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News Slideshows (08/31/2020 03 hours)


  • 1/81   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


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    Press Review


    Adele   ariana   Halle   Luka   Rahm   Kawhi   Braves   HOSEOK   Miley Cyrus   logan lerman   Clevinger   Song of the Year   Doja   joey king   
  • 2/81   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


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  • 3/81   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


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  • 4/81   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


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  • 5/81   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


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  • 6/81   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


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  • 7/81   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


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  • 8/81   Do star athletes make too much money?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    With athletes in America's biggest sports leagues raking in salaries worth $300 million and more, is it time to reign in the big spending or do superstars deserve the big bucks they make?

    With athletes in America's biggest sports leagues raking in salaries worth $300 million and more, is it time to reign in the big spending or do superstars deserve the big bucks they make?


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  • 9/81   Live animal mascots: Cute or exploitative?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?


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  • 10/81   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


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  • 11/81   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


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  • 12/81   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


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  • 13/81   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


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  • 14/81   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


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  • 15/81   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


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  • 16/81   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


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  • 17/81   PHOTOS: Fluorescent turtle embryo wins forty-fifth annual Nikon Small World Competition

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.


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  • 18/81   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


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  • 19/81   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


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  • 20/81   What the CIA thinks of your anti-virus program

    PARIS (AP) — Peppering the 8,000 pages of purported Central Intelligence Agency hacking data released Tuesday by WikiLeaks are reviews of some of the world's most popular anti-virus products.

    PARIS (AP) — Peppering the 8,000 pages of purported Central Intelligence Agency hacking data released Tuesday by WikiLeaks are reviews of some of the world's most popular anti-virus products.


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  • 21/81   Google Patents Sticky Car Hood to Trap Pedestrians in a Collision

    The patent calls for a giant sticker to be placed on the front end of a vehicle, with a special coating over the layer that is only broken when something collides with the vehicle, exposing the adhesive and helping the colliding object to remain on the vehicle.  The idea is to prevent a pedestrian from being thrown after the impact and potentially sustaining even more injuries.

    The patent calls for a giant sticker to be placed on the front end of a vehicle, with a special coating over the layer that is only broken when something collides with the vehicle, exposing the adhesive and helping the colliding object to remain on the vehicle. The idea is to prevent a pedestrian from being thrown after the impact and potentially sustaining even more injuries.


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  • 22/81   Relax, Your Instagram Feed Likely Won't Change Tomorrow

    Relax, your Instagram feed likely isn't changing tomorrow.The great "Insta-freakout" of 2016 was unleashed this morning by a slew of celebrities, bloggers and social media aficionados after they alerted followers to turn on post notifications for future access to their photos, videos and messages. ...

    Relax, your Instagram feed likely isn't changing tomorrow.The great "Insta-freakout" of 2016 was unleashed this morning by a slew of celebrities, bloggers and social media aficionados after they alerted followers to turn on post notifications for future access to their photos, videos and messages. ...


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  • 23/81   'Hack the Pentagon' and get paid legally in new program

    Attention hackers: Time to re-watch “WarGames” and crack your knuckles, the Pentagon is about to pay you to break into some government systems.

    Attention hackers: Time to re-watch “WarGames” and crack your knuckles, the Pentagon is about to pay you to break into some government systems.


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  • 24/81   Elon Musk's Hyperloop Vision Could Be Ready for Passengers by 2018

    The Hyperloop, Elon Musk's vision of launching humans through pods inside a high-speed transportation system, could be ready for passengers by 2018, according to a company building a transportation track in California.  One company working to make Musk's vision a reality, Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, said it has filed for construction permits in Quay Valley, California, for a 5-mile track.  'We are announcing the filing of the first building permit to Kings County to the building of the first full-scale hyperloop, not a test track,' Bibop Gresta, the chief operating officer of Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, said today at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, during a CNBC/TradeShift event.

    The Hyperloop, Elon Musk's vision of launching humans through pods inside a high-speed transportation system, could be ready for passengers by 2018, according to a company building a transportation track in California. One company working to make Musk's vision a reality, Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, said it has filed for construction permits in Quay Valley, California, for a 5-mile track. 'We are announcing the filing of the first building permit to Kings County to the building of the first full-scale hyperloop, not a test track,' Bibop Gresta, the chief operating officer of Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, said today at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, during a CNBC/TradeShift event.


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  • 25/81   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


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  • 26/81   Man Proposes by Text Message While Stranded at Chicago's O’Hare Airport

    An Arizona man waiting to fly home to propose to his girlfriend was forced to propose to her via text message after spending 50 hours stranded at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport.  Danny Roderique, of Phoenix, had the diamond engagement ring in his pocket but the delay got in the way of the proposal he’d planned.  “I’ve been stranded now in the airport for 50 hours,” Roderique told a reporter from ABC affiliate WLS-TV while still waiting at O’Hare on Monday.

    An Arizona man waiting to fly home to propose to his girlfriend was forced to propose to her via text message after spending 50 hours stranded at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport. Danny Roderique, of Phoenix, had the diamond engagement ring in his pocket but the delay got in the way of the proposal he’d planned. “I’ve been stranded now in the airport for 50 hours,” Roderique told a reporter from ABC affiliate WLS-TV while still waiting at O’Hare on Monday.


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  • 27/81   Twitter Warns Some Users Over Possible Government Hacking

    It's unclear how many people received a letter from Twitter.  In October, Facebook said it would begin issuing alerts to users who the social network believes are being targeted by state-sponsored hackers, according to a message posted by Alex Stamos, Facebook's chief security officer.

    It's unclear how many people received a letter from Twitter. In October, Facebook said it would begin issuing alerts to users who the social network believes are being targeted by state-sponsored hackers, according to a message posted by Alex Stamos, Facebook's chief security officer.


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  • 28/81   Facebook Notifications Get Even More Personal

    Facebook notifications may now be your first stop in the morning to catch up on everything from friends' news to weather, sports scores and what to expect later in the day.  The social network announced this week it will be rolling out expanded, personalized notifications in the Facebook across iOS and Android devices for users in the United States.  The mobile update is bringing a set of new card-like notifications that will include information such as sports scores for teams you have liked, TV shows, weather information and friends' life events, among other updates.

    Facebook notifications may now be your first stop in the morning to catch up on everything from friends' news to weather, sports scores and what to expect later in the day. The social network announced this week it will be rolling out expanded, personalized notifications in the Facebook across iOS and Android devices for users in the United States. The mobile update is bringing a set of new card-like notifications that will include information such as sports scores for teams you have liked, TV shows, weather information and friends' life events, among other updates.


