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News Slideshows (06/30/2020 03 hours)


  • 1/81   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


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    Press Review


    Virgil   Ben Shapiro   Banned From TV   All For The Love   Made You Look   MS-13   Christopher Nolan   Trade It   Trump's America   Sara Jay   Mike Braun   Carl Bernstein   Corner 3   Keepin It Gangsta   Fab and Kiss   Iran   Ratatouille   McVay   6 Minutes   Reddit   
  • 2/81   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


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  • 3/81   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


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  • 4/81   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


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  • 5/81   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


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  • 6/81   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


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  • 7/81   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


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  • 8/81   Do star athletes make too much money?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    With athletes in America's biggest sports leagues raking in salaries worth $300 million and more, is it time to reign in the big spending or do superstars deserve the big bucks they make?

    With athletes in America's biggest sports leagues raking in salaries worth $300 million and more, is it time to reign in the big spending or do superstars deserve the big bucks they make?


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  • 9/81   Live animal mascots: Cute or exploitative?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?


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  • 10/81   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


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  • 11/81   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


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  • 12/81   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


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  • 13/81   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


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  • 14/81   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


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  • 15/81   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


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  • 16/81   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


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  • 17/81   PHOTOS: Fluorescent turtle embryo wins forty-fifth annual Nikon Small World Competition

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.


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  • 18/81   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


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  • 19/81   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


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  • 20/81   What the CIA thinks of your anti-virus program

    PARIS (AP) — Peppering the 8,000 pages of purported Central Intelligence Agency hacking data released Tuesday by WikiLeaks are reviews of some of the world's most popular anti-virus products.

    PARIS (AP) — Peppering the 8,000 pages of purported Central Intelligence Agency hacking data released Tuesday by WikiLeaks are reviews of some of the world's most popular anti-virus products.


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  • 21/81   Google Patents Sticky Car Hood to Trap Pedestrians in a Collision

    The patent calls for a giant sticker to be placed on the front end of a vehicle, with a special coating over the layer that is only broken when something collides with the vehicle, exposing the adhesive and helping the colliding object to remain on the vehicle.  The idea is to prevent a pedestrian from being thrown after the impact and potentially sustaining even more injuries.

    The patent calls for a giant sticker to be placed on the front end of a vehicle, with a special coating over the layer that is only broken when something collides with the vehicle, exposing the adhesive and helping the colliding object to remain on the vehicle. The idea is to prevent a pedestrian from being thrown after the impact and potentially sustaining even more injuries.


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  • 22/81   Relax, Your Instagram Feed Likely Won't Change Tomorrow

    Relax, your Instagram feed likely isn't changing tomorrow.The great "Insta-freakout" of 2016 was unleashed this morning by a slew of celebrities, bloggers and social media aficionados after they alerted followers to turn on post notifications for future access to their photos, videos and messages. ...

    Relax, your Instagram feed likely isn't changing tomorrow.The great "Insta-freakout" of 2016 was unleashed this morning by a slew of celebrities, bloggers and social media aficionados after they alerted followers to turn on post notifications for future access to their photos, videos and messages. ...


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  • 23/81   'Hack the Pentagon' and get paid legally in new program

    Attention hackers: Time to re-watch “WarGames” and crack your knuckles, the Pentagon is about to pay you to break into some government systems.

    Attention hackers: Time to re-watch “WarGames” and crack your knuckles, the Pentagon is about to pay you to break into some government systems.


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  • 24/81   Elon Musk's Hyperloop Vision Could Be Ready for Passengers by 2018

    The Hyperloop, Elon Musk's vision of launching humans through pods inside a high-speed transportation system, could be ready for passengers by 2018, according to a company building a transportation track in California.  One company working to make Musk's vision a reality, Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, said it has filed for construction permits in Quay Valley, California, for a 5-mile track.  'We are announcing the filing of the first building permit to Kings County to the building of the first full-scale hyperloop, not a test track,' Bibop Gresta, the chief operating officer of Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, said today at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, during a CNBC/TradeShift event.

    The Hyperloop, Elon Musk's vision of launching humans through pods inside a high-speed transportation system, could be ready for passengers by 2018, according to a company building a transportation track in California. One company working to make Musk's vision a reality, Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, said it has filed for construction permits in Quay Valley, California, for a 5-mile track. 'We are announcing the filing of the first building permit to Kings County to the building of the first full-scale hyperloop, not a test track,' Bibop Gresta, the chief operating officer of Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, said today at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, during a CNBC/TradeShift event.


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  • 25/81   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


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  • 26/81   Man Proposes by Text Message While Stranded at Chicago's O’Hare Airport

    An Arizona man waiting to fly home to propose to his girlfriend was forced to propose to her via text message after spending 50 hours stranded at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport.  Danny Roderique, of Phoenix, had the diamond engagement ring in his pocket but the delay got in the way of the proposal he’d planned.  “I’ve been stranded now in the airport for 50 hours,” Roderique told a reporter from ABC affiliate WLS-TV while still waiting at O’Hare on Monday.

    An Arizona man waiting to fly home to propose to his girlfriend was forced to propose to her via text message after spending 50 hours stranded at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport. Danny Roderique, of Phoenix, had the diamond engagement ring in his pocket but the delay got in the way of the proposal he’d planned. “I’ve been stranded now in the airport for 50 hours,” Roderique told a reporter from ABC affiliate WLS-TV while still waiting at O’Hare on Monday.


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  • 27/81   Twitter Warns Some Users Over Possible Government Hacking

    It's unclear how many people received a letter from Twitter.  In October, Facebook said it would begin issuing alerts to users who the social network believes are being targeted by state-sponsored hackers, according to a message posted by Alex Stamos, Facebook's chief security officer.

    It's unclear how many people received a letter from Twitter. In October, Facebook said it would begin issuing alerts to users who the social network believes are being targeted by state-sponsored hackers, according to a message posted by Alex Stamos, Facebook's chief security officer.


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  • 28/81   Facebook Notifications Get Even More Personal

    Facebook notifications may now be your first stop in the morning to catch up on everything from friends' news to weather, sports scores and what to expect later in the day.  The social network announced this week it will be rolling out expanded, personalized notifications in the Facebook across iOS and Android devices for users in the United States.  The mobile update is bringing a set of new card-like notifications that will include information such as sports scores for teams you have liked, TV shows, weather information and friends' life events, among other updates.

    Facebook notifications may now be your first stop in the morning to catch up on everything from friends' news to weather, sports scores and what to expect later in the day. The social network announced this week it will be rolling out expanded, personalized notifications in the Facebook across iOS and Android devices for users in the United States. The mobile update is bringing a set of new card-like notifications that will include information such as sports scores for teams you have liked, TV shows, weather information and friends' life events, among other updates.


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  • 29/81   How to Tell Which Apps Are Draining Your iPhone Battery

    Some iOS 9 users have complained Facebook's app has been excessively eating away at their battery life, even when the background app refresh setting is disabled.  It's unclear what possible issue may be causing the battery drain.  Tapping the list will show how much of the battery drain was spent when the app was running in the background.

    Some iOS 9 users have complained Facebook's app has been excessively eating away at their battery life, even when the background app refresh setting is disabled. It's unclear what possible issue may be causing the battery drain. Tapping the list will show how much of the battery drain was spent when the app was running in the background.


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  • 30/81   Armed Robbery Suspect Tries Using Uber as Getaway Car, Police Say

    A 23-year-old man suspected of armed robbery tried to take an Uber car to help him get away after he held up a store outside Baltimore, police said.  The suspect, Dashawn Terrell Cochran, was at a store in Parkville, Maryland, early Wednesday morning when he allegedly took a bottle of Tylenol cold medicine to the register, the Baltimore County Police Department said.  Cochran was seen getting into the back of a silver Lexus, and when officers pulled the car over, the driver said he was an Uber driver, police said.

    A 23-year-old man suspected of armed robbery tried to take an Uber car to help him get away after he held up a store outside Baltimore, police said. The suspect, Dashawn Terrell Cochran, was at a store in Parkville, Maryland, early Wednesday morning when he allegedly took a bottle of Tylenol cold medicine to the register, the Baltimore County Police Department said. Cochran was seen getting into the back of a silver Lexus, and when officers pulled the car over, the driver said he was an Uber driver, police said.


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  • 31/81   Drone Popularity Draws Concern From Pilots, Federal Officials

    Roughly 700,000 drones are expected to be sold in the United States this year, according to the Consumer Electronics Association.  The Federal Aviation Administration plans to meet with Walmart, which has 19 different kinds of drones for sale on its website, to teach salespeople about what it should tell its customers about safe drone operation.  The Consumer Electronics Association projects the U.S. drone market to climb above $100 million in revenue this year, an increase of more than 50 percent from last year’s total.

    Roughly 700,000 drones are expected to be sold in the United States this year, according to the Consumer Electronics Association. The Federal Aviation Administration plans to meet with Walmart, which has 19 different kinds of drones for sale on its website, to teach salespeople about what it should tell its customers about safe drone operation. The Consumer Electronics Association projects the U.S. drone market to climb above $100 million in revenue this year, an increase of more than 50 percent from last year’s total.


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  • 32/81   Carly Fiorina: Why She Wants Everyone to Throw Out Their Flip Phones

    Carly Fiorina is putting flip phone users on notice: You’re going to have to upgrade under a President Fiorina.  “How many of you have a flip phone?” Fiorina recently asked a town hall in South Carolina.  It’s all part of a vision the Republican presidential candidate has to give citizens a direct line of communication – literally – to the president.

