible' for Empire State
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    "It is just another case of politics over sound policy," Cuomo's communications director said in a followup statement.

    "It is just another case of politics over sound policy," Cuomo's communications director said in a followup statement.


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  • 46/81   Missouri man charged with licking items at Walmart to mock coronavirus fears
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Authorities say Cody Lee Pfister, 26, posted a video on social media of himself licking deodorants at a Walmart in Warrenton. He was charged with making a terrorist threat.

    Authorities say Cody Lee Pfister, 26, posted a video on social media of himself licking deodorants at a Walmart in Warrenton. He was charged with making a terrorist threat.


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  • 47/81   Pence again touts chloroquine as coronavirus treatment after it's linked to deaths
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Vice President Mike Pence touted a potentially unsafe COVID-19 treatment on Tuesday even after it had been linked to deaths.Pence, who's been leading the White House's response to the new coronavirus, appeared for a Fox News town hall on Tuesday. That's where Dr. Mehmet Oz asked him about the malaria drug chloroquine that's been discussed as a potential treatment for the new coronavirus, and Pence seemed more than hopeful about the drug's prospects."There's no barrier to access chloroquine in this country. We're looking to add to that supply," Pence said of the drug. "We are engaging in a clinical trial" with the intent to make chloroquine available "for off-label use." But when asked if he'd take chloroquine if he became infected with COVID-19, Pence only said he'd follow the advice of his physician, even after repeated prodding from Oz. That cautious part of Pence's response was left out of a clip shared by the Trump campaign.Pence's chloroquine confidence comes after President Trump repeatedly touted the drug's potential in a Monday night press conference. After that, Nigeria reported two fatal overdoses of chloroquine and implored its citizens not to use the drug, which "will cause harm and can lead to death." A man in Arizona died and his wife was hospitalized after ingesting a form of chloroquine that's used to clean fish tanks. The woman said she got the idea from Trump.More stories from theweek.com  Biden doesn't want another primary debate: 'We should get on with this'  Britney Spears calls for wealth redistribution, general strike on Instagram  Nearly half of New York City's coronavirus cases found in adults under 45

    Vice President Mike Pence touted a potentially unsafe COVID-19 treatment on Tuesday even after it had been linked to deaths.Pence, who's been leading the White House's response to the new coronavirus, appeared for a Fox News town hall on Tuesday. That's where Dr. Mehmet Oz asked him about the malaria drug chloroquine that's been discussed as a potential treatment for the new coronavirus, and Pence seemed more than hopeful about the drug's prospects."There's no barrier to access chloroquine in this country. We're looking to add to that supply," Pence said of the drug. "We are engaging in a clinical trial" with the intent to make chloroquine available "for off-label use." But when asked if he'd take chloroquine if he became infected with COVID-19, Pence only said he'd follow the advice of his physician, even after repeated prodding from Oz. That cautious part of Pence's response was left out of a clip shared by the Trump campaign.Pence's chloroquine confidence comes after President Trump repeatedly touted the drug's potential in a Monday night press conference. After that, Nigeria reported two fatal overdoses of chloroquine and implored its citizens not to use the drug, which "will cause harm and can lead to death." A man in Arizona died and his wife was hospitalized after ingesting a form of chloroquine that's used to clean fish tanks. The woman said she got the idea from Trump.More stories from theweek.com Biden doesn't want another primary debate: 'We should get on with this' Britney Spears calls for wealth redistribution, general strike on Instagram Nearly half of New York City's coronavirus cases found in adults under 45


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  • 48/81   Tornado rips across Mississippi and Alabama, causing injuries and damage
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A "large and destructive" tornado ripped across northeastern Mississippi and northwestern Alabama late Tuesday afternoon.

    A "large and destructive" tornado ripped across northeastern Mississippi and northwestern Alabama late Tuesday afternoon.


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  • 49/81   Virus hits war-ravaged Mali, Kenya orders curfew
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Four countries led by war-ravaged Mali on Wednesday joined the lengthening list of African countries hit by the novel coronavirus as Kenya ordered a curfew and unveiled tax breaks in the fight against the pandemic.  Mali, mired in an eight-year-old conflict, said two nationals who had returned from France had tested positive for the virus.  Libya, another conflict-torn country, as well as the volatile West African state of Guinea-Bissau and Uganda in East Africa also reported their first cases of COVID-19.

    Four countries led by war-ravaged Mali on Wednesday joined the lengthening list of African countries hit by the novel coronavirus as Kenya ordered a curfew and unveiled tax breaks in the fight against the pandemic. Mali, mired in an eight-year-old conflict, said two nationals who had returned from France had tested positive for the virus. Libya, another conflict-torn country, as well as the volatile West African state of Guinea-Bissau and Uganda in East Africa also reported their first cases of COVID-19.


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  • 50/81   As more government workers are sent home, coronavirus risks hobbling U.S. intelligence
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The spread of the coronavirus has sent a large number of federal workers home to telework, in some cases limiting government services, raising concerns that some of the nation’s highly sensitive national security work, which can often only be done in secure facilities, could suffer.

    The spread of the coronavirus has sent a large number of federal workers home to telework, in some cases limiting government services, raising concerns that some of the nation’s highly sensitive national security work, which can often only be done in secure facilities, could suffer.


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  • 51/81   Fox News Host Martha MacCallum Nails Kellyanne Conway for Rewriting Trump’s Coronavirus History
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    White House counselor Kellyanne Conway was trashing New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio on Wednesday night when Fox News host Martha MacCallum hit her with a rude awakening. Conway accused the mayor of “lying to America” when he said he’s “been on top of” the coronavirus crisis from the beginning, pointing to tweets in which he encouraged New Yorkers to go out despite early warnings to the contrary from medical experts as well as his decision to visit his gym “one last time” as the state was being quarantined. “I think it shows you the contrast in leadership when you have feckless leaders,” Conway said, referring to de Blasio, “or when you have a president, who’s publicly facing every single day, giving people information engagement they need.”Kellyanne Conway Spars With Reporters Over ‘Kung-Flu’ Coronavirus SlurAt that point, MacCallum interrupted, saying, “But Kellyanne…” While the host didn’t disagree with Conway’s characterization of de Blasio, MacCallum couldn’t stand by as the Trump counselor erased the weeks and weeks that the president spent downplaying the deadly virus.“In terms of the things that you’re mentioning, you could probably match up, some of those early statements from him with also similarly optimistic statements from President Trump, although they’ve handled it very differently since then,” MacCallum said, arguably giving the president more credit than he deserves given his recent reversals on the value of social distancing. “There’s no comparison between the two leaders,” Conway insisted. “There’s no comparison.” “In terms of get out and live your life and go ahead and do what you’re doing, back in early March?” MacCallum asked. While Conway was able to provide evidence of others in the White House taking the pandemic seriously, she did not deny that Trump was vocally optimistic about the situation just a few weeks ago. Instead, she pivoted to touting his relatively good approval ratings as evidence that he’s handling the pandemic well now, given that it “came out of nowhere.” Samantha Bee on Making Comedy Amidst ‘Unimaginable’ TragedyRead more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

    White House counselor Kellyanne Conway was trashing New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio on Wednesday night when Fox News host Martha MacCallum hit her with a rude awakening. Conway accused the mayor of “lying to America” when he said he’s “been on top of” the coronavirus crisis from the beginning, pointing to tweets in which he encouraged New Yorkers to go out despite early warnings to the contrary from medical experts as well as his decision to visit his gym “one last time” as the state was being quarantined. “I think it shows you the contrast in leadership when you have feckless leaders,” Conway said, referring to de Blasio, “or when you have a president, who’s publicly facing every single day, giving people information engagement they need.”Kellyanne Conway Spars With Reporters Over ‘Kung-Flu’ Coronavirus SlurAt that point, MacCallum interrupted, saying, “But Kellyanne…” While the host didn’t disagree with Conway’s characterization of de Blasio, MacCallum couldn’t stand by as the Trump counselor erased the weeks and weeks that the president spent downplaying the deadly virus.“In terms of the things that you’re mentioning, you could probably match up, some of those early statements from him with also similarly optimistic statements from President Trump, although they’ve handled it very differently since then,” MacCallum said, arguably giving the president more credit than he deserves given his recent reversals on the value of social distancing. “There’s no comparison between the two leaders,” Conway insisted. “There’s no comparison.” “In terms of get out and live your life and go ahead and do what you’re doing, back in early March?” MacCallum asked. While Conway was able to provide evidence of others in the White House taking the pandemic seriously, she did not deny that Trump was vocally optimistic about the situation just a few weeks ago. Instead, she pivoted to touting his relatively good approval ratings as evidence that he’s handling the pandemic well now, given that it “came out of nowhere.” Samantha Bee on Making Comedy Amidst ‘Unimaginable’ TragedyRead more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


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  • 52/81   Great Barrier Reef suffers third mass bleaching in five years
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The third such event in five years prompts scientists to renew urgent warnings about climate change.

    The third such event in five years prompts scientists to renew urgent warnings about climate change.


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  • 53/81   Help needed to rescue UK's old rainfall records
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Pre-1960s handwritten rain gauge data can inform drought and flood planning, but only if digitised.

    Pre-1960s handwritten rain gauge data can inform drought and flood planning, but only if digitised.


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  • 54/81   Calling all kids: Send Blue Origin a space postcard while you’re stuck at home
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Are you looking for educational activities to occupy the kids while you're cooped up due to the coronavirus outbreak? One option is to make space postcards for the Club for the Future, an educational campaign created by Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin space venture. Last year, Blue Origin collected thousands of student-decorated cards, and sent them to space and back on its New Shepard suborbital craft. After the flight, the cards were stamped "Flown in Space" (in some cases, by Bezos himself) and then mailed back to their senders. Now Blue Origin is inviting students, educators and parents to… Read More

    Are you looking for educational activities to occupy the kids while you're cooped up due to the coronavirus outbreak? One option is to make space postcards for the Club for the Future, an educational campaign created by Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin space venture. Last year, Blue Origin collected thousands of student-decorated cards, and sent them to space and back on its New Shepard suborbital craft. After the flight, the cards were stamped "Flown in Space" (in some cases, by Bezos himself) and then mailed back to their senders. Now Blue Origin is inviting students, educators and parents to… Read More


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  • 55/81   Climate change: Green energy plant threat to wilderness areas
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Solar, wind and hydro electric installations are often built in conservation areas.

    Solar, wind and hydro electric installations are often built in conservation areas.


