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News Slideshows (07/27/2020 15 hours)


  • 1/81   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


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    Press Review


    Keenan Allen   Nelson Del Valle   Nadler   Chris Dodd   Diamond and Silk   Toa Alta   Tom Cotton   WE LOVE YOU ZAYN   Keemstar   Thanksgiving Day   lovren   Today is Monday   New Week   John Oliver   James Woods   NSYNC   Ted Nugent   Necessary Evil   Rubi Rose   Trojan Horse Candidate   Rodney Mullen   shindong   
  • 2/81   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


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  • 3/81   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


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  • 4/81   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


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  • 5/81   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


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  • 6/81   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


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  • 7/81   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


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  • 8/81   Do star athletes make too much money?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    With athletes in America's biggest sports leagues raking in salaries worth $300 million and more, is it time to reign in the big spending or do superstars deserve the big bucks they make?

    With athletes in America's biggest sports leagues raking in salaries worth $300 million and more, is it time to reign in the big spending or do superstars deserve the big bucks they make?


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  • 9/81   Live animal mascots: Cute or exploitative?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?


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  • 10/81   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


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  • 11/81   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


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  • 12/81   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


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  • 13/81   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


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  • 14/81   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


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  • 15/81   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


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  • 16/81   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


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  • 17/81   PHOTOS: Fluorescent turtle embryo wins forty-fifth annual Nikon Small World Competition

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.


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  • 18/81   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


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  • 19/81   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


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  • 20/81   What the CIA thinks of your anti-virus program

    PARIS (AP) — Peppering the 8,000 pages of purported Central Intelligence Agency hacking data released Tuesday by WikiLeaks are reviews of some of the world's most popular anti-virus products.

    PARIS (AP) — Peppering the 8,000 pages of purported Central Intelligence Agency hacking data released Tuesday by WikiLeaks are reviews of some of the world's most popular anti-virus products.


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  • 21/81   Google Patents Sticky Car Hood to Trap Pedestrians in a Collision

    The patent calls for a giant sticker to be placed on the front end of a vehicle, with a special coating over the layer that is only broken when something collides with the vehicle, exposing the adhesive and helping the colliding object to remain on the vehicle.  The idea is to prevent a pedestrian from being thrown after the impact and potentially sustaining even more injuries.

    The patent calls for a giant sticker to be placed on the front end of a vehicle, with a special coating over the layer that is only broken when something collides with the vehicle, exposing the adhesive and helping the colliding object to remain on the vehicle. The idea is to prevent a pedestrian from being thrown after the impact and potentially sustaining even more injuries.


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  • 22/81   Relax, Your Instagram Feed Likely Won't Change Tomorrow

    Relax, your Instagram feed likely isn't changing tomorrow.The great "Insta-freakout" of 2016 was unleashed this morning by a slew of celebrities, bloggers and social media aficionados after they alerted followers to turn on post notifications for future access to their photos, videos and messages. ...

    Relax, your Instagram feed likely isn't changing tomorrow.The great "Insta-freakout" of 2016 was unleashed this morning by a slew of celebrities, bloggers and social media aficionados after they alerted followers to turn on post notifications for future access to their photos, videos and messages. ...


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  • 23/81   'Hack the Pentagon' and get paid legally in new program

    Attention hackers: Time to re-watch “WarGames” and crack your knuckles, the Pentagon is about to pay you to break into some government systems.

    Attention hackers: Time to re-watch “WarGames” and crack your knuckles, the Pentagon is about to pay you to break into some government systems.


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  • 24/81   Elon Musk's Hyperloop Vision Could Be Ready for Passengers by 2018

    The Hyperloop, Elon Musk's vision of launching humans through pods inside a high-speed transportation system, could be ready for passengers by 2018, according to a company building a transportation track in California.  One company working to make Musk's vision a reality, Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, said it has filed for construction permits in Quay Valley, California, for a 5-mile track.  'We are announcing the filing of the first building permit to Kings County to the building of the first full-scale hyperloop, not a test track,' Bibop Gresta, the chief operating officer of Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, said today at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, during a CNBC/TradeShift event.

    The Hyperloop, Elon Musk's vision of launching humans through pods inside a high-speed transportation system, could be ready for passengers by 2018, according to a company building a transportation track in California. One company working to make Musk's vision a reality, Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, said it has filed for construction permits in Quay Valley, California, for a 5-mile track. 'We are announcing the filing of the first building permit to Kings County to the building of the first full-scale hyperloop, not a test track,' Bibop Gresta, the chief operating officer of Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, said today at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, during a CNBC/TradeShift event.


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  • 25/81   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


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  • 26/81   Man Proposes by Text Message While Stranded at Chicago's O’Hare Airport

    An Arizona man waiting to fly home to propose to his girlfriend was forced to propose to her via text message after spending 50 hours stranded at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport.  Danny Roderique, of Phoenix, had the diamond engagement ring in his pocket but the delay got in the way of the proposal he’d planned.  “I’ve been stranded now in the airport for 50 hours,” Roderique told a reporter from ABC affiliate WLS-TV while still waiting at O’Hare on Monday.

    An Arizona man waiting to fly home to propose to his girlfriend was forced to propose to her via text message after spending 50 hours stranded at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport. Danny Roderique, of Phoenix, had the diamond engagement ring in his pocket but the delay got in the way of the proposal he’d planned. “I’ve been stranded now in the airport for 50 hours,” Roderique told a reporter from ABC affiliate WLS-TV while still waiting at O’Hare on Monday.


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  • 27/81   Twitter Warns Some Users Over Possible Government Hacking

    It's unclear how many people received a letter from Twitter.  In October, Facebook said it would begin issuing alerts to users who the social network believes are being targeted by state-sponsored hackers, according to a message posted by Alex Stamos, Facebook's chief security officer.

    It's unclear how many people received a letter from Twitter. In October, Facebook said it would begin issuing alerts to users who the social network believes are being targeted by state-sponsored hackers, according to a message posted by Alex Stamos, Facebook's chief security officer.


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  • 28/81   Facebook Notifications Get Even More Personal

    Facebook notifications may now be your first stop in the morning to catch up on everything from friends' news to weather, sports scores and what to expect later in the day.  The social network announced this week it will be rolling out expanded, personalized notifications in the Facebook across iOS and Android devices for users in the United States.  The mobile update is bringing a set of new card-like notifications that will include information such as sports scores for teams you have liked, TV shows, weather information and friends' life events, among other updates.

    Facebook notifications may now be your first stop in the morning to catch up on everything from friends' news to weather, sports scores and what to expect later in the day. The social network announced this week it will be rolling out expanded, personalized notifications in the Facebook across iOS and Android devices for users in the United States. The mobile update is bringing a set of new card-like notifications that will include information such as sports scores for teams you have liked, TV shows, weather information and friends' life events, among other updates.


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  • 29/81   How to Tell Which Apps Are Draining Your iPhone Battery

    Some iOS 9 users have complained Facebook's app has been excessively eating away at their battery life, even when the background app refresh setting is disabled.  It's unclear what possible issue may be causing the battery drain.  Tapping the list will show how much of the battery drain was spent when the app was running in the background.

    Some iOS 9 users have complained Facebook's app has been excessively eating away at their battery life, even when the background app refresh setting is disabled. It's unclear what possible issue may be causing the battery drain. Tapping the list will show how much of the battery drain was spent when the app was running in the background.


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  • 30/81   Armed Robbery Suspect Tries Using Uber as Getaway Car, Police Say

    A 23-year-old man suspected of armed robbery tried to take an Uber car to help him get away after he held up a store outside Baltimore, police said.  The suspect, Dashawn Terrell Cochran, was at a store in Parkville, Maryland, early Wednesday morning when he allegedly took a bottle of Tylenol cold medicine to the register, the Baltimore County Police Department said.  Cochran was seen getting into the back of a silver Lexus, and when officers pulled the car over, the driver said he was an Uber driver, police said.

    A 23-year-old man suspected of armed robbery tried to take an Uber car to help him get away after he held up a store outside Baltimore, police said. The suspect, Dashawn Terrell Cochran, was at a store in Parkville, Maryland, early Wednesday morning when he allegedly took a bottle of Tylenol cold medicine to the register, the Baltimore County Police Department said. Cochran was seen getting into the back of a silver Lexus, and when officers pulled the car over, the driver said he was an Uber driver, police said.


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  • 31/81   Drone Popularity Draws Concern From Pilots, Federal Officials

    Roughly 700,000 drones are expected to be sold in the United States this year, according to the Consumer Electronics Association.  The Federal Aviation Administration plans to meet with Walmart, which has 19 different kinds of drones for sale on its website, to teach salespeople about what it should tell its customers about safe drone operation.  The Consumer Electronics Association projects the U.S. drone market to climb above $100 million in revenue this year, an increase of more than 50 percent from last year’s total.

    Roughly 700,000 drones are expected to be sold in the United States this year, according to the Consumer Electronics Association. The Federal Aviation Administration plans to meet with Walmart, which has 19 different kinds of drones for sale on its website, to teach salespeople about what it should tell its customers about safe drone operation. The Consumer Electronics Association projects the U.S. drone market to climb above $100 million in revenue this year, an increase of more than 50 percent from last year’s total.


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  • 32/81   Carly Fiorina: Why She Wants Everyone to Throw Out Their Flip Phones

    Carly Fiorina is putting flip phone users on notice: You’re going to have to upgrade under a President Fiorina.  “How many of you have a flip phone?” Fiorina recently asked a town hall in South Carolina.  It’s all part of a vision the Republican presidential candidate has to give citizens a direct line of communication – literally – to the president.