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  • 29/81   How to Tell Which Apps Are Draining Your iPhone Battery

    Some iOS 9 users have complained Facebook's app has been excessively eating away at their battery life, even when the background app refresh setting is disabled.  It's unclear what possible issue may be causing the battery drain.  Tapping the list will show how much of the battery drain was spent when the app was running in the background.

    Some iOS 9 users have complained Facebook's app has been excessively eating away at their battery life, even when the background app refresh setting is disabled. It's unclear what possible issue may be causing the battery drain. Tapping the list will show how much of the battery drain was spent when the app was running in the background.


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  • 30/81   Armed Robbery Suspect Tries Using Uber as Getaway Car, Police Say

    A 23-year-old man suspected of armed robbery tried to take an Uber car to help him get away after he held up a store outside Baltimore, police said.  The suspect, Dashawn Terrell Cochran, was at a store in Parkville, Maryland, early Wednesday morning when he allegedly took a bottle of Tylenol cold medicine to the register, the Baltimore County Police Department said.  Cochran was seen getting into the back of a silver Lexus, and when officers pulled the car over, the driver said he was an Uber driver, police said.

    A 23-year-old man suspected of armed robbery tried to take an Uber car to help him get away after he held up a store outside Baltimore, police said. The suspect, Dashawn Terrell Cochran, was at a store in Parkville, Maryland, early Wednesday morning when he allegedly took a bottle of Tylenol cold medicine to the register, the Baltimore County Police Department said. Cochran was seen getting into the back of a silver Lexus, and when officers pulled the car over, the driver said he was an Uber driver, police said.


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  • 31/81   Drone Popularity Draws Concern From Pilots, Federal Officials

    Roughly 700,000 drones are expected to be sold in the United States this year, according to the Consumer Electronics Association.  The Federal Aviation Administration plans to meet with Walmart, which has 19 different kinds of drones for sale on its website, to teach salespeople about what it should tell its customers about safe drone operation.  The Consumer Electronics Association projects the U.S. drone market to climb above $100 million in revenue this year, an increase of more than 50 percent from last year’s total.

    Roughly 700,000 drones are expected to be sold in the United States this year, according to the Consumer Electronics Association. The Federal Aviation Administration plans to meet with Walmart, which has 19 different kinds of drones for sale on its website, to teach salespeople about what it should tell its customers about safe drone operation. The Consumer Electronics Association projects the U.S. drone market to climb above $100 million in revenue this year, an increase of more than 50 percent from last year’s total.


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  • 32/81   Carly Fiorina: Why She Wants Everyone to Throw Out Their Flip Phones

    Carly Fiorina is putting flip phone users on notice: You’re going to have to upgrade under a President Fiorina.  “How many of you have a flip phone?” Fiorina recently asked a town hall in South Carolina.  It’s all part of a vision the Republican presidential candidate has to give citizens a direct line of communication – literally – to the president.

    Carly Fiorina is putting flip phone users on notice: You’re going to have to upgrade under a President Fiorina. “How many of you have a flip phone?” Fiorina recently asked a town hall in South Carolina. It’s all part of a vision the Republican presidential candidate has to give citizens a direct line of communication – literally – to the president.


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  • 33/81   How a 'Programming Error' Led to an Oregon Couple's $2 Million Cell Phone Bill

    A couple in Oregon say they spent 10 months trying to clear up a whopping $2 million phone bill, which they say has prevented them from buying the home of their dreams.  Ken Slusher and his girlfriend, of Damascus, Oregon, have a balance of $2,156,593.64 on a Verizon Wireless bill that was for a wireless account that they opened in November.  'Yeah, it's been very stressful to say the least,' Slusher told KPTV.com.

    A couple in Oregon say they spent 10 months trying to clear up a whopping $2 million phone bill, which they say has prevented them from buying the home of their dreams. Ken Slusher and his girlfriend, of Damascus, Oregon, have a balance of $2,156,593.64 on a Verizon Wireless bill that was for a wireless account that they opened in November. 'Yeah, it's been very stressful to say the least,' Slusher told KPTV.com.


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  • 34/81   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