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  • 56/81   How are you doing during the COVID-19 crisis? Scientists want to hear your story
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Researchers at the University of Washington are launching a study aimed at answering the question that's on a lot of people's minds as the coronavirus epidemic spreads through the Seattle area: How are you holding up? The King County COVID-19 Community Study, a.k.a. KC3S, is recruiting King County residents to tell their stories. The study is scheduled to collect data through April 19. “We want to start collecting this information now — as the COVID-19 pandemic is unfolding — about how families and communities are being impacted, and how they are adapting,” Nicole Errett, a lecturer in the UW Department… Read More

    Researchers at the University of Washington are launching a study aimed at answering the question that's on a lot of people's minds as the coronavirus epidemic spreads through the Seattle area: How are you holding up? The King County COVID-19 Community Study, a.k.a. KC3S, is recruiting King County residents to tell their stories. The study is scheduled to collect data through April 19. “We want to start collecting this information now — as the COVID-19 pandemic is unfolding — about how families and communities are being impacted, and how they are adapting,” Nicole Errett, a lecturer in the UW Department… Read More


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  • 57/81   Mammal study explains 'why females live longer'
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Across wild mammal species, females live over 18% longer than males because of genetics and environment.

    Across wild mammal species, females live over 18% longer than males because of genetics and environment.


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  • 58/81   Fossil worm shows us our evolutionary beginnings
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    A tiny, 555-million-year-old seafloor creature reveals why our bodies are organised the way they are.

    A tiny, 555-million-year-old seafloor creature reveals why our bodies are organised the way they are.


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  • 59/81   OceanGate chooses Toray CMA to make carbon fiber for its Titanic submersibles
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Everett, Wash.-based OceanGate says Toray Composite Materials America is its preferred provider for the carbon fiber material that will be used in the company's next-generation submersibles. Toray CMA is the world's largest supplier of carbon fiber and the leader in providing fibers for numerous aircraft, including the Boeing 777 and 787. The company's U.S. head office is in Tacoma, Wash. OceanGate CEO Stockton Rush said in a statement that Toray CMA "will play a critical role as we develop the next generation of manned submersible, to usher in a new era of exploration using aerospace-quality composites." Toray CMA's vice president… Read More

    Everett, Wash.-based OceanGate says Toray Composite Materials America is its preferred provider for the carbon fiber material that will be used in the company's next-generation submersibles. Toray CMA is the world's largest supplier of carbon fiber and the leader in providing fibers for numerous aircraft, including the Boeing 777 and 787. The company's U.S. head office is in Tacoma, Wash. OceanGate CEO Stockton Rush said in a statement that Toray CMA "will play a critical role as we develop the next generation of manned submersible, to usher in a new era of exploration using aerospace-quality composites." Toray CMA's vice president… Read More


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  • 60/81   Climate change: Earth's deepest ice canyon vulnerable to melting
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Nasa scientists probe Denman Glacier which fills the deepest land gorge on Earth.

    Nasa scientists probe Denman Glacier which fills the deepest land gorge on Earth.


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  • 61/81   Electric car emissions myth 'busted'
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Fears that electric cars could actually increase carbon emissions are a baseless, a study suggests.

    Fears that electric cars could actually increase carbon emissions are a baseless, a study suggests.