    Carly Fiorina is putting flip phone users on notice: You’re going to have to upgrade under a President Fiorina. “How many of you have a flip phone?” Fiorina recently asked a town hall in South Carolina. It’s all part of a vision the Republican presidential candidate has to give citizens a direct line of communication – literally – to the president.


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  • 33/81   How a 'Programming Error' Led to an Oregon Couple's $2 Million Cell Phone Bill

    A couple in Oregon say they spent 10 months trying to clear up a whopping $2 million phone bill, which they say has prevented them from buying the home of their dreams.  Ken Slusher and his girlfriend, of Damascus, Oregon, have a balance of $2,156,593.64 on a Verizon Wireless bill that was for a wireless account that they opened in November.  'Yeah, it's been very stressful to say the least,' Slusher told KPTV.com.

    A couple in Oregon say they spent 10 months trying to clear up a whopping $2 million phone bill, which they say has prevented them from buying the home of their dreams. Ken Slusher and his girlfriend, of Damascus, Oregon, have a balance of $2,156,593.64 on a Verizon Wireless bill that was for a wireless account that they opened in November. 'Yeah, it's been very stressful to say the least,' Slusher told KPTV.com.


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  • 34/81   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


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  • 35/81   Oil prices slip as weak Japan data exposes market jitters over fragile demand
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Oil prices fell in early trade on Tuesday after weak Japanese industrial production data, not usually a market-moving factor, was enough to jangle trader nerves over a bumpy recovery in fuel demand as coronavirus pandemic restrictions ease.  U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude  futures briefly traded higher then fell 38 cents, or 1%, to $39.32 a barrel by 0038 GMT, after climbing 3% on Monday.  'Japanese industrial production data released this morning may take the gloss off the overnight moves,' CMC Markets strategist Michael McCarthy said in a note.

    Oil prices fell in early trade on Tuesday after weak Japanese industrial production data, not usually a market-moving factor, was enough to jangle trader nerves over a bumpy recovery in fuel demand as coronavirus pandemic restrictions ease. U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures briefly traded higher then fell 38 cents, or 1%, to $39.32 a barrel by 0038 GMT, after climbing 3% on Monday. 'Japanese industrial production data released this morning may take the gloss off the overnight moves,' CMC Markets strategist Michael McCarthy said in a note.


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  • 36/81   Safari in macOS Big Sur will stream Netflix in 4K HDR
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    When macOS Big Sur arrives, you'll get to watch Netflix in 4K HDR using Apple's Safari browser.

    When macOS Big Sur arrives, you'll get to watch Netflix in 4K HDR using Apple's Safari browser.


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  • 37/81   Millennials had barely recovered from the Great Recession. Then came the pandemic.
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    "Millennials weren't able to ramp up, so they don't have those resources in place to weather the storm," said one financial adviser.

    "Millennials weren't able to ramp up, so they don't have those resources in place to weather the storm," said one financial adviser.


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  • 38/81   In CA: 'People don't social distance well after a couple drinks': More bars shut down
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Counties across the state are shutting back down as they set new records when it comes to cases of coronavirus and hospitalizations. And the Golden State Killer admits killing and kidnapping over two dozen people. Plus: Stick around for an Election Day preview of what's coming to a ballot near you.

    Counties across the state are shutting back down as they set new records when it comes to cases of coronavirus and hospitalizations. And the Golden State Killer admits killing and kidnapping over two dozen people. Plus: Stick around for an Election Day preview of what's coming to a ballot near you.


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  • 39/81   U.S. Halts Some Hong Kong Trade Benefits Over China Security Law
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- The Trump administration has made it harder to export sensitive American technology to Hong Kong, escalating pressure on China as lawmakers in Beijing prepared to hand down a national security law that limits the former British colony’s autonomy.The U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said in a statement Monday that the security legislation, which China’s top legislative body was expected to approve as soon as Tuesday, raised concerns about the transfer of key technology. The Commerce Department said it was suspending regulations allowing special treatment to Hong Kong over things including export license exceptions.“With the Chinese Communist Party’s imposition of new security measures on Hong Kong, the risk that sensitive U.S. technology will be diverted to the People’s Liberation Army or Ministry of State Security has increased, all while undermining the territory’s autonomy,” Ross said, providing little detail on specific impacts. “Further actions to eliminate differential treatment are also being evaluated.”Exports of sensitive technologies to Hong Kong have previously been treated differently from those to mainland China, where exporters have to apply for special licenses. Those policies were put in place after China agreed to preserve Hong Kong’s “high degree of autonomy” -- including civil liberties, free markets and independent courts -- for at least 50 years after resuming sovereignty over the city in 1997.President Donald Trump said after the National People’s Congress first approved the drafting of the security legislation last month that the U.S. would begin the process of eliminating policy exemptions for Hong Kong, including export controls on dual-use technologies like carbon fiber used to make both golf clubs and missile components. While total Hong Kong imports requiring a special license from the U.S. amounted to only 1.2% of all goods in 2018, American exporters could have more paperwork to fill out on certain items.The U.S. move was the latest tit-for-tat measure as relations with China continue to deteriorate over Hong Kong and other fronts. The president has attempted to blame the country for the spread of the coronavirus, part of his re-election effort against presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden, who has also escalated his criticism of China. Both nations’ warships and combat jets continue to track each other around the contested South China Sea and the Taiwan Strait.Last week, U.S. Secretary of State Michael Pompeo announced visa restrictions against unspecified Chinese officials involved in the Hong Kong actions, drawing retaliation from Beijing. Pompeo said on Monday that the U.S. would also cease selling defense equipment to Hong Kong, a largely symbolic act that will mostly affect sales with the city’s police and corrections forces.Trump delivered remarks last Friday that, while harsh, did not include specific punishments for Beijing.While the threat of the U.S. ending Hong Kong’s special trading status loomed over a historic wave of unrest that rocked the city for much of last year, it appears to have done little to change President Xi Jinping’s policy toward the city. Beijing has shown an increased willingness to push back against foreign pressure, as its critics in Hong Kong grow more radical and mainland citizens demand steps to protect the country’s territory from outside influence.“Separatist forces intending to disrupt Hong Kong can clamor as they like and anti-China external forces may try to exert pressure, but neither will stop China’s resolute action to advance the legislation,” Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs spokesman Zhao Lijian told a regular news briefing Monday in Beijing. “We urge the U.S. side to grasp the situation and immediately stop meddling in Hong Kong affairs and China’s internal affairs in any way.”Hong Kong matters far less to China’s fortunes than it once did, with 12% of the country’s exports going to or through the territory last year, compared with 45% in 1992. Still, the end of the Hong Kong’s preferential treatment -- which helps makes it an important base for international banks and trading firms -- could further hurt a local economy that has already been reeling from months of protests followed by the coronavirus outbreak.Trade SurplusU.S. interests could also get damaged in the dispute. The U.S.’s largest trade surplus in 2018 was with Hong Kong -- $31.1 billion. Some 290 U.S. companies had regional headquarters in the city that year and another 434 had regional offices.The NPC’s Standing Committee was expected to make a final administrative push to impose the security law when it wraps up a three-day meeting Tuesday in Beijing. That would enact the measure to punish acts of secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with foreign forces in time for the July 1 anniversary of Hong Kong’s return to Chinese rule in 1997.The symbolic date is usually marked by mass protests, including a largely peaceful pro-democracy march that attracted more than 500,000 people last year before a small faction ransacked the city’s legislature. The organizer of the march is making a last-minute appeal to hold the event, after being denied permission by police, who cited coronavirus risk and the potential for violence.The new law goes further toward revising the “one country, two systems” framework designed to protect Hong Kong’s liberal institutions and Common Law legal system. The legislation will let Chinese security agents operate in Hong Kong, allow China to prosecute some cases and give Lam the power to pick judges to hear national security matters.“You have in Hong Kong the Common Law system and imposing on it what passes as the law in China will produce chaos, which will be intolerable for the people of Hong Kong and eventually will be intolerable for business, as well,” Chris Patten, the territory’s last colonial governor, told Bloomberg Television on Monday. “Hong Kong represents all those aspects of liberal democracy which Xi Jinping so hates.”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- The Trump administration has made it harder to export sensitive American technology to Hong Kong, escalating pressure on China as lawmakers in Beijing prepared to hand down a national security law that limits the former British colony’s autonomy.The U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said in a statement Monday that the security legislation, which China’s top legislative body was expected to approve as soon as Tuesday, raised concerns about the transfer of key technology. The Commerce Department said it was suspending regulations allowing special treatment to Hong Kong over things including export license exceptions.“With the Chinese Communist Party’s imposition of new security measures on Hong Kong, the risk that sensitive U.S. technology will be diverted to the People’s Liberation Army or Ministry of State Security has increased, all while undermining the territory’s autonomy,” Ross said, providing little detail on specific impacts. “Further actions to eliminate differential treatment are also being evaluated.”Exports of sensitive technologies to Hong Kong have previously been treated differently from those to mainland China, where exporters have to apply for special licenses. Those policies were put in place after China agreed to preserve Hong Kong’s “high degree of autonomy” -- including civil liberties, free markets and independent courts -- for at least 50 years after resuming sovereignty over the city in 1997.President Donald Trump said after the National People’s Congress first approved the drafting of the security legislation last month that the U.S. would begin the process of eliminating policy exemptions for Hong Kong, including export controls on dual-use technologies like carbon fiber used to make both golf clubs and missile components. While total Hong Kong imports requiring a special license from the U.S. amounted to only 1.2% of all goods in 2018, American exporters could have more paperwork to fill out on certain items.The U.S. move was the latest tit-for-tat measure as relations with China continue to deteriorate over Hong Kong and other fronts. The president has attempted to blame the country for the spread of the coronavirus, part of his re-election effort against presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden, who has also escalated his criticism of China. Both nations’ warships and combat jets continue to track each other around the contested South China Sea and the Taiwan Strait.Last week, U.S. Secretary of State Michael Pompeo announced visa restrictions against unspecified Chinese officials involved in the Hong Kong actions, drawing retaliation from Beijing. Pompeo said on Monday that the U.S. would also cease selling defense equipment to Hong Kong, a largely symbolic act that will mostly affect sales with the city’s police and corrections forces.Trump delivered remarks last Friday that, while harsh, did not include specific punishments for Beijing.While the threat of the U.S. ending Hong Kong’s special trading status loomed over a historic wave of unrest that rocked the city for much of last year, it appears to have done little to change President Xi Jinping’s policy toward the city. Beijing has shown an increased willingness to push back against foreign pressure, as its critics in Hong Kong grow more radical and mainland citizens demand steps to protect the country’s territory from outside influence.“Separatist forces intending to disrupt Hong Kong can clamor as they like and anti-China external forces may try to exert pressure, but neither will stop China’s resolute action to advance the legislation,” Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs spokesman Zhao Lijian told a regular news briefing Monday in Beijing. “We urge the U.S. side to grasp the situation and immediately stop meddling in Hong Kong affairs and China’s internal affairs in any way.”Hong Kong matters far less to China’s fortunes than it once did, with 12% of the country’s exports going to or through the territory last year, compared with 45% in 1992. Still, the end of the Hong Kong’s preferential treatment -- which helps makes it an important base for international banks and trading firms -- could further hurt a local economy that has already been reeling from months of protests followed by the coronavirus outbreak.Trade SurplusU.S. interests could also get damaged in the dispute. The U.S.’s largest trade surplus in 2018 was with Hong Kong -- $31.1 billion. Some 290 U.S. companies had regional headquarters in the city that year and another 434 had regional offices.The NPC’s Standing Committee was expected to make a final administrative push to impose the security law when it wraps up a three-day meeting Tuesday in Beijing. That would enact the measure to punish acts of secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with foreign forces in time for the July 1 anniversary of Hong Kong’s return to Chinese rule in 1997.The symbolic date is usually marked by mass protests, including a largely peaceful pro-democracy march that attracted more than 500,000 people last year before a small faction ransacked the city’s legislature. The organizer of the march is making a last-minute appeal to hold the event, after being denied permission by police, who cited coronavirus risk and the potential for violence.The new law goes further toward revising the “one country, two systems” framework designed to protect Hong Kong’s liberal institutions and Common Law legal system. The legislation will let Chinese security agents operate in Hong Kong, allow China to prosecute some cases and give Lam the power to pick judges to hear national security matters.“You have in Hong Kong the Common Law system and imposing on it what passes as the law in China will produce chaos, which will be intolerable for the people of Hong Kong and eventually will be intolerable for business, as well,” Chris Patten, the territory’s last colonial governor, told Bloomberg Television on Monday. “Hong Kong represents all those aspects of liberal democracy which Xi Jinping so hates.”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 40/81   'I have a breathing problem,' yells maskless Trader Joe's shopper who was kicked out of store in viral video
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    A woman shopping without a mask at a California Trader Joe's caused a scene Friday, calling employees "Democratic pigs" and screaming profanities.

