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News Slideshows (05/21/2020 15 hours)


  • 1/71   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


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    Press Review


    Lana   WE LOVE YOU LIAM   Another 2.4   NAS Corpus Christi   Carly Rae Jepsen   Happy Friday Eve   Parallel Universe   TWICE WORLD DOMINATION   The End of Meat Is Here   Terrance Howard   AstraZeneca   Pepsi Cola   Fox News Host Asks   Azealia   Pat Dye   lockdown delays cost   txt best boys   summer love   Alexander Pope   Deliberative Senate   Tokyo Olympics   
  • 2/71   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


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  • 3/71   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


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  • 4/71   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


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  • 5/71   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


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  • 6/71   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


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  • 7/71   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


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  • 8/71   Do star athletes make too much money?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    With athletes in America's biggest sports leagues raking in salaries worth $300 million and more, is it time to reign in the big spending or do superstars deserve the big bucks they make?

    With athletes in America's biggest sports leagues raking in salaries worth $300 million and more, is it time to reign in the big spending or do superstars deserve the big bucks they make?


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  • 9/71   Live animal mascots: Cute or exploitative?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?


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  • 10/71   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


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  • 11/71   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


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  • 12/71   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


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  • 13/71   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


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  • 14/71   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


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  • 15/71   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


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  • 16/71   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


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  • 17/71   PHOTOS: Fluorescent turtle embryo wins forty-fifth annual Nikon Small World Competition

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.


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  • 18/71   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


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  • 19/71   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


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  • 20/71   What the CIA thinks of your anti-virus program

    PARIS (AP) — Peppering the 8,000 pages of purported Central Intelligence Agency hacking data released Tuesday by WikiLeaks are reviews of some of the world's most popular anti-virus products.

    PARIS (AP) — Peppering the 8,000 pages of purported Central Intelligence Agency hacking data released Tuesday by WikiLeaks are reviews of some of the world's most popular anti-virus products.


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  • 21/71   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


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  • 22/71   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


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  • 23/71   BNY Mellon Announces Redemption of Floating Rate Senior Bank Notes Due 2021
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The Bank of New York Mellon Corporation ("BNY Mellon") today announced that The Bank of New York Mellon, its wholly-owned subsidiary, will redeem all of the issued and outstanding Floating Rate Senior Bank Notes due June 4, 2021 (CUSIP 06405LAB7) (the "Notes"). The Notes have an aggregate principal amount of $1,250,000,000.

    The Bank of New York Mellon Corporation ("BNY Mellon") today announced that The Bank of New York Mellon, its wholly-owned subsidiary, will redeem all of the issued and outstanding Floating Rate Senior Bank Notes due June 4, 2021 (CUSIP 06405LAB7) (the "Notes"). The Notes have an aggregate principal amount of $1,250,000,000.


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  • 24/71   Black College Expo Joins The Los Angeles Urban League To Celebrate Black High School Graduates Around The Country
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Black College Expo™ and the Los Angeles Urban League are joining forces to present "2020 Black High School Graduation: Rites of Passage," a positive and uplifting cultural celebration for high school graduates, on Friday, June 5, 2020 at 3 pm Pacific Standard Time (PST). Hundreds of thousands of high school students from around the country will have a commencement ceremony unlike any other in recent memory. Visit laul.org/2020blackgrad to register for the live virtual graduation.

    Black College Expo™ and the Los Angeles Urban League are joining forces to present "2020 Black High School Graduation: Rites of Passage," a positive and uplifting cultural celebration for high school graduates, on Friday, June 5, 2020 at 3 pm Pacific Standard Time (PST). Hundreds of thousands of high school students from around the country will have a commencement ceremony unlike any other in recent memory. Visit laul.org/2020blackgrad to register for the live virtual graduation.


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  • 25/71   Oil Gains for a Sixth Session After American Stockpiles Shrink
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Oil was headed for its longest run of daily gains since February 2019 after a drop in U.S. crude stockpiles added to signs that the market is starting to balance.West Texas Intermediate futures rose for a sixth day in New York to above $34 a barrel. American inventories fell for a second week, with a record draw from the storage hub at Cushing, Oklahoma, according to U.S. Energy Information Administration data. European manufacturing data was better than expected, signaling a potential pick-up in demand.With traders now more sanguine about the chance of storage space running out, the so-called cash roll for WTI in June/July traded at 30 cents on Wednesday, above zero for the first time since December, data compiled by Bloomberg showed. The biggest commodity index, run by S&P Dow Jones, will also return to its normal schedule of futures contracts rolls as stress eases.Oil’s rally so far this month has been accompanied by a sharp jump in prices for physical cargoes. While that highlights the market’s strength, it threatens to hurt profits for refiners and also risks bringing some shuttered crude supplies back online.“It’s difficult to justify this strength, particularly when you see how weak refinery margins still are,” said Warren Patterson, head of commodities strategy at ING Bank NV.Although the large decline in stockpiles at Cushing, the delivery point for WTI futures, indicates the supply glut is starting to ease, a surprise increase in U.S. gasoline inventories reflected underlying weakness in the world’s largest economy.In Japan, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said it may be possible to lift the state of emergency in Tokyo as early as Monday if current trends of new virus infections continue.Meanwhile, India’s state-owned fuel retailers said oil demand in the world’s third-biggest consuming country may not get near a full recovery until the end of 2020.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Oil was headed for its longest run of daily gains since February 2019 after a drop in U.S. crude stockpiles added to signs that the market is starting to balance.West Texas Intermediate futures rose for a sixth day in New York to above $34 a barrel. American inventories fell for a second week, with a record draw from the storage hub at Cushing, Oklahoma, according to U.S. Energy Information Administration data. European manufacturing data was better than expected, signaling a potential pick-up in demand.With traders now more sanguine about the chance of storage space running out, the so-called cash roll for WTI in June/July traded at 30 cents on Wednesday, above zero for the first time since December, data compiled by Bloomberg showed. The biggest commodity index, run by S&P Dow Jones, will also return to its normal schedule of futures contracts rolls as stress eases.Oil’s rally so far this month has been accompanied by a sharp jump in prices for physical cargoes. While that highlights the market’s strength, it threatens to hurt profits for refiners and also risks bringing some shuttered crude supplies back online.“It’s difficult to justify this strength, particularly when you see how weak refinery margins still are,” said Warren Patterson, head of commodities strategy at ING Bank NV.Although the large decline in stockpiles at Cushing, the delivery point for WTI futures, indicates the supply glut is starting to ease, a surprise increase in U.S. gasoline inventories reflected underlying weakness in the world’s largest economy.In Japan, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said it may be possible to lift the state of emergency in Tokyo as early as Monday if current trends of new virus infections continue.Meanwhile, India’s state-owned fuel retailers said oil demand in the world’s third-biggest consuming country may not get near a full recovery until the end of 2020.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 26/71   How Does Lithia Motors's (NYSE:LAD) P/E Compare To Its Industry, After Its Big Share Price Gain?
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Lithia Motors (NYSE:LAD) shareholders are no doubt pleased to see that the share price has bounced 32% in the last...

    Lithia Motors (NYSE:LAD) shareholders are no doubt pleased to see that the share price has bounced 32% in the last...


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  • 27/71   Small Business Expo and 'Small Business University Online' Proudly Announces 'AT&T Business' as Presenting Sponsor for Largest Virtual SBE Conference Ever Produced
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Small Business Expo (SBE) and affiliate educator Small Business University Online (SBU) recently revealed that AT&T; Business is the Presenting Sponsor for both the Small Business University Online and the first-ever National Virtual Small Business Expo. SBU is a multi-functional education platform that offers members a variety of small business materials and links to weekly live webinars, discussions and interviews with global industry small business experts. The Virtual Small Business Expo is an exciting new innovative virtual conference that will be hosted nationally on June 10-11, 10am to 7pm EST both days. The Virtual SBE is a one-of-a-kind cutting-edge event that offers networking and educational opportunities, webinars, talks, vendors keynote speakers and other activities useful to small businesses, entrepreneurs & start-ups. To register for free for this first-ever Virtual SBE, you may register HERE. For those planning an SBE exhibit, you may go HERE.

    Small Business Expo (SBE) and affiliate educator Small Business University Online (SBU) recently revealed that AT&T; Business is the Presenting Sponsor for both the Small Business University Online and the first-ever National Virtual Small Business Expo. SBU is a multi-functional education platform that offers members a variety of small business materials and links to weekly live webinars, discussions and interviews with global industry small business experts. The Virtual Small Business Expo is an exciting new innovative virtual conference that will be hosted nationally on June 10-11, 10am to 7pm EST both days. The Virtual SBE is a one-of-a-kind cutting-edge event that offers networking and educational opportunities, webinars, talks, vendors keynote speakers and other activities useful to small businesses, entrepreneurs & start-ups. To register for free for this first-ever Virtual SBE, you may register HERE. For those planning an SBE exhibit, you may go HERE.


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  • 28/71   Digicel Announces Final Results of Tender Offers; Receives Tenders for 99.46% of 6.00% Notes Due 2021; Terminates Tender Offer for 6.75% Notes Due 2023
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    As part of its deleveraging process Digicel Limited ("DL" and, together with its subsidiaries, "Digicel") reports that it has secured 99.46% support to exchange its nearest bond maturity, the US$1.3 billion aggregate principal amount of 6.00% Notes due 2021 (the "Existing 2021 Notes") for new notes with an aggregate principal amount of approximately US$1.2 billion, while extending the maturity on the new notes ranging from 2024 to 2026 as outlined in more detail below. Digicel has terminated the tender offer for the 6.75% Notes due 2023 (the "Existing 2023 Notes").

    As part of its deleveraging process Digicel Limited ("DL" and, together with its subsidiaries, "Digicel") reports that it has secured 99.46% support to exchange its nearest bond maturity, the US$1.3 billion aggregate principal amount of 6.00% Notes due 2021 (the "Existing 2021 Notes") for new notes with an aggregate principal amount of approximately US$1.2 billion, while extending the maturity on the new notes ranging from 2024 to 2026 as outlined in more detail below. Digicel has terminated the tender offer for the 6.75% Notes due 2023 (the "Existing 2023 Notes").


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  • 29/71   COVID Color Therapy: Vibrant Gem Masks Evoke Happiness
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Tashka by Beatrice, a color-intense accessories online retailer, is selling out of COVID gem-themed facial masks as quickly as she creates them.

    Tashka by Beatrice, a color-intense accessories online retailer, is selling out of COVID gem-themed facial masks as quickly as she creates them.


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  • 30/71   Global Medical Devices Pipeline Assessment for Endoscopic Instruments 2020, Featuring Agile EndoSurgery Inc, AridoEndo and TransEnterix Inc
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The "Endoscopic Instruments - Medical Devices Pipeline Assessment, 2020" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.

    The "Endoscopic Instruments - Medical Devices Pipeline Assessment, 2020" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.


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  • 31/71   Trusted Media Brands' Taste of Home, Family Handyman Have Biggest Month Ever in April 2020
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Trusted Media Brands' Taste of Home and Family Handyman had their biggest month ever in April 2020, with record-setting performances.

    Trusted Media Brands' Taste of Home and Family Handyman had their biggest month ever in April 2020, with record-setting performances.


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  • 32/71   Conagra Brands Continues Deleveraging Process
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Conagra Brands, Inc. (NYSE: CAG) today announced continued progress against its deleveraging efforts and steps to further enhance its balance sheet strength and financial flexibility. Conagra will pre-pay, effective May 29, 2020, the remaining $275 million outstanding under its senior floating rate notes due October 22, 2020. Conagra has also obtained a $600 million senior three-year unsecured term loan which can be drawn, in full or in part, through October 2020 with opening pricing of LIBOR plus 150 basis points. While Conagra has not yet drawn on the facility, this facility provides Conagra with the liquidity to repay, along with cash on hand, the Company's debt maturities in fiscal 2021. Farm Credit Services of America and Farm Credit Bank of Texas served as Co-Lead Arrangers for the financing with Farm Credit Services of America serving as the Administrative Agent.

    Conagra Brands, Inc. (NYSE: CAG) today announced continued progress against its deleveraging efforts and steps to further enhance its balance sheet strength and financial flexibility. Conagra will pre-pay, effective May 29, 2020, the remaining $275 million outstanding under its senior floating rate notes due October 22, 2020. Conagra has also obtained a $600 million senior three-year unsecured term loan which can be drawn, in full or in part, through October 2020 with opening pricing of LIBOR plus 150 basis points. While Conagra has not yet drawn on the facility, this facility provides Conagra with the liquidity to repay, along with cash on hand, the Company's debt maturities in fiscal 2021. Farm Credit Services of America and Farm Credit Bank of Texas served as Co-Lead Arrangers for the financing with Farm Credit Services of America serving as the Administrative Agent.