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  • 62/81   Lombardy’s Cases Grow; Record U.S. Jobless Claims: Virus Update
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Spain reported a surge in cases, though fewer deaths than a day earlier. Infections in the Lombardy region also climbed. Europe now accounts for 7 out of 10 reported fatalities, the World Health Organization said.The number of Americans filing for unemployment benefits surged to a record last week as businesses shuttered and laid off workers. Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell vowed to support the flow of credit in the U.S. economy after the Senate approved a $2 trillion package. Caterpillar Inc. withdrew its outlook for 2020.Earlier, the European Central Bank said it will scrap limits on bond purchases, giving it almost unlimited firepower to fight the economic fallout. The Bank of England warned of a very sharp reduction in activity, while Singapore estimated that its economy contracted the most in a decade.Key Developments:Cases top 487,000; 22,000 dead, 117,700 recovered: Johns HopkinsU.S. death toll tops 1,000; confirmed cases in Canada surge 72%Kudlow says jobless claims to show a big increase on ThursdayFauci warns of potential for another cycle of coronavirus infectionsChina’s Wuhan lockdown may delay feared second wave, study showsSpanish doctors are forced to choose who to let die from virusTune in to a Q&A Blog with health experts at 2 p.m. London time (10 a.m. New York) via this link. Subscribe to a daily update on the virus from Bloomberg’s Prognosis team here.Click VRUS on the terminal for news and data on the coronavirus and here for maps and charts. For analysis of the impact from Bloomberg Economics, click here. To see the impact on oil and commodities demand, click here.Europe Shies Away from Retooling Production for Gear (9:36 a.m. NY)The European Union signaled that efforts to increase the supply of medical gear will involve ramping up existing production capacity. The European Commission said converting production lines at the likes of automotive and aeronautics businesses “would be time-consuming and not always necessarily successful.” The EU’s executive arm commented after President Ursula von der Leyen and European Industry Commissioner Thierry Breton held a phone call with representatives of various businesses.U.K. Should Brace for $240 Billion Budget Deficit (9:28 a.m. NY)Britain’s budget deficit could easily exceed 200 billion pounds ($240 billion) in the coming fiscal year as the coronavirus crisis hammers the economy and forces the government to unleash a huge package of fiscal stimulus. The warning came Thursday from the Institute for Fiscal Studies.Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak will announce assistance to the self-employed on Thursday in what will be his fourth set of emergency measures.Caterpillar Withdraws Forecast, Halts Some Operations (9:11 a.m. NY)Caterpillar Inc. is suspending operations at some U.S. facilities and withdrawing its 2020 financial guidance. The heavy-equipment maker said Thursday that the virus is starting to affect its supply chain.Lombardy Data Worse Than Wednesday (9:09 a.m. NY)The Lombardy region reported about 2500 new positive coronavirus cases on Thursday, Governor Attilio Fontana said during a press conference on Facebook.U.S. Jobless Claims Surged to Record (8:31 a.m. NY)The number of Americans filing for unemployment benefits surged to a record 3.28 million last week. Initial jobless claims in the week ended March 21 were up from 282,000 in the prior week and more than quadruple the previous record high of 695,000 in 1982, according to Labor Department data released Thursday. The figures date back to 1967.Economists’ projections had ranged as high as 4.4 million.Faster Virus Tests (8:30 a.m. NY)Henry Schein said an antibody rapid blood test, known as Standard Q COVID-19 IgM/IgG Rapid Test, is now available. The test is intended to be administered at the point of care and delivers results within 15 minutes from a pinprick with no instrumentation required.Earlier, Robert Bosch GmbH said it developed a test that can diagnose Covid-19 in less than 2.5 hours. The new test uses the Vivalytic molecular diagnostics platform made by Bosch’s healthcare division, used in hospitals, laboratories and medical practices. Patients typically must wait one or two days before they get test results.Separately, U.K.-based Mologic Ltd. has sent prototypes of a 10-minute coronavirus test to laboratories for validation before it can begin full-scale manufacturing. The company and its partner, the Senegalese research foundation Institut Pasteur de Dakar, have developed a finger-prick test to determine whether a person had the illness and the state of their immune system. The company is also working on a separate saliva test to detect the presence of the virus.Walmart Hires Thousands (8:25 a.m. NY)Walmart Inc. has taken on 25,000 new employees and given offers to thousands more in the first week of a hiring push, as the biggest private employer in the U.S. scrambles to keep its shelves stocked and checkouts staffed.The retailer has compressed a hiring process that can often take two weeks into as little as three hours by eliminating formal interviews and written job offers.German Tour Operator TUI Said to Near State Aid (8:20 a.m. NY)TUI AG, the world’s biggest tour operator, is close to securing almost 2 billion euros ($2.2 billion) in government aid in what’s seen as a litmus test for Germany’s pledge to rescue businesses ravaged by the pandemic.The company and its adviser reached an agreement with Germany’s state-owned KfW development bank on the terms of loans earlier this week, said the people, who asked not to be identified because discussions are private. That financing package is now with TUI’s lending banks, which are expected to sign off in the coming days, they said.Portugal Confirmed Coronavirus Cases Rise 18% (8:16 a.m. NY)The number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Portugal rose to 3,544 as of 11 a.m. on Thursday, an 18% increase from 2,995 on Wednesday morning, the government’s Directorate-General of Health said. Confirmed cases rose 27% on Wednesday from the previous day, following a 15% increase on Tuesday. The total number of deaths increased to 60 on Thursday from 43 reported through Wednesday morning; 43 patients have now recovered, up from 22 on Wednesday.BOE Warns of Long-Term Damage; Holds Rates (8 a.m. NY)The Bank of England left rates unchanged, but said it’s ready to provide more support for the economy after warning that a very sharp reduction in activity was likely. The pound stayed stronger in a broad trend for a weaker dollar across global markets and gilts continued to gain.“Given the severity of that disruption, there is a risk of longer-term damage to the economy, especially if there are business failures on a large scale or significant increases in unemployment,” the central bank said. The BOE has already slashed interest rates by 65 basis points in total in two emergency announcements, taking them to their lowest ever at 0.1%. It also added 200 billion pounds ($239 billion) to its quantitative-easing target, raising it to 645 billion pounds.Germany in ‘Calm Before the Storm’ (7:50 a.m. NY)Germany is only in the early stages of the coronavirus epidemic and medical staff there are preparing for their biggest challenge since the Second World War, according to Health Minister Jens Spahn. “Policy makers are in crisis mode,” Spahn said at a news conference in Berlin. “This is still the calm before the storm and nobody can say what will happen in coming weeks.”Germany has more than 37,000 confirmed cases and 203 deaths, according to data compiled by Bloomberg from regional governments.Ford Plans Gradual Restart of North American Plants (7:30 a.m. NY)Ford Motor Co. plans to resume vehicle production in Mexico on April 6, with some U.S. plants cranking up again about a week later. After halting North American production as of March 19 to help slow the spread of the coronavirus, Ford said it’s aiming to restart production first at its factory in Hermosillo, Mexico, which builds the Fusion and Lincoln MKZ sedans.Ford then plans to restart production on April 14 at plants in Michigan, Kentucky and Ohio that assemble profitable F-Series pickups and commercial vans. Other factories that make transmissions and press metal parts for those vehicles are also due to resume on that day. The F-Series is Ford’s best-selling model and provides most of its profit.Powell Says Fed Will Keep Credit Flowing (7:18 a.m. NY)“We will keep doing that aggressively and forthrightly, as we have been,” Powell said in an interview on NBC Thursday. “When it comes to this lending we’re not going to run out of ammunition.” Over the past three weeks, the U.S. central bank has introduced an unprecedented series of measures pushing it deep into uncharted territory.Powell said the U.S. may well be in recession, but expects activity to resume and move back up in the second half of the year. He said “we would tend to listen to the experts” on when normal activity should resume and added that the virus would dictate the timetable.Spain Reports Fewer Deaths, Cases Surge (6:32 a.m. NY)Total cases rose to 56,188 from 47,610 and fatalities jumped by 655, fewer than on Wednesday, to 4,089. Hospitals in the country are struggling to cope with the surge.Europe Accounts for 7 out of 10 Virus Deaths, WHO Says (6:20 a.m. NY)The number of cases tripled in the past week in Europe, with the disease spreading faster in Spain, France, Germany and Switzerland, Hans Kluge, the World Health Organization’s director for Europe, said at a press briefing in Copenhagen. Italy’s infection rate has slowed slightly, but it’s too early to say the disease has peaked there, he said. The country has 6,200 infected health-care workers, he added.Kluge said Europe needs to attack the disease in solidarity, because if the European Union manages to fight it but it takes hold in eastern Europe, it will just come back.Iran Reports 157 New Deaths (5:38 p.m. HK)Iran reported 157 new deaths and an additional 2,389 cases. About 29,400 people have been infected in total, of which 2,234 have died and more than 10,000 recovered.Austrian GDP Seen Down 2.5% if Economy Back to Normal in Summer (5:30 p.m. HK)Austrian output of goods and services will contract 2.5% this year if lockdown measures lift gradually from May and the economy returns to normal over the summer, researcher Wifo said.Irish Unemployment Set to Hit 30-Year High (5:20 p.m. HK)Irish unemployment may surge to the highest level since the 1980s, as the coronavirus takes an unprecedented toll. The jobless rate could rise 18% in the second quarter, the government-backed ESRI think-tank said on Thursday, should current restrictions remain in place for 12 weeks as planned. About 350,000 people would lose their jobs, the think tank said, with unemployment jumping from below 5%.EU Leaders to Hold Virtual Summit (5:15 p.m. HK)European Union leaders will on Thursday pledge to protect companies from foreign takeovers, discuss an exit-strategy from the looming recession, and likely agree on credit lines to help keep borrowing costs low while governments go on a spending spree. As EU nations move to tackle the fallout, leaders will tacitly admit that they were unprepared for the “unprecedented challenge” of the rapidly spreading disease, according to the latest draft of a joint statement to be issued following a video conference.Their discussion is expected to highlight divisions, especially when it comes to possible joint debt issuance and the conditions attached to any borrowing from the euro area’s bailout fund.Cases Rise in Asia (4:51 p.m. HK)Fatalities from novel coronavirus infection in Indonesia jumped to 78, the most in Southeast Asia, as the world’s fourth-most populous nation continues to see a surge in fresh cases. The total number of peopled infected rose to 893 on Thursday from 790 a day earlier. The number of new infections topped 100 for a third consecutive day.Malaysia added 235 confirmed cases of the new coronavirus, the biggest daily jump so far, after Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin decided to extend the lockdown until April 14. And Hong Kong reported 43 additional cases, the second biggest daily jump in confirmed cases.Thailand, a Southeast Asian country now entering what’s traditionally one of its hottest periods of the year, saw total cases surpass 1,000 following confirmation of 111 new cases. The total number may reach 3,500 by the end of April if the infection rate continues at this pace, according to Anupong Sujariyakul, senior expert in preventive medicine at the Disease Control Department.Virus Response Topples First European Government (4:30 p.m. HK)Kosovo lawmakers voted to remove Prime Minister Albin Kurti, becoming the first nation in Europe to vote out a government over the way it handled the coronavirus outbreak. The government collapsed late on Wednesday, just months after it took office. The vote was called by a junior coalition partner who criticized steps taken to curb the contagion.Romanian Health Minister Victor Costache resigned on Thursday as the country struggled to contain the spread.India Unveils $22.6 Billion Stimulus (4:10 p.m. HK)The measures will include cash transfers as well as steps on food security, Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman said in New Delhi Thursday. The package will benefit migrant workers, she said. India is on a total lockdown for three weeks from Wednesday in the world’s biggest isolation effort, as Prime Minister Narendra Modi seeks to prevent the virus from spreading locally.Singapore Boosts Virus Package as Economy Shrinks (3:53 p.m. HK)Singapore delivered a second stimulus package of S$48 billion ($33 billion) to fight the coronavirus outbreak, drawing on national reserves for the first time since the global financial crisis to support an economy heading for recession.The city-state’s gross domestic product fell an annualized 10.6% in the first quarter from the previous three months, far worse than the median forecast for an 8.2% contraction in a Bloomberg survey. The government said it now sees a sharp contraction in the economy of 1% to 4% for the full year.U.K. Companies Get More Time to Publish Accounts (3:50 p.m. HK)U.K. listed companies struggling with deadlines because of the coronavirus outbreak will get an extra two months to publish their financial statements, regulators said in a series of coordinated measures designed to reassure Britain’s businesses. Companies will have until six months after their financial year end to deliver their statements, the Financial Conduct Authority said on Thursday.Moscow to Shut Restaurants, Stores, Parks (3:37 p.m. HK)Moscow Mayor Sergey Sobyanin ordered a sweeping shutdown in Europe’s biggest city Thursday after infections in the Russian capital spiked. Restaurants, parks and stores except for pharmacies and food shops will shut down from Saturday for a week. Moscow reported a sharp increase in the number of cases, with the total jumping by a third over the last day to 546. The national total rose to 840.Russia is taking the illness increasingly seriously, with President Vladimir Putin on Wednesday declaring a next week a non-working one nationwide in a bid to reduce contagion and the government halting all international flights, effective March 27.French Business Confidence Tumbles by a Record (2:35 p.m. HK)French business confidence plunged at a record pace in March as shutdowns to contain the coronavirus have left the economy running at 65% of normal activity. The index fell to 95 in March from 105 the month before, statistics office Insee said Thursday. The drop echoes that seen in Germany in figures earlier this week, and reflects French President Emmanuel Macron’s move to put the country in lockdown in an effort to contain the spread of the virus.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Spain reported a surge in cases, though fewer deaths than a day earlier. Infections in the Lombardy region also climbed. Europe now accounts for 7 out of 10 reported fatalities, the World Health Organization said.The number of Americans filing for unemployment benefits surged to a record last week as businesses shuttered and laid off workers. Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell vowed to support the flow of credit in the U.S. economy after the Senate approved a $2 trillion package. Caterpillar Inc. withdrew its outlook for 2020.Earlier, the European Central Bank said it will scrap limits on bond purchases, giving it almost unlimited firepower to fight the economic fallout. The Bank of England warned of a very sharp reduction in activity, while Singapore estimated that its economy contracted the most in a decade.Key Developments:Cases top 487,000; 22,000 dead, 117,700 recovered: Johns HopkinsU.S. death toll tops 1,000; confirmed cases in Canada surge 72%Kudlow says jobless claims to show a big increase on ThursdayFauci warns of potential for another cycle of coronavirus infectionsChina’s Wuhan lockdown may delay feared second wave, study showsSpanish doctors are forced to choose who to let die from virusTune in to a Q&A Blog with health experts at 2 p.m. London time (10 a.m. New York) via this link. Subscribe to a daily update on the virus from Bloomberg’s Prognosis team here.Click VRUS on the terminal for news and data on the coronavirus and here for maps and charts. For analysis of the impact from Bloomberg Economics, click here. To see the impact on oil and commodities demand, click here.Europe Shies Away from Retooling Production for Gear (9:36 a.m. NY)The European Union signaled that efforts to increase the supply of medical gear will involve ramping up existing production capacity. The European Commission said converting production lines at the likes of automotive and aeronautics businesses “would be time-consuming and not always necessarily successful.” The EU’s executive arm commented after President Ursula von der Leyen and European Industry Commissioner Thierry Breton held a phone call with representatives of various businesses.U.K. Should Brace for $240 Billion Budget Deficit (9:28 a.m. NY)Britain’s budget deficit could easily exceed 200 billion pounds ($240 billion) in the coming fiscal year as the coronavirus crisis hammers the economy and forces the government to unleash a huge package of fiscal stimulus. The warning came Thursday from the Institute for Fiscal Studies.Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak will announce assistance to the self-employed on Thursday in what will be his fourth set of emergency measures.Caterpillar Withdraws Forecast, Halts Some Operations (9:11 a.m. NY)Caterpillar Inc. is suspending operations at some U.S. facilities and withdrawing its 2020 financial guidance. The heavy-equipment maker said Thursday that the virus is starting to affect its supply chain.Lombardy Data Worse Than Wednesday (9:09 a.m. NY)The Lombardy region reported about 2500 new positive coronavirus cases on Thursday, Governor Attilio Fontana said during a press conference on Facebook.U.S. Jobless Claims Surged to Record (8:31 a.m. NY)The number of Americans filing for unemployment benefits surged to a record 3.28 million last week. Initial jobless claims in the week ended March 21 were up from 282,000 in the prior week and more than quadruple the previous record high of 695,000 in 1982, according to Labor Department data released Thursday. The figures date back to 1967.Economists’ projections had ranged as high as 4.4 million.Faster Virus Tests (8:30 a.m. NY)Henry Schein said an antibody rapid blood test, known as Standard Q COVID-19 IgM/IgG Rapid Test, is now available. The test is intended to be administered at the point of care and delivers results within 15 minutes from a pinprick with no instrumentation required.Earlier, Robert Bosch GmbH said it developed a test that can diagnose Covid-19 in less than 2.5 hours. The new test uses the Vivalytic molecular diagnostics platform made by Bosch’s healthcare division, used in hospitals, laboratories and medical practices. Patients typically must wait one or two days before they get test results.Separately, U.K.-based Mologic Ltd. has sent prototypes of a 10-minute coronavirus test to laboratories for validation before it can begin full-scale manufacturing. The company and its partner, the Senegalese research foundation Institut Pasteur de Dakar, have developed a finger-prick test to determine whether a person had the illness and the state of their immune system. The company is also working on a separate saliva test to detect the presence of the virus.Walmart Hires Thousands (8:25 a.m. NY)Walmart Inc. has taken on 25,000 new employees and given offers to thousands more in the first week of a hiring push, as the biggest private employer in the U.S. scrambles to keep its shelves stocked and checkouts staffed.The retailer has compressed a hiring process that can often take two weeks into as little as three hours by eliminating formal interviews and written job offers.German Tour Operator TUI Said to Near State Aid (8:20 a.m. NY)TUI AG, the world’s biggest tour operator, is close to securing almost 2 billion euros ($2.2 billion) in government aid in what’s seen as a litmus test for Germany’s pledge to rescue businesses ravaged by the pandemic.The company and its adviser reached an agreement with Germany’s state-owned KfW development bank on the terms of loans earlier this week, said the people, who asked not to be identified because discussions are private. That financing package is now with TUI’s lending banks, which are expected to sign off in the coming days, they said.Portugal Confirmed Coronavirus Cases Rise 18% (8:16 a.m. NY)The number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Portugal rose to 3,544 as of 11 a.m. on Thursday, an 18% increase from 2,995 on Wednesday morning, the government’s Directorate-General of Health said. Confirmed cases rose 27% on Wednesday from the previous day, following a 15% increase on Tuesday. The total number of deaths increased to 60 on Thursday from 43 reported through Wednesday morning; 43 patients have now recovered, up from 22 on Wednesday.BOE Warns of Long-Term Damage; Holds Rates (8 a.m. NY)The Bank of England left rates unchanged, but said it’s ready to provide more support for the economy after warning that a very sharp reduction in activity was likely. The pound stayed stronger in a broad trend for a weaker dollar across global markets and gilts continued to gain.“Given the severity of that disruption, there is a risk of longer-term damage to the economy, especially if there are business failures on a large scale or significant increases in unemployment,” the central bank said. The BOE has already slashed interest rates by 65 basis points in total in two emergency announcements, taking them to their lowest ever at 0.1%. It also added 200 billion pounds ($239 billion) to its quantitative-easing target, raising it to 645 billion pounds.Germany in ‘Calm Before the Storm’ (7:50 a.m. NY)Germany is only in the early stages of the coronavirus epidemic and medical staff there are preparing for their biggest challenge since the Second World War, according to Health Minister Jens Spahn. “Policy makers are in crisis mode,” Spahn said at a news conference in Berlin. “This is still the calm before the storm and nobody can say what will happen in coming weeks.”Germany has more than 37,000 confirmed cases and 203 deaths, according to data compiled by Bloomberg from regional governments.Ford Plans Gradual Restart of North American Plants (7:30 a.m. NY)Ford Motor Co. plans to resume vehicle production in Mexico on April 6, with some U.S. plants cranking up again about a week later. After halting North American production as of March 19 to help slow the spread of the coronavirus, Ford said it’s aiming to restart production first at its factory in Hermosillo, Mexico, which builds the Fusion and Lincoln MKZ sedans.Ford then plans to restart production on April 14 at plants in Michigan, Kentucky and Ohio that assemble profitable F-Series pickups and commercial vans. Other factories that make transmissions and press metal parts for those vehicles are also due to resume on that day. The F-Series is Ford’s best-selling model and provides most of its profit.Powell Says Fed Will Keep Credit Flowing (7:18 a.m. NY)“We will keep doing that aggressively and forthrightly, as we have been,” Powell said in an interview on NBC Thursday. “When it comes to this lending we’re not going to run out of ammunition.” Over the past three weeks, the U.S. central bank has introduced an unprecedented series of measures pushing it deep into uncharted territory.Powell said the U.S. may well be in recession, but expects activity to resume and move back up in the second half of the year. He said “we would tend to listen to the experts” on when normal activity should resume and added that the virus would dictate the timetable.Spain Reports Fewer Deaths, Cases Surge (6:32 a.m. NY)Total cases rose to 56,188 from 47,610 and fatalities jumped by 655, fewer than on Wednesday, to 4,089. Hospitals in the country are struggling to cope with the surge.Europe Accounts for 7 out of 10 Virus Deaths, WHO Says (6:20 a.m. NY)The number of cases tripled in the past week in Europe, with the disease spreading faster in Spain, France, Germany and Switzerland, Hans Kluge, the World Health Organization’s director for Europe, said at a press briefing in Copenhagen. Italy’s infection rate has slowed slightly, but it’s too early to say the disease has peaked there, he said. The country has 6,200 infected health-care workers, he added.Kluge said Europe needs to attack the disease in solidarity, because if the European Union manages to fight it but it takes hold in eastern Europe, it will just come back.Iran Reports 157 New Deaths (5:38 p.m. HK)Iran reported 157 new deaths and an additional 2,389 cases. About 29,400 people have been infected in total, of which 2,234 have died and more than 10,000 recovered.Austrian GDP Seen Down 2.5% if Economy Back to Normal in Summer (5:30 p.m. HK)Austrian output of goods and services will contract 2.5% this year if lockdown measures lift gradually from May and the economy returns to normal over the summer, researcher Wifo said.Irish Unemployment Set to Hit 30-Year High (5:20 p.m. HK)Irish unemployment may surge to the highest level since the 1980s, as the coronavirus takes an unprecedented toll. The jobless rate could rise 18% in the second quarter, the government-backed ESRI think-tank said on Thursday, should current restrictions remain in place for 12 weeks as planned. About 350,000 people would lose their jobs, the think tank said, with unemployment jumping from below 5%.EU Leaders to Hold Virtual Summit (5:15 p.m. HK)European Union leaders will on Thursday pledge to protect companies from foreign takeovers, discuss an exit-strategy from the looming recession, and likely agree on credit lines to help keep borrowing costs low while governments go on a spending spree. As EU nations move to tackle the fallout, leaders will tacitly admit that they were unprepared for the “unprecedented challenge” of the rapidly spreading disease, according to the latest draft of a joint statement to be issued following a video conference.Their discussion is expected to highlight divisions, especially when it comes to possible joint debt issuance and the conditions attached to any borrowing from the euro area’s bailout fund.Cases Rise in Asia (4:51 p.m. HK)Fatalities from novel coronavirus infection in Indonesia jumped to 78, the most in Southeast Asia, as the world’s fourth-most populous nation continues to see a surge in fresh cases. The total number of peopled infected rose to 893 on Thursday from 790 a day earlier. The number of new infections topped 100 for a third consecutive day.Malaysia added 235 confirmed cases of the new coronavirus, the biggest daily jump so far, after Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin decided to extend the lockdown until April 14. And Hong Kong reported 43 additional cases, the second biggest daily jump in confirmed cases.Thailand, a Southeast Asian country now entering what’s traditionally one of its hottest periods of the year, saw total cases surpass 1,000 following confirmation of 111 new cases. The total number may reach 3,500 by the end of April if the infection rate continues at this pace, according to Anupong Sujariyakul, senior expert in preventive medicine at the Disease Control Department.Virus Response Topples First European Government (4:30 p.m. HK)Kosovo lawmakers voted to remove Prime Minister Albin Kurti, becoming the first nation in Europe to vote out a government over the way it handled the coronavirus outbreak. The government collapsed late on Wednesday, just months after it took office. The vote was called by a junior coalition partner who criticized steps taken to curb the contagion.Romanian Health Minister Victor Costache resigned on Thursday as the country struggled to contain the spread.India Unveils $22.6 Billion Stimulus (4:10 p.m. HK)The measures will include cash transfers as well as steps on food security, Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman said in New Delhi Thursday. The package will benefit migrant workers, she said. India is on a total lockdown for three weeks from Wednesday in the world’s biggest isolation effort, as Prime Minister Narendra Modi seeks to prevent the virus from spreading locally.Singapore Boosts Virus Package as Economy Shrinks (3:53 p.m. HK)Singapore delivered a second stimulus package of S$48 billion ($33 billion) to fight the coronavirus outbreak, drawing on national reserves for the first time since the global financial crisis to support an economy heading for recession.The city-state’s gross domestic product fell an annualized 10.6% in the first quarter from the previous three months, far worse than the median forecast for an 8.2% contraction in a Bloomberg survey. The government said it now sees a sharp contraction in the economy of 1% to 4% for the full year.U.K. Companies Get More Time to Publish Accounts (3:50 p.m. HK)U.K. listed companies struggling with deadlines because of the coronavirus outbreak will get an extra two months to publish their financial statements, regulators said in a series of coordinated measures designed to reassure Britain’s businesses. Companies will have until six months after their financial year end to deliver their statements, the Financial Conduct Authority said on Thursday.Moscow to Shut Restaurants, Stores, Parks (3:37 p.m. HK)Moscow Mayor Sergey Sobyanin ordered a sweeping shutdown in Europe’s biggest city Thursday after infections in the Russian capital spiked. Restaurants, parks and stores except for pharmacies and food shops will shut down from Saturday for a week. Moscow reported a sharp increase in the number of cases, with the total jumping by a third over the last day to 546. The national total rose to 840.Russia is taking the illness increasingly seriously, with President Vladimir Putin on Wednesday declaring a next week a non-working one nationwide in a bid to reduce contagion and the government halting all international flights, effective March 27.French Business Confidence Tumbles by a Record (2:35 p.m. HK)French business confidence plunged at a record pace in March as shutdowns to contain the coronavirus have left the economy running at 65% of normal activity. The index fell to 95 in March from 105 the month before, statistics office Insee said Thursday. The drop echoes that seen in Germany in figures earlier this week, and reflects French President Emmanuel Macron’s move to put the country in lockdown in an effort to contain the spread of the virus.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 63/81   Iraq, Lebanon extend government restrictions to combat virus
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Iraq and Lebanon prepared Thursday to extend government-imposed restrictions on movement for two more weeks, the latest measures announced to stem the spread of the new coronavirus.  In Iran, the death toll jumped by 157 new fatalities, prompting new steps to limit public gatherings and domestic travel.  In Saudi Arabia, authorities announced a total lockdown on the capital, Riyadh, and Islam's two holiest cities, Mecca and Medina, in addition to a nationwide curfew.