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  • 35/81   U.S. Futures, Asia Stocks Push Higher; Dollar Dips: Markets Wrap
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- U.S. futures and Asian stocks began the week with gains after equities reached fresh highs last week. The dollar fell to a more than two-year low, while the yen held Friday’s climb as Japan looks for a new prime minister.Shares advanced in Japan and South Korea and fluctuated in Australia. The S&P 500 closed at an all-time high for a sixth consecutive trading session Friday, while the Nasdaq Composite also reached a record. Investors are awaiting Chinese manufacturing data, which will give the latest reading on the recovery in the world’s second-largest economy. Treasuries held gains.Global equities have been on a tear as economies started to reemerge from virus shutdowns and central banks remained committed to providing liquidity to help a recovery. Still, infections in the U.S. are ticking up again. India recorded its biggest daily spike as Covid-19 cases worldwide surpassed 25 million.“While China has given important signs that its economy is recovering from the Covid-19 shock, doubts remain on the speed due to the lingering uncertainties regarding new waves of Covid-19 globally as well as the still hesitant consumption and poor labor market condition,” Alicia Garcia Herrero, chief Asia Pacific economist with Natixis SA, wrote in a note.Meanwhile, tensions between the U.S. and China continue to simmer. In another development, ByteDance Ltd. will be required to seek Chinese government approval to sell the U.S. operations of its short-video TikTok app under new restrictions Beijing imposed on the export of artificial intelligence technologies.Elsewhere, crude oil was little changed around $43 a barrel as Hurricane Laura weakened while crossing over land in the refinery and LNG-rich Gulf of Mexico region. Gold was higher.Here are some key events to watch this week:China’s purchasing managers’ indexes for August are likely to show the economy continued to make progress, albeit at a more moderate pace. The official and Caixin PMI readings are expected to remain comfortably above the 50-threshold, pointing to expansion.Reserve Bank of Australia hands down its policy decision Tuesday.Australia GDP is due Wednesday.U.S. jobless claims for the week ended Aug. 29 are due Thursday.U.S. jobs report on Friday is forecast to show payrolls continued to rebound in August from virus lows.Here are the main market moves:StocksS&P 500 futures rose 0.5% as of 9:32 a.m. in Tokyo. S&P 500 Index rose 0.7% Friday.Topix index climbed 1.5%.Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 Index fell 0.1%.Kospi index gained 0.8%.Hong Kong’s Hang Seng Index futures rose 0.2% earlier.CurrenciesThe yen traded at 105.35 per dollar.The offshore yuan was at 6.8562 per dollar.The euro rose 0.1% to $1.1912.The Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index fell 0.1% after dropping 0.9% Friday.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries was at 0.73%.Australia’s 10-year bond yield fell four basis points to 0.98%.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude was at $43.14 a barrel, up 0.4%.Gold rose 0.5% to $1,974.91 an ounceFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- U.S. futures and Asian stocks began the week with gains after equities reached fresh highs last week. The dollar fell to a more than two-year low, while the yen held Friday’s climb as Japan looks for a new prime minister.Shares advanced in Japan and South Korea and fluctuated in Australia. The S&P 500 closed at an all-time high for a sixth consecutive trading session Friday, while the Nasdaq Composite also reached a record. Investors are awaiting Chinese manufacturing data, which will give the latest reading on the recovery in the world’s second-largest economy. Treasuries held gains.Global equities have been on a tear as economies started to reemerge from virus shutdowns and central banks remained committed to providing liquidity to help a recovery. Still, infections in the U.S. are ticking up again. India recorded its biggest daily spike as Covid-19 cases worldwide surpassed 25 million.“While China has given important signs that its economy is recovering from the Covid-19 shock, doubts remain on the speed due to the lingering uncertainties regarding new waves of Covid-19 globally as well as the still hesitant consumption and poor labor market condition,” Alicia Garcia Herrero, chief Asia Pacific economist with Natixis SA, wrote in a note.Meanwhile, tensions between the U.S. and China continue to simmer. In another development, ByteDance Ltd. will be required to seek Chinese government approval to sell the U.S. operations of its short-video TikTok app under new restrictions Beijing imposed on the export of artificial intelligence technologies.Elsewhere, crude oil was little changed around $43 a barrel as Hurricane Laura weakened while crossing over land in the refinery and LNG-rich Gulf of Mexico region. Gold was higher.Here are some key events to watch this week:China’s purchasing managers’ indexes for August are likely to show the economy continued to make progress, albeit at a more moderate pace. The official and Caixin PMI readings are expected to remain comfortably above the 50-threshold, pointing to expansion.Reserve Bank of Australia hands down its policy decision Tuesday.Australia GDP is due Wednesday.U.S. jobless claims for the week ended Aug. 29 are due Thursday.U.S. jobs report on Friday is forecast to show payrolls continued to rebound in August from virus lows.Here are the main market moves:StocksS&P 500 futures rose 0.5% as of 9:32 a.m. in Tokyo. S&P 500 Index rose 0.7% Friday.Topix index climbed 1.5%.Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 Index fell 0.1%.Kospi index gained 0.8%.Hong Kong’s Hang Seng Index futures rose 0.2% earlier.CurrenciesThe yen traded at 105.35 per dollar.The offshore yuan was at 6.8562 per dollar.The euro rose 0.1% to $1.1912.The Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index fell 0.1% after dropping 0.9% Friday.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries was at 0.73%.Australia’s 10-year bond yield fell four basis points to 0.98%.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude was at $43.14 a barrel, up 0.4%.Gold rose 0.5% to $1,974.91 an ounceFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 36/81   Oceanagold Announces Filing of the 43-101 Technical Report for the Waihi District
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    /NOT FOR DISSEMINATION OR DISTRIBUTION IN THE UNITED STATES AND NOT FOR DISTRIBUTION TO US NEWSWIRE SERVICES./(All financial figures in US Dollars unless otherwise stated)MELBOURNE, Australia, Aug.

    /NOT FOR DISSEMINATION OR DISTRIBUTION IN THE UNITED STATES AND NOT FOR DISTRIBUTION TO US NEWSWIRE SERVICES./(All financial figures in US Dollars unless otherwise stated)MELBOURNE, Australia, Aug.


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  • 37/81   US floats idea of early approval for eventual vaccine
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The head of the US Food and Drug Administration raised the possibility in an interview published Sunday that a future vaccine against the coronavirus might be given emergency approval before the end of trials designed to ensure its safety and effectiveness.

    The head of the US Food and Drug Administration raised the possibility in an interview published Sunday that a future vaccine against the coronavirus might be given emergency approval before the end of trials designed to ensure its safety and effectiveness.


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  • 38/81   SoftBank Mobile Arm Shares Slide on News of Group Sale
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- SoftBank Corp. shares were down as much 3.4% to 1,383 yen on Monday after parent SoftBank Group Corp. announced plans to sell about a third of its holding.SoftBank Group intends to sell roughly a billion shares worth around $12.5 billion of its mobile-carrier arm, at a discount between 3% and 5%. This is part of a broader push to monetize the larger investment-focused company’s assets to help it weather the pandemic period’s economic disruption and raise funds for fresh investments in tech companies. Its shares were up as much as 4% in Tokyo Monday.Read more: SoftBank Group to Sell $12.5 Billion of Wireless Unit Stock (2)The telecom unit’s initial public offering in December 2018 was a perfect storm of bad news. Just days before the opening bell, the company suffered a rare network outage which left users across Japan without a signal for more than four hours. Investors were also spooked by e-commerce giant Rakuten Inc.’s planned entry into Japan’s wireless market and a global equities sell-off. SoftBank Corp.’s shares are trading about 7% below its debut price of 1,500 yen.“This is a big overhang near term and may create an even bigger overhang medium term,” Atul Goyal, senior analyst at Jefferies Group, wrote in a report. The sale “is likely a negative surprise” for SoftBank Corp. shareholders, according to Goyal.SoftBank Group on Friday said it plans to sell 223.5 million shares to overseas investors in Europe and Asia, excluding the U.S. and Canada, with an extra allotment of 33.5 million shares. Domestic investors will get 670.5 million shares. The company aims to hand over the shares between Sept. 23 and Sept. 25, or five business days after the pricing and other details are settled.(Updates with details of the sale in fifth paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- SoftBank Corp. shares were down as much 3.4% to 1,383 yen on Monday after parent SoftBank Group Corp. announced plans to sell about a third of its holding.SoftBank Group intends to sell roughly a billion shares worth around $12.5 billion of its mobile-carrier arm, at a discount between 3% and 5%. This is part of a broader push to monetize the larger investment-focused company’s assets to help it weather the pandemic period’s economic disruption and raise funds for fresh investments in tech companies. Its shares were up as much as 4% in Tokyo Monday.Read more: SoftBank Group to Sell $12.5 Billion of Wireless Unit Stock (2)The telecom unit’s initial public offering in December 2018 was a perfect storm of bad news. Just days before the opening bell, the company suffered a rare network outage which left users across Japan without a signal for more than four hours. Investors were also spooked by e-commerce giant Rakuten Inc.’s planned entry into Japan’s wireless market and a global equities sell-off. SoftBank Corp.’s shares are trading about 7% below its debut price of 1,500 yen.“This is a big overhang near term and may create an even bigger overhang medium term,” Atul Goyal, senior analyst at Jefferies Group, wrote in a report. The sale “is likely a negative surprise” for SoftBank Corp. shareholders, according to Goyal.SoftBank Group on Friday said it plans to sell 223.5 million shares to overseas investors in Europe and Asia, excluding the U.S. and Canada, with an extra allotment of 33.5 million shares. Domestic investors will get 670.5 million shares. The company aims to hand over the shares between Sept. 23 and Sept. 25, or five business days after the pricing and other details are settled.(Updates with details of the sale in fifth paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 39/81   Dividend Investors: Don't Be Too Quick To Buy Mortgage Choice Limited (ASX:MOC) For Its Upcoming Dividend
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Some investors rely on dividends for growing their wealth, and if you're one of those dividend sleuths, you might be...