    A woman shopping without a mask at a California Trader Joe's caused a scene Friday, calling employees "Democratic pigs" and screaming profanities.


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  • 41/81   Safe-haven currencies on defensive, sterling soft on spending plan
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Safe-haven currencies were on the back foot on Tuesday as hopes of an economic turnaround boosted stock prices while sterling was under pressure after British Prime Minister Boris Johnson promised a 'Rooseveltian' boost to public spending.  Pending home sales, based on contracts signed last month, surged 44.3%, compared to economists' forecast for 18.9% rise.  Sterling traded at $1.2297 , after sliding to a one-month low of $1.2252 on Monday on concerns about how Britain's government will pay for its planned infrastructure program following Prime Minister Johnson's promise to increase spending.

    Safe-haven currencies were on the back foot on Tuesday as hopes of an economic turnaround boosted stock prices while sterling was under pressure after British Prime Minister Boris Johnson promised a 'Rooseveltian' boost to public spending. Pending home sales, based on contracts signed last month, surged 44.3%, compared to economists' forecast for 18.9% rise. Sterling traded at $1.2297 , after sliding to a one-month low of $1.2252 on Monday on concerns about how Britain's government will pay for its planned infrastructure program following Prime Minister Johnson's promise to increase spending.


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  • 42/81   Trump shares video of man chanting, 'White power' in protest clash
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    President Trump promoted a video Sunday that featured clashing protesters, one of whom chants, "White power." The video was apparently shot in the Villages, Fla.

    President Trump promoted a video Sunday that featured clashing protesters, one of whom chants, "White power." The video was apparently shot in the Villages, Fla.


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  • 43/81   Italian teen moves closer to becoming 'patron saint of the internet'
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Italian boy, who programmed his home computer to catalog miracles and died at 15, moves a step closer to becoming the Catholic Church's first millennial saint.

    Italian boy, who programmed his home computer to catalog miracles and died at 15, moves a step closer to becoming the Catholic Church's first millennial saint.


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  • 44/81   National parks – even Mount Rushmore – show that there's more than one kind of patriotism
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    July 4th will be quieter than usual this year, thanks to COVID-19. Many U.S. cities are canceling fireworks displays to avoid drawing large crowds that could promote the spread of coronavirus. But President Trump is planning to stage a celebration at Mount Rushmore National Memorial in South Dakota on July 3. It’s easy to see why an Independence Day event at a national memorial featuring the carved faces of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln and Theodore Roosevelt would seem like a straightforward patriotic statement. But there’s controversy. Trump’s visit will be capped by fireworks for the first time in a decade, notwithstanding worries that pyrotechnics could ignite wildfires. And Native Americans are planning protests, adding Mount Rushmore to the list of monuments around the world that critics see as commemorating histories of racism, slavery and genocide and reinforcing white supremacy. As I show in my book, “Memorials Matter: Emotion, Environment, and Public Memory at American Historical Sites,” many venerated historical sites tell complicated stories. Even Mount Rushmore, which was designed explicitly to evoke national pride, can be a source of anger or shame rather than patriotic feeling. Twenty-first-century patriotism is a touchy subject, increasingly claimed by America’s conservative right. National Park Service sites like Mount Rushmore are public lands, meant to be appreciated by everyone, but they raise crucial questions about history, unity and love of country, especially during this election year. For me, and I suspect for many tourists, national memorials and monuments elicit conflicting feelings. There’s pride in our nation’s achievements, but also guilt, regret or anger over the costs of progress and the injustices that still exist. Patriotism, especially at sites of shame, can be unsettling – and I see this as a good thing. In my view, honestly confronting the darker parts of U.S. history as well as its best moments is vital for tourism, for patriotism and for the nation.  Whose history?Patriotism has roots in the Latin “patriotia,” meaning “fellow countryman.” It’s common to feel patriotic pride in U.S. technological achievements or military strength. But Americans also glory in the diversity and beauty of our natural landscapes. That kind of patriotism, I think, has the potential to be more inclusive, less divisive and more socially and environmentally just. [Expertise in your inbox. Sign up for The Conversation’s newsletter and get expert takes on today’s news, every day.]The physical environment at national memorials can inspire more than one kind of patriotism. At Mount Rushmore, tourists are invited to walk the Avenue of Flags, marvel at the labor required to carve four U.S. presidents’ faces out of granite, and applaud when rangers invite military veterans onstage during visitor programs. Patriotism centers on labor, progress and the “great men” the memorial credits with founding, expanding, preserving and unifying the U.S. But there are other perspectives. Viewed from the Peter Norbeck Overlook, a short drive from the main site, the presidents’ faces are tiny elements embedded in the expansive Black Hills region. Re-seeing the memorial in space and contextualizing it within a longer time scale can spark new emotions. The Black Hills are a sacred place for Lakota peoples that they never willingly relinquished. Viewing Mount Rushmore this way puts those rock faces in a broader ecological, historical and colonial context, and raises questions about history and justice.  Sites of shameSites where visitors are meant to feel remorse challenge patriotism more directly. At Manzanar National Historic Site in California – one of 10 camps where over 110,000 Japanese Americans were incarcerated during World War II – natural and textual cues prevent any easy patriotic reflexes. Reconstructed guard towers and barracks help visitors perceive the experience of being detained. I could imagine Japanese Americans’ shame as I entered claustrophobic buildings and touched the rough straw that filled makeshift mattresses. Many visitors doubtlessly associate mountains with adventure and freedom, but some incarcerees saw the nearby Sierra Nevada as barricades reinforcing the camp’s barbed wire fence. Rangers play up these emotional tensions on their tours. I saw one ranger position a group of schoolchildren atop what were once latrines, and ask them: “Will it happen again? We don’t know. We hope not. We have to stand up for what is right.” Instead of offering visitors a self-congratulatory sense of being a good citizen, Manzanar leaves them with unsettling questions and mixed feelings. Visitors to incarceration camps today might make connections to the U.S.-Mexico border, where detention centers corral people in unhealthy conditions, sometimes separating children from parents. Sites like Manzanar ask us to rethink who “counts” as an American and what unites us as human beings. Visiting and writing about these and other sites made me consider what it would take to disassociate patriotism from “America first”-style nationalism and recast it as collective pride in the United States’ diverse landscapes and peoples. Building a more inclusive patriotism means celebrating freedom in all forms – such as making Juneteenth a federal holiday – and commemorating the tragedies of our past in ways that promote justice in the present.  Humble patriotismThis July 4th invites contemplation of what holds us together as a nation during a time of reckoning. I believe Americans should be willing to imagine how a public memorial could be offensive or traumatic. The National Park Service website claims that Mount Rushmore preserves a “rich heritage we all share,” but what happens when that heritage feels like hatred to some people? Growing momentum for removing statues of Confederate generals and other historical figures now understood to be racist, including the statue of Theodore Roosevelt in the front of New York City’s Museum of Natural History, tests the limits of national coherence. Understanding this momentum is not an issue of political correctness – it’s a matter of compassion.Greater clarity about value systems could help unite Americans across party lines. Psychologists have found striking differences between the moral frameworks that shape liberals’ and conservatives’ views. Conservatives generally prioritize purity, sanctity and loyalty, while liberals tend to value justice in the form of concerns about fairness and harm. In my view, patriotism could function as an emotional bridge between these moral foundations. My research suggests that visits to memorial sites are helpful for recognizing our interdependence with each other, as inhabitants of a common country. Places like Mount Rushmore are part of our collective past that raise important questions about what unites us today. I believe it’s our responsibility to approach these places, and each other, with both pride and humility. This is an updated version of an article originally published on June 26, 2019.This article is republished from The Conversation, a nonprofit news site dedicated to sharing ideas from academic experts.Read more:    * More than scenery: National parks preserve our history and culture  * The twisted roots of U.S. land policy in the WestJennifer Ladino received funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support her book on national memorials.