    Carly Fiorina is putting flip phone users on notice: You’re going to have to upgrade under a President Fiorina. “How many of you have a flip phone?” Fiorina recently asked a town hall in South Carolina. It’s all part of a vision the Republican presidential candidate has to give citizens a direct line of communication – literally – to the president.


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  • 33/81   How a 'Programming Error' Led to an Oregon Couple's $2 Million Cell Phone Bill

    A couple in Oregon say they spent 10 months trying to clear up a whopping $2 million phone bill, which they say has prevented them from buying the home of their dreams.  Ken Slusher and his girlfriend, of Damascus, Oregon, have a balance of $2,156,593.64 on a Verizon Wireless bill that was for a wireless account that they opened in November.  'Yeah, it's been very stressful to say the least,' Slusher told KPTV.com.

    A couple in Oregon say they spent 10 months trying to clear up a whopping $2 million phone bill, which they say has prevented them from buying the home of their dreams. Ken Slusher and his girlfriend, of Damascus, Oregon, have a balance of $2,156,593.64 on a Verizon Wireless bill that was for a wireless account that they opened in November. 'Yeah, it's been very stressful to say the least,' Slusher told KPTV.com.


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  • 34/81   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


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  • 35/81   SAP Plans To Take Qualtrics Public Via US IPO
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    German software maker SAP AG (SAP) announced plans on Sunday to take its Qualtrics unit public through an initial public offering (IPO) in the US.Following the IPO, SAP intends to remain the majority owner of Qualtrics, which is part of its cloud portfolio. The main objective behind the IPO is to strengthen Qualtrics’ ability to capture its full market potential within the experience management industry. The move will help Qualtrics to expand its footprint both within SAP’s customer base and beyond, the company said.“SAP’s acquisition of Qualtrics has been a great success and has outperformed our expectations with 2019 cloud growth in excess of 40%, demonstrating very strong performance in the current setup,” SAP CEO Christian Klein said. “SAP will remain Qualtrics’ largest and most important go-to-market and research and development (R&D) partner while giving Qualtrics greater independence to broaden its base by partnering and building out the entire experience management ecosystem.”SAP added that it has no intention of spinning off or divesting its 100% majority ownership. The IPO plan is not expected to have an impact on SAP’s 2020 or longer-term financial targets, the company said. SAP bought Qualtrics back in 2018 for $8 billion.The software maker’s shares have been on a gaining path since dropping to a low in March and are now trading 18% higher than at the start of the year.Wall Street analysts have a cautiously optimistic outlook on the stock as 5 out of 7 analysts covering the company in the past three months have Buys and 2 have Holds adding up to a Moderate Buy consensus. In light of the recent rally, the $158 average price target implies shares are fully valued. (See SAP stock analysis on TipRanks)   Meanwhile, Argus Research analyst Joseph Bonner on July 10 raised SAP’s price target to $175 (10% upside potential) from $145, saying that the updated price target still implies a forward earnings multiple of 28-times, which is below the peer average multiple of 42-times.Bonner maintained a Buy rating on the stock after SAP reported better-than-expected preliminary Q2 results and "strong" operating margins.The analyst pointed to management commentary on the gradual improvement during the quarter, with a "particular strong" recovery in software license revenue in the Asia Pacific region.  Related News:  Logitech Ramps Up Annual Profit Outlook As Q1 Income Leaps 75%  Synaptics Snaps Up DisplayLink For $305M In All-Cash Deal  Texas Instruments Provides Upbeat Sales Outlook; Top Analyst Sees 18% Upside

    German software maker SAP AG (SAP) announced plans on Sunday to take its Qualtrics unit public through an initial public offering (IPO) in the US.Following the IPO, SAP intends to remain the majority owner of Qualtrics, which is part of its cloud portfolio. The main objective behind the IPO is to strengthen Qualtrics’ ability to capture its full market potential within the experience management industry. The move will help Qualtrics to expand its footprint both within SAP’s customer base and beyond, the company said.“SAP’s acquisition of Qualtrics has been a great success and has outperformed our expectations with 2019 cloud growth in excess of 40%, demonstrating very strong performance in the current setup,” SAP CEO Christian Klein said. “SAP will remain Qualtrics’ largest and most important go-to-market and research and development (R&D) partner while giving Qualtrics greater independence to broaden its base by partnering and building out the entire experience management ecosystem.”SAP added that it has no intention of spinning off or divesting its 100% majority ownership. The IPO plan is not expected to have an impact on SAP’s 2020 or longer-term financial targets, the company said. SAP bought Qualtrics back in 2018 for $8 billion.The software maker’s shares have been on a gaining path since dropping to a low in March and are now trading 18% higher than at the start of the year.Wall Street analysts have a cautiously optimistic outlook on the stock as 5 out of 7 analysts covering the company in the past three months have Buys and 2 have Holds adding up to a Moderate Buy consensus. In light of the recent rally, the $158 average price target implies shares are fully valued. (See SAP stock analysis on TipRanks) Meanwhile, Argus Research analyst Joseph Bonner on July 10 raised SAP’s price target to $175 (10% upside potential) from $145, saying that the updated price target still implies a forward earnings multiple of 28-times, which is below the peer average multiple of 42-times.Bonner maintained a Buy rating on the stock after SAP reported better-than-expected preliminary Q2 results and "strong" operating margins.The analyst pointed to management commentary on the gradual improvement during the quarter, with a "particular strong" recovery in software license revenue in the Asia Pacific region. Related News: Logitech Ramps Up Annual Profit Outlook As Q1 Income Leaps 75% Synaptics Snaps Up DisplayLink For $305M In All-Cash Deal Texas Instruments Provides Upbeat Sales Outlook; Top Analyst Sees 18% Upside


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  • 36/81   Redgrave LLP Welcomes Vanessa Barsanti as a Partner in Los Angeles
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Redgrave LLP, the premier law firm focusing exclusively on eDiscovery and information law, is proud to announce today that Vanessa Barsanti has joined the Firm as a Partner in Los Angeles. Ms. Barsanti most recently served as Of Counsel at Kirkland & Ellis LLP, where she was a member of the eDiscovery Strategy team.

    Redgrave LLP, the premier law firm focusing exclusively on eDiscovery and information law, is proud to announce today that Vanessa Barsanti has joined the Firm as a Partner in Los Angeles. Ms. Barsanti most recently served as Of Counsel at Kirkland & Ellis LLP, where she was a member of the eDiscovery Strategy team.


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  • 37/81   Alani Nu Energy Drinks to be Featured in Kroger Stores Nationwide
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Alani Nu, a premium women's supplement and nutrition company, today announced the debut of their energy drinks in Kroger stores nationwide. Unwavering from their commitment to creating thoughtfully engineered, full of essential, health boosting nutrients, Alani Nu's Energy Drinks are designed with simple, filler free ingredients.

    Alani Nu, a premium women's supplement and nutrition company, today announced the debut of their energy drinks in Kroger stores nationwide. Unwavering from their commitment to creating thoughtfully engineered, full of essential, health boosting nutrients, Alani Nu's Energy Drinks are designed with simple, filler free ingredients.


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  • 38/81   ExxonMobil Discovers New Material To Boost Carbon Capture
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Energy giant ExxonMobil (XOM) has discovered a new material that could capture more than 90% of CO2 emitted from industrial sources, such as natural gas-fired power plants, using low-temperature steam, requiring less energy for the overall carbon capture process.Scientists from the company worked with the University of California, Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on the project.Laboratory tests indicate the patent-pending materials, known as tetraamine-functionalized metal organic frameworks, capture carbon dioxide emissions up to six times more effectively than conventional amine-based carbon capture technology, says Exxon.Using less energy to capture and remove carbon, the material has the potential to reduce the cost of the technology and eventually support commercial applications.By manipulating the structure of the metal organic framework material, the team of scientists and students demonstrated the ability to condense a surface area the size of a football field, into just one gram of mass – about the same as a paperclip – that acts as a sponge for CO2.“This innovative hybrid porous material has so far proven to be more effective, requires less heating and cooling, and captures more CO2 than current materials,” said ExxonMobil’s Vijay Swarup.According to Exxon, additional research and development will be needed to progress this technology to a larger scale pilot and ultimately to industrial scale.Shares in XOM have plunged 38% year-to-date, and analysts have a cautious Hold consensus on the stock. That’s with 12 recent hold ratings, vs just 1 buy rating and 3 sell ratings. Meanwhile the average analyst price target stands at $48 (11% upside potential).“ExxonMobil has historically been one of the most successful super-majors at investing through the business cycle and taking advantage of downturns by lowering its cost structure and high-grading its asset base. Unfortunately, its current efforts have been overrun by a weaker macro, leaving it in a challenging position” he adds.” comments RBC Capital’s Biraj Borkhataria.The analyst has a sell rating on the stock and $45 price target, adding “XOM must lean on its balance sheet heavily in order to stay the course. With limited visibility on a full recovery, we can see why this makes investors nervous.” (See XOM stock analysis on TipRanks).Related News:  Kratos Pops 9% On $400M US Skyborg Contract Award  NRG Buys Centrica’s Direct Energy For $3.63B To Boost U.S Reach  American Airlines Reports Pretax Loss of $4.3 Billion In 2Q