    Some investors rely on dividends for growing their wealth, and if you're one of those dividend sleuths, you might be...


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  • 40/81   Buffett’s Berkshire Takes Stakes in Japanese Trading Companies
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway Inc. took stakes in five Japanese trading companies, expanding its reach abroad.Buffett’s company announced Sunday night that it acquired “slightly more” than 5% of the shares of Itochu Corp., Marubeni Corp., Mitsubishi Corp., Mitsui & Co. and Sumitomo Corp., according to a statement. The purchases, made through one of its insurers, National Indemnity, are valued at more than $6 billion, according to Bloomberg calculations.The move marks a big push abroad by Buffett’s firm, which has long accumulated stakes in U.S. companies including Apple Inc. and Coca-Cola Co. Berkshire has also sought investments abroad with holdings in China’s BYD Co. through its energy business and Brazilian payment company StoneCo Ltd.“I am delighted to have Berkshire Hathaway participate in the future of Japan and the five companies we have chosen for investment,” Buffett said in the statement. “The five major trading companies have many joint ventures throughout the world and are likely to have more of these partnerships. I hope that in the future there may be opportunities of mutual benefit.”Shares of the trading companies surged after the announcement, with Sumitomo climbing as much as 8.9% on Monday morning in Tokyo.Berkshire plans to hold the Japan investments for the long term and has pledged to only hold as much as 9.9% of the shares in any of the five companies, unless given specific approval by the investee firm’s board of directors, according to the statement.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway Inc. took stakes in five Japanese trading companies, expanding its reach abroad.Buffett’s company announced Sunday night that it acquired “slightly more” than 5% of the shares of Itochu Corp., Marubeni Corp., Mitsubishi Corp., Mitsui & Co. and Sumitomo Corp., according to a statement. The purchases, made through one of its insurers, National Indemnity, are valued at more than $6 billion, according to Bloomberg calculations.The move marks a big push abroad by Buffett’s firm, which has long accumulated stakes in U.S. companies including Apple Inc. and Coca-Cola Co. Berkshire has also sought investments abroad with holdings in China’s BYD Co. through its energy business and Brazilian payment company StoneCo Ltd.“I am delighted to have Berkshire Hathaway participate in the future of Japan and the five companies we have chosen for investment,” Buffett said in the statement. “The five major trading companies have many joint ventures throughout the world and are likely to have more of these partnerships. I hope that in the future there may be opportunities of mutual benefit.”Shares of the trading companies surged after the announcement, with Sumitomo climbing as much as 8.9% on Monday morning in Tokyo.Berkshire plans to hold the Japan investments for the long term and has pledged to only hold as much as 9.9% of the shares in any of the five companies, unless given specific approval by the investee firm’s board of directors, according to the statement.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 41/81   As fintech upends banking, Japan regulator expects more cross-boundary tie-ups
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Japan will likely see more financial tie-ups that extend beyond traditional boundaries similar to those signed between internet banking giant SBI Holdings Inc and regional banks, the country's senior financial regulator said.  Advances in financial technology could trigger structural changes in Japan's banking industry by breaking barriers between lending and other services, said Teruhisa Kurita, who oversees bank supervision at the Financial Services Agency (FSA).

    Japan will likely see more financial tie-ups that extend beyond traditional boundaries similar to those signed between internet banking giant SBI Holdings Inc and regional banks, the country's senior financial regulator said. Advances in financial technology could trigger structural changes in Japan's banking industry by breaking barriers between lending and other services, said Teruhisa Kurita, who oversees bank supervision at the Financial Services Agency (FSA).


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  • 42/81   Trump resumes campaign rallies and utters the unthinkable: 'If Biden wins...'
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    One night after accepting the Republican nomination, Donald Trump resumed campaigning for reelection as though the coronavirus pandemic was a thing of the past, rallying hundreds of supporters at New Hampshire airport hangar.

    One night after accepting the Republican nomination, Donald Trump resumed campaigning for reelection as though the coronavirus pandemic was a thing of the past, rallying hundreds of supporters at New Hampshire airport hangar.


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  • 43/81   'Deeply reckless': Critics slam leaked police memo about Breonna Taylor
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The memo was written several weeks after Taylor’s death and includes details that weren't provided to the judge in the search warrant application.

    The memo was written several weeks after Taylor’s death and includes details that weren't provided to the judge in the search warrant application.


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  • 44/81   Hundreds of protesters arrested by Belarusian police as 100,000 rally against Lukashenko
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Tens of thousands of opposition supporters marched through the Belarusian capital of Minsk on Sunday calling for an end to strongman Alexander Lukashenko's rule, despite heavily armed police and troops blocking streets and detaining dozens of demonstrators. Protests have now entered a third week since the disputed presidential election on August 9 in which Mr Lukashenko claimed victory, while opposition rival Svetlana Tikhanovskaya said she was the true winner. An AFP journalist and local media estimated that more than 100,000 people came to Sunday's protest, equalling the scale of the rallies on previous weekends, the largest demonstrations the country has seen since independence from the USSR.