    July 4th will be quieter than usual this year, thanks to COVID-19. Many U.S. cities are canceling fireworks displays to avoid drawing large crowds that could promote the spread of coronavirus. But President Trump is planning to stage a celebration at Mount Rushmore National Memorial in South Dakota on July 3. It’s easy to see why an Independence Day event at a national memorial featuring the carved faces of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln and Theodore Roosevelt would seem like a straightforward patriotic statement. But there’s controversy. Trump’s visit will be capped by fireworks for the first time in a decade, notwithstanding worries that pyrotechnics could ignite wildfires. And Native Americans are planning protests, adding Mount Rushmore to the list of monuments around the world that critics see as commemorating histories of racism, slavery and genocide and reinforcing white supremacy. As I show in my book, “Memorials Matter: Emotion, Environment, and Public Memory at American Historical Sites,” many venerated historical sites tell complicated stories. Even Mount Rushmore, which was designed explicitly to evoke national pride, can be a source of anger or shame rather than patriotic feeling. Twenty-first-century patriotism is a touchy subject, increasingly claimed by America’s conservative right. National Park Service sites like Mount Rushmore are public lands, meant to be appreciated by everyone, but they raise crucial questions about history, unity and love of country, especially during this election year. For me, and I suspect for many tourists, national memorials and monuments elicit conflicting feelings. There’s pride in our nation’s achievements, but also guilt, regret or anger over the costs of progress and the injustices that still exist. Patriotism, especially at sites of shame, can be unsettling – and I see this as a good thing. In my view, honestly confronting the darker parts of U.S. history as well as its best moments is vital for tourism, for patriotism and for the nation. Whose history?Patriotism has roots in the Latin “patriotia,” meaning “fellow countryman.” It’s common to feel patriotic pride in U.S. technological achievements or military strength. But Americans also glory in the diversity and beauty of our natural landscapes. That kind of patriotism, I think, has the potential to be more inclusive, less divisive and more socially and environmentally just. [Expertise in your inbox. Sign up for The Conversation’s newsletter and get expert takes on today’s news, every day.]The physical environment at national memorials can inspire more than one kind of patriotism. At Mount Rushmore, tourists are invited to walk the Avenue of Flags, marvel at the labor required to carve four U.S. presidents’ faces out of granite, and applaud when rangers invite military veterans onstage during visitor programs. Patriotism centers on labor, progress and the “great men” the memorial credits with founding, expanding, preserving and unifying the U.S. But there are other perspectives. Viewed from the Peter Norbeck Overlook, a short drive from the main site, the presidents’ faces are tiny elements embedded in the expansive Black Hills region. Re-seeing the memorial in space and contextualizing it within a longer time scale can spark new emotions. The Black Hills are a sacred place for Lakota peoples that they never willingly relinquished. Viewing Mount Rushmore this way puts those rock faces in a broader ecological, historical and colonial context, and raises questions about history and justice. Sites of shameSites where visitors are meant to feel remorse challenge patriotism more directly. At Manzanar National Historic Site in California – one of 10 camps where over 110,000 Japanese Americans were incarcerated during World War II – natural and textual cues prevent any easy patriotic reflexes. Reconstructed guard towers and barracks help visitors perceive the experience of being detained. I could imagine Japanese Americans’ shame as I entered claustrophobic buildings and touched the rough straw that filled makeshift mattresses. Many visitors doubtlessly associate mountains with adventure and freedom, but some incarcerees saw the nearby Sierra Nevada as barricades reinforcing the camp’s barbed wire fence. Rangers play up these emotional tensions on their tours. I saw one ranger position a group of schoolchildren atop what were once latrines, and ask them: “Will it happen again? We don’t know. We hope not. We have to stand up for what is right.” Instead of offering visitors a self-congratulatory sense of being a good citizen, Manzanar leaves them with unsettling questions and mixed feelings. Visitors to incarceration camps today might make connections to the U.S.-Mexico border, where detention centers corral people in unhealthy conditions, sometimes separating children from parents. Sites like Manzanar ask us to rethink who “counts” as an American and what unites us as human beings. Visiting and writing about these and other sites made me consider what it would take to disassociate patriotism from “America first”-style nationalism and recast it as collective pride in the United States’ diverse landscapes and peoples. Building a more inclusive patriotism means celebrating freedom in all forms – such as making Juneteenth a federal holiday – and commemorating the tragedies of our past in ways that promote justice in the present. Humble patriotismThis July 4th invites contemplation of what holds us together as a nation during a time of reckoning. I believe Americans should be willing to imagine how a public memorial could be offensive or traumatic. The National Park Service website claims that Mount Rushmore preserves a “rich heritage we all share,” but what happens when that heritage feels like hatred to some people? Growing momentum for removing statues of Confederate generals and other historical figures now understood to be racist, including the statue of Theodore Roosevelt in the front of New York City’s Museum of Natural History, tests the limits of national coherence. Understanding this momentum is not an issue of political correctness – it’s a matter of compassion.Greater clarity about value systems could help unite Americans across party lines. Psychologists have found striking differences between the moral frameworks that shape liberals’ and conservatives’ views. Conservatives generally prioritize purity, sanctity and loyalty, while liberals tend to value justice in the form of concerns about fairness and harm. In my view, patriotism could function as an emotional bridge between these moral foundations. My research suggests that visits to memorial sites are helpful for recognizing our interdependence with each other, as inhabitants of a common country. Places like Mount Rushmore are part of our collective past that raise important questions about what unites us today. I believe it’s our responsibility to approach these places, and each other, with both pride and humility. This is an updated version of an article originally published on June 26, 2019.This article is republished from The Conversation, a nonprofit news site dedicated to sharing ideas from academic experts.Read more: * More than scenery: National parks preserve our history and culture * The twisted roots of U.S. land policy in the WestJennifer Ladino received funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support her book on national memorials.


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  • 45/81   What we know about Steven Lopez, the suspect in the fatal Louisville protest shooting
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Steven Lopez is accused of firing a gun into the crowd at a protest at Louisville's Jefferson Square Park, killing a 27-year-old photographer.

    Steven Lopez is accused of firing a gun into the crowd at a protest at Louisville's Jefferson Square Park, killing a 27-year-old photographer.


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  • 46/81   South Korea urges staggered vacations, warns against gatherings as coronavirus cases rise
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    South Korea's health authorities called on Monday for citizens to stagger vacation schedules ahead of the holiday season and avoid gatherings at workplaces and religious facilities, as coronavirus infections from small clusters persist.  After battling the first major coronavirus epidemic outside China, South Korea managed to reduce the rates of daily infections to single digits by late April, propelled by an intensive tracking and testing campaign.  As of midnight Sunday, the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC) reported 42 new coronavirus cases, for a total of 12,757 cases with 282 deaths.

    South Korea's health authorities called on Monday for citizens to stagger vacation schedules ahead of the holiday season and avoid gatherings at workplaces and religious facilities, as coronavirus infections from small clusters persist. After battling the first major coronavirus epidemic outside China, South Korea managed to reduce the rates of daily infections to single digits by late April, propelled by an intensive tracking and testing campaign. As of midnight Sunday, the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC) reported 42 new coronavirus cases, for a total of 12,757 cases with 282 deaths.


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  • 47/81   'Enough': 1 killed in shooting in Seattle's protest zone
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A 16-year-old boy was killed and and a younger teenager was wounded early Monday in Seattle's “occupied” protest zone — the second deadly shooting in the area that local officials have vowed to change after business complaints and criticism from President Donald Trump.  The violence that came just over a week after another shooting in the zone left one person dead and another wounded was “dangerous and unacceptable' police Chief Carmen Best said.  Demonstrators have occupied several blocks around the Seattle Police Department’s East Precinct and a park for about two weeks after police abandoned the precinct following standoffs and clashes with protesters calling for racial justice and an end to police brutality.

    A 16-year-old boy was killed and and a younger teenager was wounded early Monday in Seattle's “occupied” protest zone — the second deadly shooting in the area that local officials have vowed to change after business complaints and criticism from President Donald Trump. The violence that came just over a week after another shooting in the zone left one person dead and another wounded was “dangerous and unacceptable' police Chief Carmen Best said. Demonstrators have occupied several blocks around the Seattle Police Department’s East Precinct and a park for about two weeks after police abandoned the precinct following standoffs and clashes with protesters calling for racial justice and an end to police brutality.