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  • 33/71   U.S. Stock Futures Pare Drop After Jobless Data: Markets Wrap
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- U.S. equity futures trimmed a decline on Thursday as weekly unemployment data in the world’s largest economy matched expectations and amid simmering tension between America and China. Treasuries edged higher and the dollar fluctuated.Contracts on the three main U.S. equity gauges pared some of their losses after figures revealed another 2.44 million Americans claiming jobless benefits, in line with expectations for about 2.4 million new applicants. Futures are on the back foot after the Senate overwhelmingly passed a bill that could bar some Chinese companies from listing on U.S. exchanges. President Donald Trump stoked tensions by tweeting criticism of Xi Jinping’s leadership, days before the biggest Chinese political gathering of the year.Most Asian shares dipped along with the yuan in offshore trading. The Stoxx Europe 600 Index fell, with nearly all 19 sector groups in the red. Deutsche Lufthansa AG shares bucked the trend after the carrier said it was close to a multibillion-euro bailout deal from the German government.Concern over the stress between the U.S. and China and global coronavirus cases reaching 5 million are vying for investor attention with optimism over reopening economies and progress on thwarting the pandemic. AstraZeneca Plc received more than $1 billion in American funding to develop a Covid-19 vaccine. Meanwhile, the U.S. legislation could lead to Chinese mega-companies such as Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. and Baidu Inc. being barred from exchanges. Both slipped in early trading.“Markets may be pricing in far too much complacency as the U.S.-China ‘phase one’ trade deal could be at risk,” said Stephen Innes, chief global market strategist at AxiCorp. “The pandemic and resulting acute economic downturn have made China’s trade commitment to the U.S. much more challenging to fulfill.”The fresh jobless data has once again underscored the economic hit from the virus. The latest jump in claimants takes the number of newly unemployed since the crisis began nine weeks ago to almost 40 million.Elsewhere, crude oil climbed for a sixth day after a drop in U.S. stockpiles.These are the moves across major assets:StocksFutures on the S&P 500 Index dipped 0.2% as of 8:39 a.m. New York time.The Stoxx Europe 600 Index fell 0.4%.The MSCI Asia Pacific Index declined 0.3%.The MSCI Emerging Market Index climbed 0.1%.CurrenciesThe Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index dipped 0.1%.The euro jumped 0.2% to $1.1007.The British pound was little changed at $1.2243.The onshore yuan weakened 0.2% to 7.105 per dollar.The Japanese yen weakened 0.1% to 107.66 per dollar.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries fell one basis point to 0.67%.The yield on two-year Treasuries climbed less than one basis point to 0.17%.Germany’s 10-year yield fell one basis point to -0.48%.Britain’s 10-year yield dipped three basis points to 0.196%.Japan’s 10-year yield dipped one basis point to 0.001%.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude gained 3.3% to $34.60 a barrel.Brent crude increased 3% to $36.83 a barrel.Gold weakened 0.5% to $1,739.50 an ounce.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- U.S. equity futures trimmed a decline on Thursday as weekly unemployment data in the world’s largest economy matched expectations and amid simmering tension between America and China. Treasuries edged higher and the dollar fluctuated.Contracts on the three main U.S. equity gauges pared some of their losses after figures revealed another 2.44 million Americans claiming jobless benefits, in line with expectations for about 2.4 million new applicants. Futures are on the back foot after the Senate overwhelmingly passed a bill that could bar some Chinese companies from listing on U.S. exchanges. President Donald Trump stoked tensions by tweeting criticism of Xi Jinping’s leadership, days before the biggest Chinese political gathering of the year.Most Asian shares dipped along with the yuan in offshore trading. The Stoxx Europe 600 Index fell, with nearly all 19 sector groups in the red. Deutsche Lufthansa AG shares bucked the trend after the carrier said it was close to a multibillion-euro bailout deal from the German government.Concern over the stress between the U.S. and China and global coronavirus cases reaching 5 million are vying for investor attention with optimism over reopening economies and progress on thwarting the pandemic. AstraZeneca Plc received more than $1 billion in American funding to develop a Covid-19 vaccine. Meanwhile, the U.S. legislation could lead to Chinese mega-companies such as Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. and Baidu Inc. being barred from exchanges. Both slipped in early trading.“Markets may be pricing in far too much complacency as the U.S.-China ‘phase one’ trade deal could be at risk,” said Stephen Innes, chief global market strategist at AxiCorp. “The pandemic and resulting acute economic downturn have made China’s trade commitment to the U.S. much more challenging to fulfill.”The fresh jobless data has once again underscored the economic hit from the virus. The latest jump in claimants takes the number of newly unemployed since the crisis began nine weeks ago to almost 40 million.Elsewhere, crude oil climbed for a sixth day after a drop in U.S. stockpiles.These are the moves across major assets:StocksFutures on the S&P 500 Index dipped 0.2% as of 8:39 a.m. New York time.The Stoxx Europe 600 Index fell 0.4%.The MSCI Asia Pacific Index declined 0.3%.The MSCI Emerging Market Index climbed 0.1%.CurrenciesThe Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index dipped 0.1%.The euro jumped 0.2% to $1.1007.The British pound was little changed at $1.2243.The onshore yuan weakened 0.2% to 7.105 per dollar.The Japanese yen weakened 0.1% to 107.66 per dollar.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries fell one basis point to 0.67%.The yield on two-year Treasuries climbed less than one basis point to 0.17%.Germany’s 10-year yield fell one basis point to -0.48%.Britain’s 10-year yield dipped three basis points to 0.196%.Japan’s 10-year yield dipped one basis point to 0.001%.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude gained 3.3% to $34.60 a barrel.Brent crude increased 3% to $36.83 a barrel.Gold weakened 0.5% to $1,739.50 an ounce.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 34/71   Why Hurco Companies, Inc.’s (NASDAQ:HURC) Use Of Investor Capital Doesn’t Look Great
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today we are going to look at Hurco Companies, Inc. (NASDAQ:HURC) to see whether it might be an attractive investment...

    Today we are going to look at Hurco Companies, Inc. (NASDAQ:HURC) to see whether it might be an attractive investment...


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  • 35/71   Clarks to cut 900 office jobs in virus shake-up
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The 195-year-old firm said it had to make "some difficult decisions" to re-energise the business

    The 195-year-old firm said it had to make "some difficult decisions" to re-energise the business


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  • 36/71   New weekly figures show almost 40 million people lost their job since the pandemic
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The weekly figures come amid a slew of bankruptcies and as more companies announce layoffs.

    The weekly figures come amid a slew of bankruptcies and as more companies announce layoffs.