    Tens of thousands of opposition supporters marched through the Belarusian capital of Minsk on Sunday calling for an end to strongman Alexander Lukashenko's rule, despite heavily armed police and troops blocking streets and detaining dozens of demonstrators. Protests have now entered a third week since the disputed presidential election on August 9 in which Mr Lukashenko claimed victory, while opposition rival Svetlana Tikhanovskaya said she was the true winner. An AFP journalist and local media estimated that more than 100,000 people came to Sunday's protest, equalling the scale of the rallies on previous weekends, the largest demonstrations the country has seen since independence from the USSR.


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  • 45/81   Counter-protester who pulled a gun on Black Lives Matter protesters in Florida after a fight erupted won't be charged
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A counter-protester in Tallahassee, Florida won't be charged for pulling a gun on BLM protesters as officials said he was "lawfully defending himself."

    A counter-protester in Tallahassee, Florida won't be charged for pulling a gun on BLM protesters as officials said he was "lawfully defending himself."


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  • 46/81   A teen activist in New Jersey received a $2,500 bill to pay for police presence at a Black Lives Matter protest she organized
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Mayor Mario Kranjac of Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, said the bill covered police presence and their overtime hours.

    Mayor Mario Kranjac of Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, said the bill covered police presence and their overtime hours.


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  • 47/81   3-year-old girl safe after being lofted by kite in Taiwan
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A 3-year-old girl in Taiwan was reported safe after becoming caught in the strings of a kite and lifted several meters into the air.  The unidentified girl was taking part in a kite festival Sunday in the seaside town of Nanlioao when she was caught up by a giant, long-tailed orange kite.

    A 3-year-old girl in Taiwan was reported safe after becoming caught in the strings of a kite and lifted several meters into the air. The unidentified girl was taking part in a kite festival Sunday in the seaside town of Nanlioao when she was caught up by a giant, long-tailed orange kite.


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  • 48/81   Fact check: Biden tax plan would raise rates for those who make more than $400K, corporations
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The claim that families who make $75,000 would see their tax rate double under the Democratic nominee's plan is false.

    The claim that families who make $75,000 would see their tax rate double under the Democratic nominee's plan is false.


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  • 49/81   Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez may have a lot to do with Joe Kennedy's primary struggles
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Rep. Joe Kennedy III (D-Mass.) could soon be out of politics, and an unlikely colleague may have something to do with it, Politico reports.Kennedy is challenging Sen. Ed Markey (D-Mass.) in the statewide Democratic primary for Markey's seat, which he's held since 2013. Politico notes that Kennedy tries to hit the 74-year-old Markey by criticizing his support for the 1994 crime bill and the Iraq War when he was in the House, both of which would seemingly put him in trouble with the progressive left. But the incumbent has maintained a lead over his 39-year-old challenger in large part thanks to an army of young voters, who, with a push from Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), view Markey as key to the climate change movement.Mary Ann Marsh, a Boston-based Democratic consultant, told Politico that Ocasio-Cortez, the Sunrise Movement, and Justice Democrats have "allowed this remarkable makeover" of the veteran lawmaker who has been in Congress for 44 years, turning him into the "darling of the climate change warriors." Without Ocasio-Cortez, she said, "I think it would've been a much harder effort to make him into the Ed Markey people see in this race, which is very different from the Ed Markey people in Massachusetts have seen in 44 years." Read more at Politico.More stories from theweek.com  5 more scathingly funny cartoons about the Republican National Convention  Air travel in the coronavirus era  Biden's latest ad puts Trump's weirdest moments and empty rallies to a Bad Bunny song

    Rep. Joe Kennedy III (D-Mass.) could soon be out of politics, and an unlikely colleague may have something to do with it, Politico reports.Kennedy is challenging Sen. Ed Markey (D-Mass.) in the statewide Democratic primary for Markey's seat, which he's held since 2013. Politico notes that Kennedy tries to hit the 74-year-old Markey by criticizing his support for the 1994 crime bill and the Iraq War when he was in the House, both of which would seemingly put him in trouble with the progressive left. But the incumbent has maintained a lead over his 39-year-old challenger in large part thanks to an army of young voters, who, with a push from Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), view Markey as key to the climate change movement.Mary Ann Marsh, a Boston-based Democratic consultant, told Politico that Ocasio-Cortez, the Sunrise Movement, and Justice Democrats have "allowed this remarkable makeover" of the veteran lawmaker who has been in Congress for 44 years, turning him into the "darling of the climate change warriors." Without Ocasio-Cortez, she said, "I think it would've been a much harder effort to make him into the Ed Markey people see in this race, which is very different from the Ed Markey people in Massachusetts have seen in 44 years." Read more at Politico.More stories from theweek.com 5 more scathingly funny cartoons about the Republican National Convention Air travel in the coronavirus era Biden's latest ad puts Trump's weirdest moments and empty rallies to a Bad Bunny song


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  • 50/81   Death toll in China restaurant collapse climbs to 29
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The number of people killed when a restaurant in northern China collapsed has climbed to 29, state media said Sunday, with efforts to find survivors brought to a close.

    The number of people killed when a restaurant in northern China collapsed has climbed to 29, state media said Sunday, with efforts to find survivors brought to a close.


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  • 51/81   Kim Klacik: President Trump is producing real results for the Black community
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Republican congressional candidate Kim Klacik joins Maria Bartiromo on 'Sunday Morning Futures.'

    Republican congressional candidate Kim Klacik joins Maria Bartiromo on 'Sunday Morning Futures.'


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  • 52/81   SpaceX calls off one launch, succeeds with another
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Bad weather blocked a morning launch, but SpaceX pressed ahead with an evening flight.

    Bad weather blocked a morning launch, but SpaceX pressed ahead with an evening flight.


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  • 53/81   AstraZeneca diabetes drug improves survival in kidney disease patients study shows
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The British drugmaker said Farxiga was shown in a study to cut the risk of dying from any cause for people suffering from chronic kidney disease by 31% when compared to a group on placebo.  Farxiga is among AstaZeneca's five best-selling drugs and brought in revenues of $1.54 billion in 2019 for treating diabetes.  It also reduced the risk of deteriorating kidney function by 39% in the trial.