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  • 48/81   Judge in George Floyd case says likely to move hearing out of Minneapolis as officers appear in court
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A Minnesota judge on Monday warned that he is likely to move the trials of four police officers charged in George Floyd's death out of Minneapolis if public officials and attorneys do not stop talking about the case. Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill stopped short of issuing a gag order on attorneys, but he said one is likely if public statements continue. Cahill added that such a situation would also make him likely to grant a change-of-venue motion if one is filed. "The court is not going to be happy about hearing about the case in three areas: media, evidence and guilt or innocence," Cahill said. It was the second pretrial hearing for the officers, who were fired after Floyd's May 25 death. Derek Chauvin, 44, is charged with second-degree murder and other counts, while Thomas Lane, 37, J. Kueng, 26, and Tou Thao, 34, are charged with aiding and abetting Chauvin.

    A Minnesota judge on Monday warned that he is likely to move the trials of four police officers charged in George Floyd's death out of Minneapolis if public officials and attorneys do not stop talking about the case. Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill stopped short of issuing a gag order on attorneys, but he said one is likely if public statements continue. Cahill added that such a situation would also make him likely to grant a change-of-venue motion if one is filed. "The court is not going to be happy about hearing about the case in three areas: media, evidence and guilt or innocence," Cahill said. It was the second pretrial hearing for the officers, who were fired after Floyd's May 25 death. Derek Chauvin, 44, is charged with second-degree murder and other counts, while Thomas Lane, 37, J. Kueng, 26, and Tou Thao, 34, are charged with aiding and abetting Chauvin.


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  • 49/81   Huntsman at risk of shocking defeat in Utah
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    After a decade away from Utah politics and a weeks-long fight with the coronavirus, the former governor is locked in a tight race for his old job.

    After a decade away from Utah politics and a weeks-long fight with the coronavirus, the former governor is locked in a tight race for his old job.


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  • 50/81   Syed Ali Geelani: Kashmir leader quits Hurriyat Conference
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Syed Ali Geelani has been heading political opposition to Indian rule in Kashmir for decades.

    Syed Ali Geelani has been heading political opposition to Indian rule in Kashmir for decades.


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  • 51/81   Trump accuses California Democrats of 'incredible stupidity' in row over John Wayne's white supremacy remarks
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Donald Trump is accusing some Democratic officials of "incredible stupidity" for calling for actor John Wayne's name to be removed from an airport in California even after an interview resurfaced of "The Duke" embracing white supremacy.John Wayne Airport in southern California serves Orange County and Los Angeles. Mr Trump in January 2016, as a presidential candidate, held a special event at the John Wayne Birthplace Museum in Winterset, Iowa. He spoke at a lectern with a wax statue of the late actor behind him.

    Donald Trump is accusing some Democratic officials of "incredible stupidity" for calling for actor John Wayne's name to be removed from an airport in California even after an interview resurfaced of "The Duke" embracing white supremacy.John Wayne Airport in southern California serves Orange County and Los Angeles. Mr Trump in January 2016, as a presidential candidate, held a special event at the John Wayne Birthplace Museum in Winterset, Iowa. He spoke at a lectern with a wax statue of the late actor behind him.


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  • 52/81   Betelgeuse: Nearby 'supernova' star's dimming explained
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Astronomers say big cool patches on the Betelgeuse star likely drove its surprise dimming last year.

    Astronomers say big cool patches on the Betelgeuse star likely drove its surprise dimming last year.


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  • 53/81   With Flights Banned, Son Sails Solo Across Atlantic to Reach Father, 90
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    BUENOS AIRES -- Days after Argentina canceled all international passenger flights to shield the country from the new coronavirus, Juan Manuel Ballestero began his journey home the only way possible: He stepped aboard his small sailboat for what turned out to be an 85-day odyssey across the Atlantic.The 47-year-old sailor could have stayed put on the tiny Portuguese island of Porto Santo, to ride out the era of lockdowns and social distancing in a scenic place largely spared by the virus. But the idea of spending what he thought could be "the end of the world" away from his family, especially his father who was soon to turn 90, was unbearable.So he said he loaded his 29-foot sailboat with canned tuna, fruit and rice and set sail in mid-March."I didn't want to stay like a coward on an island where there were no cases," Ballestero said. "I wanted to do everything possible to return home. The most important thing for me was to be with my family."The coronavirus pandemic has upended life in virtually every country, gutting the global economy, exacerbating geopolitical tension and halting most international travel. A particularly painful aspect of this awful era has been the inability of an untold number of people to rush home to help ailing loved ones and attend funerals.Friends tried to dissuade Ballestero from embarking on the perilous journey, and authorities in Portugal warned him he might not be allowed to re-enter if he ran into trouble and had to turn back. But he was resolute."I bought myself a one-way ticket, and there was no going back," he said.His relatives, used to Ballestero's itinerant lifestyle, knew better than to try to talk him out of it."The uncertainty of not knowing where he was for 50-some days was very rough," said his father, Carlos Alberto Ballestero. "But we had no doubt this was going to turn out well."Sailing across the Atlantic in a small boat is challenging in the best of circumstances. The added difficulties of doing it during a pandemic became clear three weeks into the trip.On April 12, authorities in Cape Verde refused to allow him to dock at the island nation to restock his supply of food and fuel, Ballestero said.Hoping he had enough food to carry him through, he turned his boat west. With less fuel than he hoped for, he would be more at the mercy of the winds.He was no stranger to spending long stretches of time at sea, but being alone on the open ocean is daunting to even the most experienced sailor.Days into the journey, he became panicked by the light of a ship that he thought was trailing him and seemed to be approaching closer and closer."I started going as fast as possible," Ballestero said. "I thought, 'If it gets very close, I'll shoot.'"Seafaring is a Ballestero family tradition.From the time he was 3, his father took him aboard the fishing vessels he captained.When he turned 18, he took a job on a fishing boat in southern Argentina. Off the coast of Patagonia, one of the most experienced fishermen aboard gave him a piece of advice that would become a way of life."Go see the world," the fisherman said.And so he did.Ballestero has spent much of his life sailing, with stops in Venezuela, Sri Lanka, Bali, Hawaii, Costa Rica, Brazil, Alaska and Spain.He has tagged sea turtles and whales for conservation organizations and spent summers working as a skipper aboard boats owned by wealthy Europeans.He bought his sailboat, an Ohlson 29 named the Skua, in 2017, hoping to take it on a loop around the world. It proved up to the task of traversing an ocean on a planet plunged into crisis mode."I wasn't afraid, but I did have a lot of uncertainty," he said. "It was very strange to sail in the middle of a pandemic with humanity teetering around me."Sailing can be a lonely passion, and it was particularly so on this voyage for Ballestero, who each night tuned into the news on a radio for 30 minutes to take stock of how the virus was rippling across the globe."I kept thinking about whether this would be my last trip," he said.The expansiveness of the ocean notwithstanding, Ballestero felt he was in a quarantine of sorts, imprisoned by an unrelenting stream of foreboding thoughts about what the future held."I was locked up in my own freedom," he recalled.On a particularly trying day, he turned to a bottle of whiskey for solace. But drinking only increased his anxiety. With his nerves frayed, Ballestero said he found himself praying and resetting his relationship with God."Faith keeps you standing in these situations," he said. "I learned about myself; this voyage gave me lots of humility."Several weeks into the trip, when his spirits were low, Ballestero said he was buoyed by wildlife sightings that felt like omens.He found solace in a pod of dolphins that swam alongside his boat, on and off, for some 2,000 miles."They would go and come back," he said. "And one day, they seemed to say goodbye."During a day when he had drunk heavily, he spotted a large bird cruising nearby. It turned out to be a skua, the bird his boat is named after."It was as if the bird was telling me not to give up, to keep going," he said.One day, when he tired of canned food, Ballestero got a fishing rod and scanned a school of mahi-mahi. But he had a sudden reluctance to cast out a line."I didn't want to kill one. It felt like killing a person," he said. "I used to be a fisherman, but after that experience it's hard for me to kill now."He went back to eating canned tuna.When he was approaching the Americas, a brutal wave rattled the boat some 150 miles from Vitoria, Brazil, he said. That episode forced him to make an unplanned pit stop in Vitoria, adding about 10 days to a trip he had expected to take 75 days.During that stop, Ballestero learned that his brother had told reporters in Argentina about the voyage, which enthralled people who were bored and cooped up at home. At the urging of friends, he created an Instagram account to document the final leg of the trip.When he made it to his native Mar del Plata, on June 17, he was startled by the hero's welcome he received."Entering my port where my father had his sailboat, where he taught me so many things and where I learned how to sail and where all this originated, gave me the taste of a mission accomplished," he said.A medical professional administered a test for COVID-19 on the dock. Within 72 hours, after the test came back negative, he was allowed to set foot on Argentine soil.While he did not get to celebrate his father's 90th birthday in May, he did make it home in time for Father's Day."What I lived is a dream," Ballestero said. "But I have a strong desire to keep on sailing."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company