    Iraq and Lebanon prepared Thursday to extend government-imposed restrictions on movement for two more weeks, the latest measures announced to stem the spread of the new coronavirus. In Iran, the death toll jumped by 157 new fatalities, prompting new steps to limit public gatherings and domestic travel. In Saudi Arabia, authorities announced a total lockdown on the capital, Riyadh, and Islam's two holiest cities, Mecca and Medina, in addition to a nationwide curfew.


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  • 64/81   Why do rightwing populist leaders oppose experts?
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The likes of Trump, Bolsonaro and Johnson have denigrated professionalism but Reagan, Thatcher and other neoliberals led the wayIt is conventional wisdom that populists are against “elites” – and experts in particular. But rightwing populists aren’t opposed to all elites – they only denounce professionals who claim authority on the basis of special knowledge. Their perverse version of rightwing anti-authoritarianism implies that there is nothing wrong with the wealthy; in fact, the latter can be superior sources of wisdom. Trump putting the advice of “business leaders” above that of infectious disease experts is likely to yield deadly results. But it’s important to understand that the systematic denigration of professionalism started not with the populists – Reagan, Thatcher and other cheerleaders for neoliberalism led the way.Populists are often criticized for being great simplifiers, when the world is in fact highly complex. For those who take Trump to be the paradigmatic populist of our day, it’s easy to conclude that populists are constantly lying and ushering in a “post-truth” era, in which falsehoods exclusively produced by the daily White House reality TV show are literally turning out to be deadly.But this picture is itself simplistic. Populists are not by definition liars. They are only committed to one particular empirical falsehood: the notion that they, and only they, represent what populists often call “the real people” – with the implication that other politicians are not only corrupt and “crooked”, but traitors to the people, or, as Trump has often put it, “Un-American”.More important, it’s not true that today’s rightwing populists are indiscriminately against all elites. They only denounce professionals. Trump supporters did not find it scandalous that his cabinet was full of Wall Street figures. The base does not resent the rich – rather, it aspires to be rich. In their eyes, the wealthy have earned their money, an objective indicator of their “hard work”, or the fact that they really produced something (never mind that the likes of Ross and Mnuchin have never created anything and only shifted money around).These supposed movers and shakers contrast starkly with professionals who claim authority on the basis of education and special licensing – think lawyers, doctors and professors. Such figures can automatically be maligned by rightwing culture warriors as “condescending” – after all, they tell other people what to do, because they claim to know better. According to Nigel Farage, for instance, the World Health Organization is just another club of “clever people” who want to “bully us”.Is the success of the Trumps, Bolsonaros and Johnsons of this world proof that the people can always be seduced by demagogues – and simply don’t know what’s good for them? Distrust of professionalism does not come out of nowhere. Neoliberalism paved the way for these attitudes. Margaret Thatcher memorably held that academics didn’t really do any work; in fact, they all – with the possible exception of scientists – seemed to be lefties wasting taxpayers’ money. Tories introduced the imperative constantly to audit and assess (and discipline and punish those not measuring up); only what could be counted, counted. Governments that praised “free markets” – the spontaneous emergence of economic order – actually ended up constructing entirely artificial “markets” in academia and healthcare. These pseudo-markets had to provide the right “incentives” – because, so the assumption went, professionals could not possibly be motivated by intrinsic goals of helping patients or pursuing research or educating young people.> This concerted attack on professionalism made it easier for Trump and Boris Johnson to claim that they might just know better than leading scientistsThe result was not a genuine market, but a vast bureaucracy reminiscent of the late Soviet Union. What one historian has called “the tyranny of metrics” meant that the measure became the target; the relentless quantification of performance distorted what and how professionals performed. Enormous resources, and a fair bit of cunning, went into gaming a system which was based on the suspicion that professional self-regulation and internal accountability are sham ideals that just justify professionals erecting monopolies and closed shops.This concerted attack on professionalism made it easier for Trump and Boris Johnson to claim that they might just know better than leading scientists. Business leaders are praised as more capable decision-makers, when it comes to the length of a lockdown, than epidemiologists. Trump – who apparently listens to theories cooked up by his uniquely unqualified son-in-law and fears being upstaged by Anthony Fauci – has still not understood that the longer amateur hour at the very top lasts, the more lives will be lost.The Covid-19 crisis might lead us to a clear-eyed view of the value of professionalism (including professionals in politics like, say, Hillary Clinton). But it’s also important to keep professionalism in its place. Professional advice should constrain political choices, not determine them. Proper professionals, unlike technocrats, do not promise that they know the uniquely correct solution to all policy problems.The assumption that there is only one right way is perversely shared by populists and technocrats: populists claim that there is only one authentic popular will (to build a Wall, get Brexit done, or what have you), and that they are the only ones who know it – and the only ones who can implement it. The technocratic stance – widely on display on the continent during the European debt crisis – holds that there is only one rational answer to policy challenges, and that only technocrats can identify it. If you disagree with a populist, you are declared a traitor to the people; if you disagree with a technocrat, you’ll be told politely that you’re not smart enough.The lesson is not that professionalism should replace democratic politics, or, for that matter, widespread participation by citizens – a conclusion drawn by unashamedly elitist liberals who have sought to reinstate professional gatekeepers everywhere, but especially in primaries. Citizens still know best what their problems are; professionals – in perfectly non-condescending ways – play a crucial role in addressing them. Or, as John Dewey, the greatest American philosopher of democracy in the 20th century, put it, “no government by experts in which the masses do not have the chance to inform the experts as to their needs can be anything but an oligarchy managed in the interests of the few.”  * Jan-Werner Müller teaches at Princeton. Democracy Rules is forthcoming

    The likes of Trump, Bolsonaro and Johnson have denigrated professionalism but Reagan, Thatcher and other neoliberals led the wayIt is conventional wisdom that populists are against “elites” – and experts in particular. But rightwing populists aren’t opposed to all elites – they only denounce professionals who claim authority on the basis of special knowledge. Their perverse version of rightwing anti-authoritarianism implies that there is nothing wrong with the wealthy; in fact, the latter can be superior sources of wisdom. Trump putting the advice of “business leaders” above that of infectious disease experts is likely to yield deadly results. But it’s important to understand that the systematic denigration of professionalism started not with the populists – Reagan, Thatcher and other cheerleaders for neoliberalism led the way.Populists are often criticized for being great simplifiers, when the world is in fact highly complex. For those who take Trump to be the paradigmatic populist of our day, it’s easy to conclude that populists are constantly lying and ushering in a “post-truth” era, in which falsehoods exclusively produced by the daily White House reality TV show are literally turning out to be deadly.But this picture is itself simplistic. Populists are not by definition liars. They are only committed to one particular empirical falsehood: the notion that they, and only they, represent what populists often call “the real people” – with the implication that other politicians are not only corrupt and “crooked”, but traitors to the people, or, as Trump has often put it, “Un-American”.More important, it’s not true that today’s rightwing populists are indiscriminately against all elites. They only denounce professionals. Trump supporters did not find it scandalous that his cabinet was full of Wall Street figures. The base does not resent the rich – rather, it aspires to be rich. In their eyes, the wealthy have earned their money, an objective indicator of their “hard work”, or the fact that they really produced something (never mind that the likes of Ross and Mnuchin have never created anything and only shifted money around).These supposed movers and shakers contrast starkly with professionals who claim authority on the basis of education and special licensing – think lawyers, doctors and professors. Such figures can automatically be maligned by rightwing culture warriors as “condescending” – after all, they tell other people what to do, because they claim to know better. According to Nigel Farage, for instance, the World Health Organization is just another club of “clever people” who want to “bully us”.Is the success of the Trumps, Bolsonaros and Johnsons of this world proof that the people can always be seduced by demagogues – and simply don’t know what’s good for them? Distrust of professionalism does not come out of nowhere. Neoliberalism paved the way for these attitudes. Margaret Thatcher memorably held that academics didn’t really do any work; in fact, they all – with the possible exception of scientists – seemed to be lefties wasting taxpayers’ money. Tories introduced the imperative constantly to audit and assess (and discipline and punish those not measuring up); only what could be counted, counted. Governments that praised “free markets” – the spontaneous emergence of economic order – actually ended up constructing entirely artificial “markets” in academia and healthcare. These pseudo-markets had to provide the right “incentives” – because, so the assumption went, professionals could not possibly be motivated by intrinsic goals of helping patients or pursuing research or educating young people.> This concerted attack on professionalism made it easier for Trump and Boris Johnson to claim that they might just know better than leading scientistsThe result was not a genuine market, but a vast bureaucracy reminiscent of the late Soviet Union. What one historian has called “the tyranny of metrics” meant that the measure became the target; the relentless quantification of performance distorted what and how professionals performed. Enormous resources, and a fair bit of cunning, went into gaming a system which was based on the suspicion that professional self-regulation and internal accountability are sham ideals that just justify professionals erecting monopolies and closed shops.This concerted attack on professionalism made it easier for Trump and Boris Johnson to claim that they might just know better than leading scientists. Business leaders are praised as more capable decision-makers, when it comes to the length of a lockdown, than epidemiologists. Trump – who apparently listens to theories cooked up by his uniquely unqualified son-in-law and fears being upstaged by Anthony Fauci – has still not understood that the longer amateur hour at the very top lasts, the more lives will be lost.The Covid-19 crisis might lead us to a clear-eyed view of the value of professionalism (including professionals in politics like, say, Hillary Clinton). But it’s also important to keep professionalism in its place. Professional advice should constrain political choices, not determine them. Proper professionals, unlike technocrats, do not promise that they know the uniquely correct solution to all policy problems.The assumption that there is only one right way is perversely shared by populists and technocrats: populists claim that there is only one authentic popular will (to build a Wall, get Brexit done, or what have you), and that they are the only ones who know it – and the only ones who can implement it. The technocratic stance – widely on display on the continent during the European debt crisis – holds that there is only one rational answer to policy challenges, and that only technocrats can identify it. If you disagree with a populist, you are declared a traitor to the people; if you disagree with a technocrat, you’ll be told politely that you’re not smart enough.The lesson is not that professionalism should replace democratic politics, or, for that matter, widespread participation by citizens – a conclusion drawn by unashamedly elitist liberals who have sought to reinstate professional gatekeepers everywhere, but especially in primaries. Citizens still know best what their problems are; professionals – in perfectly non-condescending ways – play a crucial role in addressing them. Or, as John Dewey, the greatest American philosopher of democracy in the 20th century, put it, “no government by experts in which the masses do not have the chance to inform the experts as to their needs can be anything but an oligarchy managed in the interests of the few.” * Jan-Werner Müller teaches at Princeton. Democracy Rules is forthcoming


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  • 65/81   Former FBI agent missing in Iran may be dead, US officials say
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Iran must provide a complete accounting of what occurred with Bob Levinson before the United States can fully accept what happened in this case," National Security Advisor Robert C. O'Brien said.

    Iran must provide a complete accounting of what occurred with Bob Levinson before the United States can fully accept what happened in this case," National Security Advisor Robert C. O'Brien said.