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  • 37/71   Oxford Vaccine Gets $1 Billion; Surge in Brazil: Virus Update
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Global coronavirus cases topped 5 million, doubling in the past month, and infections rose at a record pace in Brazil and Indonesia. AstraZeneca received $1.2 billion in U.S. funding to develop a vaccine, while CanSino Biologics signed a deal to test and sell a Canadian vaccine candidate.U.S. President Donald Trump suggested Chinese leader Xi Jinping was behind a “disinformation and propaganda attack,” and is set to tour Ford’s ventilator facility on Thursday. Cases stabilized in Russia, and the emergency in Tokyo may soon be lifted.More than two million Americans applied for unemployment benefits last week, indicating major job losses are continuing. The U.S. Transportation Security Administration has started making changes to airport screening, and EasyJet plans to resume flights from some European airports in June.Key Developments:Virus Tracker: Cases reached 5 million; deaths exceed 328,000Why a new cluster in China is triggering alarms: QuickTakeTrump’s push to reopen repels some GOP supportersWHO is caught in a dangerous place between Trump and ChinaTrump gambles on a resurrection, with lives and livelihoodsTune in to a TOPLive Q&A with leading health experts on Thursday, starting at 2 p.m. London, 9 a.m. New York. Subscribe to a daily update on the virus from Bloomberg’s Prognosis team here. Click VRUS on the terminal for news and data on the coronavirus. See this week’s top stories from QuickTake here.Another 2.4 Million Americans Filed for Unemployment (8:33 a.m. NY)More than 2 million Americans applied for unemployment benefits last week, signaling major job losses are continuing two months after the coronavirus pandemic started shuttering businesses. Initial jobless claims for regular state programs totaled 2.44 million in the week ended May 16, Labor Department figures showed Thursday.Since efforts to the contain Covid-19 pandemic rapidly shut down the U.S. economy in mid-March, about 38.6 million initial unemployment insurance claims have been filed. That two-month total is roughly equivalent to all of the initial claims filed during the Great Recession.Tesla Offers Anxious Plant Workers Unpaid Leave (8:18 a.m. NY)Tesla Inc. will give workers at its U.S. car and battery plants the ability to take unpaid leave through the end of the month if they’re wary of returning to work, according to an internal memo. Employees who are concerned they might expose an at-risk member of their household can sign and submit a document to take leave until May 31, Valerie Capers Workman, Tesla’s head of North American human resources, wrote in the memo viewed by Bloomberg News.Scotland to Start Easing Lockdown Next Week (8:14 a.m. NY)Scotland plans to start easing restrictions next week, allowing more free movement outdoors in line with similar efforts across other parts of the U.K. to emerge from lockdown. First Minister Nicola Sturgeon told the Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh on Thursday that people will be able to meet those from another household outside, while activities such as golf and tennis can resume. Businesses such as garden centers and more food takeouts can open to customers while the construction and forestry industries will restart.Natixis Losses on Equity Derivatives Soar (7:10 a.m. NY)Natixis SA, the French investment bank that embraced complex trades as a key money maker, has lost about 250 million euros ($274 million) so far this year on equity derivatives. About 150 million euros of the losses have occurred since April, according to people familiar with the matter. The results are partly driven by corporations slashing their dividends because of the coronavirus.Turkey Cuts Rates Again (7:02 a.m. NY)Turkey’s central bank delivered a ninth straight interest-rate cut after measures to prop up the lira drove out foreign investors, helping the currency recover from an all-time low. By escalating their defense of the lira, authorities have opened the way for lower borrowing costs, a linchpin of the government’s strategy to keep cheap credit flowing to consumers and businesses as it tries to mitigate the economic fallout from the coronavirus outbreak.Texas Sees Power Demand Rebound (7 a.m. NY)Texas has started seeing a slight increase in power use this week in one of the first signs that electricity demand is bouncing back in the U.S. as lockdowns ease. While power use in the Lone Star state is still depressed, the state’s main grid operator noticed a slight improvement in electricity use during early morning hours, according to a report.TSA Makes Changes to Airport Security Screening (6:47 a.m. NY)Ahead of the Memorial Day holiday weekend in the U.S., the Transportation Security Administration has started making changes to airport screening. “In the interest of TSA frontline workers and traveler health, TSA is committed to making prudent changes to our screening processes to limit physical contact and increase physical distance as much as possible,” TSA Administrator David Pekoske said.The agency said it had seen a steady growth of travelers coming through airport checkpoints over the past couple of weeks.U.K. Home Sales Crater (6:09 a.m. NY)U.K. home sales collapsed last month as the government effectively shut down the market to help slow the coronavirus outbreak. The number of residential property deals plunged by 53.4% compared with April last year, according to provisional data published by the U.K. tax authority on Thursday. About 46,440 home sales were recorded.Insurance giant Aviva Plc expects residential property prices to drop 12% and commercial real estate to decline by 15% because of the impact of the pandemic, it said in an earnings update on Thursday. The company sees long-term growth for house prices after they trough. The insurer also said it expects to pay out around 160 million pounds in coronavirus-related claims.Philippine Apologizes for ‘Second Wave’ Confusion (5:52 p.m. HK)The Philippines’ Health Department corrected a statement made by its top official that the country is already experiencing its second wave of coronavirus infections, apologizing for the confusion it caused.The Southeast Asian nation is still in the first wave, driven by the local community transmission of the virus, Health Director Beverly Ho said in a virtual briefing. Secretary Francisco Duque told lawmakers on Wednesday that the first wave already occurred in January when three Chinese tourists tested positive for the virus.Tokyo Emergency May Be Lifted Soon (5:22 p.m. HK)Japan could lift the state of emergency in Tokyo and surrounding prefectures as soon as Monday, if current trends continue, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said. The measure was lifted Thursday for Osaka and the two adjoining prefectures of Kyoto and Hyogo after the move was endorsed by a government panel of health experts earlier in the day. The emergency declaration will stay in effect for Tokyo and surrounding prefectures, as well as for the northern island of Hokkaido, for the time being, he said.Italian PM Urges Banks to Speed Up Loans (5:18 p.m. HK)Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte ramped up the pressure on Italy’s banking sector, urging lenders to speed up delivery of state-backed loans to businesses paralyzed by a nationwide lockdown to counter the coronavirus.“The banking system is making a contribution, but it can and must do more to accelerate procedures to deliver state-backed loans,” Conte said in a speech to the lower house of parliament. “The liquidity decree allows for guaranteed loans to be delivered in 24 hours, especially for requests under 25,000 euros ($27,400).”Conte’s government and banks have been blaming each other for delays in guaranteeing liquidity to companies, as more than two months of containment measures weigh on the economy. The European Commission forecasts Italy’s output will shrink 9.5% this year, while Bloomberg Economics expects a 13% contraction.Indonesia Cases Top 20,000 After Record Surge (4:56 p.m. HK)Indonesia recorded a record surge in new coronavirus cases, adding 973 infections to take the total in the country to 20,162. The increase was driven by 502 infections reported in East Java. Earlier this week, President Joko Widodo ruled out an immediate easing of social distancing rules and ordered officials to strictly enforce a ban on travel during the busy holiday season to prevent a spike in new coronavirus cases.The spike in infections in recent weeks may delay plans to reopen Southeast Asia’s largest economy as early as next month as an overwhelmed healthcare system fails to ramp up testing of those with even explicit Covid-19 symptoms. With reports of a large number of people traveling to their hometowns to celebrate the Muslim festival of Eid al-Fitr later this month in defiance of the ban on such travel, known as mudik, fears have increased of a fresh wave of infections.China Vaccine Maker Agrees to Canada Deal (4:37 p.m. HK)Leading Chinese vaccine developer CanSino Biologics Inc.. has agreed to a deal to test and sell a separate Canadian vaccine candidate. In addition to developing its own vaccine with the Chinese military, CanSino will partner with Vancouver-based Precision NanoSystems Inc. to co-develop another potential vaccine.The company will conduct testing of Precision’s experimental vaccine and has the right to commercialize it in Asia excluding Japan. Widely viewed as one of the front-runners in the race for successful vaccine, the deal adds to CanSino’s chances of being among the first to deliver.CanSino’s own vaccine is currently in the second of three phases of human testing and is among five Chinese candidates to have reached that advanced stage -- more than the U.S. and Europe combined. The stock surged in Hong Kong on Thursday morning before abruptly reversing gains in the afternoon.Euro-Area Economy Reaches Trough (4 p.m. HK)The euro-area economy started to claw its way out of its deepest downturn ever as the relaxing of coronavirus lockdowns allows thousands of businesses to reopen. The big question is how long it stumbles along at the bottom before a meaningful recovery starts to take shape. While a report from IHS Markit on Thursday offered some hope, it also suggested that improvement will be slow.“Demand is likely to remain extremely weak for a prolonged period, putting further pressure on companies to make more aggressive job cuts as government retention schemes expire,” said Chris Williamson, chief business economist at IHS Markit. Growth could slump by almost 9% in 2020, and a full recovery could “take several years,” he said.Cases Stabilize in Russia (3:40 p.m. HK)The number of confirmed new infections rose by 8,849 over the past day in Russia, to 317,554. The country reported 127 more fatalities, taking the total to 3,099.Infections in the country have nearly tripled from the end of April, but new cases have since started to level off. Thursday’s 2.9% increase in cases is in line with Wednesday, and below the five-day average.Human Development Set for First Decline Since 1990 (3:30 p.m. HK)Global human development -- a measure that combines education, health and living standards -- will decline for the first time in at least three decades, the United Nations Development Programme warned.Global income per person is expected to fall 4% this year, and, when adjusted for those who don’t have Internet access, the percentage of primary school-age children who are getting an education is at the lowest level since the 1980s. The death toll from the virus has exceeded 300,000 so far.“The world has seen many crises over the past 30 years,” UNDP Administrator Achim Steiner said in a statement. “Each has hit human development hard but, overall, development gains accrued globally year-on-year. Covid-19 –- with its triple hit to health, education and income -- may change this trend.”Lufthansa Nears Rescue (3:23 p.m. HK)Deutsche Lufthansa AG said it’s close to a multibillion euro bailout deal that would see the state become its biggest shareholder after the coronavirus punctured a decades-long boom in air travel. Lufthansa shares gained as much as 5.8% Thursday after Europe’s largest carrier confirmed it’s in advanced talks with Germany’s WSF Economic Stabilization Fund for aid of as much as 9 billion euros ($9.9 billion).The package would include a 3 billion-euro loan, a so-called silent participation and the WSF obtaining a 20% stake through a capital issuance, Lufthansa said.EasyJet Plans to Restart Flights (3:20 p.m. HK)EasyJet Plc will resume flights from 22 European airports on June 15, becoming one of the first airlines in the region to begin building up services as coronavirus lockdowns ease. Britain’s biggest discount carrier will start with mainly internal flights in the U.K. and France before announcing more routes in coming weeks as travel restrictions are lifted and demand picks up.Passengers, cabin crew and ground staff will be required to wear face masks, in line with guidance this week by the European Aviation Safety Agency and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. No food will be served on the first flights and customers will be asked to sit apart from others not in their party, though only where spare seats are available.German Infection Rate Under Key Threshold (2:44 p.m. HK)Germany’s new coronavirus cases dropped below 1,000 and the number of new fatalities remained under 100, as the country’s infection rate stayed below the key threshold of 1.0. There were 695 new cases in the 24 hours through Thursday morning, bringing the total to 178,473, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. That’s down from 1,227 on Wednesday.AstraZeneca Gets $1 Billion From U.S. to Make Vaccine (2:18 p.m. HK)AstraZeneca Plc received more than $1 billion in U.S. government funding to develop a Covid-19 vaccine from the University of Oxford, and said it has supply agreements for 400 million doses. The investment accelerates a race to secure vaccine supplies, seen as a key step toward getting global economies moving again after a lockdown-induced slump.Drugmakers around the world are looking for manufacturing capacity to ramp up output. The Oxford vaccine is one of the world’s fastest-moving, and AstraZeneca has said it expects to have doses ready as soon as September. BARDA has also provided funding for French pharmaceutical giant Sanofi, including $30 million for its Covid vaccine and a $226 million award in December to increase production capacity for its pandemic influenza vaccine.Coronavirus Cases Reach 5 Million (2 p.m. HK)It’s the latest milestone for the worst pandemic in a century that has upended every aspect of modern life and hammered the global economy. The number of infections worldwide has doubled over the past month. The U.S. accounts for almost a third of the cases, five times the number seen by Russia, the No. 2 country on the list. Brazil, one of the latest hot spots, has the third largest number of cases.Milestones in the pandemic have become commonplace and only amount to an approximate guidepost. Health experts widely believe the actual count is higher than the official numbers, as Covid-19 has proved difficult to detect and track. The official death toll is at more than 328,000, with the U.S. fatalities exceeding 93,000.Thai Panel to Propose Extending Emergency (12:17 p.m. HK)Thailand’s National Security Council will propose an extension of a state of emergency through June 30, the panel’s Secretary-General Somsak Rungsita told reporters. The NSC will propose the extension at the Covid-19 meeting chaired by Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-Ocha on Friday.Diamond Princess’s Cases Reveal Pattern of Disease (12:03 p.m. HK)Months after the coronavirus infected more than 700 people on board the Diamond Princess cruise ship in Japan, scientists are still gleaning insights into the patterns of illness it causes.Women Job Losses Could Shave $1 Trillion Off GDP (8:47 a.m. HK)Of 44 million workers in vulnerable sectors, about 31 million female workers face potential job cuts compared to 13 million men, underscoring that women globally are more vulnerable to losing their jobs during the crisis, according to Citigroup Inc. The assessment excludes China, with the figure likely to be higher if the world’s second-largest economy was included.Virus-Ravaged USS Theodore Roosevelt Returns to Sea (8:38 a.m. HK)The USS Theodore Roosevelt “left Naval Base Guam and entered the Philippine Sea May 21 to conduct carrier qualification flights for the embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 11,” the U.S. 7th Fleet Commander said in a statement. The ship moored in Guam after crew members tested positive for Covid-19.China Reports 2 New Cases, Including 1 in Shanghai (8:33 a.m. HK)One local coronavirus infection is reported in Shanghai and one imported case is in Guangdong province, National Health Commission said in a statement. 31 asymptomatic cases are reported; three of them are from overseas.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Global coronavirus cases topped 5 million, doubling in the past month, and infections rose at a record pace in Brazil and Indonesia. AstraZeneca received $1.2 billion in U.S. funding to develop a vaccine, while CanSino Biologics signed a deal to test and sell a Canadian vaccine candidate.U.S. President Donald Trump suggested Chinese leader Xi Jinping was behind a “disinformation and propaganda attack,” and is set to tour Ford’s ventilator facility on Thursday. Cases stabilized in Russia, and the emergency in Tokyo may soon be lifted.More than two million Americans applied for unemployment benefits last week, indicating major job losses are continuing. The U.S. Transportation Security Administration has started making changes to airport screening, and EasyJet plans to resume flights from some European airports in June.Key Developments:Virus Tracker: Cases reached 5 million; deaths exceed 328,000Why a new cluster in China is triggering alarms: QuickTakeTrump’s push to reopen repels some GOP supportersWHO is caught in a dangerous place between Trump and ChinaTrump gambles on a resurrection, with lives and livelihoodsTune in to a TOPLive Q&A with leading health experts on Thursday, starting at 2 p.m. London, 9 a.m. New York. Subscribe to a daily update on the virus from Bloomberg’s Prognosis team here. Click VRUS on the terminal for news and data on the coronavirus. See this week’s top stories from QuickTake here.Another 2.4 Million Americans Filed for Unemployment (8:33 a.m. NY)More than 2 million Americans applied for unemployment benefits last week, signaling major job losses are continuing two months after the coronavirus pandemic started shuttering businesses. Initial jobless claims for regular state programs totaled 2.44 million in the week ended May 16, Labor Department figures showed Thursday.Since efforts to the contain Covid-19 pandemic rapidly shut down the U.S. economy in mid-March, about 38.6 million initial unemployment insurance claims have been filed. That two-month total is roughly equivalent to all of the initial claims filed during the Great Recession.Tesla Offers Anxious Plant Workers Unpaid Leave (8:18 a.m. NY)Tesla Inc. will give workers at its U.S. car and battery plants the ability to take unpaid leave through the end of the month if they’re wary of returning to work, according to an internal memo. Employees who are concerned they might expose an at-risk member of their household can sign and submit a document to take leave until May 31, Valerie Capers Workman, Tesla’s head of North American human resources, wrote in the memo viewed by Bloomberg News.Scotland to Start Easing Lockdown Next Week (8:14 a.m. NY)Scotland plans to start easing restrictions next week, allowing more free movement outdoors in line with similar efforts across other parts of the U.K. to emerge from lockdown. First Minister Nicola Sturgeon told the Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh on Thursday that people will be able to meet those from another household outside, while activities such as golf and tennis can resume. Businesses such as garden centers and more food takeouts can open to customers while the construction and forestry industries will restart.Natixis Losses on Equity Derivatives Soar (7:10 a.m. NY)Natixis SA, the French investment bank that embraced complex trades as a key money maker, has lost about 250 million euros ($274 million) so far this year on equity derivatives. About 150 million euros of the losses have occurred since April, according to people familiar with the matter. The results are partly driven by corporations slashing their dividends because of the coronavirus.Turkey Cuts Rates Again (7:02 a.m. NY)Turkey’s central bank delivered a ninth straight interest-rate cut after measures to prop up the lira drove out foreign investors, helping the currency recover from an all-time low. By escalating their defense of the lira, authorities have opened the way for lower borrowing costs, a linchpin of the government’s strategy to keep cheap credit flowing to consumers and businesses as it tries to mitigate the economic fallout from the coronavirus outbreak.Texas Sees Power Demand Rebound (7 a.m. NY)Texas has started seeing a slight increase in power use this week in one of the first signs that electricity demand is bouncing back in the U.S. as lockdowns ease. While power use in the Lone Star state is still depressed, the state’s main grid operator noticed a slight improvement in electricity use during early morning hours, according to a report.TSA Makes Changes to Airport Security Screening (6:47 a.m. NY)Ahead of the Memorial Day holiday weekend in the U.S., the Transportation Security Administration has started making changes to airport screening. “In the interest of TSA frontline workers and traveler health, TSA is committed to making prudent changes to our screening processes to limit physical contact and increase physical distance as much as possible,” TSA Administrator David Pekoske said.The agency said it had seen a steady growth of travelers coming through airport checkpoints over the past couple of weeks.U.K. Home Sales Crater (6:09 a.m. NY)U.K. home sales collapsed last month as the government effectively shut down the market to help slow the coronavirus outbreak. The number of residential property deals plunged by 53.4% compared with April last year, according to provisional data published by the U.K. tax authority on Thursday. About 46,440 home sales were recorded.Insurance giant Aviva Plc expects residential property prices to drop 12% and commercial real estate to decline by 15% because of the impact of the pandemic, it said in an earnings update on Thursday. The company sees long-term growth for house prices after they trough. The insurer also said it expects to pay out around 160 million pounds in coronavirus-related claims.Philippine Apologizes for ‘Second Wave’ Confusion (5:52 p.m. HK)The Philippines’ Health Department corrected a statement made by its top official that the country is already experiencing its second wave of coronavirus infections, apologizing for the confusion it caused.The Southeast Asian nation is still in the first wave, driven by the local community transmission of the virus, Health Director Beverly Ho said in a virtual briefing. Secretary Francisco Duque told lawmakers on Wednesday that the first wave already occurred in January when three Chinese tourists tested positive for the virus.Tokyo Emergency May Be Lifted Soon (5:22 p.m. HK)Japan could lift the state of emergency in Tokyo and surrounding prefectures as soon as Monday, if current trends continue, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said. The measure was lifted Thursday for Osaka and the two adjoining prefectures of Kyoto and Hyogo after the move was endorsed by a government panel of health experts earlier in the day. The emergency declaration will stay in effect for Tokyo and surrounding prefectures, as well as for the northern island of Hokkaido, for the time being, he said.Italian PM Urges Banks to Speed Up Loans (5:18 p.m. HK)Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte ramped up the pressure on Italy’s banking sector, urging lenders to speed up delivery of state-backed loans to businesses paralyzed by a nationwide lockdown to counter the coronavirus.“The banking system is making a contribution, but it can and must do more to accelerate procedures to deliver state-backed loans,” Conte said in a speech to the lower house of parliament. “The liquidity decree allows for guaranteed loans to be delivered in 24 hours, especially for requests under 25,000 euros ($27,400).”Conte’s government and banks have been blaming each other for delays in guaranteeing liquidity to companies, as more than two months of containment measures weigh on the economy. The European Commission forecasts Italy’s output will shrink 9.5% this year, while Bloomberg Economics expects a 13% contraction.Indonesia Cases Top 20,000 After Record Surge (4:56 p.m. HK)Indonesia recorded a record surge in new coronavirus cases, adding 973 infections to take the total in the country to 20,162. The increase was driven by 502 infections reported in East Java. Earlier this week, President Joko Widodo ruled out an immediate easing of social distancing rules and ordered officials to strictly enforce a ban on travel during the busy holiday season to prevent a spike in new coronavirus cases.The spike in infections in recent weeks may delay plans to reopen Southeast Asia’s largest economy as early as next month as an overwhelmed healthcare system fails to ramp up testing of those with even explicit Covid-19 symptoms. With reports of a large number of people traveling to their hometowns to celebrate the Muslim festival of Eid al-Fitr later this month in defiance of the ban on such travel, known as mudik, fears have increased of a fresh wave of infections.China Vaccine Maker Agrees to Canada Deal (4:37 p.m. HK)Leading Chinese vaccine developer CanSino Biologics Inc.. has agreed to a deal to test and sell a separate Canadian vaccine candidate. In addition to developing its own vaccine with the Chinese military, CanSino will partner with Vancouver-based Precision NanoSystems Inc. to co-develop another potential vaccine.The company will conduct testing of Precision’s experimental vaccine and has the right to commercialize it in Asia excluding Japan. Widely viewed as one of the front-runners in the race for successful vaccine, the deal adds to CanSino’s chances of being among the first to deliver.CanSino’s own vaccine is currently in the second of three phases of human testing and is among five Chinese candidates to have reached that advanced stage -- more than the U.S. and Europe combined. The stock surged in Hong Kong on Thursday morning before abruptly reversing gains in the afternoon.Euro-Area Economy Reaches Trough (4 p.m. HK)The euro-area economy started to claw its way out of its deepest downturn ever as the relaxing of coronavirus lockdowns allows thousands of businesses to reopen. The big question is how long it stumbles along at the bottom before a meaningful recovery starts to take shape. While a report from IHS Markit on Thursday offered some hope, it also suggested that improvement will be slow.“Demand is likely to remain extremely weak for a prolonged period, putting further pressure on companies to make more aggressive job cuts as government retention schemes expire,” said Chris Williamson, chief business economist at IHS Markit. Growth could slump by almost 9% in 2020, and a full recovery could “take several years,” he said.Cases Stabilize in Russia (3:40 p.m. HK)The number of confirmed new infections rose by 8,849 over the past day in Russia, to 317,554. The country reported 127 more fatalities, taking the total to 3,099.Infections in the country have nearly tripled from the end of April, but new cases have since started to level off. Thursday’s 2.9% increase in cases is in line with Wednesday, and below the five-day average.Human Development Set for First Decline Since 1990 (3:30 p.m. HK)Global human development -- a measure that combines education, health and living standards -- will decline for the first time in at least three decades, the United Nations Development Programme warned.Global income per person is expected to fall 4% this year, and, when adjusted for those who don’t have Internet access, the percentage of primary school-age children who are getting an education is at the lowest level since the 1980s. The death toll from the virus has exceeded 300,000 so far.“The world has seen many crises over the past 30 years,” UNDP Administrator Achim Steiner said in a statement. “Each has hit human development hard but, overall, development gains accrued globally year-on-year. Covid-19 –- with its triple hit to health, education and income -- may change this trend.”Lufthansa Nears Rescue (3:23 p.m. HK)Deutsche Lufthansa AG said it’s close to a multibillion euro bailout deal that would see the state become its biggest shareholder after the coronavirus punctured a decades-long boom in air travel. Lufthansa shares gained as much as 5.8% Thursday after Europe’s largest carrier confirmed it’s in advanced talks with Germany’s WSF Economic Stabilization Fund for aid of as much as 9 billion euros ($9.9 billion).The package would include a 3 billion-euro loan, a so-called silent participation and the WSF obtaining a 20% stake through a capital issuance, Lufthansa said.EasyJet Plans to Restart Flights (3:20 p.m. HK)EasyJet Plc will resume flights from 22 European airports on June 15, becoming one of the first airlines in the region to begin building up services as coronavirus lockdowns ease. Britain’s biggest discount carrier will start with mainly internal flights in the U.K. and France before announcing more routes in coming weeks as travel restrictions are lifted and demand picks up.Passengers, cabin crew and ground staff will be required to wear face masks, in line with guidance this week by the European Aviation Safety Agency and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. No food will be served on the first flights and customers will be asked to sit apart from others not in their party, though only where spare seats are available.German Infection Rate Under Key Threshold (2:44 p.m. HK)Germany’s new coronavirus cases dropped below 1,000 and the number of new fatalities remained under 100, as the country’s infection rate stayed below the key threshold of 1.0. There were 695 new cases in the 24 hours through Thursday morning, bringing the total to 178,473, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. That’s down from 1,227 on Wednesday.AstraZeneca Gets $1 Billion From U.S. to Make Vaccine (2:18 p.m. HK)AstraZeneca Plc received more than $1 billion in U.S. government funding to develop a Covid-19 vaccine from the University of Oxford, and said it has supply agreements for 400 million doses. The investment accelerates a race to secure vaccine supplies, seen as a key step toward getting global economies moving again after a lockdown-induced slump.Drugmakers around the world are looking for manufacturing capacity to ramp up output. The Oxford vaccine is one of the world’s fastest-moving, and AstraZeneca has said it expects to have doses ready as soon as September. BARDA has also provided funding for French pharmaceutical giant Sanofi, including $30 million for its Covid vaccine and a $226 million award in December to increase production capacity for its pandemic influenza vaccine.Coronavirus Cases Reach 5 Million (2 p.m. HK)It’s the latest milestone for the worst pandemic in a century that has upended every aspect of modern life and hammered the global economy. The number of infections worldwide has doubled over the past month. The U.S. accounts for almost a third of the cases, five times the number seen by Russia, the No. 2 country on the list. Brazil, one of the latest hot spots, has the third largest number of cases.Milestones in the pandemic have become commonplace and only amount to an approximate guidepost. Health experts widely believe the actual count is higher than the official numbers, as Covid-19 has proved difficult to detect and track. The official death toll is at more than 328,000, with the U.S. fatalities exceeding 93,000.Thai Panel to Propose Extending Emergency (12:17 p.m. HK)Thailand’s National Security Council will propose an extension of a state of emergency through June 30, the panel’s Secretary-General Somsak Rungsita told reporters. The NSC will propose the extension at the Covid-19 meeting chaired by Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-Ocha on Friday.Diamond Princess’s Cases Reveal Pattern of Disease (12:03 p.m. HK)Months after the coronavirus infected more than 700 people on board the Diamond Princess cruise ship in Japan, scientists are still gleaning insights into the patterns of illness it causes.Women Job Losses Could Shave $1 Trillion Off GDP (8:47 a.m. HK)Of 44 million workers in vulnerable sectors, about 31 million female workers face potential job cuts compared to 13 million men, underscoring that women globally are more vulnerable to losing their jobs during the crisis, according to Citigroup Inc. The assessment excludes China, with the figure likely to be higher if the world’s second-largest economy was included.Virus-Ravaged USS Theodore Roosevelt Returns to Sea (8:38 a.m. HK)The USS Theodore Roosevelt “left Naval Base Guam and entered the Philippine Sea May 21 to conduct carrier qualification flights for the embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 11,” the U.S. 7th Fleet Commander said in a statement. The ship moored in Guam after crew members tested positive for Covid-19.China Reports 2 New Cases, Including 1 in Shanghai (8:33 a.m. HK)One local coronavirus infection is reported in Shanghai and one imported case is in Guangdong province, National Health Commission said in a statement. 31 asymptomatic cases are reported; three of them are from overseas.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 38/71   Leading Women Named to HR Tech Outlook's List of Top 10 Leadership Development/Training Coaching Companies
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Leading Women, one of the world's premier global consulting firms for bringing Gender Balance to corporate leadership, has been recognized by HR Tech Outlook as a Top 10 Leadership Development Training/Coaching Company for 2020, and featured among an elite group of companies in the Leadership special edition of HR Tech Outlook magazine.