    BUENOS AIRES -- Days after Argentina canceled all international passenger flights to shield the country from the new coronavirus, Juan Manuel Ballestero began his journey home the only way possible: He stepped aboard his small sailboat for what turned out to be an 85-day odyssey across the Atlantic.The 47-year-old sailor could have stayed put on the tiny Portuguese island of Porto Santo, to ride out the era of lockdowns and social distancing in a scenic place largely spared by the virus. But the idea of spending what he thought could be "the end of the world" away from his family, especially his father who was soon to turn 90, was unbearable.So he said he loaded his 29-foot sailboat with canned tuna, fruit and rice and set sail in mid-March."I didn't want to stay like a coward on an island where there were no cases," Ballestero said. "I wanted to do everything possible to return home. The most important thing for me was to be with my family."The coronavirus pandemic has upended life in virtually every country, gutting the global economy, exacerbating geopolitical tension and halting most international travel. A particularly painful aspect of this awful era has been the inability of an untold number of people to rush home to help ailing loved ones and attend funerals.Friends tried to dissuade Ballestero from embarking on the perilous journey, and authorities in Portugal warned him he might not be allowed to re-enter if he ran into trouble and had to turn back. But he was resolute."I bought myself a one-way ticket, and there was no going back," he said.His relatives, used to Ballestero's itinerant lifestyle, knew better than to try to talk him out of it."The uncertainty of not knowing where he was for 50-some days was very rough," said his father, Carlos Alberto Ballestero. "But we had no doubt this was going to turn out well."Sailing across the Atlantic in a small boat is challenging in the best of circumstances. The added difficulties of doing it during a pandemic became clear three weeks into the trip.On April 12, authorities in Cape Verde refused to allow him to dock at the island nation to restock his supply of food and fuel, Ballestero said.Hoping he had enough food to carry him through, he turned his boat west. With less fuel than he hoped for, he would be more at the mercy of the winds.He was no stranger to spending long stretches of time at sea, but being alone on the open ocean is daunting to even the most experienced sailor.Days into the journey, he became panicked by the light of a ship that he thought was trailing him and seemed to be approaching closer and closer."I started going as fast as possible," Ballestero said. "I thought, 'If it gets very close, I'll shoot.'"Seafaring is a Ballestero family tradition.From the time he was 3, his father took him aboard the fishing vessels he captained.When he turned 18, he took a job on a fishing boat in southern Argentina. Off the coast of Patagonia, one of the most experienced fishermen aboard gave him a piece of advice that would become a way of life."Go see the world," the fisherman said.And so he did.Ballestero has spent much of his life sailing, with stops in Venezuela, Sri Lanka, Bali, Hawaii, Costa Rica, Brazil, Alaska and Spain.He has tagged sea turtles and whales for conservation organizations and spent summers working as a skipper aboard boats owned by wealthy Europeans.He bought his sailboat, an Ohlson 29 named the Skua, in 2017, hoping to take it on a loop around the world. It proved up to the task of traversing an ocean on a planet plunged into crisis mode."I wasn't afraid, but I did have a lot of uncertainty," he said. "It was very strange to sail in the middle of a pandemic with humanity teetering around me."Sailing can be a lonely passion, and it was particularly so on this voyage for Ballestero, who each night tuned into the news on a radio for 30 minutes to take stock of how the virus was rippling across the globe."I kept thinking about whether this would be my last trip," he said.The expansiveness of the ocean notwithstanding, Ballestero felt he was in a quarantine of sorts, imprisoned by an unrelenting stream of foreboding thoughts about what the future held."I was locked up in my own freedom," he recalled.On a particularly trying day, he turned to a bottle of whiskey for solace. But drinking only increased his anxiety. With his nerves frayed, Ballestero said he found himself praying and resetting his relationship with God."Faith keeps you standing in these situations," he said. "I learned about myself; this voyage gave me lots of humility."Several weeks into the trip, when his spirits were low, Ballestero said he was buoyed by wildlife sightings that felt like omens.He found solace in a pod of dolphins that swam alongside his boat, on and off, for some 2,000 miles."They would go and come back," he said. "And one day, they seemed to say goodbye."During a day when he had drunk heavily, he spotted a large bird cruising nearby. It turned out to be a skua, the bird his boat is named after."It was as if the bird was telling me not to give up, to keep going," he said.One day, when he tired of canned food, Ballestero got a fishing rod and scanned a school of mahi-mahi. But he had a sudden reluctance to cast out a line."I didn't want to kill one. It felt like killing a person," he said. "I used to be a fisherman, but after that experience it's hard for me to kill now."He went back to eating canned tuna.When he was approaching the Americas, a brutal wave rattled the boat some 150 miles from Vitoria, Brazil, he said. That episode forced him to make an unplanned pit stop in Vitoria, adding about 10 days to a trip he had expected to take 75 days.During that stop, Ballestero learned that his brother had told reporters in Argentina about the voyage, which enthralled people who were bored and cooped up at home. At the urging of friends, he created an Instagram account to document the final leg of the trip.When he made it to his native Mar del Plata, on June 17, he was startled by the hero's welcome he received."Entering my port where my father had his sailboat, where he taught me so many things and where I learned how to sail and where all this originated, gave me the taste of a mission accomplished," he said.A medical professional administered a test for COVID-19 on the dock. Within 72 hours, after the test came back negative, he was allowed to set foot on Argentine soil.While he did not get to celebrate his father's 90th birthday in May, he did make it home in time for Father's Day."What I lived is a dream," Ballestero said. "But I have a strong desire to keep on sailing."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company


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  • 54/81   How one teaspoon of Amazon soil teems with fungal life
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Scientists discover hundreds of different fungi in Amazonian soil, thought to play a vital role in nature.

    Scientists discover hundreds of different fungi in Amazonian soil, thought to play a vital role in nature.


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  • 55/81   Washing machines' microplastic filters 'untested'
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Filters can cut ocean-bound microplastics from washing machines, but more tests are needed, study finds.

    Filters can cut ocean-bound microplastics from washing machines, but more tests are needed, study finds.


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  • 56/81   Space Adventures looks for a customer to do a spacewalk after Russia gives its OK
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    BELLEVUE, Wash. — Russian space officials say that they've signed off on a commercial deal with Virginia-based Space Adventures to fly two customers to the International Space Station in 2023 — and that one of those customers would be allowed to do a spacewalk. Space Adventures' co-founder and chairman, Eric Anderson, told GeekWire that the company is now checking to see who's interested. "There is no specific client who's been contracted for this one," said Anderson, who has his office in Bellevue even though Space Adventures is headquartered in Virginia. "We're looking for clients." Space Adventures has talked about selling… Read More

    BELLEVUE, Wash. — Russian space officials say that they've signed off on a commercial deal with Virginia-based Space Adventures to fly two customers to the International Space Station in 2023 — and that one of those customers would be allowed to do a spacewalk. Space Adventures' co-founder and chairman, Eric Anderson, told GeekWire that the company is now checking to see who's interested. "There is no specific client who's been contracted for this one," said Anderson, who has his office in Bellevue even though Space Adventures is headquartered in Virginia. "We're looking for clients." Space Adventures has talked about selling… Read More


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  • 57/81   Black women scientists missing from textbooks, study finds
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Scientists portrayed in biology textbooks are predominantly white men, according to a US study.

    Scientists portrayed in biology textbooks are predominantly white men, according to a US study.


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  • 58/81   Britain's 'blindingly cool' engineering innovation
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Conceptual still-life photographer Ted Humble-Smith celebrates 50 years of world-beating technology.

    Conceptual still-life photographer Ted Humble-Smith celebrates 50 years of world-beating technology.


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  • 59/81   Allen Institute will host $40.5M brain research center to map the effects of Alzheimer’s disease
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    A $40.5 million collaborative research center headquartered at Seattle's Allen Institute aims to create high-resolution maps of brains ravaged by Alzheimer's disease, to trace new paths to early diagnosis and treatment. The center will draw upon expertise not only at the institute, but also at UW Medicine and Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute. Funding for the next five years comes from the National Institute on Aging, part of the National Institutes of Health. Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia affect 5.8 million Americans, and by 2050, that number is expected to rise to nearly 14 million. It's the sixth-leading… Read More

    A $40.5 million collaborative research center headquartered at Seattle's Allen Institute aims to create high-resolution maps of brains ravaged by Alzheimer's disease, to trace new paths to early diagnosis and treatment. The center will draw upon expertise not only at the institute, but also at UW Medicine and Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute. Funding for the next five years comes from the National Institute on Aging, part of the National Institutes of Health. Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia affect 5.8 million Americans, and by 2050, that number is expected to rise to nearly 14 million. It's the sixth-leading… Read More


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  • 60/81   Nasa Mars rover: Key questions about Perseverance
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    We answer some common questions about the America's Perseverance rover mission to Mars.

    We answer some common questions about the America's Perseverance rover mission to Mars.


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  • 61/81   Relativity makes deals with Vandenberg AFB and Iridium for California launches
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Relativity Space, a startup that was born in Seattle but grew up in Los Angeles, says it has signed an agreement to develop launch facilities at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, and a contract with Iridium to launch satellites from those facilities. The flurry of announcements marks a significant expansion for a company that barely existed five years ago but has raised $185 million since then. Relativity is gearing up to build rocket parts using giant 3-D printers in Southern California, testing rocket engines at NASA's Stennis Space Center in Mississippi and creating a launch complex at Cape Canaveral… Read More

    Relativity Space, a startup that was born in Seattle but grew up in Los Angeles, says it has signed an agreement to develop launch facilities at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, and a contract with Iridium to launch satellites from those facilities. The flurry of announcements marks a significant expansion for a company that barely existed five years ago but has raised $185 million since then. Relativity is gearing up to build rocket parts using giant 3-D printers in Southern California, testing rocket engines at NASA's Stennis Space Center in Mississippi and creating a launch complex at Cape Canaveral… Read More


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  • 62/81   Once again, US-Russia tensions soar despite Trump
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Donald Trump has spent much of the past four years musing about warmer ties with Russia.  Top Democrats have demanded answers and even some Republicans have urged retaliation after reports, first published by The New York Times, that a Russian unit offered rewards to Taliban-linked militants to kill US-led forces in Afghanistan.  The furor comes weeks after Trump again offered an olive branch to President Vladimir Putin, speaking of inviting him to an expanded summit of the Group of Seven, from which Russia was kicked out over its 2014 takeover of Crimea.