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  • 66/81   Venezuela’s Dollar Lifeline at Risk From Anti-Virus Lockdowns
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Business closures and lockdowns in the U.S., Europe and Latin America are putting at risk billions of dollars in remittances on which Venezuela’s economy depends.Venezuelan families get nearly $4 billion per year from relatives abroad, but that figure is projected to slump as migrants lose their jobs amid the coronavirus pandemic. That would bring additional misery to a country that has also been hit by a crash in crude prices as well as its own outbreak of the virus.Mariang Stefanie Escala, 29, earned 34,000 pesos ($8) a day as a waitress in a Bogota restaurant until March 19, when the managers told her they were closing due to a lockdown announced by the mayor’s office.Escala sent 300,000 pesos per month to her family in the Venezuelan city of Puerto la Cruz, but now doesn’t even have enough to pay her own rent or electricity bill.“There are a lot of Venezuelans in the same situation,” she said, in a phone interview.Venezuela is undergoing the deepest depression in the history of the Americas, made even worse by U.S. sanctions. The inflow of dollars from the 5 million Venezuelans who left the country in recent years is a lifeline for about a third of the households left behind.Now Venezuelan migrants in countries such as Colombia, Peru and Spain risk being thrown out of work amid the global downturn.“The economies of the countries where Venezuelans are living and sending remittances from are losing dynamism and, adding the exceptional situation of the coronavirus, impediments to sending money build up,” said Francisco Rodriguez, a Venezuelan economist who teaches at Tulane University.Rodriguez estimates remittances will drop 60% this year. Other economists, such Ecoanalitica director Asdrubal Oliveros, estimate a less dramatic drop of 30%, depending on how severely the global crisis affects employment.A quarter of Venezuelans -- about 7 million -- face regular food shortages, according to the United Nations Food Program.President Nicolas Maduro ordered a nationwide lockdown on March 17 to curb the spread of the virus, which has so far infected at least 91 people in Venezuela and more than 450,000 worldwide.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Business closures and lockdowns in the U.S., Europe and Latin America are putting at risk billions of dollars in remittances on which Venezuela’s economy depends.Venezuelan families get nearly $4 billion per year from relatives abroad, but that figure is projected to slump as migrants lose their jobs amid the coronavirus pandemic. That would bring additional misery to a country that has also been hit by a crash in crude prices as well as its own outbreak of the virus.Mariang Stefanie Escala, 29, earned 34,000 pesos ($8) a day as a waitress in a Bogota restaurant until March 19, when the managers told her they were closing due to a lockdown announced by the mayor’s office.Escala sent 300,000 pesos per month to her family in the Venezuelan city of Puerto la Cruz, but now doesn’t even have enough to pay her own rent or electricity bill.“There are a lot of Venezuelans in the same situation,” she said, in a phone interview.Venezuela is undergoing the deepest depression in the history of the Americas, made even worse by U.S. sanctions. The inflow of dollars from the 5 million Venezuelans who left the country in recent years is a lifeline for about a third of the households left behind.Now Venezuelan migrants in countries such as Colombia, Peru and Spain risk being thrown out of work amid the global downturn.“The economies of the countries where Venezuelans are living and sending remittances from are losing dynamism and, adding the exceptional situation of the coronavirus, impediments to sending money build up,” said Francisco Rodriguez, a Venezuelan economist who teaches at Tulane University.Rodriguez estimates remittances will drop 60% this year. Other economists, such Ecoanalitica director Asdrubal Oliveros, estimate a less dramatic drop of 30%, depending on how severely the global crisis affects employment.A quarter of Venezuelans -- about 7 million -- face regular food shortages, according to the United Nations Food Program.President Nicolas Maduro ordered a nationwide lockdown on March 17 to curb the spread of the virus, which has so far infected at least 91 people in Venezuela and more than 450,000 worldwide.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 67/81   Iran reports 157 new virus deaths, imposes intercity ban
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Iran on Thursday announced 157 new deaths from coronavirus, raising the official number of fatalities to 2,234, as it slapped a ban on intercity travel to try to curb the spread.  Health ministry spokesman Kianoush Jahanpour also said that 2,389 new cases have been confirmed in the past 24 hours, bringing the total number of declared infections in one of the world's wost-hit countries to 29,406.  Jahanpour said that the spread of the new coronavirus and its rate of infection was 'growing steadily' in Iran.

    Iran on Thursday announced 157 new deaths from coronavirus, raising the official number of fatalities to 2,234, as it slapped a ban on intercity travel to try to curb the spread. Health ministry spokesman Kianoush Jahanpour also said that 2,389 new cases have been confirmed in the past 24 hours, bringing the total number of declared infections in one of the world's wost-hit countries to 29,406. Jahanpour said that the spread of the new coronavirus and its rate of infection was 'growing steadily' in Iran.