    Leading Women, one of the world's premier global consulting firms for bringing Gender Balance to corporate leadership, has been recognized by HR Tech Outlook as a Top 10 Leadership Development Training/Coaching Company for 2020, and featured among an elite group of companies in the Leadership special edition of HR Tech Outlook magazine.


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  • 39/71   Canna Hemp™'s Proprietary Blend of Terpenes Sets Them Apart in the CBD Industry
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Nevada-based brand Canna Hemp™ has been touted as a CBD company to watch in 2020, but what makes Canna Hemp™'s products so unique?

    Nevada-based brand Canna Hemp™ has been touted as a CBD company to watch in 2020, but what makes Canna Hemp™'s products so unique?


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  • 40/71   Some Heritage Commerce (NASDAQ:HTBK) Shareholders Are Down 47%
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    As an investor its worth striving to ensure your overall portfolio beats the market average. But in any portfolio...

    As an investor its worth striving to ensure your overall portfolio beats the market average. But in any portfolio...


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  • 41/71   Another 2.4 Million Americans Filed for Unemployment Last Week
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- More than 2 million Americans applied for unemployment benefits last week, indicating major job losses are continuing two months after the coronavirus pandemic started shuttering businesses.Initial jobless claims for regular state programs totaled 2.44 million in the week ended May 16, Labor Department figures showed Thursday. The prior week’s figure was revised down by 294,000 to 2.69 million after a clerical error by Connecticut labor officials inflated the overall nationwide figure. The median estimate in a Bloomberg survey of economists called for 2.4 million claims in the latest week.Since efforts to the contain Covid-19 pandemic rapidly shut down the U.S. economy in mid-March, about 38.6 million initial unemployment insurance claims have been filed. That two-month total is roughly equivalent to all of the initial claims filed during the Great Recession.Continuing claims -- the total number of Americans receiving unemployment benefits -- increased to a record 25.1 million in the week ended May 9. That sent the insured unemployment rate, or the number of people currently receiving unemployment insurance as a share of the total eligible labor market, to 17.2% for that period.Those series are reported with a one-week lag. Economists are monitoring continuing claims to gauge the breadth of the recovery in the labor market as states begin to reopen their economies.The collapse in the labor market has extended to the self-employed, the gig workers, the men and women driving for Uber and Lyft, who have also been out of work as a result of the crisis. Initial claims under the federal Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program -- which expands unemployment benefits to such individuals not typically eligible -- totaled 2.23 million last week.Continuing claims under the PUA program totaled 6.12 million as of May 2.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- More than 2 million Americans applied for unemployment benefits last week, indicating major job losses are continuing two months after the coronavirus pandemic started shuttering businesses.Initial jobless claims for regular state programs totaled 2.44 million in the week ended May 16, Labor Department figures showed Thursday. The prior week’s figure was revised down by 294,000 to 2.69 million after a clerical error by Connecticut labor officials inflated the overall nationwide figure. The median estimate in a Bloomberg survey of economists called for 2.4 million claims in the latest week.Since efforts to the contain Covid-19 pandemic rapidly shut down the U.S. economy in mid-March, about 38.6 million initial unemployment insurance claims have been filed. That two-month total is roughly equivalent to all of the initial claims filed during the Great Recession.Continuing claims -- the total number of Americans receiving unemployment benefits -- increased to a record 25.1 million in the week ended May 9. That sent the insured unemployment rate, or the number of people currently receiving unemployment insurance as a share of the total eligible labor market, to 17.2% for that period.Those series are reported with a one-week lag. Economists are monitoring continuing claims to gauge the breadth of the recovery in the labor market as states begin to reopen their economies.The collapse in the labor market has extended to the self-employed, the gig workers, the men and women driving for Uber and Lyft, who have also been out of work as a result of the crisis. Initial claims under the federal Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program -- which expands unemployment benefits to such individuals not typically eligible -- totaled 2.23 million last week.Continuing claims under the PUA program totaled 6.12 million as of May 2.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 42/71   Trump threatens to withhold aid to 2 states over expanded voting by mail
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    President Trump on Wednesday threatened to halt federal funding to Michigan and Nevada over the distribution of absentee ballots in those swing states amid the ongoing coronavirus outbreak that has left more than 90,000 Americans dead.

    President Trump on Wednesday threatened to halt federal funding to Michigan and Nevada over the distribution of absentee ballots in those swing states amid the ongoing coronavirus outbreak that has left more than 90,000 Americans dead.


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  • 43/71   Biden says U.S. doesn't have a food shortage problem, 'we have a leadership problem'
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Former Vice President Joe Biden on Tuesday said that America has “a leadership problem,” about food and nutrition in the face of the pandemic that has crippled the food distribution network.

    Former Vice President Joe Biden on Tuesday said that America has “a leadership problem,” about food and nutrition in the face of the pandemic that has crippled the food distribution network.


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  • 44/71   Sept. 11 convict now says he renounces terrorism, bin Laden
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The only man ever convicted in a U.S. court for a role in the Sept. 11 attacks now says he is renouncing terrorism, al-Qaida and the Islamic State.  Zacarias Moussaoui is serving a life sentence at a federal prison in Colorado after narrowly escaping the death penalty at his 2006 trial.  Instead, prosecutors pinned responsibility on Moussaoui because they said he could have prevented the attacks if he had not lied to the FBI about his knowledge of al-Qaida and its efforts to attack the U.S. when he was arrested in August 2001.

    The only man ever convicted in a U.S. court for a role in the Sept. 11 attacks now says he is renouncing terrorism, al-Qaida and the Islamic State. Zacarias Moussaoui is serving a life sentence at a federal prison in Colorado after narrowly escaping the death penalty at his 2006 trial. Instead, prosecutors pinned responsibility on Moussaoui because they said he could have prevented the attacks if he had not lied to the FBI about his knowledge of al-Qaida and its efforts to attack the U.S. when he was arrested in August 2001.


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  • 45/71   Amphan: Why Bay of Bengal is the world's hotbed of tropical cyclones
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Twenty-six of the 35 deadliest tropical cyclones recorded in history have occurred here.

    Twenty-six of the 35 deadliest tropical cyclones recorded in history have occurred here.


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  • 46/71   China says U.S.'s Pompeo 'blackmailing' Hong Kong government
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    China said on Thursday U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is 'blackmailing' the Hong Kong government with the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act and that Washington's recent actions amount to blatant interference on China's internal affairs.  Pompeo said on Wednesday the recent treatment of pro-democracy activists in Hong Kong makes it harder to assess whether the territory remains highly autonomous from China, a requirement for special treatments the city gets under American law.

    China said on Thursday U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is 'blackmailing' the Hong Kong government with the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act and that Washington's recent actions amount to blatant interference on China's internal affairs. Pompeo said on Wednesday the recent treatment of pro-democracy activists in Hong Kong makes it harder to assess whether the territory remains highly autonomous from China, a requirement for special treatments the city gets under American law.


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  • 47/71   Florida’s Coronavirus Dashboard Architect: I Was Fired for Not Manipulating Data
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A top Florida Department of Health data manager alleges she was forced to resign from her job maintaining the state’s COVID-19 portal because she refused to change data that would “drum up support for the plan to reopen” amid the pandemic. Rebekah Jones, the architect behind the Sunshine State’s interactive COVID-19 dashboard once praised by the White House, told several news outlets on Tuesday she was removed from her position as Graphic Information Systems manager on May 5 due to “reasons beyond my division’s control.” On Monday, the state’s Department of Health offered her a settlement with the option to resign instead of being fired, which would go into effect on May 26, she said.Jones, 30, told CBS12 News that her involuntary removal came one day after she refused to “manually change data to drum up support for the plan to reopen.” The scientist, however, did not elaborate on which data in particular she refused to alter. States Are Starting to Reopen Amid the Coronavirus Pandemic. Here Are Their Plans.To date, nearly 2,000 Floridians have died and 46,442 have been diagnosed with the coronavirus. Despite the ongoing public health issue, Gov. Ron Desantis announced last week his plan to open up Florida’s virus-stricken economy. The news of Jones’ ouster was first revealed in a May 5 farewell email she sent to researchers and members of the public who signed up to receive updates on the data portal. In the email, Jones said her department was no longer responsible for updating information on the site “in any shape or form.” “As a word of caution, I would not expect the new team to continue the same level of accessibility and transparency that I made central to the process during the first two months. After all, my commitment to both is largely (arguably entirely) the reason I am no longer managing it,” Jones wrote. “They are making a lot of changes. I would advise being diligent in your respective uses of this data.”The COVID-19 Data and Surveillance Dashboard provides daily updates on the numbers of deaths, new cases, and tests for every county in the state. Seen as one of the leading trackers in the state, the portal is heavily relied upon by officials, academics, and residents as Florida moves toward restarting the economy three months after issuing a stay-at-home order. According to internal emails obtained by the Tampa Bay Times, reporters contacted the department on May 4 about a field of data that showed when residents first began to report their virus symptoms or testing positive. The data, according to the emails, showed that Floridians were experiencing symptoms as early as Jan. 1—three months earlier than when the first COVID-19 case was confirmed in the state. ‘Hopefully, The Virus Is Dying in That Room’: A New York Nurse Bids Farewell to a Coronavirus ICUThat field of data vanished from the portal several hours later, the Times reported. Then, at around 5 p.m. on May 5, Department of Health I.T. Director Craig Curry messaged Jones asking her to “disable the ability to export data” from the interactive COVID-19 site. “Per Dr. Blackmore, disable the ability to export the data to files from the dashboard immediately,” Curry wrote, referring to Dr. Carina Blackmore, the director of the Division of Disease Control and Health Protection in Florida. “We need to ensure that dates (date fields) in all objects match their counterpart on the PDF line list published.”Minutes later, Jones responded saying “this is the wrong call” before complying with the request. About an hour later, at 6 p.m. on May 5, the I.T. director emailed both Jones and Blackmore asking them to “re-enable” the ability to export data “for now.” The Florida Department of Health did not immediately respond to The Daily Beast’s request for comment. “Allegations that Florida’s government may have tried to manipulate or alter data to make reopening appear safer is outrageous. These kinds of actions are dangerous and, frankly, should be criminal,” Terrie Rizzo, chair of the Florida Democratic Party, said in a Tuesday statement to The Daily Beast. “An independent investigation into these allegations is needed immediately. Meanwhile, city and state officials across Florida should closely monitor the situation to protect the public’s health.”Jones joined the Florida Department of Health in 2018 after obtaining her doctorate in geography from Florida State University in 2018. She told Florida Today she spent “sixteen hours a day for two months” creating the COVID-19 dashboard to ensure Floridians and researchers had a tool that would allow them to analyze the coronavirus situation in real time. FL Gov. Overrides County Officials to Allow Church During Coronavirus LockdownDespite the hard work, several researchers have slammed the portal for consistently excluding the racial and ethnic data breakdowns of COVID-19 cases and deaths from the dashboard—a seemingly growing nationwide problem throughout this pandemic. In April, Jones’ dashboard received national attention from Dr. Deborah Birx. In an interview with CBS’s Face the Nation, the White House coronavirus response coordinator raved about its accessibility and the importance of transparent information during a global pandemic. “If you go to the Florida Public Health website on COVID, they’ve been able to show their communities’ cases and tests district by district, county by county, ZIP code by ZIP code,” Birx said. “That’s the kind of knowledge and power we need to put into the hands of American people so that they can see where the virus is, where the cases are, and make decisions.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