    The British drugmaker said Farxiga was shown in a study to cut the risk of dying from any cause for people suffering from chronic kidney disease by 31% when compared to a group on placebo. Farxiga is among AstaZeneca's five best-selling drugs and brought in revenues of $1.54 billion in 2019 for treating diabetes. It also reduced the risk of deteriorating kidney function by 39% in the trial.


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  • 54/81   The Climate Legacy of Racist Housing Policies
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    RICHMOND, Va. -- On a hot summer's day, the neighborhood of Gilpin quickly becomes one of the most sweltering parts of Richmond.There are few trees along the sidewalks to shield people from the sun's relentless glare. More than 2,000 residents, mostly Black, live in low-income public housing that lacks central air conditioning. Many front yards are paved with concrete, which absorbs and traps heat. The ZIP code has among the highest rates of heat-related ambulance calls in the city.There are places like Gilpin all across the United States. In cities like Baltimore, Dallas, Denver, Miami, Portland and New York, neighborhoods that are poorer and have more residents of color can be 5 to 20 degrees Fahrenheit hotter in summer than wealthier, whiter parts of the same city.And there's growing evidence that this is no coincidence. In the 20th century, local and federal officials, usually white, enacted policies that reinforced racial segregation in cities and diverted investment away from minority neighborhoods in ways that created large disparities in the urban heat environment.The consequences are being felt today.To escape the heat, Sparkle Veronica Taylor, a 40-year-old Gilpin resident, often walks with her two young boys more than a half-hour across Richmond to a tree-lined park in a wealthier neighborhood. Her local playground lacks shade, leaving the gyms and slides to bake in the sun. The trek is grueling in summer temperatures that regularly soar past 95 degrees, but it's worth it to find a cooler play area, she said."The heat gets really intense, I'm just zapped of energy by the end of the day," said Taylor, who doesn't own a car. "But once we get to that park, I'm struck by how green the space is. I feel calmer, better able to breathe. Walking through different neighborhoods, there's a stark difference between places that have lots of greenery and places that don't."To understand why many cities have such large heat disparities, researchers are looking closer at historical practices like redlining.In the 1930s, the federal government created maps of hundreds of cities, rating the riskiness of different neighborhoods for real estate investment by grading them "best," "still desirable," "declining" or "hazardous." Race played a defining role: Black and immigrant neighborhoods were typically rated "hazardous" and outlined in red, denoting a perilous place to lend money. For decades, people in redlined areas were denied access to federally backed mortgages and other credit, fueling a cycle of disinvestment.In 2016, these old redlining maps were digitized by historians at the University of Richmond. Researchers comparing them to today's cities have spotted striking patterns.Across more than 100 cities, a recent study found, formerly redlined neighborhoods are today 5 degrees hotter in summer, on average, than areas once favored for housing loans, with some cities seeing differences as large as 12 degrees. Redlined neighborhoods, which remain lower-income and more likely to have Black or Hispanic residents, consistently have far fewer trees and parks that help cool the air. They also have more paved surfaces, such as asphalt lots or nearby highways, that absorb and radiate heat."It's uncanny how often we see this pattern," said Vivek Shandas, a professor of urban studies and planning at Portland State University and a co-author of the study. "It tells us we really need to better understand what was going on in the past to create these land-use patterns."Heat is the nation's deadliest weather disaster, killing as many as 12,000 people a year. Now, as global warming brings ever more intense heat waves, cities like Richmond are drawing up plans to adapt -- and confronting a historical legacy that has left communities of color far more vulnerable to heat.A Redlined Past, a Hotter FutureThe appraisers in Richmond were transparent in their racism as they mapped the city in the 1930s as part of a Depression-era federal program to rescue the nation's collapsing housing markets.Every Black neighborhood, no matter its income level, was outlined in red and deemed a "hazardous" area for housing loans. The appraisers' notes made clear that race was a key factor in giving these neighborhoods the lowest grade.One part of town was outlined in yellow and rated as "declining" because, the appraisers wrote, Black families sometimes walked through.By contrast, white neighborhoods, described as containing "respectable people," were often outlined in blue and green and were subsequently favored for investment.Richmond, like many cities, was already segregated before the 1930s by racial zoning laws and restrictive covenants that barred Black families from moving into white neighborhoods. But the redlining maps, economists have found, deepened patterns of racial inequality in cities nationwide in ways that reverberated for decades. White families could more easily get loans and federal assistance to buy homes, building wealth to pass on to their children. Black families, all too often, could not.That inequity likely influenced urban heat patterns, too. Neighborhoods with white homeowners had more clout to lobby city governments for tree-lined sidewalks and parks. In Black neighborhoods, homeownership declined, and landlords rarely invested in green space. City planners also targeted redlined areas as cheap land for new industries, highways, warehouses and public housing, built with lots of heat-absorbing asphalt and little cooling vegetation.Disparities in access to housing finance "created a snowball effect that compounded over generations," said Nathan Connolly, a historian at Johns Hopkins who helped digitize the maps. Redlining wasn't the only factor driving racial inequality, but the maps offer a visible symbol of how federal policies codified housing discrimination.Congress outlawed redlining by the 1970s. But the practice has left lasting marks on cities.Neighborhoods to Richmond's west that were deemed desirable for investment, outlined in green on the old maps, remain wealthier and predominantly white, with trees and parks covering 42% of the land. Neighborhoods in Richmond's east and south that were once redlined are still poorer and majority Black, with much lower rates of homeownership and green space covering just 12% of the surface.These patterns largely persisted through cycles of white flight to the suburbs and, more recently, gentrification.Today, Richmond's formerly redlined neighborhoods are, on average, 5 degrees hotter on a summer day than greenlined neighborhoods, satellite analyses reveal. Some of the hottest areas, like the Gilpin neighborhood, can see temperatures 15 degrees higher than wealthier, whiter parts of town.Even small differences in heat can be dangerous, scientists have found. During a heat wave, every 1 degree increase in temperature can increase the risk of dying by 2.5%. Higher temperatures can strain the heart and make breathing more difficult, increasing hospitalization rates for cardiac arrest and respiratory diseases like asthma. Richmond's four hottest ZIP codes all have the city's highest rates of heat-related emergency-room visits.Few neighborhoods in Richmond have been as radically reshaped as Gilpin. In the early 20th century, Gilpin was part of Jackson Ward, a thriving area known as "Black Wall Street" and the cultural heart of the city's African American middle class, a place where people came to see Louis Armstrong or Ella Fitzgerald perform.But with redlining in the 1930s, Jackson Ward fell into decline. Black residents had a tougher time obtaining mortgages, and property values deteriorated. In the 1940s, the city embarked on "slum clearance" projects, razing acres of properties and replacing them with Richmond's first segregated public housing project, Gilpin Court, a set of austere, barracks-style buildings that were not designed with heat in mind.A decade later, over the objections of residents, Virginia's state government decided to build a new federal highway right through the neighborhood, destroying thousands of homes and isolating Gilpin.Today, Gilpin's community pool sits empty, unfixed by the city for years. Cinder block walls bake in the sun, unshaded by trees. While city officials and local utilities