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  • 68/81   Trump’s Go-It-Alone Virus Stance Brings Risks
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Donald Trump looks increasingly intent on playing a game of chicken of sorts with his government’s Covid-19 response.As the U.S. death toll topped 1,000 yesterday, the president’s vision of putting Americans back to work by Easter has set him on a collision course with some other global leaders and the heads of U.S. cities and states who are imposing lockdowns to stem the contagion.Trump’s play-it-down approach, also embraced by like-minded Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, contrasts with the nations warning their health-care systems risk being overrun. The schism will be on full display today as Group of 20 leaders hold a virtual summit to “advance a coordinated global response.”Others who adopted lenient stances have since bowed to the reality of the virus. U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson abandoned a “herd immunity” approach and announced a three-week lockdown. In Russia, Vladimir Putin postponed a constitutional vote that would let him rule to 2036, and Japan, where workers were thronging the Tokyo metro as recently as yesterday, is considering declaring a state of emergency.The World Health Organization wants governments to stop wasting time.“We squandered the first window of opportunity,” Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said yesterday in a rare public admonishment of the response so far. “The time to act was actually more than a month ago or two months ago.”Global HeadlinesU.S. stimulus | The Senate approved a $2 trillion economic rescue plan, putting pressure on the Democratic-led House to do the same and send it to Trump for his signature. The legislation passed on a 96-0 vote just before midnight following intense negotiations between Republicans and Democrats, who demanded changes after saying the measure’s provisions were too focused on companies.Click here for a breakdown of the bill. White House chief economic adviser Larry Kudlow said jobless claims data out today will show a “very large increase” in Americans filing for benefits.Life-or-death choice | In Spain, people are dying in hospital waiting rooms before they can even be admitted, Ben Sills and Laura Millan Lombrana report. Triage rules for access to overflowing intensive-care wards dictate that older patients miss out to younger people with a better shot at surviving the virus. With some funeral services halted and no space left in morgues, corpses are being stored at the main ice rink. “We are completely overwhelmed,” one medic said.Taking control | Governments worldwide have adopted sweeping powers to control the coronavirus, Iain Marlow reports. They’re locking down cities with the help of the army, mapping population flows via smartphones and jailing or sequestering quarantine breakers using CCTV and facial recognition cameras. As the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks on the U.S. shows, however, governments may be reluctant to relinquish these tools once the immediate crisis is over.Power shift | Israel’s parliament meets today to choose a new speaker, a vote that’s expected to hand control of the legislative agenda to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s opponents, the Blue and White bloc of Benny Gantz. It follows a showdown between the High Court and Knesset Speaker Yuli Edelstein, a Netanyahu ally, who resigned rather than call a vote on his successor. The court transferred his authority to convene parliament to an opposition legislator.Refugee risk | Social distancing and even clean water needed to keep the coronavirus at bay are luxuries few of the world’s 30 million refugees can afford, Saud Abu Ramadan and David Wainer report. With health-care systems and employment opportunities already under severe strain, camps for those fleeing conflict and poverty and urban slums are potential breeding grounds for the pandemic.What to WatchU.K. Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak will announce assistance today to help millions of self-employed people whose incomes are threatened by the pandemic. Joe Biden rejected any idea of an April debate with Bernie Sanders and signaled that he views the Democratic nominating contest as essentially over.Tell us how we’re doing or what we’re missing at balancepower@bloomberg.net.And finally … Kosovo became Europe’s first nation to torpedo a government for the way it’s confronting the coronavirus. Lawmakers voted to remove Prime Minister Albin Kurti after he clashed with President Hashim Thaci over calling a state of emergency. The ouster underscores a split between Western powers over Kosovo’s approach to resolving its dispute with Serbia: Germany and France warned it could spread instability but Washington supported Kurti’s departure because the U.S. prefers Thaci calling the shots. For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Donald Trump looks increasingly intent on playing a game of chicken of sorts with his government’s Covid-19 response.As the U.S. death toll topped 1,000 yesterday, the president’s vision of putting Americans back to work by Easter has set him on a collision course with some other global leaders and the heads of U.S. cities and states who are imposing lockdowns to stem the contagion.Trump’s play-it-down approach, also embraced by like-minded Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, contrasts with the nations warning their health-care systems risk being overrun. The schism will be on full display today as Group of 20 leaders hold a virtual summit to “advance a coordinated global response.”Others who adopted lenient stances have since bowed to the reality of the virus. U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson abandoned a “herd immunity” approach and announced a three-week lockdown. In Russia, Vladimir Putin postponed a constitutional vote that would let him rule to 2036, and Japan, where workers were thronging the Tokyo metro as recently as yesterday, is considering declaring a state of emergency.The World Health Organization wants governments to stop wasting time.“We squandered the first window of opportunity,” Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said yesterday in a rare public admonishment of the response so far. “The time to act was actually more than a month ago or two months ago.”Global HeadlinesU.S. stimulus | The Senate approved a $2 trillion economic rescue plan, putting pressure on the Democratic-led House to do the same and send it to Trump for his signature. The legislation passed on a 96-0 vote just before midnight following intense negotiations between Republicans and Democrats, who demanded changes after saying the measure’s provisions were too focused on companies.Click here for a breakdown of the bill. White House chief economic adviser Larry Kudlow said jobless claims data out today will show a “very large increase” in Americans filing for benefits.Life-or-death choice | In Spain, people are dying in hospital waiting rooms before they can even be admitted, Ben Sills and Laura Millan Lombrana report. Triage rules for access to overflowing intensive-care wards dictate that older patients miss out to younger people with a better shot at surviving the virus. With some funeral services halted and no space left in morgues, corpses are being stored at the main ice rink. “We are completely overwhelmed,” one medic said.Taking control | Governments worldwide have adopted sweeping powers to control the coronavirus, Iain Marlow reports. They’re locking down cities with the help of the army, mapping population flows via smartphones and jailing or sequestering quarantine breakers using CCTV and facial recognition cameras. As the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks on the U.S. shows, however, governments may be reluctant to relinquish these tools once the immediate crisis is over.Power shift | Israel’s parliament meets today to choose a new speaker, a vote that’s expected to hand control of the legislative agenda to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s opponents, the Blue and White bloc of Benny Gantz. It follows a showdown between the High Court and Knesset Speaker Yuli Edelstein, a Netanyahu ally, who resigned rather than call a vote on his successor. The court transferred his authority to convene parliament to an opposition legislator.Refugee risk | Social distancing and even clean water needed to keep the coronavirus at bay are luxuries few of the world’s 30 million refugees can afford, Saud Abu Ramadan and David Wainer report. With health-care systems and employment opportunities already under severe strain, camps for those fleeing conflict and poverty and urban slums are potential breeding grounds for the pandemic.What to WatchU.K. Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak will announce assistance today to help millions of self-employed people whose incomes are threatened by the pandemic. Joe Biden rejected any idea of an April debate with Bernie Sanders and signaled that he views the Democratic nominating contest as essentially over.Tell us how we’re doing or what we’re missing at balancepower@bloomberg.net.And finally … Kosovo became Europe’s first nation to torpedo a government for the way it’s confronting the coronavirus. Lawmakers voted to remove Prime Minister Albin Kurti after he clashed with President Hashim Thaci over calling a state of emergency. The ouster underscores a split between Western powers over Kosovo’s approach to resolving its dispute with Serbia: Germany and France warned it could spread instability but Washington supported Kurti’s departure because the U.S. prefers Thaci calling the shots. For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 69/81   After Putin's Big Fail, Russia Braces for COVID-19 Onslaught
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Only days after the Kremlin assured the Russians that the coronavirus pandemic was under control, Moscow’s Mayor Sergei Sobyanin told Russian President Vladimir Putin that “the momentum is high and a serious situation is unfolding.” Contrary to the previously reported low rate of infection, "the real number of those who are sick is significantly higher,” Sobyanin said. He added that the number of tests conducted to date has been extremely low “and no one on earth knows the real picture.”Russia Swore It Whipped the Virus, and Fox and CNN Bought ItOn Wednesday, officially released statistics listed 658 coronavirus infections and no deaths. To date, there have been at least 3 known deaths of coronavirus patients in Russia, but they are being attributed to other causes and thereby deceptively omitted from government reports. The official bulletin about the coronavirus, released by Russia’s federal agency Rospotrebnadzor on March 24, states that more than 112,074 people remain under medical supervision.Concerned Russian doctors sounded the alarm that potential coronavirus cases are being ascribed to pneumonia and seasonal flu without testing. For example, the city of St. Petersburg experienced a sharp jump of SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) virus cases. During just one week in March, 63,000 SARS cases and 406 cases of pneumonia have been recorded, according to Interfax. The city’s administration emphasized that the incidence of SARS is at the epidemiological threshold. The Interfax news report did not point out that the official name of the novel coronavirus is SARS-CoV-2.In light of the Kremlin’s pandemic propensity for lying, the public disregarded initial claims that the government successfully curtailed the spread of the coronavirus. Panic buying ensued, leading to the rising prices of sugar, buckwheat, produce and other food items.As the coronavirus curve keeps on climbing, President Putin is on a mission to demonstrate his leadership. He postponed a nationwide vote on pending constitutional changes, which are meant to secure his lifelong presidency. The voting may take place later in the year and possibly be conducted by mail. The decision is being left solely to Putin.Putin Worries Coronavirus Could Screw Up His Constitutional ‘Coronation’In a televised address to the nation Wednesday, Putin announced a sweeping array of measures, which he said were designed to prevent “what is happening today in many Western countries, both in Europe and overseas” from becoming Russia’s future. Starting on March 28, Russians are getting one week of paid leave to stay home, in an attempt to “flatten the curve” of the pandemic. With exception of the Russians trying to return from abroad, Russia stopped all international flights.Russian pundits and medical experts described the fight against the coronavirus pandemic as a rehearsal for biological warfare. Vladimir Putin has ordered the Russian army to carry out drills designed to increase its readiness to fight the novel coronavirus. The drills will include specialist medical units and nuclear, biological and chemical protection troops.  Discussions are underway as to the potential cancellation of the Victory Day parade in May of this year, but final determination will be made depending on the efforts to curtail the spread of the coronavirus. There is a possibility the parade, commemorating the surrender of the Nazis in WWII, may be held without spectators. U.S. National Security Adviser Robert O’Brien is currently set to attend the event, in lieu of Donald J. Trump.  Kremlin-controlled state TV shows are taking unprecedented measures to protect some of their most cherished assets: the hosts, whose full-throated support of Vladimir Putin is especially important during these challenging times. Popular Russian info-talk show 60 Minutes is now filming its segments without audiences. After the host Olga Skabeeva could be heard coughing during a commercial break, she was separated from her husband and co-host Evgeny Popov. The married couple are now hosting 60 Minutes separately, on different days. Likewise, they are staying apart during the off-work hours, because even if one of them falls ill, the show must go on.Speaking of performance art, Vladimir Putin embarked on a visit to Moscow’s hospital for monitoring suspected coronavirus patients. Unlike U.S. President Donald J. Trump, who frequently claims that the threat of coronavirus is widely overblown, Vladimir Putin is an old Chekist who believes in science, facts and bio-warfare. Taking no chances, Putin donned a hazmat suit and visited only one patient— Dmitry Garkavi, who is a doctor and a social media influencer. The drop-in was not particularly risky, since Garkavi was hospitalized with pneumonia, and tested negative for coronavirus—twice. In his social media posts, Garkavi remarked that he communicated with Vladimir Putin for all of “10-15 seconds.” After the brief exchange, Putin observed other patients through the glass of the hospital’s control room, was helped out of his outfit and promptly left the building.  The hazmat suit sported by the Russian leader was distinctly different than the protective attire worn by hospital workers. It was purchased for the Russian president by his staff especially for his hospital visit. Putin’s yellow jumpsuit is now in high demand, but is completely sold out at the store where it was bought.Vladimir Putin’s coronavirus photo op promptly made the rounds on Russian state television. During his show, The Evening with Vladimir Soloviev, the host beamed with pride when he pointed out: “Out of all of the world leaders, only [China’a President] Xi Jinping and [Russian President] Vladimir Putin went to visit the sick.” For contrast, Soloviev introduced a clip of the U.S. President Donald J. Trump rapidly moving away from the White House's coronavirus task force response coordinator, Dr Deborah Birx, as soon as she mentioned her low grade fever.In spite of Russia’s own issues with coronavirus testing, widespread shortages of medical equipment and protective medical gear, the Kremlin is posturing by offering to help other countries in fighting the coronavirus pandemic. Russian Ambassador to the United States Anatoly Antonov offered to help Washington in the fight against the outbreak of the novel coronavirus and complained about “rude” American media trying to switch the focus to other countries (like Russia).State TV host Vladimir Soloviev pompously predicted: “I have a feeling that we will end up saving humanity—again, like we’ve done more than once,” an apparent reference to Russia’s sacrifices defeating the Nazis in World War II. Russian state media are framing the failure by the Trump administration to offer help to its European allies in their fight against the deadly pandemic as the defeat of the United States, the end of NATO, and the virtual nonexistence of transatlantic unity. Russian experts believe that the outcome of the global fight against the coronavirus pandemic will change the entire balance of power in the world. Russian state media outlet Vesti described the course chosen by the administration of the U.S. President Donald J. Trump as “indecisive,” “poorly coordinated” and hesitant to implement the tough measures recommended by the experts in curtailing the deadly pandemic.Vesti argued that “coronavirus will determine the winner in the rivalry between China and the United States.” But the stakes are much higher. Kremlin-controlled media believe that on a larger scale, “the success or failure of the United States will form a global view of the effectiveness of democracy compared to autocracy. This, in turn, will affect America’s global position, its ability to attract vacillating allies into its orbit from China’s sphere of influence, and possibly determine the global geopolitical leader for years to come.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