    Energy giant ExxonMobil (XOM) has discovered a new material that could capture more than 90% of CO2 emitted from industrial sources, such as natural gas-fired power plants, using low-temperature steam, requiring less energy for the overall carbon capture process.Scientists from the company worked with the University of California, Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on the project.Laboratory tests indicate the patent-pending materials, known as tetraamine-functionalized metal organic frameworks, capture carbon dioxide emissions up to six times more effectively than conventional amine-based carbon capture technology, says Exxon.Using less energy to capture and remove carbon, the material has the potential to reduce the cost of the technology and eventually support commercial applications.By manipulating the structure of the metal organic framework material, the team of scientists and students demonstrated the ability to condense a surface area the size of a football field, into just one gram of mass – about the same as a paperclip – that acts as a sponge for CO2.“This innovative hybrid porous material has so far proven to be more effective, requires less heating and cooling, and captures more CO2 than current materials,” said ExxonMobil’s Vijay Swarup.According to Exxon, additional research and development will be needed to progress this technology to a larger scale pilot and ultimately to industrial scale.Shares in XOM have plunged 38% year-to-date, and analysts have a cautious Hold consensus on the stock. That’s with 12 recent hold ratings, vs just 1 buy rating and 3 sell ratings. Meanwhile the average analyst price target stands at $48 (11% upside potential).“ExxonMobil has historically been one of the most successful super-majors at investing through the business cycle and taking advantage of downturns by lowering its cost structure and high-grading its asset base. Unfortunately, its current efforts have been overrun by a weaker macro, leaving it in a challenging position” he adds.” comments RBC Capital’s Biraj Borkhataria.The analyst has a sell rating on the stock and $45 price target, adding “XOM must lean on its balance sheet heavily in order to stay the course. With limited visibility on a full recovery, we can see why this makes investors nervous.” (See XOM stock analysis on TipRanks).Related News: Kratos Pops 9% On $400M US Skyborg Contract Award NRG Buys Centrica’s Direct Energy For $3.63B To Boost U.S Reach American Airlines Reports Pretax Loss of $4.3 Billion In 2Q


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  • 39/81   Global Boron Trifluoride Industry
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Amid the COVID-19 crisis, the global market for Boron Trifluoride estimated at US$221.7 Million in the year 2020, is projected to reach a revised size of US$281.5 Million by 2027, growing at aCAGR of 3.5% over the period 2020-2027. Purified, one of the segments analyzed in the report, is projected to record 3.7% CAGR and reach US$203.7 Million by the end of the analysis period. After an early analysis of the business implications of the pandemic and its induced economic crisis, growth in the High Purity segment is readjusted to a revised 2.9% CAGR for the next 7-year period. Read the full report: https://www.reportlinker.com/p05900595/?utm_source=PRN The U.S. Market is Estimated at $59.8 Million, While China is Forecast to Grow at 6.3% CAGR The Boron Trifluoride market in the U.S. is estimated at US$59.8 Million in the year 2020. China, the world`s second largest economy, is forecast to reach a projected market size of US$59 Million by the year 2027 trailing a CAGR of 6.3% over the analysis period 2020 to 2027. Among the other noteworthy geographic markets are Japan and Canada, each forecast to grow at 1% and 2.6% respectively over the 2020-2027 period. Within Europe, Germany is forecast to grow at approximately 1.7% CAGR.We bring years of research experience to this 9th edition of our report. The 379-page report presents concise insights into how the pandemic has impacted production and the buy side for 2020 and 2021. A short-term phased recovery by key geography is also addressed. Competitors identified in this market include, among others,

    Amid the COVID-19 crisis, the global market for Boron Trifluoride estimated at US$221.7 Million in the year 2020, is projected to reach a revised size of US$281.5 Million by 2027, growing at aCAGR of 3.5% over the period 2020-2027. Purified, one of the segments analyzed in the report, is projected to record 3.7% CAGR and reach US$203.7 Million by the end of the analysis period. After an early analysis of the business implications of the pandemic and its induced economic crisis, growth in the High Purity segment is readjusted to a revised 2.9% CAGR for the next 7-year period. Read the full report: https://www.reportlinker.com/p05900595/?utm_source=PRN The U.S. Market is Estimated at $59.8 Million, While China is Forecast to Grow at 6.3% CAGR The Boron Trifluoride market in the U.S. is estimated at US$59.8 Million in the year 2020. China, the world`s second largest economy, is forecast to reach a projected market size of US$59 Million by the year 2027 trailing a CAGR of 6.3% over the analysis period 2020 to 2027. Among the other noteworthy geographic markets are Japan and Canada, each forecast to grow at 1% and 2.6% respectively over the 2020-2027 period. Within Europe, Germany is forecast to grow at approximately 1.7% CAGR.We bring years of research experience to this 9th edition of our report. The 379-page report presents concise insights into how the pandemic has impacted production and the buy side for 2020 and 2021. A short-term phased recovery by key geography is also addressed. Competitors identified in this market include, among others,


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  • 40/81   Coronavirus live updates: Moderna could provide 1 billion vaccine doses in 2021; Swastika masks draw outrage
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    A $1 trillion relief bill may move forward. A North Korean city is on lockdown. Storms stoke pandemic fears. Latest on COVID-19.

    A $1 trillion relief bill may move forward. A North Korean city is on lockdown. Storms stoke pandemic fears. Latest on COVID-19.


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  • 41/81   KODW 2020 Goes Virtual
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The pandemic has catalysed the rapid adoption of digital technologies to keep businesses going, information flowing and peoples connected. As life returns to normal and economies begin to slowly revive, technologies must be interweaved with human-centred design to reimagine and reinvent a better future and society.

    The pandemic has catalysed the rapid adoption of digital technologies to keep businesses going, information flowing and peoples connected. As life returns to normal and economies begin to slowly revive, technologies must be interweaved with human-centred design to reimagine and reinvent a better future and society.


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  • 42/81   Iran moves mock aircraft carrier to sea amid U.S. tensions
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A satellite image from Maxar Technologies taken Sunday shows an Iranian fast boat speed toward the carrier, sending waves up in its wake.

    A satellite image from Maxar Technologies taken Sunday shows an Iranian fast boat speed toward the carrier, sending waves up in its wake.


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  • 43/81   People in the US have been receiving packages of jewelry that actually contain mysterious seeds from China, report says
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services has asked recipients not to plant the seeds that might be an "invasive plant species."

    The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services has asked recipients not to plant the seeds that might be an "invasive plant species."


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  • 44/81   Putin attends naval parade, promises new ships to navy
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    President Vladimir Putin said the Russian navy will get 40 new ships and vessels this year, as he attended a naval parade in St. Petersburg on Sunday marking the Navy Day in Russia.  The parade in St. Petersburg and the nearby town of Kronshtadt featured 46 ships and vessels and over 4,000 troops and aimed to “demonstrate the growing power of our navy,” Putin said Friday.

    President Vladimir Putin said the Russian navy will get 40 new ships and vessels this year, as he attended a naval parade in St. Petersburg on Sunday marking the Navy Day in Russia. The parade in St. Petersburg and the nearby town of Kronshtadt featured 46 ships and vessels and over 4,000 troops and aimed to “demonstrate the growing power of our navy,” Putin said Friday.


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  • 45/81   U.S. records 1,000 coronavirus deaths for fourth day, some progress seen
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    At least 1,019 fatalities due to COVID-19 were confirmed nationwide on Friday, following 1,140 on Thursday, 1,135 on Wednesday and 1,141 on Tuesday.  Total cases across the United States rose by at least 68,800 on Friday to over 4 million.  The numbers have been driven in large part by a surge in infections in Arizona, California, Florida, Texas and California.

    At least 1,019 fatalities due to COVID-19 were confirmed nationwide on Friday, following 1,140 on Thursday, 1,135 on Wednesday and 1,141 on Tuesday. Total cases across the United States rose by at least 68,800 on Friday to over 4 million. The numbers have been driven in large part by a surge in infections in Arizona, California, Florida, Texas and California.


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  • 46/81   Walmart won't enforce its own rules on mask-wearing because it fears staff could be attacked by shoppers angry at being challenged
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Walmart and several other chain stores bend face mask rules. Violence towards store staff from mask objectors have been reported across the US.

    Walmart and several other chain stores bend face mask rules. Violence towards store staff from mask objectors have been reported across the US.