    A top Florida Department of Health data manager alleges she was forced to resign from her job maintaining the state’s COVID-19 portal because she refused to change data that would “drum up support for the plan to reopen” amid the pandemic. Rebekah Jones, the architect behind the Sunshine State’s interactive COVID-19 dashboard once praised by the White House, told several news outlets on Tuesday she was removed from her position as Graphic Information Systems manager on May 5 due to “reasons beyond my division’s control.” On Monday, the state’s Department of Health offered her a settlement with the option to resign instead of being fired, which would go into effect on May 26, she said.Jones, 30, told CBS12 News that her involuntary removal came one day after she refused to “manually change data to drum up support for the plan to reopen.” The scientist, however, did not elaborate on which data in particular she refused to alter. States Are Starting to Reopen Amid the Coronavirus Pandemic. Here Are Their Plans.To date, nearly 2,000 Floridians have died and 46,442 have been diagnosed with the coronavirus. Despite the ongoing public health issue, Gov. Ron Desantis announced last week his plan to open up Florida’s virus-stricken economy. The news of Jones’ ouster was first revealed in a May 5 farewell email she sent to researchers and members of the public who signed up to receive updates on the data portal. In the email, Jones said her department was no longer responsible for updating information on the site “in any shape or form.” “As a word of caution, I would not expect the new team to continue the same level of accessibility and transparency that I made central to the process during the first two months. After all, my commitment to both is largely (arguably entirely) the reason I am no longer managing it,” Jones wrote. “They are making a lot of changes. I would advise being diligent in your respective uses of this data.”The COVID-19 Data and Surveillance Dashboard provides daily updates on the numbers of deaths, new cases, and tests for every county in the state. Seen as one of the leading trackers in the state, the portal is heavily relied upon by officials, academics, and residents as Florida moves toward restarting the economy three months after issuing a stay-at-home order. According to internal emails obtained by the Tampa Bay Times, reporters contacted the department on May 4 about a field of data that showed when residents first began to report their virus symptoms or testing positive. The data, according to the emails, showed that Floridians were experiencing symptoms as early as Jan. 1—three months earlier than when the first COVID-19 case was confirmed in the state. ‘Hopefully, The Virus Is Dying in That Room’: A New York Nurse Bids Farewell to a Coronavirus ICUThat field of data vanished from the portal several hours later, the Times reported. Then, at around 5 p.m. on May 5, Department of Health I.T. Director Craig Curry messaged Jones asking her to “disable the ability to export data” from the interactive COVID-19 site. “Per Dr. Blackmore, disable the ability to export the data to files from the dashboard immediately,” Curry wrote, referring to Dr. Carina Blackmore, the director of the Division of Disease Control and Health Protection in Florida. “We need to ensure that dates (date fields) in all objects match their counterpart on the PDF line list published.”Minutes later, Jones responded saying “this is the wrong call” before complying with the request. About an hour later, at 6 p.m. on May 5, the I.T. director emailed both Jones and Blackmore asking them to “re-enable” the ability to export data “for now.” The Florida Department of Health did not immediately respond to The Daily Beast’s request for comment. “Allegations that Florida’s government may have tried to manipulate or alter data to make reopening appear safer is outrageous. These kinds of actions are dangerous and, frankly, should be criminal,” Terrie Rizzo, chair of the Florida Democratic Party, said in a Tuesday statement to The Daily Beast. “An independent investigation into these allegations is needed immediately. Meanwhile, city and state officials across Florida should closely monitor the situation to protect the public’s health.”Jones joined the Florida Department of Health in 2018 after obtaining her doctorate in geography from Florida State University in 2018. She told Florida Today she spent “sixteen hours a day for two months” creating the COVID-19 dashboard to ensure Floridians and researchers had a tool that would allow them to analyze the coronavirus situation in real time. FL Gov. Overrides County Officials to Allow Church During Coronavirus LockdownDespite the hard work, several researchers have slammed the portal for consistently excluding the racial and ethnic data breakdowns of COVID-19 cases and deaths from the dashboard—a seemingly growing nationwide problem throughout this pandemic. In April, Jones’ dashboard received national attention from Dr. Deborah Birx. In an interview with CBS’s Face the Nation, the White House coronavirus response coordinator raved about its accessibility and the importance of transparent information during a global pandemic. “If you go to the Florida Public Health website on COVID, they’ve been able to show their communities’ cases and tests district by district, county by county, ZIP code by ZIP code,” Birx said. “That’s the kind of knowledge and power we need to put into the hands of American people so that they can see where the virus is, where the cases are, and make decisions.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


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  • 48/71   Millions head to shelters as cyclone bears down on India and Bangladesh
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    While the region is no stranger to devastating storms, wind speeds have grown due to climate change and warming, experts say.

    While the region is no stranger to devastating storms, wind speeds have grown due to climate change and warming, experts say.


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  • 49/71   Saudi Ramadan TV dramas invite scrutiny of Israel ties
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Two Ramadan television dramas on a Saudi-controlled network have stirred controversy as they test public perceptions of quietly warming relations between the Gulf kingdom and Israel.  Arab states including Saudi Arabia have no official diplomatic ties with Israel, but both sides are pursuing what one think tank calls a 'tepid dance' to furtively build relations on the basis of shared animosity towards Iran.  Now, two taboo-busting series during the holy fasting month —- the peak television season —- have fuelled speculation that Riyadh is trying to openly normalise closer ties with the Jewish state.

    Two Ramadan television dramas on a Saudi-controlled network have stirred controversy as they test public perceptions of quietly warming relations between the Gulf kingdom and Israel. Arab states including Saudi Arabia have no official diplomatic ties with Israel, but both sides are pursuing what one think tank calls a 'tepid dance' to furtively build relations on the basis of shared animosity towards Iran. Now, two taboo-busting series during the holy fasting month —- the peak television season —- have fuelled speculation that Riyadh is trying to openly normalise closer ties with the Jewish state.


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  • 50/71   Andrew Cuomo is no hero. He's to blame for New York's coronavirus catastrophe
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    His record was terrible before coronavirus, but his abysmal handling of the crisis should get him thrown out of officeAndrew Cuomo may be the most popular politician in the country. His approval ratings have hit all-time highs thanks to his Covid-19 response. Some Democrats have discussed him as a possible replacement for Joe Biden, due to Biden’s perceived weakness as a nominee. And there have even been some unfortunate tributes to Cuomo’s alleged sex appeal.All of which is bizarre, because Cuomo should be one of the most loathed officials in America right now. ProPublica recently released a report outlining catastrophic missteps by Cuomo and the New York City mayor, Bill de Blasio, which probably resulted in many thousands of needless coronavirus cases. ProPublica offers some appalling numbers contrasting what happened in New York with the outbreak in California. By mid-May, New York City alone had almost 20,000 deaths, while in San Francisco there had been only 35, and New York state as a whole suffered 10 times as many deaths as California.Federal failures played a role, of course, but this tragedy was absolutely due, in part, to decisions by the governor. Cuomo initially “reacted to De Blasio’s idea for closing down New York City with derision”, saying it “was dangerous” and “served only to scare people”. He said the “seasonal flu was a graver worry”. A spokesperson for Cuomo “refused to say if the governor had ever read the state’s pandemic plan”. Later, Cuomo would blame the press, including the New York Times for failing to say “Be careful, there’s a virus in China that may be in the United States?” even though the Times wrote nearly 500 stories on the virus before the state acted. Experts told ProPublica that “had New York imposed its extreme social distancing measures a week or two earlier, the death toll might have been cut by half or more”.But delay was not the only screw-up. Elderly prisoners have died of coronavirus because New York has failed to act on their medical parole requests. As Business Insider documented:“Testing was slow. Nonprofit social-service agencies that serve the most vulnerable couldn’t get answers either. And medical experts like the former CDC director Tom Frieden said ‘so many deaths could have been prevented’ had New York issued its stay-at-home order just ‘days earlier’ than it did. On March 19, when New York’s schools had already been closed, Cuomo said ‘in many ways, the fear is more dangerous than the virus.’”The governor has failed to take responsibility for the obvious failures, consistently blaming others and at one point even saying “governors don’t do pandemics”. (Actually, some governors just don’t read their state’s pandemic plans.) But much of the press has ignored this, focusing instead on Cuomo’s aesthetic presentation: his poise during press conferences, his dramatic statements about “taking responsibility” (even when he obviously hasn’t), and his invisible good looks.> Cuomo’s record was shameful long before coronavirus beganThe mask mural is yet another publicity stunt mistaken by the press as a sign of leadership. On 29 April, Cuomo unveiled a wall of handmade cloth masks that had been sent to his office by concerned citizens all over America. He called it “a self-portrait of America. You know what that spells? It spells love.” Since the arrangement of masks doesn’t form words, the mural doesn’t actually spell anything, but it is a perfect symbol of Cuomo’s leadership failures. Handmade cloth face coverings are not as effective as N95 masks, of course, but if unsuitable for healthcare workers they would still have been perfectly appropriate to distribute to New Yorkers (some of whom have been brutally arrested for not wearing masks). But Cuomo, rather than putting the needs of New Yorkers first, chose to tack hundreds of cloth masks on a wall as a monument to himself.Cuomo’s record was shameful long before coronavirus began. He enabled the IDC (Independent Democratic Conference), a group of conservative Democratic state lawmakers, in allying with the Republican minority to block progressive legislation. (Cuomo denies any role in the IDC, but that stretches credulity.) Before the pandemic, he pushed through Medicaid cuts which shut down necessary hospital space in the name of “efficiency” despite the warnings of medical professionals. And on 3 April, as 3,000 New Yorkers already lay dead from the virus and hospitals like Elmhurst in Queens were overwhelmed with cases, Cuomo forced through further Medicaid cuts, slashing $400m from hospital budgets.As the state now staggers to its feet, Cuomo has partnered with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to “reimagine education” (which almost certainly means privatization), and with the ex-Google chief Eric Schmidt to – as Naomi Klein puts it – “permanently integrat[e] technology into every aspect of civic life”. All of this has happened without the democratic input of New Yorkers, who would likely prefer that the progressive legislators they elected could govern without interference, that their hospitals have enough money to function and that billionaires don’t infiltrate and control every element of civic life.There’s something disturbing about Cuomo being hailed as the hero of the pandemic when he should rightly be one of the villains. As Business Insider notes, he is now only able to attain praise for his actions because his earlier failures made those actions necessary. He’s lauded for addressing a problem that he himself partly caused. Of course, part of this is because Donald Trump has bungled the coronavirus response even more badly, so that Cuomo – by not being a complete buffoon – looks like a capable statesman by contrast. But this is the problem: for too long, Democrats have measured their politicians by “whether they are better than Republicans”. This sets the bar very low indeed, and means that Democrats end up settling for incompetent and amoral leaders who betray progressive values again and again.  * Lyta Gold is the managing editor and amusements editor of Current Affairs. Nathan Robinson is the editor of Current Affairs and a Guardian US columnist

    His record was terrible before coronavirus, but his abysmal handling of the crisis should get him thrown out of officeAndrew Cuomo may be the most popular politician in the country. His approval ratings have hit all-time highs thanks to his Covid-19 response. Some Democrats have discussed him as a possible replacement for Joe Biden, due to Biden’s perceived weakness as a nominee. And there have even been some unfortunate tributes to Cuomo’s alleged sex appeal.All of which is bizarre, because Cuomo should be one of the most loathed officials in America right now. ProPublica recently released a report outlining catastrophic missteps by Cuomo and the New York City mayor, Bill de Blasio, which probably resulted in many thousands of needless coronavirus cases. ProPublica offers some appalling numbers contrasting what happened in New York with the outbreak in California. By mid-May, New York City alone had almost 20,000 deaths, while in San Francisco there had been only 35, and New York state as a whole suffered 10 times as many deaths as California.Federal failures played a role, of course, but this tragedy was absolutely due, in part, to decisions by the governor. Cuomo initially “reacted to De Blasio’s idea for closing down New York City with derision”, saying it “was dangerous” and “served only to scare people”. He said the “seasonal flu was a graver worry”. A spokesperson for Cuomo “refused to say if the governor had ever read the state’s pandemic plan”. Later, Cuomo would blame the press, including the New York Times for failing to say “Be careful, there’s a virus in China that may be in the United States?” even though the Times wrote nearly 500 stories on the virus before the state acted. Experts told ProPublica that “had New York imposed its extreme social distancing measures a week or two earlier, the death toll might have been cut by half or more”.But delay was not the only screw-up. Elderly prisoners have died of coronavirus because New York has failed to act on their medical parole requests. As Business Insider documented:“Testing was slow. Nonprofit social-service agencies that serve the most vulnerable couldn’t get answers either. And medical experts like the former CDC director Tom Frieden said ‘so many deaths could have been prevented’ had New York issued its stay-at-home order just ‘days earlier’ than it did. On March 19, when New York’s schools had already been closed, Cuomo said ‘in many ways, the fear is more dangerous than the virus.’”The governor has failed to take responsibility for the obvious failures, consistently blaming others and at one point even saying “governors don’t do pandemics”. (Actually, some governors just don’t read their state’s pandemic plans.) But much of the press has ignored this, focusing instead on Cuomo’s aesthetic presentation: his poise during press conferences, his dramatic statements about “taking responsibility” (even when he obviously hasn’t), and his invisible good looks.> Cuomo’s record was shameful long before coronavirus beganThe mask mural is yet another publicity stunt mistaken by the press as a sign of leadership. On 29 April, Cuomo unveiled a wall of handmade cloth masks that had been sent to his office by concerned citizens all over America. He called it “a self-portrait of America. You know what that spells? It spells love.” Since the arrangement of masks doesn’t form words, the mural doesn’t actually spell anything, but it is a perfect symbol of Cuomo’s leadership failures. Handmade cloth face coverings are not as effective as N95 masks, of course, but if unsuitable for healthcare workers they would still have been perfectly appropriate to distribute to New Yorkers (some of whom have been brutally arrested for not wearing masks). But Cuomo, rather than putting the needs of New Yorkers first, chose to tack hundreds of cloth masks on a wall as a monument to himself.Cuomo’s record was shameful long before coronavirus began. He enabled the IDC (Independent Democratic Conference), a group of conservative Democratic state lawmakers, in allying with the Republican minority to block progressive legislation. (Cuomo denies any role in the IDC, but that stretches credulity.) Before the pandemic, he pushed through Medicaid cuts which shut down necessary hospital space in the name of “efficiency” despite the warnings of medical professionals. And on 3 April, as 3,000 New Yorkers already lay dead from the virus and hospitals like Elmhurst in Queens were overwhelmed with cases, Cuomo forced through further Medicaid cuts, slashing $400m from hospital budgets.As the state now staggers to its feet, Cuomo has partnered with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to “reimagine education” (which almost certainly means privatization), and with the ex-Google chief Eric Schmidt to – as Naomi Klein puts it – “permanently integrat[e] technology into every aspect of civic life”. All of this has happened without the democratic input of New Yorkers, who would likely prefer that the progressive legislators they elected could govern without interference, that their hospitals have enough money to function and that billionaires don’t infiltrate and control every element of civic life.There’s something disturbing about Cuomo being hailed as the hero of the pandemic when he should rightly be one of the villains. As Business Insider notes, he is now only able to attain praise for his actions because his earlier failures made those actions necessary. He’s lauded for addressing a problem that he himself partly caused. Of course, part of this is because Donald Trump has bungled the coronavirus response even more badly, so that Cuomo – by not being a complete buffoon – looks like a capable statesman by contrast. But this is the problem: for too long, Democrats have measured their politicians by “whether they are better than Republicans”. This sets the bar very low indeed, and means that Democrats end up settling for incompetent and amoral leaders who betray progressive values again and again. * Lyta Gold is the managing editor and amusements editor of Current Affairs. Nathan Robinson is the editor of Current Affairs and a Guardian US columnist