    Donald Trump has spent much of the past four years musing about warmer ties with Russia. Top Democrats have demanded answers and even some Republicans have urged retaliation after reports, first published by The New York Times, that a Russian unit offered rewards to Taliban-linked militants to kill US-led forces in Afghanistan. The furor comes weeks after Trump again offered an olive branch to President Vladimir Putin, speaking of inviting him to an expanded summit of the Group of Seven, from which Russia was kicked out over its 2014 takeover of Crimea.


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  • 63/81   AP FACT CHECK: Actually, 20% of US lives in a virus hot spot
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    It’s been a frequent Trump administration talking point on the recent spike in COVID-19 infections: Don’t worry, only a small sliver of U.S. counties is at greater risk.  In offering this reassurance, Vice President Mike Pence and Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar have said that only 3% or 4% of counties in the country are seeing a surge in cases.  Focus on the “encouraging signs,' Pence told senators last week.

    It’s been a frequent Trump administration talking point on the recent spike in COVID-19 infections: Don’t worry, only a small sliver of U.S. counties is at greater risk. In offering this reassurance, Vice President Mike Pence and Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar have said that only 3% or 4% of counties in the country are seeing a surge in cases. Focus on the “encouraging signs,' Pence told senators last week.


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  • 64/81   Trump news: White House denies intelligence on Russian bounty threat and Reddit bans supporters's forum as Twitch suspends president's account
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Donald Trump has been made the subject of an arrest warrant by Iran over the US killing of the country’s top general Qassem Soleimani on 3 January, with Tehran appealing to Interpol for help in enforcing it.The president has meanwhile insisted he was not briefed by intelligence officials over an alleged Russian plot to pay out bounties to Taliban-linked militia in exchange for targeting American and British soldiers in Afghanistan to sow unrest, after the president was accused of sitting on the report by his domestic political rivals.

    Donald Trump has been made the subject of an arrest warrant by Iran over the US killing of the country’s top general Qassem Soleimani on 3 January, with Tehran appealing to Interpol for help in enforcing it.The president has meanwhile insisted he was not briefed by intelligence officials over an alleged Russian plot to pay out bounties to Taliban-linked militia in exchange for targeting American and British soldiers in Afghanistan to sow unrest, after the president was accused of sitting on the report by his domestic political rivals.


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  • 65/81   Democrats to unveil bold new climate plan to phase out emissions by 2050
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    * Report to outline aim to reduce emissions to 88% of 2010 levels  * Huge sums for public transport and proposals for green vehicles House Democrats will unveil an aggressive climate crisis “action plan” on Tuesday to nearly eliminate US emissions by 2050, according to summary documents reviewed by the Guardian.The net-zero emissions goal is what United Nations leaders and the scientific community say the world must achieve to avoid the worst of rising temperatures, and it’s what the Democratic presidential nominee, Joe Biden, says he would pursue if he were to win the White House in November.The Democrats’ proposal, referred to in a two-page summary as a “congressional action plan” and a “roadmap”, calls for interim targets to assess progress and make sure fossil fuel pollution is declining, particularly in communities of color that have suffered environmental injustices.The House speaker, Nancy Pelosi, will announce the plan, compiled by the House select committee on the climate crisis that is chaired by the Florida congresswoman Kathy Castor, at an event in front of the US Capitol on Tuesday morning.The more than 538-page report will include hundreds of policy recommendations focused on 12 key pillars, according to a separate outline.Modeling on a subset of those recommendations by the firm energy innovation showed they would cut net US greenhouse gas emissions by 37% below 2010 levels in 2030, and 88% below 2010 levels in 2050, according to the report outline. The remaining 12% of emissions cuts would have to come from hard-to-decarbonize sectors, including heavy-duty truck transportation, industry and agriculture.The proposal outline recommends a clean energy standard for net-zero electricity by 2040 and net-zero new buildings by 2030. It calls for only zero-emitting new vehicles to be sold by 2035, and it advocates for doubling funding for public transit.The plan provides a “roadmap for Congress to build a prosperous, clean energy economy that values workers, advances environmental justice, and is prepared to meet the challenges of the climate crisis”, according to the documents.Leah Stokes, an assistant professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara, who studies climate policy, called the plan “ambitious and comprehensive”.“It shows that the committee has been listening to stakeholders, and has watched the Democratic primary carefully. Clearly they have learned from climate champions like [Washington] Governor Jay Inslee,” she said.“I am very heartened to see the detail and ambition that the committee has put forward – it shows that the Democratic party is waking up to the scale and urgency of the climate crisis.”However, the plan has no chance of passing a Republican-controlled Senate, and would be a difficult sell even for some Democrats if their party took back that chamber and won the White House from Donald Trump. The president has vowed to exit the Paris climate agreement and has rescinded the country’s national climate efforts.Democrats will tout that the plan would provide almost $8tn in climate and health benefits through the middle of the century, but Republicans are sure to zero in on the proposal’s costs, arguing that they will stifle an already struggling economy.Investments would also be made to stem and respond to climate impacts, including water infrastructure to handle increased flooding and a next-generation 911 system to make sure wireless communications networks are reliable during disasters.The plan would aim to reduce methane leaks from the oil and gas sector 90% by 2030, noted Stokes, who reviewed the full report.Oil and gas companies would no longer get “unnecessary tax breaks” and the US would place a price on carbon to make companies pay for their pollution. Under the plan, Congress would also implement policies to make sure heavy industries cut pollution in vulnerable communities, so that poor Americans and communities of color do not suffer from the transition.The roadmap would “put [environmental justice] at the center of federal climate and environmental policy.”It would also establish a national climate adaptation program and protect at least 30% of all US lands and ocean areas by 2030.A national economic transition office would help displaced workers, and coal industry veterans would get healthcare support.Finally, the proposal would invest in “climate literacy”.“Turning this plan into reality will build a safer, healthier, and fairer America, restore our global climate leadership, enhance our national security, and provide a livable climate for today’s youth and future generations,” the documents say.

    * Report to outline aim to reduce emissions to 88% of 2010 levels * Huge sums for public transport and proposals for green vehicles House Democrats will unveil an aggressive climate crisis “action plan” on Tuesday to nearly eliminate US emissions by 2050, according to summary documents reviewed by the Guardian.The net-zero emissions goal is what United Nations leaders and the scientific community say the world must achieve to avoid the worst of rising temperatures, and it’s what the Democratic presidential nominee, Joe Biden, says he would pursue if he were to win the White House in November.The Democrats’ proposal, referred to in a two-page summary as a “congressional action plan” and a “roadmap”, calls for interim targets to assess progress and make sure fossil fuel pollution is declining, particularly in communities of color that have suffered environmental injustices.The House speaker, Nancy Pelosi, will announce the plan, compiled by the House select committee on the climate crisis that is chaired by the Florida congresswoman Kathy Castor, at an event in front of the US Capitol on Tuesday morning.The more than 538-page report will include hundreds of policy recommendations focused on 12 key pillars, according to a separate outline.Modeling on a subset of those recommendations by the firm energy innovation showed they would cut net US greenhouse gas emissions by 37% below 2010 levels in 2030, and 88% below 2010 levels in 2050, according to the report outline. The remaining 12% of emissions cuts would have to come from hard-to-decarbonize sectors, including heavy-duty truck transportation, industry and agriculture.The proposal outline recommends a clean energy standard for net-zero electricity by 2040 and net-zero new buildings by 2030. It calls for only zero-emitting new vehicles to be sold by 2035, and it advocates for doubling funding for public transit.The plan provides a “roadmap for Congress to build a prosperous, clean energy economy that values workers, advances environmental justice, and is prepared to meet the challenges of the climate crisis”, according to the documents.Leah Stokes, an assistant professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara, who studies climate policy, called the plan “ambitious and comprehensive”.“It shows that the committee has been listening to stakeholders, and has watched the Democratic primary carefully. Clearly they have learned from climate champions like [Washington] Governor Jay Inslee,” she said.“I am very heartened to see the detail and ambition that the committee has put forward – it shows that the Democratic party is waking up to the scale and urgency of the climate crisis.”However, the plan has no chance of passing a Republican-controlled Senate, and would be a difficult sell even for some Democrats if their party took back that chamber and won the White House from Donald Trump. The president has vowed to exit the Paris climate agreement and has rescinded the country’s national climate efforts.Democrats will tout that the plan would provide almost $8tn in climate and health benefits through the middle of the century, but Republicans are sure to zero in on the proposal’s costs, arguing that they will stifle an already struggling economy.Investments would also be made to stem and respond to climate impacts, including water infrastructure to handle increased flooding and a next-generation 911 system to make sure wireless communications networks are reliable during disasters.The plan would aim to reduce methane leaks from the oil and gas sector 90% by 2030, noted Stokes, who reviewed the full report.Oil and gas companies would no longer get “unnecessary tax breaks” and the US would place a price on carbon to make companies pay for their pollution. Under the plan, Congress would also implement policies to make sure heavy industries cut pollution in vulnerable communities, so that poor Americans and communities of color do not suffer from the transition.The roadmap would “put [environmental justice] at the center of federal climate and environmental policy.”It would also establish a national climate adaptation program and protect at least 30% of all US lands and ocean areas by 2030.A national economic transition office would help displaced workers, and coal industry veterans would get healthcare support.Finally, the proposal would invest in “climate literacy”.“Turning this plan into reality will build a safer, healthier, and fairer America, restore our global climate leadership, enhance our national security, and provide a livable climate for today’s youth and future generations,” the documents say.