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  • 47/81   Tom Cotton calls slavery 'necessary evil' in attack on New York Times' 1619 Project
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    * Republican gives interview to Arkansas Democrat-Gazette  * Senator wants to ‘save’ US history from New York TimesThe Arkansas Republican senator Tom Cotton has called the enslavement of millions of African people “the necessary evil upon which the union was built”.Cotton, widely seen as a possible presidential candidate in 2024, made the comment in an interview with the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette published on Sunday.He was speaking in support of legislation he introduced on Thursday that aims to prohibit use of federal funds to teach the 1619 Project, an initiative from the New York Times that reframes US history around August 1619 and the arrival of slave ships on American shores for the first time.Cotton’s Saving American History Act of 2020 and “would prohibit the use of federal funds to teach the 1619 Project by K-12 schools or school districts”, according to a statement from the senator’s office.“The entire premise of the New York Times’ factually, historically flawed 1619 Project … is that America is at root, a systemically racist country to the core and irredeemable,” Cotton told the Democrat-Gazette.“I reject that root and branch. America is a great and noble country founded on the proposition that all mankind is created equal. We have always struggled to live up to that promise, but no country has ever done more to achieve it.”He added: “We have to study the history of slavery and its role and impact on the development of our country because otherwise we can’t understand our country. As the Founding Fathers said, it was the necessary evil upon which the union was built, but the union was built in a way, as [Abraham] Lincoln said, to put slavery on the course to its ultimate extinction.”Nikole Hannah-Jones, who was awarded this year’s Pulitzer Prize for commentary for her introductory essay to the 1619 Project, said on Friday that Cotton’s bill “speaks to the power of journalism more than anything I’ve ever done in my career”.On Sunday, she tweeted: “If chattel slavery – heritable, generational, permanent, race-based slavery where it was legal to rape, torture, and sell human beings for profit – were a ‘necessary evil’ as Tom Cotton says, it’s hard to imagine what cannot be justified if it is a means to an end.“Imagine thinking a non-divisive curriculum is one that tells black children the buying and selling of their ancestors, the rape, torture, and forced labor of their ancestors for PROFIT, was just a ‘necessary evil’ for the creation of the ‘noblest’ country the world has ever seen.“So, was slavery foundational to the Union on which it was built, or nah? You heard it from Tom Cotton himself.”Cotton responded: “More lies from the debunked 1619 Project. Describing the views of the Founders and how they put the evil institution on a path to extinction, a point frequently made by Lincoln, is not endorsing or justifying slavery. No surprise that the 1619 Project can’t get facts right.”In June, the Times was forced to issue a mea culpa after publishing an op-ed written by Cotton and entitled “Send in the troops”. The article, which drew widespread criticism, advocated for the deployment of the military to protests against police brutality toward black Americans.Times publisher AG Sulzberger initially defended the decision, saying the paper was committed to representing “views from across the spectrum”.But the Times subsequently issued a statement saying the op-ed fell short of its editorial standards, leading to the resignation of editorial page director James Bennet.

    * Republican gives interview to Arkansas Democrat-Gazette * Senator wants to ‘save’ US history from New York TimesThe Arkansas Republican senator Tom Cotton has called the enslavement of millions of African people “the necessary evil upon which the union was built”.Cotton, widely seen as a possible presidential candidate in 2024, made the comment in an interview with the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette published on Sunday.He was speaking in support of legislation he introduced on Thursday that aims to prohibit use of federal funds to teach the 1619 Project, an initiative from the New York Times that reframes US history around August 1619 and the arrival of slave ships on American shores for the first time.Cotton’s Saving American History Act of 2020 and “would prohibit the use of federal funds to teach the 1619 Project by K-12 schools or school districts”, according to a statement from the senator’s office.“The entire premise of the New York Times’ factually, historically flawed 1619 Project … is that America is at root, a systemically racist country to the core and irredeemable,” Cotton told the Democrat-Gazette.“I reject that root and branch. America is a great and noble country founded on the proposition that all mankind is created equal. We have always struggled to live up to that promise, but no country has ever done more to achieve it.”He added: “We have to study the history of slavery and its role and impact on the development of our country because otherwise we can’t understand our country. As the Founding Fathers said, it was the necessary evil upon which the union was built, but the union was built in a way, as [Abraham] Lincoln said, to put slavery on the course to its ultimate extinction.”Nikole Hannah-Jones, who was awarded this year’s Pulitzer Prize for commentary for her introductory essay to the 1619 Project, said on Friday that Cotton’s bill “speaks to the power of journalism more than anything I’ve ever done in my career”.On Sunday, she tweeted: “If chattel slavery – heritable, generational, permanent, race-based slavery where it was legal to rape, torture, and sell human beings for profit – were a ‘necessary evil’ as Tom Cotton says, it’s hard to imagine what cannot be justified if it is a means to an end.“Imagine thinking a non-divisive curriculum is one that tells black children the buying and selling of their ancestors, the rape, torture, and forced labor of their ancestors for PROFIT, was just a ‘necessary evil’ for the creation of the ‘noblest’ country the world has ever seen.“So, was slavery foundational to the Union on which it was built, or nah? You heard it from Tom Cotton himself.”Cotton responded: “More lies from the debunked 1619 Project. Describing the views of the Founders and how they put the evil institution on a path to extinction, a point frequently made by Lincoln, is not endorsing or justifying slavery. No surprise that the 1619 Project can’t get facts right.”In June, the Times was forced to issue a mea culpa after publishing an op-ed written by Cotton and entitled “Send in the troops”. The article, which drew widespread criticism, advocated for the deployment of the military to protests against police brutality toward black Americans.Times publisher AG Sulzberger initially defended the decision, saying the paper was committed to representing “views from across the spectrum”.But the Times subsequently issued a statement saying the op-ed fell short of its editorial standards, leading to the resignation of editorial page director James Bennet.


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  • 48/81   Malaysia arrests Bangladeshi migrant who criticised government on TV
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The Bangladeshi man criticised the treatment of undocumented workers during the Covid-19 pandemic.

    The Bangladeshi man criticised the treatment of undocumented workers during the Covid-19 pandemic.


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  • 49/81   North Korea may be 'reaching out to the world for help' after finally announcing a suspected coronavirus case
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    North Korean leader Kim Jong Un declared an emergency and imposed a lockdown in the border city of Kaesong after the country reported its first suspected coronavirus case, state media said Sunday, adding that a person who defected three years ago to South Korea returned last week and exhibited COVID-19 symptoms after "illegally crossing the demarcation line."Pyongyang shut its borders and put thousands of people in isolation six months ago when the coronavirus pandemic began, but Kim's regime has not acknowledged any coronavirus cases during that span, a feat analysts say was always unlikely. Still, the announcement appears to be a significant step for the secretive state — experts believe it may represent a cry for help. "It's an ice-breaking moment for North Korea to admit a case," said Choo Jae-woo, a professor at South Korea's Kyung Hee University. "It could be reaching out to the world for help. Perhaps for humanitarian assistance."The description of the infected person, and the fact that the alleged case was imported, also may be meaningful. "North Korea is in such a dire situation, where they can't even finish building the Pyongyang General Hospital on time," said Cho Han-bum, a senior fellow at the Korea Institute for National Unification in Seoul. "Pointing the blame at an 'imported case' from South Korea, the North can use this as a way to openly accept aid from the South." Read more at Reuters and BBC.More stories from theweek.com  5 scathing cartoons about Trump's use of federal force  The GOP cancels the convention of Trump's dreams  Trump's old tricks aren't working

    North Korean leader Kim Jong Un declared an emergency and imposed a lockdown in the border city of Kaesong after the country reported its first suspected coronavirus case, state media said Sunday, adding that a person who defected three years ago to South Korea returned last week and exhibited COVID-19 symptoms after "illegally crossing the demarcation line."Pyongyang shut its borders and put thousands of people in isolation six months ago when the coronavirus pandemic began, but Kim's regime has not acknowledged any coronavirus cases during that span, a feat analysts say was always unlikely. Still, the announcement appears to be a significant step for the secretive state — experts believe it may represent a cry for help. "It's an ice-breaking moment for North Korea to admit a case," said Choo Jae-woo, a professor at South Korea's Kyung Hee University. "It could be reaching out to the world for help. Perhaps for humanitarian assistance."The description of the infected person, and the fact that the alleged case was imported, also may be meaningful. "North Korea is in such a dire situation, where they can't even finish building the Pyongyang General Hospital on time," said Cho Han-bum, a senior fellow at the Korea Institute for National Unification in Seoul. "Pointing the blame at an 'imported case' from South Korea, the North can use this as a way to openly accept aid from the South." Read more at Reuters and BBC.More stories from theweek.com 5 scathing cartoons about Trump's use of federal force The GOP cancels the convention of Trump's dreams Trump's old tricks aren't working


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  • 50/81   Portland protests: Police declare riot as demonstrators break through court fence
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Police in Portland, Oregon have declared a riot after protesters breached a fence surrounding a court building where federal officers have been stationed during ongoing protests against police brutality and the presence of militarised law enforcement.A police announcement condemned protesters' "violent conduct" that created a "grave risk of public alarm" after a group of protesters had pulled down a section of fencing around 1.20am on Sunday.

    Police in Portland, Oregon have declared a riot after protesters breached a fence surrounding a court building where federal officers have been stationed during ongoing protests against police brutality and the presence of militarised law enforcement.A police announcement condemned protesters' "violent conduct" that created a "grave risk of public alarm" after a group of protesters had pulled down a section of fencing around 1.20am on Sunday.


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  • 51/81   Mnuchin says virus aid package will come soon, $1,200 checks by August
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said on Saturday that Republicans were set to roll out the next COVID-19 aid package Monday and assured there was support from the White House.

    Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said on Saturday that Republicans were set to roll out the next COVID-19 aid package Monday and assured there was support from the White House.


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  • 52/81   Scientists reveal first-ever photo of a solar system like ours
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The incredibly rare family portrait highlights two baby exoplanets orbiting a very young, sun-like star.

    The incredibly rare family portrait highlights two baby exoplanets orbiting a very young, sun-like star.


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  • 53/81   What the heroin industry can teach us about solar power
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Afghan poppy farmers have embraced solar power to irrigate their crops, leading to a heroin boom.

    Afghan poppy farmers have embraced solar power to irrigate their crops, leading to a heroin boom.