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  • 51/71   How a pair of Donald Trump tweets created an 'Obamagate' domino effect in the Senate
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    All it took was a couple of tweets for Donald Trump and top Senate Republicans to get on the same page for the president’s chief messaging strategy ahead of the 2020 presidential election.When Mr Trump fired off a pair of messages over the weekend urging Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham to shore up their resources to probe his “Obamagate” theory, it took less than 48 hours for the duo to answer the call.

    All it took was a couple of tweets for Donald Trump and top Senate Republicans to get on the same page for the president’s chief messaging strategy ahead of the 2020 presidential election.When Mr Trump fired off a pair of messages over the weekend urging Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham to shore up their resources to probe his “Obamagate” theory, it took less than 48 hours for the duo to answer the call.


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  • 52/71   Monkeys infected with COVID-19 develop immunity in studies, a positive sign for vaccines
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Two studies in monkeys published on Wednesday offer some of the first scientific evidence that surviving COVID-19 may result in immunity from reinfection, a positive sign that vaccines under development may succeed, U.S. researchers said on Wednesday.  Although scientists have assumed that antibodies produced in response to the new coronavirus virus are protective, there has been scant scientifically rigorous evidence to back that up.  In one of the new studies, researchers infected nine monkeys with COVID-19, the illness caused by the novel coronavirus.

    Two studies in monkeys published on Wednesday offer some of the first scientific evidence that surviving COVID-19 may result in immunity from reinfection, a positive sign that vaccines under development may succeed, U.S. researchers said on Wednesday. Although scientists have assumed that antibodies produced in response to the new coronavirus virus are protective, there has been scant scientifically rigorous evidence to back that up. In one of the new studies, researchers infected nine monkeys with COVID-19, the illness caused by the novel coronavirus.


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  • 53/71   Climate Change Is Making Hurricanes Stronger, Researchers Find
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Hurricanes have become stronger worldwide during the past four decades, an analysis of observational data shows, supporting what theory and computer models have long suggested: Climate change is making these storms more intense and destructive.The analysis, of satellite images dating to 1979, shows that warming has increased the likelihood of a hurricane developing into a major one of Category 3 or higher, with sustained winds greater than 110 mph, by about 8% a decade."The trend is there and it is real," said James P. Kossin, a researcher with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and lead author of the study, published Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. "There's this remarkable building of this body of evidence that we're making these storms more deleterious."Kerry Emanuel, a hurricane expert at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who was not involved in the study, said the findings were "much in line with what's expected.""When you see things going up all over the globe like that, the ducks are kind of in order," he said.But in the North Atlantic, where hurricane activity has increased in recent decades and storms have caused tens of billions of dollars of damage in the United States and the Caribbean, factors other than climate change may have played more of a role in the increase in intensity, Emanuel said.Physics suggests that as the world warms, hurricanes and other tropical cyclones should get stronger, because warmer water provides more of the energy that fuels these storms. And climate simulations have long showed an increase in stronger hurricanes as warming continues.But confirming that through observations has been problematic, because of the relatively small number of hurricanes every year and the difficulty of obtaining data on their wind speeds and other characteristics. Even in the United States, storms that do not potentially threaten populations are measured less than others."We're doing collectively a bad job of measuring tropical cyclones around the world," Emanuel said. "We've all believed we should see more intense hurricanes. But it's very very tricky to find it in the data."Kossin and his colleagues got around the limitations by using satellite images of storms worldwide and using computers to interpret them with a long-accepted pattern-matching algorithm, or set of instructions. They had done this before, in a study published in 2013, but that analysis only included imagery from 1982 to 2009 and the findings, while similar, were not statistically significant.In the new study the researchers extended the data set by 11 years, using imagery from 1979 to 2017."The first time through we found trends but they hadn't risen to the level of confidence that we would require," Kossin said. The findings of the new study are statistically significant."This is saying, OK now, the historical observations are also in agreement" with the theory and models, he added.The study looked at tropical storms worldwide because that provided a lot more data than looking at those in just one region. And every region has natural variability or other factors that can affect storm intensity and make it more difficult to tease out the effects of warming."When you look at the picture globally, it tends to wash away that regional variability," Kossin said. "The trend rises above the noise."The North Atlantic has seen increased hurricane activity in recent decades, by a measure that combines intensity with other characteristics like duration and frequency of storms. On Thursday, NOAA will issue its forecast of activity for this season, which officially runs from June 1 to Nov. 30. Forecasts by other organizations have suggested that this year may be an active one.But the North Atlantic is one region where climate change may be overshadowed by other factors, Emanuel said."We do see clear signals and strong trends in the North Atlantic," he said. "The problem is we can't uniquely attribute that to greenhouse gases."Some scientists say that long-term natural variability in sea surface temperatures, on a time scale of decades, has played the major role in affecting North Atlantic storm activity. Others say that mandated reductions in sulfur emissions from fossil-fuel burning over the past few decades may be more important, by affecting ocean temperatures through a series of atmospheric connections.Whatever the main factors are, the study suggests that climate change will play a long-term role in increasing the strength of storms in the North Atlantic and elsewhere, Kossin said. Planning for how to mitigate the effect of major storms must take this into account."From a short time scale, these trends are not going to change the risk landscape," Kossin said. But over the long term, he said, "the risk landscape could change, and in a bad way, not in a good way."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company

    Hurricanes have become stronger worldwide during the past four decades, an analysis of observational data shows, supporting what theory and computer models have long suggested: Climate change is making these storms more intense and destructive.The analysis, of satellite images dating to 1979, shows that warming has increased the likelihood of a hurricane developing into a major one of Category 3 or higher, with sustained winds greater than 110 mph, by about 8% a decade."The trend is there and it is real," said James P. Kossin, a researcher with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and lead author of the study, published Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. "There's this remarkable building of this body of evidence that we're making these storms more deleterious."Kerry Emanuel, a hurricane expert at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who was not involved in the study, said the findings were "much in line with what's expected.""When you see things going up all over the globe like that, the ducks are kind of in order," he said.But in the North Atlantic, where hurricane activity has increased in recent decades and storms have caused tens of billions of dollars of damage in the United States and the Caribbean, factors other than climate change may have played more of a role in the increase in intensity, Emanuel said.Physics suggests that as the world warms, hurricanes and other tropical cyclones should get stronger, because warmer water provides more of the energy that fuels these storms. And climate simulations have long showed an increase in stronger hurricanes as warming continues.But confirming that through observations has been problematic, because of the relatively small number of hurricanes every year and the difficulty of obtaining data on their wind speeds and other characteristics. Even in the United States, storms that do not potentially threaten populations are measured less than others."We're doing collectively a bad job of measuring tropical cyclones around the world," Emanuel said. "We've all believed we should see more intense hurricanes. But it's very very tricky to find it in the data."Kossin and his colleagues got around the limitations by using satellite images of storms worldwide and using computers to interpret them with a long-accepted pattern-matching algorithm, or set of instructions. They had done this before, in a study published in 2013, but that analysis only included imagery from 1982 to 2009 and the findings, while similar, were not statistically significant.In the new study the researchers extended the data set by 11 years, using imagery from 1979 to 2017."The first time through we found trends but they hadn't risen to the level of confidence that we would require," Kossin said. The findings of the new study are statistically significant."This is saying, OK now, the historical observations are also in agreement" with the theory and models, he added.The study looked at tropical storms worldwide because that provided a lot more data than looking at those in just one region. And every region has natural variability or other factors that can affect storm intensity and make it more difficult to tease out the effects of warming."When you look at the picture globally, it tends to wash away that regional variability," Kossin said. "The trend rises above the noise."The North Atlantic has seen increased hurricane activity in recent decades, by a measure that combines intensity with other characteristics like duration and frequency of storms. On Thursday, NOAA will issue its forecast of activity for this season, which officially runs from June 1 to Nov. 30. Forecasts by other organizations have suggested that this year may be an active one.But the North Atlantic is one region where climate change may be overshadowed by other factors, Emanuel said."We do see clear signals and strong trends in the North Atlantic," he said. "The problem is we can't uniquely attribute that to greenhouse gases."Some scientists say that long-term natural variability in sea surface temperatures, on a time scale of decades, has played the major role in affecting North Atlantic storm activity. Others say that mandated reductions in sulfur emissions from fossil-fuel burning over the past few decades may be more important, by affecting ocean temperatures through a series of atmospheric connections.Whatever the main factors are, the study suggests that climate change will play a long-term role in increasing the strength of storms in the North Atlantic and elsewhere, Kossin said. Planning for how to mitigate the effect of major storms must take this into account."From a short time scale, these trends are not going to change the risk landscape," Kossin said. But over the long term, he said, "the risk landscape could change, and in a bad way, not in a good way."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company


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  • 54/71   Antarctic algal blooms: 'Green snow' mapped from space
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    UK scientists create the first wide-area maps of microscopic algae growing in coastal Antarctica.

    UK scientists create the first wide-area maps of microscopic algae growing in coastal Antarctica.


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  • 55/71   To safely explore the solar system and beyond, spaceships need to go faster – nuclear-powered rockets may be the answer
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    With dreams of Mars on the minds of both NASA and Elon Musk, long-distance crewed missions through space are coming. But you might be surprised to learn that modern rockets don’t go all that much faster than the rockets of the past.There are a lot of reasons that a faster spaceship is a better one, and nuclear-powered rockets are a way to do this. They offer many benefits over traditional fuel-burning rockets or modern solar-powered electric rockets, but there have been only eight U.S. space launches carrying nuclear reactors in the last 40 years.However, last year the laws regulating nuclear space flights changed and work has already begun on this next generation of rockets.  Why the need for speed?The first step of a space journey involves the use of launch rockets to get a ship into orbit. These are the large fuel-burning engines people imagine when they think of rocket launches and are not likely to go away in the foreseeable future due to the constraints of gravity.It is once a ship reaches space that things get interesting. To escape Earth’s gravity and reach deep space destinations, ships need additional acceleration. This is where nuclear systems come into play. If astronauts want to explore anything farther than the Moon and perhaps Mars, they are going to need to be going very very fast. Space is massive, and everything is far away.There are two reasons faster rockets are better for long-distance space travel: safety and time.Astronauts on a trip to Mars would be exposed to very high levels of radiation which can cause serious long-term health problems such as cancer and sterility. Radiation shielding can help, but it is extremely heavy, and the longer the mission, the more shielding is needed. A better way to reduce radiation exposure is to simply get where you are going quicker.But human safety isn’t the only benefit. As space agencies probe farther out into space, it is important to get data from unmanned missions as soon as possible. It took Voyager-2 12 years just to reach Neptune, where it snapped some incredible photos as it flew by. If Voyager-2 had a faster propulsion system, astronomers could have had those photos and the information they contained years earlier. Speed is good. But why are nuclear systems faster? Systems of todayOnce a ship has escaped Earth’s gravity, there are three important aspects to consider when comparing any propulsion system:  * Thrust – how fast a system can accelerate a ship  * Mass efficiency – how much thrust a system can produce for a given amount of fuel  * Energy density – how much energy a given amount of fuel can produceToday, the most common propulsion systems in use are chemical propulsion – that is, regular fuel-burning rockets – and solar-powered electric propulsion systems.Chemical propulsion systems provide a lot of thrust, but chemical rockets aren’t particularly efficient, and rocket fuel isn’t that energy-dense. The Saturn V rocket that took astronauts to the Moon produced 35 million Newtons of force at liftoff and carried 950,000 gallons of fuel. While most of the fuel was used in getting the rocket into orbit, the limitations are apparent: It takes a lot of heavy fuel to get anywhere.Electric propulsion systems generate thrust using electricity produced from solar panels. The most common way to do this is to use an electrical field to accelerate ions, such as in the Hall thruster. These devices are commonly used to power satellites and can have more than five times higher mass efficiency than chemical systems. But they produce much less thrust – about three Newtons, or only enough to accelerate a car from 0-60 mph in about two and a half hours. The energy source – the Sun – is essentially infinite but becomes less useful the farther away from the Sun the ship gets.One of the reasons nuclear-powered rockets are promising is because they offer incredible energy density. The uranium fuel used in nuclear reactors has an energy density that is 4 million times higher than hydrazine, a typical chemical rocket propellant. It is much easier to get a small amount of uranium to space than hundreds of thousands of gallons of fuel.So what about thrust and mass efficiency? Two options for nuclearEngineers have designed two main types of nuclear systems for space travel. The first is called nuclear thermal propulsion. These systems are very powerful and moderately efficient. They use a small nuclear fission reactor – similar to those found in nuclear submarines – to heat a gas, such as hydrogen, and that gas is then accelerated through a rocket nozzle to provide thrust. Engineers from NASA estimate that a mission to Mars powered by nuclear thermal propulsion would be 20%-25% shorter than a trip on a chemical-powered rocket. Nuclear thermal propulsion systems are more than twice as efficient as chemical propulsion systems – meaning they generate twice as much thrust using the same amount of propellant mass – and can deliver 100,000 Newtons of thrust. That’s enough force to get a car from 0-60 mph in about a quarter of a second.The second nuclear-based rocket system is called nuclear electric propulsion. No nuclear electric systems have been built yet, but the idea is to use a high-power fission reactor to generate electricity that would then power an electrical propulsion system like a Hall thruster. This would be very efficient, about three times better than a nuclear thermal propulsion system. Since the nuclear reactor could create a lot of power, many individual electric thrusters could be operated simultaneously to generate a good amount of thrust. Nuclear electric systems would be the best choice for extremely long-range missions because they don’t require solar energy, have very high efficiency and can give relatively high thrust. But while nuclear electric rockets are extremely promising, there are still a lot of technical problems to solve before they are put into use.  Why aren’t there nuclear powered rockets yet?Nuclear thermal propulsion systems have been studied since the 1960s but have not yet flown in space. Regulations first imposed in the U.S. in the 1970s essentially required case-by-case examination and approval of any nuclear space project from multiple government agencies and explicit approval from the president. Along with a lack of funding for nuclear rocket system research, this environment prevented further improvement of nuclear reactors for use in space. That all changed when the Trump administration issued a presidential memorandum in August 2019. While upholding the need to keep nuclear launches as safe as possible, the new directive allows for nuclear missions with lower amounts of nuclear material to skip the multi-agency approval process. Only the sponsoring agency, like NASA, for example, needs to certify that the mission meets safety recommendations. Larger nuclear missions would go through the same process as before.Along with this revision of regulations, NASA received US$100 million in the 2019 budget to develop nuclear thermal propulsion. DARPA is also developing a space nuclear thermal propulsion system to enable national security operations beyond Earth orbit. After 60 years of stagnation, it’s possible a nuclear-powered rocket will be heading to space within a decade. This exciting achievement will usher in a new era of space exploration. People will go to Mars and science experiments will make new discoveries all across our solar system and beyond.[You’re too busy to read everything. We get it. That’s why we’ve got a weekly newsletter. Sign up for good Sunday reading. ]This article is republished from The Conversation, a nonprofit news site dedicated to sharing ideas from academic experts.Read more:    * Never mind SpaceX’s Falcon 9, where’s my Millennium Falcon?  * How SpaceX lowered costs and reduced barriers to spaceIain Boyd receives funding from the following sources, none of it is related to space propulsion: Office of Naval Research Lockheed-Martin Northrop-Grumman L3-Harris