have provided many people with window air conditioners, residents said they often aren't enough, and old electric wiring means blown fuses are common."The air conditioning unit in my bedroom runs 24/7," said Taylor, the 40-year-old mother of two. "Air circulation is poor up here on the upper level of where I live."Gilpin is grappling with a mix of heat and poverty that illustrates how global warming can compound inequality.Sherrell Thompson, a community health worker in Gilpin, said residents have high rates of asthma, diabetes and high blood pressure, all conditions that can be worsened by heat. They are also exposed to air pollution from the six-lane highway next door.There are no doctor's offices nearby or grocery stores selling fresh produce, which means that people without cars face further health challenges in the heat."It becomes a whole circle of issues," Thompson said. "If you want to find any kind of healthy food, you need to walk at least a mile or catch two buses. If you have asthma but it's 103 degrees out and you're not feeling well enough to catch three buses to see your primary care physician, what do you do?"In Gilpin, the average life expectancy is 63 years. Just a short drive over the James River sits Westover Hills, a largely white, middle-income neighborhood that greets visitors with rows of massive oak trees spreading their leaves over quiet boulevards. Life expectancy there is 83 years.A broad array of socioeconomic factors drives this gap, but it is made worse by heat. Researchers have found that excess heat and a lack of green space can affect mental well-being and increase anxiety. Without parks or shady outdoor areas to gather, people are more likely to be isolated indoors during the summer, a dynamic worsened by the coronavirus pandemic."Especially when there's no green space nearby, the heat traps people in their homes," said Tevin Moore, 22, who grew up in Richmond's formerly redlined East End. "The heat definitely messes with you psychologically; people get frustrated over every little thing."Confronting Racial InequalityNationwide, the pattern is consistent: Neighborhoods that were once redlined see more extreme heat in the summer than those that weren't. But every city has its own story.In Denver, formerly redlined neighborhoods tend to have more Hispanic than Black residents today, but they remain hotter: Parks were intentionally placed in whiter, wealthier neighborhoods that then blocked construction of affordable housing nearby even after racial segregation was banned. In Baltimore, polluting industries were more likely to be located near communities of color. In Portland, zoning rules allowed multifamily apartment buildings to cover the entire lot and be built without any green space, a practice the city only recently changed.The problem worsens as global warming increases the number of hot days nationwide.Today, the Richmond area can expect about 43 days per year with temperatures of at least 90 degrees. By 2089, climate models suggest, the number of very hot days could double. "All of a sudden you're sitting on top of really unlivable temperatures," said Jeremy Hoffman, chief scientist at the Science Museum of Virginia and a co-author of the redlining study.For years, cities across the United States rarely thought about racial equity when designing their climate plans, which meant that climate protection measures, like green roofs on buildings, often disproportionately benefited whiter, wealthier residents. That's slowly starting to change.In Houston, officials recently passed an ordinance to prioritize disadvantaged neighborhoods for flood protection. Minneapolis and Portland are reworking zoning to allow denser, more affordable housing to be built in desirable neighborhoods. Denver has passed a new sales tax to fund parks and tree-planting, and city officials say they would like to add more green space in historically redlined areas.And in Richmond, a city in the midst of a major reckoning with its racist past, where crowds this summer tore down Confederate monuments and protested police brutality, officials are paying much closer attention to racial inequality as they draw up plans to adapt to global warming. The city has launched a new mapping tool that shows in detail how heat and flooding can disproportionately harm communities of color."We can see that racial equity and climate equity are inherently entwined, and we need to take that into account when we're building our capacity to prepare," said Alicia Zatcoff, the city's sustainability manager. "It's a new frontier in climate action planning, and there aren't a lot of cities that have really done it yet."Officials in Richmond's sustainability office are currently engaged in an intensive listening process with neighborhoods on the front lines of global warming to hear their concerns, as they work to put racial equity at the core of their climate action and resilience plan. Doing so "can mean confronting some very uncomfortable history," Zatcoff said. But "the more proponents there are of doing the work this way, the better off we'll all be for it."To start, the city has announced a goal of ensuring that everyone in Richmond is within a 10-minute walk of a park, working with the Science Museum of Virginia and community partners to identify city-owned properties in vulnerable neighborhoods that can be converted into green space. It's the city's first large-scale greening project since the 1970s.Green space can be transformative. Trees can cool down neighborhoods by several degrees during a heat wave, studies show, helping to lower electric bills as well as the risk of death. When planted near roads, trees can help filter air pollution. The presence of green space can even reduce stress levels for people living nearby.And trees have another climate benefit: Unlike paved surfaces, they can soak up water in their roots, reducing flooding during downpours.A few years ago, in Richmond's formerly redlined Southside, local nonprofits and residents sought to address the lack of green space and grocery stores by building a new community garden, a triangular park with a shaded veranda and fruit trees. "Almost instantly, the garden became a community space," said Duron Chavis of Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden, which backed the effort. "We have people holding cookouts; people doing yoga and meditation here; they can get to know their neighbors. It reduces social isolation."Richmond's long-term master plan, a draft of which was released in June, calls for increasing tree canopy in the hottest neighborhoods, redesigning buildings to increase air flow, reducing the number of paved lots and using more light-colored pavement to reflect the sun's energy. The plan explicitly mentions redlining as one of the historical forces that has shaped the city."Even people who don't believe institutionalized racism are struck when we show them these maps," said Cate Mingoya, director of capacity building at Groundwork USA, which has been highlighting links between redlining and heat in cities like Richmond. "We didn't get here by accident, and we're not going to get it fixed by accident."Still, the challenges are immense. Cities often face tight budgets, particularly as revenues have declined amid the coronavirus pandemic.And tree-planting can be politically charged. Some researchers have warned that building new parks and planting trees in lower-income neighborhoods of color can often accelerate gentrification, displacing longtime residents. In Richmond, city officials say they are looking to address this by building additional affordable housing alongside new green space.Richmond's draft master plan envisions building a park over Routes I-95 and I-64 to reconnect Gilpin with historical Jackson Ward, as well as redeveloping the public housing complex into a more walkable mixed-income neighborhood. That plan is not imminent, but local activists fear residents could eventually be priced out of this newer, greener area."My worry is that they won't build that park until the people who currently live here are removed," said Arthur Burton, director of the Kinfolk Community Empowerment Center, who has been working to build community gardens in historically redlined areas like Gilpin.While many are optimistic about Richmond's efforts to focus on racial equity, they warn there's still much work to be done to undo disparities built up over many decades. Inequality in housing, incomes, health and education "all make a difference when we're talking about vulnerability to climate change," said Rob Jones, executive director of Groundwork USA's Richmond chapter. "Greening the built environment is absolutely important," he said, "but it's only a start."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company