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  • 54/81   'You Do the Right Things, and Still You Get It'
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    HOUSTON -- Elaine Roberts, a longtime bagger at a supermarket, tried to be so careful. She put on gloves and stopped riding the bus to work, instead relying on her father to drive her to keep their family safe. She wore masks -- in space-themed fabrics stitched by her sister -- as she stacked products on shelves, helped people to their cars and retrieved carts from the parking lot.But many of the customers at the Randalls store in a Houston suburb did not wear them, she noticed, even as coronavirus cases in the state began rising in early June. Gov. Greg Abbott, who had pushed to reopen businesses in Texas, was refusing to make masks mandatory and for weeks had blocked local officials from enforcing any mask requirements. The grocery store only posted signs asking shoppers to wear them.Roberts, 35, who has autism and lives with her parents, got sick first, sneezing and coughing. Then her father, Paul, and mother, Sheryl, who had been so cautious after the pandemic struck that their rare ventures out were mostly for bird-watching in a nearly empty park, were hospitalized with breathing problems.Their cases were unusual: Sheryl Roberts, a sunny retired nurse, experienced severe psychiatric symptoms that made doctors fear she was suicidal, possibly an effect of the disease and medicines to treat it. She is recovering, but her husband is critically ill, on a ventilator, with failing kidneys and a mysterious paralysis that has afflicted about a dozen others at Houston Methodist Hospital.While no one can be certain how Elaine Roberts was infected, her older sister, Sidra Roman, blamed grocery customers who she felt had put her family in danger."Wearing a piece of cloth, it's a little uncomfortable," she said. "It's a lot less uncomfortable than ventilators, dialysis lines, all of those things that have had to happen to my father. And it's not necessarily you that's going to get sick and get hurt."Whoever came to the grocery store and didn't wear a mask," she added, "doesn't know this is going on."What happened to the Robertses is in many ways the story of Texas, one of the nation's hot spots as coronavirus cases mount and deaths climb. For weeks, politicians were divided over keeping the economy open, citizens were polarized about wearing masks, doctors were warning that careless behavior could imperil others, and families were put at risk by their young.Paul Roberts, 67, is among the patients now packing intensive care units across Texas and other parts of the Sun Belt. The surge in virus cases here that took off in June first appeared to involve mostly younger adults, causing milder illnesses doctors believed would respond to new treatments. But the chain of infections that began with people younger than 40 -- many who socialized at bars or parties without masks or distancing -- moved to essential workers like Elaine Roberts and then to their relatives."We thought this might be different, maybe with some of the things we've learned," Dr. Pat Herlihy, chief of critical care at Baylor St. Luke's Medical Center, said last week. But, he went on, "We're right there now with super, supersick people."The same is likely to befall hospitals in other areas where cases are rising; Houston was among the cities at the leading edge of the summer wave, and critical illnesses often lag new infections by weeks.Nearly 11,000 confirmed coronavirus patients were in Texas hospitals as of Wednesday, the last day for which complete data were available. It was a record high, according to the state health department, five times as many as the peak in the spring.At Houston Methodist, the city's largest hospital, beds were filled disproportionately with Hispanic patients and with multiple members of families. There were people who believed they were invulnerable to the virus, and others like the Robertses who knew that they were not. Coronavirus deaths across Methodist's hospital system have multiplied, as they have elsewhere: 31 in May, 47 in June and 144 in the first three weeks of July.Administrators have created ICU after ICU to tend to the growing number of severely ill patients who often require weeks of resource-intensive treatment. In recent days, doctors were told to stop offering a remedy used as a last resort -- treatment with a heart-lung machine -- to any more patients because staffing was too stretched.With patients on ventilators awaiting beds in ICUs, physicians have been pressed to move patients through as quickly as possible, including urging families to make decisions about removing life support when there is little chance of recovery.Herlihy and Dr. Faisal Masud, head of critical care at the Methodist hospital system, said that because so many patients were so severely sick, they had been forced to turn away some transfers from other institutions."I get desperate calls, desperate emails," Masud said. "I have to make the call as to who can come and not come in. That's a huge burden because in my heart, with my saying no, they will more than likely end up dying."Masks Were 'Kind of 50-50'Elaine Roberts began working at the Randalls grocery store in Bellaire, part of a larger chain, when she was 16. Nearly two decades later, she is one of its longest-tenured employees.Diagnosed in childhood with a form of autism that she said has made learning difficult, she didn't speak until she was 8, when the words came in a burst during a Disney World trip. But her parents have raised her to be as independent as possible.She completed a four-year vocational program after high school and applied to countless other jobs over the years, to no avail. Outgoing and chatty, she has a boyfriend whom she's known since elementary school and a circle of good friends. She loves old television comedies and the color pink."She's so sweet and very caring and will do anything you ask of her," said her manager, Cindy Fletcher.To protect against the virus, Fletcher said, the store devotes many hours a week to cleaning, and employees are asked to stay home if they have viral symptoms.Until late June, the company did not require patrons to wear face masks. Postings asked customers to put them on, but "it wasn't anything we had to enforce," Fletcher said. "It was kind of 50-50," she added, with "younger customers not as much."Roberts had no choice about coming into close contact with shoppers, whether they wore masks or not."I ended up sacking their groceries," she said. "I couldn't say anything to them about it. I didn't want to be bossy."Public health officials acknowledge that masks and social distancing are not complete defenses against the virus, but studies suggest they can have a significant impact in protecting others. In Harris County, which includes Houston, a local order directing businesses to require people to wear masks went into effect June 22 after the governor relented. A sign went up at the Randalls entrance saying that masks were mandatory. Compliance, Fletcher said, has been good.But it was too late for the Roberts family.Paul Roberts, a former musician and carpenter turned computer programmer for NASA, now works at a software company. He and his wife, a retired Methodist Hospital nurse who calls herself a "glass half-full person," ran an online fanzine and attended Comic Con events years ago. For years, they gathered weekly with their two daughters, son-in-law and now-7-year-old grandson for jigsaw puzzles and fierce games of Uno."They are amazing nerds," Roman, 38, said of her parents.Sheryl Roberts, 65, understood the perils of the pandemic; she had diabetes, asthma and heart disease, which could put her at higher risk. Her husband had chronic lung disease and a stent to open a blocked coronary artery."We have been so careful, so very careful, and stayed away from people," she said.Her husband began working from home in the spring when Washington state, New York and then other areas around the country were hit hard. Paul Roberts occasionally made a supermarket run during "senior" hour; the couple's only "big, hot date" in recent months, Sheryl Roberts said, was to view wildflowers from their car.Their younger daughter was diligent as well. But then she came back from work sneezing one day in mid-June and thought it was allergies. Soon she had a cough, fever, headaches and diarrhea, and lost her senses of taste and smell, telltale symptoms of the coronavirus."She told me, 'I don't know what's going on, Mom, but I wore a mask, I wore gloves, I washed my hands,'" Sheryl Roberts said. "You do the right things, and still you get it."Elaine Roberts, who tested positive for the coronavirus, did not become seriously ill. But for her parents, it would be much worse.Daughter, Sister, CaretakerPaul Roberts and his wife started sneezing, then coughing, just like their daughter, and developed fevers and severe body aches. Then he got "awfully sick awfully quickly," Sheryl Roberts recalled. He became confused June 22. Alarmed, she tested his oxygen level. It was low, and she called her older daughter to take him to an emergency care center, the second visit in two days.Before he left, his wife asked him to make a promise."He and I made a deal," she recalled. "He was going to get well, and I was going to do the same. We were going to live through this."But a few days later, his lungs ravaged by the virus, Roberts was put on a ventilator."He cratered," his wife said.Within a week, Sheryl Roberts, too, was admitted to Methodist after becoming short of breath.Neither daughter could see their parents: Methodist, like many other hospitals around the country, blocked visitors to contain the virus's spread. The couple were isolated in separate buildings and could not communicate with each other. Paul Roberts was gravely ill, and his wife's condition was deteriorating. Roman, an oil industry engineer, tried to fill the gap."I've known for a very long time that when the time comes, I get to step up," said Roman, 38. "I have to take care of my parents. I have to take care of my sister. I just didn't expect it all to converge at once."After about a week in the hospital, there was a crisis: Sheryl Roberts became delirious and repeatedly pulled the tubing that supplied oxygen out from under her nose. Doctors put restraints on her, stationed a sitter outside her room and called Roman to say they thought her mother's turmoil might be a result of medication side effects combined with her illness.Roman called her sister in tears. "I said, 'I'm scared, Lainie, I'm scared.' She said, 'I am, too.'"After Sheryl Roberts' steroid dose was cut, the symptoms resolved over a couple of days."They said that I had said that I was going to kill myself," she recalled the doctors telling her. "This is not me."Her breathing gradually improved, and she did not need a ventilator. A few days later, she said she was keeping herself going by imagining a trip on her bucket list: taking her husband to see macaws in the Amazon.Doctors called Roman with updates on her father and requests to give consent for procedures, including a catheter for emergency kidney dialysis. He received steroids, which work against inflammation, and experimental medications. Paul Roberts was put under deep sedation and given drugs to paralyze him so the ventilator could work more effectively.There were some glimmers of hope -- his lungs seemed to be healing -- but whenever the medical team reduced the sedation over the next few days, his blood pressure rose and his heart raced, signs of agitation. On July 9, Dr. Mukhtar Al-Saadi called Roman with an update."It was very difficult for us to wake him up meaningfully to see if he can breathe on his own," the doctor said.'Believe Me, It's Real'Last week, after she was discharged and just about to be wheeled out of the hospital, Sheryl Roberts received a terrifying call. Her husband was still not waking up or moving, and doctors believed a massive stroke or another neurological problem was the likely reason. She and her daughters gathered that night, discussing the difficult decisions they might have to make."Do we just let him go if he's brain-dead?" Sheryl Roberts said they wondered. As they considered what the "very bright, very proud man" would want, Roman said, the three women wept.A brain scan the next day showed that he had not had a stroke, but additional studies were delayed to avoid exposing the few available technicians to the virus. On Friday, Dr. R. Glenn Smith, a neurology attending physician, performed neuromuscular testing that indicated severe damage to Paul Roberts' nerve coverings.About a dozen other patients at the hospital have developed a paralysis or profound weakness that doctors believe may be a complication of the virus, according to Smith. Doctors had already begun treating Roberts with a medication used for Guillain-Barre syndrome, a similar paralyzing disorder that occurs rarely after some viral infections.They don't know how much function he will be able to regain; he has begun showing some limited progress. On Tuesday a staff member brought a tablet into his room and made a video connection."He nodded; I chatted," his wife said. "He blew me a kiss."While her husband waits for a bed in a long-term acute care unit to begin rehabilitation, he remains on a ventilator. Even if there are no more challenges, his recovery will take months, Smith said."It's going to be slow," Roman said. "It's not going to be easy." But, she added, "it seems like he's still Dad upstairs, so I'll take it."The family's ordeal has made her mother more outspoken about the toll of the pandemic. The misinformation and confusion about the virus that she sees on social media scares her, she said. "The ignorance kills me: 'It's really not that bad. It's not really fatal.'"She said she now responds to such statements. "I'm always happy to show right up and say, 'You know, I just lived through it; believe me, it's real.'"She still requires oxygen, and Elaine Roberts is taking care of her, cooking meals, helping her shower and maintaining her breathing device. When her parents were both gone, she assumed new household tasks."My youngest has proved to me she's far more capable of things than I ever dreamed," her mother said. "I'm so proud of her."On Monday, Elaine Roberts has a coronavirus test scheduled. If it is negative, she hopes to go back to work at Randalls.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company