    With dreams of Mars on the minds of both NASA and Elon Musk, long-distance crewed missions through space are coming. But you might be surprised to learn that modern rockets don’t go all that much faster than the rockets of the past.There are a lot of reasons that a faster spaceship is a better one, and nuclear-powered rockets are a way to do this. They offer many benefits over traditional fuel-burning rockets or modern solar-powered electric rockets, but there have been only eight U.S. space launches carrying nuclear reactors in the last 40 years.However, last year the laws regulating nuclear space flights changed and work has already begun on this next generation of rockets. Why the need for speed?The first step of a space journey involves the use of launch rockets to get a ship into orbit. These are the large fuel-burning engines people imagine when they think of rocket launches and are not likely to go away in the foreseeable future due to the constraints of gravity.It is once a ship reaches space that things get interesting. To escape Earth’s gravity and reach deep space destinations, ships need additional acceleration. This is where nuclear systems come into play. If astronauts want to explore anything farther than the Moon and perhaps Mars, they are going to need to be going very very fast. Space is massive, and everything is far away.There are two reasons faster rockets are better for long-distance space travel: safety and time.Astronauts on a trip to Mars would be exposed to very high levels of radiation which can cause serious long-term health problems such as cancer and sterility. Radiation shielding can help, but it is extremely heavy, and the longer the mission, the more shielding is needed. A better way to reduce radiation exposure is to simply get where you are going quicker.But human safety isn’t the only benefit. As space agencies probe farther out into space, it is important to get data from unmanned missions as soon as possible. It took Voyager-2 12 years just to reach Neptune, where it snapped some incredible photos as it flew by. If Voyager-2 had a faster propulsion system, astronomers could have had those photos and the information they contained years earlier. Speed is good. But why are nuclear systems faster? Systems of todayOnce a ship has escaped Earth’s gravity, there are three important aspects to consider when comparing any propulsion system: * Thrust – how fast a system can accelerate a ship * Mass efficiency – how much thrust a system can produce for a given amount of fuel * Energy density – how much energy a given amount of fuel can produceToday, the most common propulsion systems in use are chemical propulsion – that is, regular fuel-burning rockets – and solar-powered electric propulsion systems.Chemical propulsion systems provide a lot of thrust, but chemical rockets aren’t particularly efficient, and rocket fuel isn’t that energy-dense. The Saturn V rocket that took astronauts to the Moon produced 35 million Newtons of force at liftoff and carried 950,000 gallons of fuel. While most of the fuel was used in getting the rocket into orbit, the limitations are apparent: It takes a lot of heavy fuel to get anywhere.Electric propulsion systems generate thrust using electricity produced from solar panels. The most common way to do this is to use an electrical field to accelerate ions, such as in the Hall thruster. These devices are commonly used to power satellites and can have more than five times higher mass efficiency than chemical systems. But they produce much less thrust – about three Newtons, or only enough to accelerate a car from 0-60 mph in about two and a half hours. The energy source – the Sun – is essentially infinite but becomes less useful the farther away from the Sun the ship gets.One of the reasons nuclear-powered rockets are promising is because they offer incredible energy density. The uranium fuel used in nuclear reactors has an energy density that is 4 million times higher than hydrazine, a typical chemical rocket propellant. It is much easier to get a small amount of uranium to space than hundreds of thousands of gallons of fuel.So what about thrust and mass efficiency? Two options for nuclearEngineers have designed two main types of nuclear systems for space travel. The first is called nuclear thermal propulsion. These systems are very powerful and moderately efficient. They use a small nuclear fission reactor – similar to those found in nuclear submarines – to heat a gas, such as hydrogen, and that gas is then accelerated through a rocket nozzle to provide thrust. Engineers from NASA estimate that a mission to Mars powered by nuclear thermal propulsion would be 20%-25% shorter than a trip on a chemical-powered rocket. Nuclear thermal propulsion systems are more than twice as efficient as chemical propulsion systems – meaning they generate twice as much thrust using the same amount of propellant mass – and can deliver 100,000 Newtons of thrust. That’s enough force to get a car from 0-60 mph in about a quarter of a second.The second nuclear-based rocket system is called nuclear electric propulsion. No nuclear electric systems have been built yet, but the idea is to use a high-power fission reactor to generate electricity that would then power an electrical propulsion system like a Hall thruster. This would be very efficient, about three times better than a nuclear thermal propulsion system. Since the nuclear reactor could create a lot of power, many individual electric thrusters could be operated simultaneously to generate a good amount of thrust. Nuclear electric systems would be the best choice for extremely long-range missions because they don’t require solar energy, have very high efficiency and can give relatively high thrust. But while nuclear electric rockets are extremely promising, there are still a lot of technical problems to solve before they are put into use. Why aren’t there nuclear powered rockets yet?Nuclear thermal propulsion systems have been studied since the 1960s but have not yet flown in space. Regulations first imposed in the U.S. in the 1970s essentially required case-by-case examination and approval of any nuclear space project from multiple government agencies and explicit approval from the president. Along with a lack of funding for nuclear rocket system research, this environment prevented further improvement of nuclear reactors for use in space. That all changed when the Trump administration issued a presidential memorandum in August 2019. While upholding the need to keep nuclear launches as safe as possible, the new directive allows for nuclear missions with lower amounts of nuclear material to skip the multi-agency approval process. Only the sponsoring agency, like NASA, for example, needs to certify that the mission meets safety recommendations. Larger nuclear missions would go through the same process as before.Along with this revision of regulations, NASA received US$100 million in the 2019 budget to develop nuclear thermal propulsion. DARPA is also developing a space nuclear thermal propulsion system to enable national security operations beyond Earth orbit. After 60 years of stagnation, it’s possible a nuclear-powered rocket will be heading to space within a decade. This exciting achievement will usher in a new era of space exploration. People will go to Mars and science experiments will make new discoveries all across our solar system and beyond.[You’re too busy to read everything. We get it. That’s why we’ve got a weekly newsletter. Sign up for good Sunday reading. ]This article is republished from The Conversation, a nonprofit news site dedicated to sharing ideas from academic experts.Read more: * Never mind SpaceX’s Falcon 9, where’s my Millennium Falcon? * How SpaceX lowered costs and reduced barriers to spaceIain Boyd receives funding from the following sources, none of it is related to space propulsion: Office of Naval Research Lockheed-Martin Northrop-Grumman L3-Harris


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  • 56/71   Astronauts get to work ahead of historic flight
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Nasa's Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken are a week away from their flight to the space station.

    Nasa's Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken are a week away from their flight to the space station.


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  • 57/71   Astronauts arrive in Florida to set new NASA traditions for crewed spaceflight
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Two NASA astronauts landed at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida today to go through a set of pre-launch traditions that haven't been followed for nearly nine years — and create a few new traditions as well. When Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken walked out of a NASA Gulfstream jet and met the press, they began a routine that's due to climax next week with the first orbital launch from U.S. soil since the space shuttle fleet's retirement in 2011. SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket is due to loft their commercial Crew Dragon capsule to the International Space Station a week… Read More

    Two NASA astronauts landed at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida today to go through a set of pre-launch traditions that haven't been followed for nearly nine years — and create a few new traditions as well. When Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken walked out of a NASA Gulfstream jet and met the press, they began a routine that's due to climax next week with the first orbital launch from U.S. soil since the space shuttle fleet's retirement in 2011. SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket is due to loft their commercial Crew Dragon capsule to the International Space Station a week… Read More


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  • 58/71   Sir Richard Branson: Virgin Orbit hopes for rocket flight this weekend
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    UK businessman Sir Richard Branson is looking to Saturday to debut one of his new space systems.

    UK businessman Sir Richard Branson is looking to Saturday to debut one of his new space systems.


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  • 59/71   Amid Hydroxychloroquine Uproar, Real Studies of Drug Are Suffering
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    WASHINGTON -- President Donald Trump's enthusiastic embrace of a malaria drug that he now says he takes daily -- and the resulting uproar in the news media -- appears to be interfering with legitimate scientific research into whether the medicine might work to prevent coronavirus infection or treat the disease in its early stages.The drug, hydroxychloroquine, which is also widely used to treat lupus and other autoimmune diseases, has shown no real benefit for hospitalized coronavirus patients and may have contributed to some deaths, recent studies show. Some bioethicists are even calling for the Food and Drug Administration -- which has warned that the drug can cause heart problems -- to revoke an emergency waiver it granted in March to accept millions of doses of hydroxychloroquine into the national stockpile for use in hospitals.But specialists -- including Dr. Anthony Fauci, the government's top infectious disease expert -- say the jury is still out on whether the drug might help prevent infection or help patients avoid hospitalization. Trump's frequent pronouncements and misstatements -- he has praised the drug as a "game changer" and a "miracle" -- are only complicating matters, politicizing the drug and creating a frenzy in the news media that is impeding research."The virus is not Democrat or Republican, and hydroxychloroquine is not Democrat or Republican, and I'm just hopeful that people would allow us to finish our scientific work," said Dr. William O'Neill, an interventional cardiologist at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, who is studying hydroxychloroquine as a prophylactic in health care workers."The worst thing in the world that would happen," he added, "is that at the end of this epidemic, in late September, we don't have a cure or a preventive because we let politics interfere with the scientific process."On Tuesday, Trump added to the furor. Addressing reporters on Capitol Hill, he called the research on hospitalized patients "a Trump enemy statement." Later, at the White House, he said he decided to take hydroxychloroquine after his valet tested positive for COVID-19 -- and intended to do so for "a little while longer" because he viewed it as a "worthwhile line of defense" and was "very curious" about it."It's gotten a bad reputation only because I'm promoting it," the president added. "If anybody else were promoting it, they would say it's the best thing ever."Last week, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which Fauci leads, announced a 2,000-patient study to determine whether hydroxychloroquine, when combined with the antibiotic azithromycin, "can prevent hospitalization and death from COVID-19," joining more than 50 other clinical trials involving hydroxychloroquine that are continuing in the United States."Although there is anecdotal evidence that hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin may benefit people with COVID-19, we need solid data," Fauci said in making the announcement.Other researchers around the country said the controversy was depressing enrollment in their clinical trials."People who had already enrolled would say, 'Now I'm afraid, I want to disenroll,' " said Deneen Vojta, the executive vice president for research and development at UnitedHealth Group, the insurance giant, which is conducting a smaller study of hydroxychloroquine alone.In a draft letter to the Journal of the American Medical Association, obtained by The New York Times, members of a research consortium complained that "negative media coverage" of hydroxychloroquine -- in particular the studies showing it might have harmed hospitalized patients -- "directly correlated" with a drop in enrollment in trials run by institutions including the University of Minnesota, the University of Washington, Columbia University in New York and Henry Ford Hospital.Inside the White House, the president's trade adviser, Peter Navarro, who is an enthusiast for hydroxychloroquine and has worked with the Federal Emergency Management Agency to steer 19 million pills from the stockpile to 14 coronavirus hot zones around the country, said "hydroxy hysteria" in the news media -- not Trump -- was to blame."Has the media's war of hysteria on hydroxychloroquine killed people?" Navarro asked in an interview. "If the scientific evidence does indeed prove that the medicine has both prophylactic and therapeutic value, the answer is yes."While Navarro complained that "fake news and bad reporting" had resulted in a "dramatic drop in demand for hydroxy at hospitals," Dr. Mitchell Katz, president and chief executive of NYC Health and Hospitals, the nation's largest municipal health system, said hospitals and doctors became less interested in hydroxychloroquine after the FDA approved another medicine, remdesivir, for treatment of COVID-19.Scientists have worried about politics impeding their research since long before Trump took office. But perhaps no president in modern history has gone to the lengths that Trump has to promote a specific, unproven medicine -- and then announce he is taking it himself.Even Trump's favorite television network, Fox News Channel, has been critical. Its senior managing editor for health news, Dr. Manny Alvarez, called the president "highly irresponsible" for taking the drug.In doing so, Trump "may lead people to overestimate the potential that it would help them -- which is entirely unproven -- and to underestimate the risks, which are known," said Jesse L. Goodman, a professor of medicine at Georgetown University and former chief scientist at the FDA who is calling for the agency to revoke its waiver. "I think that right now this drug should be used really only in the context of clinical trials."But the president's promotion of the drug is making even that difficult.Dr. Adrian Hernandez, who directs the Clinical Research Institute at the Duke University School of Medicine and has enrolled 550 health care workers in a clinical trial to study whether hydroxychloroquine is effective as a prophylactic, said Trump's promotion of hydroxychloroquine "may have hurt public health."When Trump first began talking up hydroxychloroquine, Hernandez said, he faced questions about whether his study should be weighted toward giving the drug to more people than were receiving placebo.When he started, he said, two-thirds of more than 12,000 health care workers who have signed up for a coronavirus registry were willing to participate in his study. Now, only half are."When we have this playing out in the media instead of the scientific and clinical communities, people don't know what the right answer is, and so they will use what they hear the most through the media," Hernandez said. "So it's a pingpong match, in terms of, is it good one day? Is it bad one day?"Hernandez and others, including O'Neill, say that no study -- even those conducted in hospitalized patients -- has produced definitive results about hydroxychloroquine for the coronavirus, although several have suggested it could be harmful especially to patients with underlying heart conditions.An analysis of veterans treated with hydroxychloroquine found that 28% of them died, compared with 11% who had routine care. A small study in Brazil was halted after patients taking a high dose of chloroquine -- a predecessor to hydroxychloroquine that researchers consider less safe -- developed irregular heart rates that increased their risk of a potentially fatal heart arrhythmia.Dr. Christine Johnston, an associate professor of medicine at the University of Washington who is hoping to enroll 630 people in a trial examining the effectiveness of hydroxychloroquine in those recently infected, said many of her patients conflated the Brazil study with her drug. She, too, has seen a dip in enrollment."People put these things together in their minds, but they are actually very different," she said.On April 24, the FDA issued a warning about hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine, cautioning against their use "outside of the hospital setting or a clinical trial due to risk of heart rhythm problems." An FDA spokesman, Michael Felberbaum, said in a statement that the agency was continuing to evaluate all emergency use authorizations issued during the coronavirus crisis "to determine whether they continue to meet the statutory criteria for issuance."More recently, a large observational study of 1,446 patients at NewYork-Presbyterian-Columbia University Hospital in New York City, published this month in the New England Journal of Medicine, found no clear benefit or risk to hydroxychloroquine.The authors concluded that randomized controlled clinical trials -- studies in which half the patients are given placebo, half are given the drug, and neither the patients nor doctors know who is getting what -- are needed."Studying it is exactly the right thing to do," said Aaron S. Kesselheim, a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School who is among those calling for the FDA to revoke the waiver. "And heck, if it turns out there is some activity, then great."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company