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  • 66/81   Distancing from Trump? Some Republicans step up critiques
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    For more than three years, President Donald Trump instilled such fear in the Republican Party's leaders that most kept criticism of his turbulent leadership or inconsistent politics to themselves.  Four months before voters decide the Republican president's reelection, some in Trump's party are daring to say the quiet part out loud as Trump struggles to navigate competing national crises and a scattershot campaign message.  “He is losing,” former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, a Trump friend and confidant, said Sunday of Trump’s reelection prospects on ABC’s “This Week.”

    For more than three years, President Donald Trump instilled such fear in the Republican Party's leaders that most kept criticism of his turbulent leadership or inconsistent politics to themselves. Four months before voters decide the Republican president's reelection, some in Trump's party are daring to say the quiet part out loud as Trump struggles to navigate competing national crises and a scattershot campaign message. “He is losing,” former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, a Trump friend and confidant, said Sunday of Trump’s reelection prospects on ABC’s “This Week.”


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  • 67/81   Interpol Rejects Iran's Arrest Warrant For President Trump
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The International Criminal Police Organization has rejected Iran's request to help enforce an arrest warrant for President Donald Trump.  Iran's state-run news agency, IRNA, reports the country issued an arrest warrant for President Trump and 35 other people on Monday.  According to a Tehran prosecutor, they're facing 'murder and terrorism charges' for carrying out the drone strike that killed Major Gen. Qassem Soleimani in January.

    The International Criminal Police Organization has rejected Iran's request to help enforce an arrest warrant for President Donald Trump. Iran's state-run news agency, IRNA, reports the country issued an arrest warrant for President Trump and 35 other people on Monday. According to a Tehran prosecutor, they're facing 'murder and terrorism charges' for carrying out the drone strike that killed Major Gen. Qassem Soleimani in January.


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  • 68/81   Cape Cod officials warn of white sharks ahead of July Fourth
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Cape Cod's beaches and towns may be quieter because of the coronavirus pandemic, but officials are reminding visitors ahead of the July Fourth holiday that the famous Massachusetts destination remains a popular getaway for other summertime travelers: great white sharks.  Cape Cod National Seashore Chief Ranger Leslie Reynolds warned at a news conference that the powerful predators are coming close enough to shore to be a concern for swimmers.  Officials in Orleans also have documented at least two shark attacks on seals in recent days, the Cape Cod Times reports.

    Cape Cod's beaches and towns may be quieter because of the coronavirus pandemic, but officials are reminding visitors ahead of the July Fourth holiday that the famous Massachusetts destination remains a popular getaway for other summertime travelers: great white sharks. Cape Cod National Seashore Chief Ranger Leslie Reynolds warned at a news conference that the powerful predators are coming close enough to shore to be a concern for swimmers. Officials in Orleans also have documented at least two shark attacks on seals in recent days, the Cape Cod Times reports.


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  • 69/81   Roberts a pivotal vote in the Supreme Court's big opinions
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The biggest cases of the Supreme Court term so far have a surprising common thread.  On a court with five Republican appointees, the liberal justices have been in the majority in rulings that make workplace discrimination against gay and transgender people illegal, protect young immigrants from deportation and, as of Monday, struck down a Louisiana law that restricted abortion providers.  As surprising, Chief Justice John Roberts, a conservative nominated by President George W. Bush who has led the court for nearly 15 years, has joined his liberal colleagues in all three.

    The biggest cases of the Supreme Court term so far have a surprising common thread. On a court with five Republican appointees, the liberal justices have been in the majority in rulings that make workplace discrimination against gay and transgender people illegal, protect young immigrants from deportation and, as of Monday, struck down a Louisiana law that restricted abortion providers. As surprising, Chief Justice John Roberts, a conservative nominated by President George W. Bush who has led the court for nearly 15 years, has joined his liberal colleagues in all three.


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  • 70/81   Iran charges President Trump with ‘murder,' issues arrest warrant
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Iran has issued an arrest warrant for President Trump tied to the Jan. 3 U.S. drone strike that killed major general Qassem Soleimani.  Tehran prosecutor Ali Alqasimehr made the announcement Monday, stating that Trump is one of more than 30 suspects Iran’s government wants to put on trial for the killing of Soleimani in Iraq.  FILE - In this Sept. 18, 2016 photo provided by an official website of the office of the Iranian supreme leader, Revolutionary Guard Gen. Qassem Soleimani, center, attends a meeting in Tehran, Iran.

    Iran has issued an arrest warrant for President Trump tied to the Jan. 3 U.S. drone strike that killed major general Qassem Soleimani. Tehran prosecutor Ali Alqasimehr made the announcement Monday, stating that Trump is one of more than 30 suspects Iran’s government wants to put on trial for the killing of Soleimani in Iraq. FILE - In this Sept. 18, 2016 photo provided by an official website of the office of the Iranian supreme leader, Revolutionary Guard Gen. Qassem Soleimani, center, attends a meeting in Tehran, Iran.


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  • 71/81   Mike Pompeo’s Fight to Punish Iran at the UN Heats Up
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    And Iran is going on the diplomatic offensive.

    And Iran is going on the diplomatic offensive.


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  • 72/81   As coronavirus spreads to people under 40, it's making them sicker — and for longer — than once thought
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Once assumed to be safe from the dangers of COVID-19, younger adults share their prolonged struggles with the disease.

    Once assumed to be safe from the dangers of COVID-19, younger adults share their prolonged struggles with the disease.


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  • 73/81   As Texas coronavirus cases surge, Pence attends megachurch service
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Vice President Mike Pence peeled off his White House-branded mask and smiled at a crowd of thousands Sunday morning. Yet he wasn’t technically headlining a political rally — he was at church in a state that has seen a dramatic spike in coronavirus cases.

    Vice President Mike Pence peeled off his White House-branded mask and smiled at a crowd of thousands Sunday morning. Yet he wasn’t technically headlining a political rally — he was at church in a state that has seen a dramatic spike in coronavirus cases.


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  • 74/81   Americans confront 'very scary' next phase of coronavirus pandemic as new infections spike across the South
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Calling the recent surge in coronavirus cases in states like Florida, Texas and Arizona “very scary,” Yahoo News Medical Contributor Dr. Kavita Patel said she fears the virus will continue to flare up in communities around the country throughout the summer.

    Calling the recent surge in coronavirus cases in states like Florida, Texas and Arizona “very scary,” Yahoo News Medical Contributor Dr. Kavita Patel said she fears the virus will continue to flare up in communities around the country throughout the summer.


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  • 75/81   Citing 'irrational fears' of killer pandemic, Republicans fight face masks in Congress
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    The face mask culture war arrived in full force on Capitol Hill on Friday when a bitter dispute erupted in a congressional hearing room, with Republicans refusing to wear face coverings and Democrats insisting that they do so. 

    The face mask culture war arrived in full force on Capitol Hill on Friday when a bitter dispute erupted in a congressional hearing room, with Republicans refusing to wear face coverings and Democrats insisting that they do so. 


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  • 76/81   Pence hails 'remarkable progress' on COVID-19 as new cases surge in many states
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Vice President Mike Pence hailed “remarkable progress” toward returning the nation to normalcy at the first public briefing of the coronavirus task force in nearly two months on Friday, a day the U.S. saw a new high for coronavirus cases recorded.

    Vice President Mike Pence hailed “remarkable progress” toward returning the nation to normalcy at the first public briefing of the coronavirus task force in nearly two months on Friday, a day the U.S. saw a new high for coronavirus cases recorded.


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  • 77/81   New Yahoo News/YouGov coronavirus poll: Two-thirds of Americans say masks should be mandatory, siding with Biden over Trump
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    As coronavirus case counts soar, a new Yahoo News/YouGov poll shows that two-thirds of Americans now share Joe Biden’s position on masks — even as Republicans, and President Trump, continue to oppose it.  

    As coronavirus case counts soar, a new Yahoo News/YouGov poll shows that two-thirds of Americans now share Joe Biden’s position on masks — even as Republicans, and President Trump, continue to oppose it.  


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  • 78/81   CDC maps show Florida's deepening coronavirus crisis, as state shatters daily case record
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    The Sunshine State reported nearly 9,000 new cases on Friday as its death toll ticked over 3,400.

    The Sunshine State reported nearly 9,000 new cases on Friday as its death toll ticked over 3,400.


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  • 79/81   In face of pandemic, Trump pushes Obamacare repeal
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    If the health care program is overturned by the Supreme Court, millions of Americans could lose their insurance coverage.

    If the health care program is overturned by the Supreme Court, millions of Americans could lose their insurance coverage.


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  • 80/81   Beto O'Rourke thinks Texas is 'Biden's to lose'
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Although his presidential bid failed to gain traction, former Rep. Beto O’Rourke came within a hair of becoming a senator from Texas in 2018 and performed better than any Democrat in a statewide race in nearly 30 years. 

    Although his presidential bid failed to gain traction, former Rep. Beto O’Rourke came within a hair of becoming a senator from Texas in 2018 and performed better than any Democrat in a statewide race in nearly 30 years. 


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  • 81/81   New U.S. COVID-19 cases surpass peak set in April as states rethink strategy
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    States stretching from Florida to California are seeing record highs in cases as hospitals begin to fill up and Republican governors urge the use of masks.

    States stretching from Florida to California are seeing record highs in cases as hospitals begin to fill up and Republican governors urge the use of masks.


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