    HOUSTON -- Elaine Roberts, a longtime bagger at a supermarket, tried to be so careful. She put on gloves and stopped riding the bus to work, instead relying on her father to drive her to keep their family safe. She wore masks -- in space-themed fabrics stitched by her sister -- as she stacked products on shelves, helped people to their cars and retrieved carts from the parking lot.But many of the customers at the Randalls store in a Houston suburb did not wear them, she noticed, even as coronavirus cases in the state began rising in early June. Gov. Greg Abbott, who had pushed to reopen businesses in Texas, was refusing to make masks mandatory and for weeks had blocked local officials from enforcing any mask requirements. The grocery store only posted signs asking shoppers to wear them.Roberts, 35, who has autism and lives with her parents, got sick first, sneezing and coughing. Then her father, Paul, and mother, Sheryl, who had been so cautious after the pandemic struck that their rare ventures out were mostly for bird-watching in a nearly empty park, were hospitalized with breathing problems.Their cases were unusual: Sheryl Roberts, a sunny retired nurse, experienced severe psychiatric symptoms that made doctors fear she was suicidal, possibly an effect of the disease and medicines to treat it. She is recovering, but her husband is critically ill, on a ventilator, with failing kidneys and a mysterious paralysis that has afflicted about a dozen others at Houston Methodist Hospital.While no one can be certain how Elaine Roberts was infected, her older sister, Sidra Roman, blamed grocery customers who she felt had put her family in danger."Wearing a piece of cloth, it's a little uncomfortable," she said. "It's a lot less uncomfortable than ventilators, dialysis lines, all of those things that have had to happen to my father. And it's not necessarily you that's going to get sick and get hurt."Whoever came to the grocery store and didn't wear a mask," she added, "doesn't know this is going on."What happened to the Robertses is in many ways the story of Texas, one of the nation's hot spots as coronavirus cases mount and deaths climb. For weeks, politicians were divided over keeping the economy open, citizens were polarized about wearing masks, doctors were warning that careless behavior could imperil others, and families were put at risk by their young.Paul Roberts, 67, is among the patients now packing intensive care units across Texas and other parts of the Sun Belt. The surge in virus cases here that took off in June first appeared to involve mostly younger adults, causing milder illnesses doctors believed would respond to new treatments. But the chain of infections that began with people younger than 40 -- many who socialized at bars or parties without masks or distancing -- moved to essential workers like Elaine Roberts and then to their relatives."We thought this might be different, maybe with some of the things we've learned," Dr. Pat Herlihy, chief of critical care at Baylor St. Luke's Medical Center, said last week. But, he went on, "We're right there now with super, supersick people."The same is likely to befall hospitals in other areas where cases are rising; Houston was among the cities at the leading edge of the summer wave, and critical illnesses often lag new infections by weeks.Nearly 11,000 confirmed coronavirus patients were in Texas hospitals as of Wednesday, the last day for which complete data were available. It was a record high, according to the state health department, five times as many as the peak in the spring.At Houston Methodist, the city's largest hospital, beds were filled disproportionately with Hispanic patients and with multiple members of families. There were people who believed they were invulnerable to the virus, and others like the Robertses who knew that they were not. Coronavirus deaths across Methodist's hospital system have multiplied, as they have elsewhere: 31 in May, 47 in June and 144 in the first three weeks of July.Administrators have created ICU after ICU to tend to the growing number of severely ill patients who often require weeks of resource-intensive treatment. In recent days, doctors were told to stop offering a remedy used as a last resort -- treatment with a heart-lung machine -- to any more patients because staffing was too stretched.With patients on ventilators awaiting beds in ICUs, physicians have been pressed to move patients through as quickly as possible, including urging families to make decisions about removing life support when there is little chance of recovery.Herlihy and Dr. Faisal Masud, head of critical care at the Methodist hospital system, said that because so many patients were so severely sick, they had been forced to turn away some transfers from other institutions."I get desperate calls, desperate emails," Masud said. "I have to make the call as to who can come and not come in. That's a huge burden because in my heart, with my saying no, they will more than likely end up dying."Masks Were 'Kind of 50-50'Elaine Roberts began working at the Randalls grocery store in Bellaire, part of a larger chain, when she was 16. Nearly two decades later, she is one of its longest-tenured employees.Diagnosed in childhood with a form of autism that she said has made learning difficult, she didn't speak until she was 8, when the words came in a burst during a Disney World trip. But her parents have raised her to be as independent as possible.She completed a four-year vocational program after high school and applied to countless other jobs over the years, to no avail. Outgoing and chatty, she has a boyfriend whom she's known since elementary school and a circle of good friends. She loves old television comedies and the color pink."She's so sweet and very caring and will do anything you ask of her," said her manager, Cindy Fletcher.To protect against the virus, Fletcher said, the store devotes many hours a week to cleaning, and employees are asked to stay home if they have viral symptoms.Until late June, the company did not require patrons to wear face masks. Postings asked customers to put them on, but "it wasn't anything we had to enforce," Fletcher said. "It was kind of 50-50," she added, with "younger customers not as much."Roberts had no choice about coming into close contact with shoppers, whether they wore masks or not."I ended up sacking their groceries," she said. "I couldn't say anything to them about it. I didn't want to be bossy."Public health officials acknowledge that masks and social distancing are not complete defenses against the virus, but studies suggest they can have a significant impact in protecting others. In Harris County, which includes Houston, a local order directing businesses to require people to wear masks went into effect June 22 after the governor relented. A sign went up at the Randalls entrance saying that masks were mandatory. Compliance, Fletcher said, has been good.But it was too late for the Roberts family.Paul Roberts, a former musician and carpenter turned computer programmer for NASA, now works at a software company. He and his wife, a retired Methodist Hospital nurse who calls herself a "glass half-full person," ran an online fanzine and attended Comic Con events years ago. For years, they gathered weekly with their two daughters, son-in-law and now-7-year-old grandson for jigsaw puzzles and fierce games of Uno."They are amazing nerds," Roman, 38, said of her parents.Sheryl Roberts, 65, understood the perils of the pandemic; she had diabetes, asthma and heart disease, which could put her at higher risk. Her husband had chronic lung disease and a stent to open a blocked coronary artery."We have been so careful, so very careful, and stayed away from people," she said.Her husband began working from home in the spring when Washington state, New York and then other areas around the country were hit hard. Paul Roberts occasionally made a supermarket run during "senior" hour; the couple's only "big, hot date" in recent months, Sheryl Roberts said, was to view wildflowers from their car.Their younger daughter was diligent as well. But then she came back from work sneezing one day in mid-June and thought it was allergies. Soon she had a cough, fever, headaches and diarrhea, and lost her senses of taste and smell, telltale symptoms of the coronavirus."She told me, 'I don't know what's going on, Mom, but I wore a mask, I wore gloves, I washed my hands,'" Sheryl Roberts said. "You do the right things, and still you get it."Elaine Roberts, who tested positive for the coronavirus, did not become seriously ill. But for her parents, it would be much worse.Daughter, Sister, CaretakerPaul Roberts and his wife started sneezing, then coughing, just like their daughter, and developed fevers and severe body aches. Then he got "awfully sick awfully quickly," Sheryl Roberts recalled. He became confused June 22. Alarmed, she tested his oxygen level. It was low, and she called her older daughter to take him to an emergency care center, the second visit in two days.Before he left, his wife asked him to make a promise."He and I made a deal," she recalled. "He was going to get well, and I was going to do the same. We were going to live through this."But a few days later, his lungs ravaged by the virus, Roberts was put on a ventilator."He cratered," his wife said.Within a week, Sheryl Roberts, too, was admitted to Methodist after becoming short of breath.Neither daughter could see their parents: Methodist, like many other hospitals around the country, blocked visitors to contain the virus's spread. The couple were isolated in separate buildings and could not communicate with each other. Paul Roberts was gravely ill, and his wife's condition was deteriorating. Roman, an oil industry engineer, tried to fill the gap."I've known for a very long time that when the time comes, I get to step up," said Roman, 38. "I have to take care of my parents. I have to take care of my sister. I just didn't expect it all to converge at once."After about a week in the hospital, there was a crisis: Sheryl Roberts became delirious and repeatedly pulled the tubing that supplied oxygen out from under her nose. Doctors put restraints on her, stationed a sitter outside her room and called Roman to say they thought her mother's turmoil might be a result of medication side effects combined with her illness.Roman called her sister in tears. "I said, 'I'm scared, Lainie, I'm scared.' She said, 'I am, too.'"After Sheryl Roberts' steroid dose was cut, the symptoms resolved over a couple of days."They said that I had said that I was going to kill myself," she recalled the doctors telling her. "This is not me."Her breathing gradually improved, and she did not need a ventilator. A few days later, she said she was keeping herself going by imagining a trip on her bucket list: taking her husband to see macaws in the Amazon.Doctors called Roman with updates on her father and requests to give consent for procedures, including a catheter for emergency kidney dialysis. He received steroids, which work against inflammation, and experimental medications. Paul Roberts was put under deep sedation and given drugs to paralyze him so the ventilator could work more effectively.There were some glimmers of hope -- his lungs seemed to be healing -- but whenever the medical team reduced the sedation over the next few days, his blood pressure rose and his heart raced, signs of agitation. On July 9, Dr. Mukhtar Al-Saadi called Roman with an update."It was very difficult for us to wake him up meaningfully to see if he can breathe on his own," the doctor said.'Believe Me, It's Real'Last week, after she was discharged and just about to be wheeled out of the hospital, Sheryl Roberts received a terrifying call. Her husband was still not waking up or moving, and doctors believed a massive stroke or another neurological problem was the likely reason. She and her daughters gathered that night, discussing the difficult decisions they might have to make."Do we just let him go if he's brain-dead?" Sheryl Roberts said they wondered. As they considered what the "very bright, very proud man" would want, Roman said, the three women wept.A brain scan the next day showed that he had not had a stroke, but additional studies were delayed to avoid exposing the few available technicians to the virus. On Friday, Dr. R. Glenn Smith, a neurology attending physician, performed neuromuscular testing that indicated severe damage to Paul Roberts' nerve coverings.About a dozen other patients at the hospital have developed a paralysis or profound weakness that doctors believe may be a complication of the virus, according to Smith. Doctors had already begun treating Roberts with a medication used for Guillain-Barre syndrome, a similar paralyzing disorder that occurs rarely after some viral infections.They don't know how much function he will be able to regain; he has begun showing some limited progress. On Tuesday a staff member brought a tablet into his room and made a video connection."He nodded; I chatted," his wife said. "He blew me a kiss."While her husband waits for a bed in a long-term acute care unit to begin rehabilitation, he remains on a ventilator. Even if there are no more challenges, his recovery will take months, Smith said."It's going to be slow," Roman said. "It's not going to be easy." But, she added, "it seems like he's still Dad upstairs, so I'll take it."The family's ordeal has made her mother more outspoken about the toll of the pandemic. The misinformation and confusion about the virus that she sees on social media scares her, she said. "The ignorance kills me: 'It's really not that bad. It's not really fatal.'"She said she now responds to such statements. "I'm always happy to show right up and say, 'You know, I just lived through it; believe me, it's real.'"She still requires oxygen, and Elaine Roberts is taking care of her, cooking meals, helping her shower and maintaining her breathing device. When her parents were both gone, she assumed new household tasks."My youngest has proved to me she's far more capable of things than I ever dreamed," her mother said. "I'm so proud of her."On Monday, Elaine Roberts has a coronavirus test scheduled. If it is negative, she hopes to go back to work at Randalls.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company