    WASHINGTON -- President Donald Trump's enthusiastic embrace of a malaria drug that he now says he takes daily -- and the resulting uproar in the news media -- appears to be interfering with legitimate scientific research into whether the medicine might work to prevent coronavirus infection or treat the disease in its early stages.The drug, hydroxychloroquine, which is also widely used to treat lupus and other autoimmune diseases, has shown no real benefit for hospitalized coronavirus patients and may have contributed to some deaths, recent studies show. Some bioethicists are even calling for the Food and Drug Administration -- which has warned that the drug can cause heart problems -- to revoke an emergency waiver it granted in March to accept millions of doses of hydroxychloroquine into the national stockpile for use in hospitals.But specialists -- including Dr. Anthony Fauci, the government's top infectious disease expert -- say the jury is still out on whether the drug might help prevent infection or help patients avoid hospitalization. Trump's frequent pronouncements and misstatements -- he has praised the drug as a "game changer" and a "miracle" -- are only complicating matters, politicizing the drug and creating a frenzy in the news media that is impeding research."The virus is not Democrat or Republican, and hydroxychloroquine is not Democrat or Republican, and I'm just hopeful that people would allow us to finish our scientific work," said Dr. William O'Neill, an interventional cardiologist at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, who is studying hydroxychloroquine as a prophylactic in health care workers."The worst thing in the world that would happen," he added, "is that at the end of this epidemic, in late September, we don't have a cure or a preventive because we let politics interfere with the scientific process."On Tuesday, Trump added to the furor. Addressing reporters on Capitol Hill, he called the research on hospitalized patients "a Trump enemy statement." Later, at the White House, he said he decided to take hydroxychloroquine after his valet tested positive for COVID-19 -- and intended to do so for "a little while longer" because he viewed it as a "worthwhile line of defense" and was "very curious" about it."It's gotten a bad reputation only because I'm promoting it," the president added. "If anybody else were promoting it, they would say it's the best thing ever."Last week, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which Fauci leads, announced a 2,000-patient study to determine whether hydroxychloroquine, when combined with the antibiotic azithromycin, "can prevent hospitalization and death from COVID-19," joining more than 50 other clinical trials involving hydroxychloroquine that are continuing in the United States."Although there is anecdotal evidence that hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin may benefit people with COVID-19, we need solid data," Fauci said in making the announcement.Other researchers around the country said the controversy was depressing enrollment in their clinical trials."People who had already enrolled would say, 'Now I'm afraid, I want to disenroll,' " said Deneen Vojta, the executive vice president for research and development at UnitedHealth Group, the insurance giant, which is conducting a smaller study of hydroxychloroquine alone.In a draft letter to the Journal of the American Medical Association, obtained by The New York Times, members of a research consortium complained that "negative media coverage" of hydroxychloroquine -- in particular the studies showing it might have harmed hospitalized patients -- "directly correlated" with a drop in enrollment in trials run by institutions including the University of Minnesota, the University of Washington, Columbia University in New York and Henry Ford Hospital.Inside the White House, the president's trade adviser, Peter Navarro, who is an enthusiast for hydroxychloroquine and has worked with the Federal Emergency Management Agency to steer 19 million pills from the stockpile to 14 coronavirus hot zones around the country, said "hydroxy hysteria" in the news media -- not Trump -- was to blame."Has the media's war of hysteria on hydroxychloroquine killed people?" Navarro asked in an interview. "If the scientific evidence does indeed prove that the medicine has both prophylactic and therapeutic value, the answer is yes."While Navarro complained that "fake news and bad reporting" had resulted in a "dramatic drop in demand for hydroxy at hospitals," Dr. Mitchell Katz, president and chief executive of NYC Health and Hospitals, the nation's largest municipal health system, said hospitals and doctors became less interested in hydroxychloroquine after the FDA approved another medicine, remdesivir, for treatment of COVID-19.Scientists have worried about politics impeding their research since long before Trump took office. But perhaps no president in modern history has gone to the lengths that Trump has to promote a specific, unproven medicine -- and then announce he is taking it himself.Even Trump's favorite television network, Fox News Channel, has been critical. Its senior managing editor for health news, Dr. Manny Alvarez, called the president "highly irresponsible" for taking the drug.In doing so, Trump "may lead people to overestimate the potential that it would help them -- which is entirely unproven -- and to underestimate the risks, which are known," said Jesse L. Goodman, a professor of medicine at Georgetown University and former chief scientist at the FDA who is calling for the agency to revoke its waiver. "I think that right now this drug should be used really only in the context of clinical trials."But the president's promotion of the drug is making even that difficult.Dr. Adrian Hernandez, who directs the Clinical Research Institute at the Duke University School of Medicine and has enrolled 550 health care workers in a clinical trial to study whether hydroxychloroquine is effective as a prophylactic, said Trump's promotion of hydroxychloroquine "may have hurt public health."When Trump first began talking up hydroxychloroquine, Hernandez said, he faced questions about whether his study should be weighted toward giving the drug to more people than were receiving placebo.When he started, he said, two-thirds of more than 12,000 health care workers who have signed up for a coronavirus registry were willing to participate in his study. Now, only half are."When we have this playing out in the media instead of the scientific and clinical communities, people don't know what the right answer is, and so they will use what they hear the most through the media," Hernandez said. "So it's a pingpong match, in terms of, is it good one day? Is it bad one day?"Hernandez and others, including O'Neill, say that no study -- even those conducted in hospitalized patients -- has produced definitive results about hydroxychloroquine for the coronavirus, although several have suggested it could be harmful especially to patients with underlying heart conditions.An analysis of veterans treated with hydroxychloroquine found that 28% of them died, compared with 11% who had routine care. A small study in Brazil was halted after patients taking a high dose of chloroquine -- a predecessor to hydroxychloroquine that researchers consider less safe -- developed irregular heart rates that increased their risk of a potentially fatal heart arrhythmia.Dr. Christine Johnston, an associate professor of medicine at the University of Washington who is hoping to enroll 630 people in a trial examining the effectiveness of hydroxychloroquine in those recently infected, said many of her patients conflated the Brazil study with her drug. She, too, has seen a dip in enrollment."People put these things together in their minds, but they are actually very different," she said.On April 24, the FDA issued a warning about hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine, cautioning against their use "outside of the hospital setting or a clinical trial due to risk of heart rhythm problems." An FDA spokesman, Michael Felberbaum, said in a statement that the agency was continuing to evaluate all emergency use authorizations issued during the coronavirus crisis "to determine whether they continue to meet the statutory criteria for issuance."More recently, a large observational study of 1,446 patients at NewYork-Presbyterian-Columbia University Hospital in New York City, published this month in the New England Journal of Medicine, found no clear benefit or risk to hydroxychloroquine.The authors concluded that randomized controlled clinical trials -- studies in which half the patients are given placebo, half are given the drug, and neither the patients nor doctors know who is getting what -- are needed."Studying it is exactly the right thing to do," said Aaron S. Kesselheim, a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School who is among those calling for the FDA to revoke the waiver. "And heck, if it turns out there is some activity, then great."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company


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  • 60/71   Days before landmark launch, NASA’s head of human spaceflight quits due to ‘mistake’
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    NASA's top executive concentrating on human spaceflight, Doug Loverro, has resigned just a week before the scheduled start of a milestone space mission. Loverro became NASA's associate administrator for human exploration and operations last December, and was playing a leading role in NASA's Artemis moon program as well as preparations for next week's launch of a SpaceX Crew Dragon mission to the International Space Station. That mission, set for liftoff on May 27 from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, is due to send NASA astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken to the station for a stay that could last… Read More

    NASA's top executive concentrating on human spaceflight, Doug Loverro, has resigned just a week before the scheduled start of a milestone space mission. Loverro became NASA's associate administrator for human exploration and operations last December, and was playing a leading role in NASA's Artemis moon program as well as preparations for next week's launch of a SpaceX Crew Dragon mission to the International Space Station. That mission, set for liftoff on May 27 from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, is due to send NASA astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken to the station for a stay that could last… Read More


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  • 61/71   Climate change: Scientists fear car surge will see CO2 rebound
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    An analysis shows a huge daily CO2 drop, but a return to car travel may see emissions rebound.

    An analysis shows a huge daily CO2 drop, but a return to car travel may see emissions rebound.


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  • 62/71   White House says the Trump administration is 'keeping people safe' at airports despite a lack of coronavirus screening
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Amid growing concerns over a lack of screening for the coronavirus at U.S. airports, WH press secretary Kayleigh McEnany said Wednesday the Trump administration was taking the issue seriously.

    Amid growing concerns over a lack of screening for the coronavirus at U.S. airports, WH press secretary Kayleigh McEnany said Wednesday the Trump administration was taking the issue seriously.


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  • 63/71   As more states reopen, Georgia defies predictions of coronavirus resurgence. What's the lesson for the rest of the country?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    On April 24, Georgia became the first U.S. state to initiate the fraught process known as “reopening.” That hasn’t produced a surge of new cases … yet. The answer to whether other states should follow Georgia’s lead and reopen more fully is that it depends.

    On April 24, Georgia became the first U.S. state to initiate the fraught process known as “reopening.” That hasn’t produced a surge of new cases … yet. The answer to whether other states should follow Georgia’s lead and reopen more fully is that it depends.


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  • 64/71   Biden rips Trump for not wearing mask: 'I can't walk outside my house' without one
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    During a Yahoo News virtual town hall, the former vice president tore into President Trump’s refusal to wear a protective mask despite the recommendations of health experts and WH protocols for West Wing staffers.

    During a Yahoo News virtual town hall, the former vice president tore into President Trump’s refusal to wear a protective mask despite the recommendations of health experts and WH protocols for West Wing staffers.


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  • 65/71   Biden on meatpacking safety: 'No worker's life is worth me getting a cheaper hamburger'
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    The presumptive Democratic president nominee said during a Yahoo News Town Hall that workers were being sacrificed in order to increase profits.

    The presumptive Democratic president nominee said during a Yahoo News Town Hall that workers were being sacrificed in order to increase profits.


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  • 66/71   Coronavirus has made the 2020 election a perfect storm for voting rights lawsuits
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    “There’s been more voting rights litigation this election cycle already than there was in all of 2016, by a lot,” said Marc Elias, a D.C.-based lawyer with a long history in the political trenches.

    “There’s been more voting rights litigation this election cycle already than there was in all of 2016, by a lot,” said Marc Elias, a D.C.-based lawyer with a long history in the political trenches.


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  • 67/71   What is hydroxychloroquine and does it prevent COVID-19?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    President Trump said Monday that he has been taking hydroxychloroquine. Although Trump has been touting the drug for months, it has not been proven to treat or prevent the virus.

    President Trump said Monday that he has been taking hydroxychloroquine. Although Trump has been touting the drug for months, it has not been proven to treat or prevent the virus.


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  • 68/71   Can ‘social bubbles’ offer relief from lockdown loneliness?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Several countries are considering plans to allow people to expand their social circles to a limited number of people to help offset the mental health toll of isolation. Would this plan work in the U.S. or would it lead to more outbreaks?

    Several countries are considering plans to allow people to expand their social circles to a limited number of people to help offset the mental health toll of isolation. Would this plan work in the U.S. or would it lead to more outbreaks?


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  • 69/71   Questions arise on coronavirus data used to back reopenings
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    A Florida official said she was fired for not censoring the state's data, while questions have also been raised about accuracy in Georgia and Texas.

    A Florida official said she was fired for not censoring the state's data, while questions have also been raised about accuracy in Georgia and Texas.


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  • 70/71   Contact-tracing apps for COVID-19: What you need to know (and do)
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Among the most promising, yet also controversial, tools for minimizing new coronavirus infections are smartphone applications that perform contact tracing. 

    Among the most promising, yet also controversial, tools for minimizing new coronavirus infections are smartphone applications that perform contact tracing. 


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  • 71/71   Trump says he started taking hydroxychloroquine 'a couple of weeks ago'
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    President Trump said Monday that he has been taking the antimalarial drug hydroxychloroquine despite a lack of scientific evidence to show that it helps prevent a person from being infected with the coronavirus.

    President Trump said Monday that he has been taking the antimalarial drug hydroxychloroquine despite a lack of scientific evidence to show that it helps prevent a person from being infected with the coronavirus.


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