    Only days after the Kremlin assured the Russians that the coronavirus pandemic was under control, Moscow’s Mayor Sergei Sobyanin told Russian President Vladimir Putin that “the momentum is high and a serious situation is unfolding.” Contrary to the previously reported low rate of infection, "the real number of those who are sick is significantly higher,” Sobyanin said. He added that the number of tests conducted to date has been extremely low “and no one on earth knows the real picture.”Russia Swore It Whipped the Virus, and Fox and CNN Bought ItOn Wednesday, officially released statistics listed 658 coronavirus infections and no deaths. To date, there have been at least 3 known deaths of coronavirus patients in Russia, but they are being attributed to other causes and thereby deceptively omitted from government reports. The official bulletin about the coronavirus, released by Russia’s federal agency Rospotrebnadzor on March 24, states that more than 112,074 people remain under medical supervision.Concerned Russian doctors sounded the alarm that potential coronavirus cases are being ascribed to pneumonia and seasonal flu without testing. For example, the city of St. Petersburg experienced a sharp jump of SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) virus cases. During just one week in March, 63,000 SARS cases and 406 cases of pneumonia have been recorded, according to Interfax. The city’s administration emphasized that the incidence of SARS is at the epidemiological threshold. The Interfax news report did not point out that the official name of the novel coronavirus is SARS-CoV-2.In light of the Kremlin’s pandemic propensity for lying, the public disregarded initial claims that the government successfully curtailed the spread of the coronavirus. Panic buying ensued, leading to the rising prices of sugar, buckwheat, produce and other food items.As the coronavirus curve keeps on climbing, President Putin is on a mission to demonstrate his leadership. He postponed a nationwide vote on pending constitutional changes, which are meant to secure his lifelong presidency. The voting may take place later in the year and possibly be conducted by mail. The decision is being left solely to Putin.Putin Worries Coronavirus Could Screw Up His Constitutional ‘Coronation’In a televised address to the nation Wednesday, Putin announced a sweeping array of measures, which he said were designed to prevent “what is happening today in many Western countries, both in Europe and overseas” from becoming Russia’s future. Starting on March 28, Russians are getting one week of paid leave to stay home, in an attempt to “flatten the curve” of the pandemic. With exception of the Russians trying to return from abroad, Russia stopped all international flights.Russian pundits and medical experts described the fight against the coronavirus pandemic as a rehearsal for biological warfare. Vladimir Putin has ordered the Russian army to carry out drills designed to increase its readiness to fight the novel coronavirus. The drills will include specialist medical units and nuclear, biological and chemical protection troops.  Discussions are underway as to the potential cancellation of the Victory Day parade in May of this year, but final determination will be made depending on the efforts to curtail the spread of the coronavirus. There is a possibility the parade, commemorating the surrender of the Nazis in WWII, may be held without spectators. U.S. National Security Adviser Robert O’Brien is currently set to attend the event, in lieu of Donald J. Trump.  Kremlin-controlled state TV shows are taking unprecedented measures to protect some of their most cherished assets: the hosts, whose full-throated support of Vladimir Putin is especially important during these challenging times. Popular Russian info-talk show 60 Minutes is now filming its segments without audiences. After the host Olga Skabeeva could be heard coughing during a commercial break, she was separated from her husband and co-host Evgeny Popov. The married couple are now hosting 60 Minutes separately, on different days. Likewise, they are staying apart during the off-work hours, because even if one of them falls ill, the show must go on.Speaking of performance art, Vladimir Putin embarked on a visit to Moscow’s hospital for monitoring suspected coronavirus patients. Unlike U.S. President Donald J. Trump, who frequently claims that the threat of coronavirus is widely overblown, Vladimir Putin is an old Chekist who believes in science, facts and bio-warfare. Taking no chances, Putin donned a hazmat suit and visited only one patient— Dmitry Garkavi, who is a doctor and a social media influencer. The drop-in was not particularly risky, since Garkavi was hospitalized with pneumonia, and tested negative for coronavirus—twice. In his social media posts, Garkavi remarked that he communicated with Vladimir Putin for all of “10-15 seconds.” After the brief exchange, Putin observed other patients through the glass of the hospital’s control room, was helped out of his outfit and promptly left the building.  The hazmat suit sported by the Russian leader was distinctly different than the protective attire worn by hospital workers. It was purchased for the Russian president by his staff especially for his hospital visit. Putin’s yellow jumpsuit is now in high demand, but is completely sold out at the store where it was bought.Vladimir Putin’s coronavirus photo op promptly made the rounds on Russian state television. During his show, The Evening with Vladimir Soloviev, the host beamed with pride when he pointed out: “Out of all of the world leaders, only [China’a President] Xi Jinping and [Russian President] Vladimir Putin went to visit the sick.” For contrast, Soloviev introduced a clip of the U.S. President Donald J. Trump rapidly moving away from the White House's coronavirus task force response coordinator, Dr Deborah Birx, as soon as she mentioned her low grade fever.In spite of Russia’s own issues with coronavirus testing, widespread shortages of medical equipment and protective medical gear, the Kremlin is posturing by offering to help other countries in fighting the coronavirus pandemic. Russian Ambassador to the United States Anatoly Antonov offered to help Washington in the fight against the outbreak of the novel coronavirus and complained about “rude” American media trying to switch the focus to other countries (like Russia).State TV host Vladimir Soloviev pompously predicted: “I have a feeling that we will end up saving humanity—again, like we’ve done more than once,” an apparent reference to Russia’s sacrifices defeating the Nazis in World War II. Russian state media are framing the failure by the Trump administration to offer help to its European allies in their fight against the deadly pandemic as the defeat of the United States, the end of NATO, and the virtual nonexistence of transatlantic unity. Russian experts believe that the outcome of the global fight against the coronavirus pandemic will change the entire balance of power in the world. Russian state media outlet Vesti described the course chosen by the administration of the U.S. President Donald J. Trump as “indecisive,” “poorly coordinated” and hesitant to implement the tough measures recommended by the experts in curtailing the deadly pandemic.Vesti argued that “coronavirus will determine the winner in the rivalry between China and the United States.” But the stakes are much higher. Kremlin-controlled media believe that on a larger scale, “the success or failure of the United States will form a global view of the effectiveness of democracy compared to autocracy. This, in turn, will affect America’s global position, its ability to attract vacillating allies into its orbit from China’s sphere of influence, and possibly determine the global geopolitical leader for years to come.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


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  • 70/81   Iraq extends nationwide curfew until April 11
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The Iraqi government said Thursday that it will extend a countrywide lockdown it imposed in response to the coronavirus pandemic until April 11.  One of Iraq's first precautionary  measures was to close its 1,500-kilometre (940-mile) land border with Iran late last month.  Iraq has since ramped up its measures against the virus, with individual provinces imposing curfews before the government last week announced a countrywide lockdown.

    The Iraqi government said Thursday that it will extend a countrywide lockdown it imposed in response to the coronavirus pandemic until April 11. One of Iraq's first precautionary measures was to close its 1,500-kilometre (940-mile) land border with Iran late last month. Iraq has since ramped up its measures against the virus, with individual provinces imposing curfews before the government last week announced a countrywide lockdown.


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  • 71/81   Israeli parliament to choose new speaker amid double crisis
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The Israeli parliament will select a new speaker on Thursday after the Supreme Court forced the vote amid an unprecedented challenge to Israeli democracy and as the country is battling against the rapid spread of coronavirus.  A new speaker from the opposition Blue and White party will deal a blow to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as he tries to cling to power while averting a looming corruption trial.  Outgoing Knesset Speaker Yuli Edelstein resigned in protest Wednesday.

    The Israeli parliament will select a new speaker on Thursday after the Supreme Court forced the vote amid an unprecedented challenge to Israeli democracy and as the country is battling against the rapid spread of coronavirus. A new speaker from the opposition Blue and White party will deal a blow to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as he tries to cling to power while averting a looming corruption trial. Outgoing Knesset Speaker Yuli Edelstein resigned in protest Wednesday.


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  • 72/81   Florida man whose ‘game changer’ coronavirus treatment was touted by Trump is a believer, but warns: Don’t try this at home
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    It’s been less than a week since  Rio Giardinieri claimed his coronavirus was cured overnight by an anti-malaria drug touted by President Trump and by Fox News, and he has no complaints.  “Man, I'm alive and kickin’,” Giardinieri told Yahoo News over the phone Wednesday.  The story of Giardinieri’s remarkable recovery, which was first reported Monday by a local Fox affiliate in Los Angeles, quickly became the subject of national news — and speculation — after it was picked up by the New York Post and tweeted by President Trump, who hailed the news as a “great early result” from the drug which has yet to be approved as a treatment for coronavirus.  Clinical trials of hydroxychloroquine — a drug used to treat malaria and some autoimmune conditions such as lupus — in combination with the antibiotic azithromycin were set to begin in New York on Tuesday, but Trump had been touting the unproven drug combination as a “game changer” for coronavirus since last week.

    It’s been less than a week since  Rio Giardinieri claimed his coronavirus was cured overnight by an anti-malaria drug touted by President Trump and by Fox News, and he has no complaints. “Man, I'm alive and kickin’,” Giardinieri told Yahoo News over the phone Wednesday. The story of Giardinieri’s remarkable recovery, which was first reported Monday by a local Fox affiliate in Los Angeles, quickly became the subject of national news — and speculation — after it was picked up by the New York Post and tweeted by President Trump, who hailed the news as a “great early result” from the drug which has yet to be approved as a treatment for coronavirus. Clinical trials of hydroxychloroquine — a drug used to treat malaria and some autoimmune conditions such as lupus — in combination with the antibiotic azithromycin were set to begin in New York on Tuesday, but Trump had been touting the unproven drug combination as a “game changer” for coronavirus since last week.


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  • 73/81   Coronavirus: News and live updates
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    The latest news and information on the pandemic from Yahoo News reporters in the United States and around the world.

    The latest news and information on the pandemic from Yahoo News reporters in the United States and around the world.


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  • 74/81   Liberty University students split over decision to reopen school
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Liberty University president Jerry Falwell Jr.’s decision to reopen the school this week was met with wide-ranging reactions. While many critics feel Falwell is endangering the lives of students and faculty, others think it was the right decision.

    Liberty University president Jerry Falwell Jr.’s decision to reopen the school this week was met with wide-ranging reactions. While many critics feel Falwell is endangering the lives of students and faculty, others think it was the right decision.


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  • 75/81   False or just misleading? Trump claims U.S. has tested 'far more' for coronavirus than any other country.
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    President Trump’s boast about the U.S. testing more people for the coronavirus than any other country is  likely untrue, and certainly misleading.

    President Trump’s boast about the U.S. testing more people for the coronavirus than any other country is likely untrue, and certainly misleading.


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  • 76/81   Should the airlines get a bailout?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    The major U.S. airlines have asked for upwards of $50 billion from Congress to save their industry amid the coronavirus pandemic. Should taxpayer money be used to rescue them?

    The major U.S. airlines have asked for upwards of $50 billion from Congress to save their industry amid the coronavirus pandemic. Should taxpayer money be used to rescue them?


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  • 77/81   While coronavirus reigns, Trump can't jump-start the economy by himself
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    The White House is pushing to return things back to normal by Easter, but there is only so much the federal government can do amid the pandemic if local leaders maintain shutdowns.

    The White House is pushing to return things back to normal by Easter, but there is only so much the federal government can do amid the pandemic if local leaders maintain shutdowns.


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  • 78/81   Coronavirus: Yahoo answers your questions
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    TUNE IN LIVE: Yahoo medical contributor Dr. Kavita Patel will answer readers’ questions about the coronavirus here on Thursday, March 26, at 5 p.m. ET.

    TUNE IN LIVE: Yahoo medical contributor Dr. Kavita Patel will answer readers’ questions about the coronavirus here on Thursday, March 26, at 5 p.m. ET.


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  • 79/81   Doctors and nurses on their risks, fears — and hard decisions — in coronavirus pandemic
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    While the general public is being strongly advised to stay indoors, doctors, nurses and other health care providers can’t work from home. They are facing a new reality of their own, as hospitals and clinics prepare for an imminent influx of coronavirus patients.

    While the general public is being strongly advised to stay indoors, doctors, nurses and other health care providers can’t work from home. They are facing a new reality of their own, as hospitals and clinics prepare for an imminent influx of coronavirus patients.


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  • 80/81   Should prisoners be freed to stop outbreaks behind bars?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Health experts are concerned about the possibility of devastating coronavirus outbreaks inside America's jails and prisons. Are drastic steps needed to prevent the virus from wreaking havoc behind bars?

    Health experts are concerned about the possibility of devastating coronavirus outbreaks inside America's jails and prisons. Are drastic steps needed to prevent the virus from wreaking havoc behind bars?


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  • 81/81   Coronavirus strikes Navy carrier at sea, three sailors evacuated
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Three sailors aboard the carrier Theodore Roosevelt tested positive for coronavirus after coming down with symptoms of COVID-19 and have been evacuated from the ship.

    Three sailors aboard the carrier Theodore Roosevelt tested positive for coronavirus after coming down with symptoms of COVID-19 and have been evacuated from the ship.


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