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  • 55/81   Nasa Mars rover: Meteorite to head home to Red Planet
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The Perseverance robot will take Martian rock with it when it launches from Earth on Thursday.

    The Perseverance robot will take Martian rock with it when it launches from Earth on Thursday.


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  • 56/81   Genetic impact of African slave trade revealed in DNA study
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The consequences of rape, maltreatment, disease and racism are revealed by the findings.

    The consequences of rape, maltreatment, disease and racism are revealed by the findings.


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  • 57/81   Nasa Mars rover: How Perseverance will hunt for signs of past life
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    If there was life on Mars, how will the US space agency's next robot rover recognise it?

    If there was life on Mars, how will the US space agency's next robot rover recognise it?


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  • 58/81   Earliest evidence for humans in the Americas
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Humans settled in the Americas much earlier than previously thought, according to new finds from Mexico.

    Humans settled in the Americas much earlier than previously thought, according to new finds from Mexico.


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  • 59/81   Plastic pollution to weigh 1.3 billion tonnes by 2040
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    An estimated 1.3 billion tonnes of plastic is destined for the environment by 2040 unless global action is taken, scientists say.

    An estimated 1.3 billion tonnes of plastic is destined for the environment by 2040 unless global action is taken, scientists say.


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  • 60/81   Conservation: Reef sharks are in major decline worldwide
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The crash in shark numbers, caused largely by over-fishing, could have dire consequences for corals.

    The crash in shark numbers, caused largely by over-fishing, could have dire consequences for corals.


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  • 61/81   China's Tianwen-1 Mars rover rockets away from Earth
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The six-wheeled robot will arrive in orbit around the Red Planet in February.

    The six-wheeled robot will arrive in orbit around the Red Planet in February.


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  • 62/81   Tanzania presidential hopeful Tundu Lissu returns home after attempt on life
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Tundu Lissu, attacked in the capital in 2017, wants to run for office after treatment in Belgium.

    Tundu Lissu, attacked in the capital in 2017, wants to run for office after treatment in Belgium.


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  • 63/81   Germany has rejected Trump's bid to bring Russia back into the G7
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Trump said in June it was "common sense" for Russian President Vladimir Putin to be invited to the G7.

    Trump said in June it was "common sense" for Russian President Vladimir Putin to be invited to the G7.


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  • 64/81   Coronavirus: How fast is it spreading in Africa?
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The World Health Organization has voiced fears that the disease is accelerating in Africa, so what are the key trends?

    The World Health Organization has voiced fears that the disease is accelerating in Africa, so what are the key trends?


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  • 65/81   Group: Yemen rebels should be sanctioned over moored tanker
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    A leading international rights group on Monday urged the U.N. Security Council to impose additional sanctions on Yemen’s Iran-backed Houthi rebels unless they provide U.N. experts access to an oil tanker moored off the coast of Yemen and in danger of leaking.  The Houthi rebels, who control the area, have denied U.N. inspectors access to the vessel.  The U.N. warned earlier this month of an environmental, economic and humanitarian catastrophe from the ship, which hasn’t been maintained for over five years.

    A leading international rights group on Monday urged the U.N. Security Council to impose additional sanctions on Yemen’s Iran-backed Houthi rebels unless they provide U.N. experts access to an oil tanker moored off the coast of Yemen and in danger of leaking. The Houthi rebels, who control the area, have denied U.N. inspectors access to the vessel. The U.N. warned earlier this month of an environmental, economic and humanitarian catastrophe from the ship, which hasn’t been maintained for over five years.


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  • 66/81   John Oliver blames China for your lack of knowledge about Uighur concentration camps
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    John Oliver said Sunday's Last Week Tonight was going to be about eyelashes, and that was mostly just to set up a TikTok video. Its creator "is right," he said: "A lash-curler is a vital tool in anyone's beauty arsenal, and there's an ethnic group in China being systematically surveilled and imprisoned in an attempt to essentially wipe their culture off the map." Oliver started with the basics: "The people in question are the Uighurs. They're mostly a mostly Muslim minority in a region of China called Xinjiang, and the Chinese government has been treating them absolutely terribly.""If this is the first time you're hearing about an estimated million people who've been held in detention camps -- mostly Uighurs but also Kazakhs and other ethnic minorities -- you are not alone," Oliver said. "And it's probably because China has done its level best to keep this story from getting out." That may be harder now, because some of the face masks and other PPE used in America is likely made by forced Uighur labor, making us complicit, he added. "And while there is clearly nothing new about horrific practices being hidden deep in the supply chain of global capitalism, what is happening to the Uighurs is particularly appalling. So tonight let's talk about them: Who they are, what's been happening to them, and why?"Oliver ran though a bit of the historical enmity between Uighurs and Beijing, the 2009 riots, and China's crackdown with President Xi Jinping's 2014 Strike Hard Against Violent Terrorism law -- "think of it as the Patriot Act on steroids" -- and current Minority Report-like pre-emptive arrests and Chinese excuses: They are "simply being proactive" and sending them to helpful "vocational training facilities," among other euphemisms for "cultural erasure.""Whenever pressed on this, the Chinese government has been quick to use whataboutism," Oliver said. "They responded to U.S. criticism by invoking atrocities ranging from he genocide of Native Americans to George Floyd's death." Those "are fair hits, those are fair points right there," he said, "but it's also completely possible for two things to be wrong at the same time." What can you do? Pay attention, he said. Watch below. More stories from theweek.com  5 scathing cartoons about Trump's use of federal force  The GOP cancels the convention of Trump's dreams  Trump's old tricks aren't working

    John Oliver said Sunday's Last Week Tonight was going to be about eyelashes, and that was mostly just to set up a TikTok video. Its creator "is right," he said: "A lash-curler is a vital tool in anyone's beauty arsenal, and there's an ethnic group in China being systematically surveilled and imprisoned in an attempt to essentially wipe their culture off the map." Oliver started with the basics: "The people in question are the Uighurs. They're mostly a mostly Muslim minority in a region of China called Xinjiang, and the Chinese government has been treating them absolutely terribly.""If this is the first time you're hearing about an estimated million people who've been held in detention camps -- mostly Uighurs but also Kazakhs and other ethnic minorities -- you are not alone," Oliver said. "And it's probably because China has done its level best to keep this story from getting out." That may be harder now, because some of the face masks and other PPE used in America is likely made by forced Uighur labor, making us complicit, he added. "And while there is clearly nothing new about horrific practices being hidden deep in the supply chain of global capitalism, what is happening to the Uighurs is particularly appalling. So tonight let's talk about them: Who they are, what's been happening to them, and why?"Oliver ran though a bit of the historical enmity between Uighurs and Beijing, the 2009 riots, and China's crackdown with President Xi Jinping's 2014 Strike Hard Against Violent Terrorism law -- "think of it as the Patriot Act on steroids" -- and current Minority Report-like pre-emptive arrests and Chinese excuses: They are "simply being proactive" and sending them to helpful "vocational training facilities," among other euphemisms for "cultural erasure.""Whenever pressed on this, the Chinese government has been quick to use whataboutism," Oliver said. "They responded to U.S. criticism by invoking atrocities ranging from he genocide of Native Americans to George Floyd's death." Those "are fair hits, those are fair points right there," he said, "but it's also completely possible for two things to be wrong at the same time." What can you do? Pay attention, he said. Watch below. More stories from theweek.com 5 scathing cartoons about Trump's use of federal force The GOP cancels the convention of Trump's dreams Trump's old tricks aren't working


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  • 67/81   Barr able to put his stamp on executive power as Trump's AG
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    “We’ve been here an hour and now we all understand what you go through every day,” a middle-age banker tells Barr, “so thank you.”  Barr can expect this kind of praise when he appears Tuesday for the first time before the House Judiciary Committee -- but only from its Republicans.  To them, he is a conservative stalwart, an unflappable foe of the left and its excesses, and -- most importantly -- a staunch defender of President Donald Trump.

    “We’ve been here an hour and now we all understand what you go through every day,” a middle-age banker tells Barr, “so thank you.” Barr can expect this kind of praise when he appears Tuesday for the first time before the House Judiciary Committee -- but only from its Republicans. To them, he is a conservative stalwart, an unflappable foe of the left and its excesses, and -- most importantly -- a staunch defender of President Donald Trump.


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  • 68/81   AP-NORC poll: Anxiety props up Biden, Trump voters fervent
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Murtice Sherek is not excited about Joe Biden.  Roughly three months before Election Day, a new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds that Biden's supporters are less enthusiastic than Trump's — both about the campaign itself and about their candidate — although the Democrat's coalition may be equally motivated by anxiety.

    Murtice Sherek is not excited about Joe Biden. Roughly three months before Election Day, a new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds that Biden's supporters are less enthusiastic than Trump's — both about the campaign itself and about their candidate — although the Democrat's coalition may be equally motivated by anxiety.


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  • 69/81   Officials: 2 protesters killed in new clashes in Baghdad
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Two anti-government protesters were killed and 21 were injured in Baghdad in new clashes between demonstrators and Iraqi security forces, human rights monitors and officials said Monday.  Tension between the security forces and the demonstrators soared when dozens of protesters cut off the road connecting two main intersections — the Tayaran Square and the Tahrir Square.

    Two anti-government protesters were killed and 21 were injured in Baghdad in new clashes between demonstrators and Iraqi security forces, human rights monitors and officials said Monday. Tension between the security forces and the demonstrators soared when dozens of protesters cut off the road connecting two main intersections — the Tayaran Square and the Tahrir Square.


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  • 70/81   2020 Watch: Can Trump turn around his beleaguered campaign?
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    With fewer than 100 days before polls open across America, President Donald Trump is running short on time to reset his beleaguered reelection bid.  After spending much of the year playing down the crises, Trump has adopted a more serious tone in the latest round of White House pandemic briefings.  Joe Biden, meanwhile, seems content to remain an afterthought right now as he rolls out new policies, narrows his search for a running mate and enjoys a discernible lead in most polls.

    With fewer than 100 days before polls open across America, President Donald Trump is running short on time to reset his beleaguered reelection bid. After spending much of the year playing down the crises, Trump has adopted a more serious tone in the latest round of White House pandemic briefings. Joe Biden, meanwhile, seems content to remain an afterthought right now as he rolls out new policies, narrows his search for a running mate and enjoys a discernible lead in most polls.


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  • 71/81   Pilgrims arrive in Mecca for downsized hajj amid pandemic
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Muslim pilgrims have started arriving in Mecca for a drastically scaled-down hajj as Saudi authorities balance the kingdom's oversight of one of Islam's key pillars and the safety of visitors in the face of a global pandemic.  This year, Saudi Arabia's Hajj Ministry has said between 1,000 and 10,000 people already residing in the kingdom will be allowed to perform the pilgrimage.  Two-thirds of those pilgrims will be from among foreign residents in Saudi Arabia and one-third will be Saudi citizens.

    Muslim pilgrims have started arriving in Mecca for a drastically scaled-down hajj as Saudi authorities balance the kingdom's oversight of one of Islam's key pillars and the safety of visitors in the face of a global pandemic. This year, Saudi Arabia's Hajj Ministry has said between 1,000 and 10,000 people already residing in the kingdom will be allowed to perform the pilgrimage. Two-thirds of those pilgrims will be from among foreign residents in Saudi Arabia and one-third will be Saudi citizens.


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  • 72/81   'We are living in fear': Florida health department workers write to DeSantis after several employees test positive
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Employees at the central offices of the Florida Department of Health have written to Gov. Ron DeSantis to express concern that his administration has not done enough to keep them safe from the coronavirus. 

    Employees at the central offices of the Florida Department of Health have written to Gov. Ron DeSantis to express concern that his administration has not done enough to keep them safe from the coronavirus. 


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  • 73/81   Trump makes pitch for masks, but plays catch without one as Little Leaguers visit White House
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Minutes after reiterating his call for all Americans to wear face masks, President Trump greeted more than a dozen youth baseball players without one.

    Minutes after reiterating his call for all Americans to wear face masks, President Trump greeted more than a dozen youth baseball players without one.


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  • 74/81   Trump scraps Florida convention plans due to coronavirus fears: 'The timing is not right'
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    President Trump announced he is cancelling the portion of the Republican National Convention that was set to take place in Jacksonville, Fla., next month.

    President Trump announced he is cancelling the portion of the Republican National Convention that was set to take place in Jacksonville, Fla., next month.


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  • 75/81   Open schools for younger kids, top pediatrician says
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Younger children pose a smaller risk of catching and transmitting the coronavirus, a top pediatrician told Congress on Thursday.

    Younger children pose a smaller risk of catching and transmitting the coronavirus, a top pediatrician told Congress on Thursday.


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  • 76/81   The coronavirus curves are starting to flatten — again. But complacency now could prove deadly.
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    There’s no evidence from the rest of the world that relying on people to behave themselves can actually suppress the coronavirus to a manageable level, as opposed to merely slowing its spread. So far, only lockdowns have done that.

    There’s no evidence from the rest of the world that relying on people to behave themselves can actually suppress the coronavirus to a manageable level, as opposed to merely slowing its spread. So far, only lockdowns have done that.


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  • 77/81   Republican coronavirus relief bill includes no local aid, smaller unemployment benefits and $20 billion for farmers
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    The White House is pushing for the new coronavirus relief bill to include $20 billion in payments to farmers, which may complicate negotiations with Democrats, according to a draft plan obtained by Yahoo News.

    The White House is pushing for the new coronavirus relief bill to include $20 billion in payments to farmers, which may complicate negotiations with Democrats, according to a draft plan obtained by Yahoo News.


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  • 78/81   FEMA won't commit to face masks for schools
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Even as the president pushes for schools to reopen in the fall, the director of FEMA said it would likely not supply schools with face masks.

    Even as the president pushes for schools to reopen in the fall, the director of FEMA said it would likely not supply schools with face masks.


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  • 79/81   A public health employee predicted Florida's coronavirus catastrophe — then she was fired: 'This is everything I was trying to warn people about'
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    In a complaint filed last Thursday, attorneys for Rebekah Jones, who designed a dashboard on coronavirus spread in the state, say she was fired for “refusing to publish misleading health data.”

    In a complaint filed last Thursday, attorneys for Rebekah Jones, who designed a dashboard on coronavirus spread in the state, say she was fired for “refusing to publish misleading health data.”


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  • 80/81   As post-COVID heart and brain problems linger, some coronavirus survivors find it's a long haul to recovery
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    A large online movement of COVID-19 survivors who are still sick are outraged at how casually many Americans are treating the coronavirus threat.

    A large online movement of COVID-19 survivors who are still sick are outraged at how casually many Americans are treating the coronavirus threat.


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  • 81/81   On coronavirus, Trump insists the U.S. has the world's 'No. 1 low mortality rate.' He's wrong — and it's the wrong way to measure success.
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    The problem with President Trump’s new strategy is that his prized data point is a mirage — an illusion that dissolves under closer inspection, revealing the opposite of the “success” it’s supposed to show.

    The problem with President Trump’s new strategy is that his prized data point is a mirage — an illusion that dissolves under closer inspection, revealing the opposite of the “success” it’s supposed to show.


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