    RICHMOND, Va. -- On a hot summer's day, the neighborhood of Gilpin quickly becomes one of the most sweltering parts of Richmond.There are few trees along the sidewalks to shield people from the sun's relentless glare. More than 2,000 residents, mostly Black, live in low-income public housing that lacks central air conditioning. Many front yards are paved with concrete, which absorbs and traps heat. The ZIP code has among the highest rates of heat-related ambulance calls in the city.There are places like Gilpin all across the United States. In cities like Baltimore, Dallas, Denver, Miami, Portland and New York, neighborhoods that are poorer and have more residents of color can be 5 to 20 degrees Fahrenheit hotter in summer than wealthier, whiter parts of the same city.And there's growing evidence that this is no coincidence. In the 20th century, local and federal officials, usually white, enacted policies that reinforced racial segregation in cities and diverted investment away from minority neighborhoods in ways that created large disparities in the urban heat environment.The consequences are being felt today.To escape the heat, Sparkle Veronica Taylor, a 40-year-old Gilpin resident, often walks with her two young boys more than a half-hour across Richmond to a tree-lined park in a wealthier neighborhood. Her local playground lacks shade, leaving the gyms and slides to bake in the sun. The trek is grueling in summer temperatures that regularly soar past 95 degrees, but it's worth it to find a cooler play area, she said."The heat gets really intense, I'm just zapped of energy by the end of the day," said Taylor, who doesn't own a car. "But once we get to that park, I'm struck by how green the space is. I feel calmer, better able to breathe. Walking through different neighborhoods, there's a stark difference between places that have lots of greenery and places that don't."To understand why many cities have such large heat disparities, researchers are looking closer at historical practices like redlining.In the 1930s, the federal government created maps of hundreds of cities, rating the riskiness of different neighborhoods for real estate investment by grading them "best," "still desirable," "declining" or "hazardous." Race played a defining role: Black and immigrant neighborhoods were typically rated "hazardous" and outlined in red, denoting a perilous place to lend money. For decades, people in redlined areas were denied access to federally backed mortgages and other credit, fueling a cycle of disinvestment.In 2016, these old redlining maps were digitized by historians at the University of Richmond. Researchers comparing them to today's cities have spotted striking patterns.Across more than 100 cities, a recent study found, formerly redlined neighborhoods are today 5 degrees hotter in summer, on average, than areas once favored for housing loans, with some cities seeing differences as large as 12 degrees. Redlined neighborhoods, which remain lower-income and more likely to have Black or Hispanic residents, consistently have far fewer trees and parks that help cool the air. They also have more paved surfaces, such as asphalt lots or nearby highways, that absorb and radiate heat."It's uncanny how often we see this pattern," said Vivek Shandas, a professor of urban studies and planning at Portland State University and a co-author of the study. "It tells us we really need to better understand what was going on in the past to create these land-use patterns."Heat is the nation's deadliest weather disaster, killing as many as 12,000 people a year. Now, as global warming brings ever more intense heat waves, cities like Richmond are drawing up plans to adapt -- and confronting a historical legacy that has left communities of color far more vulnerable to heat.A Redlined Past, a Hotter FutureThe appraisers in Richmond were transparent in their racism as they mapped the city in the 1930s as part of a Depression-era federal program to rescue the nation's collapsing housing markets.Every Black neighborhood, no matter its income level, was outlined in red and deemed a "hazardous" area for housing loans. The appraisers' notes made clear that race was a key factor in giving these neighborhoods the lowest grade.One part of town was outlined in yellow and rated as "declining" because, the appraisers wrote, Black families sometimes walked through.By contrast, white neighborhoods, described as containing "respectable people," were often outlined in blue and green and were subsequently favored for investment.Richmond, like many cities, was already segregated before the 1930s by racial zoning laws and restrictive covenants that barred Black families from moving into white neighborhoods. But the redlining maps, economists have found, deepened patterns of racial inequality in cities nationwide in ways that reverberated for decades. White families could more easily get loans and federal assistance to buy homes, building wealth to pass on to their children. Black families, all too often, could not.That inequity likely influenced urban heat patterns, too. Neighborhoods with white homeowners had more clout to lobby city governments for tree-lined sidewalks and parks. In Black neighborhoods, homeownership declined, and landlords rarely invested in green space. City planners also targeted redlined areas as cheap land for new industries, highways, warehouses and public housing, built with lots of heat-absorbing asphalt and little cooling vegetation.Disparities in access to housing finance "created a snowball effect that compounded over generations," said Nathan Connolly, a historian at Johns Hopkins who helped digitize the maps. Redlining wasn't the only factor driving racial inequality, but the maps offer a visible symbol of how federal policies codified housing discrimination.Congress outlawed redlining by the 1970s. But the practice has left lasting marks on cities.Neighborhoods to Richmond's west that were deemed desirable for investment, outlined in green on the old maps, remain wealthier and predominantly white, with trees and parks covering 42% of the land. Neighborhoods in Richmond's east and south that were once redlined are still poorer and majority Black, with much lower rates of homeownership and green space covering just 12% of the surface.These patterns largely persisted through cycles of white flight to the suburbs and, more recently, gentrification.Today, Richmond's formerly redlined neighborhoods are, on average, 5 degrees hotter on a summer day than greenlined neighborhoods, satellite analyses reveal. Some of the hottest areas, like the Gilpin neighborhood, can see temperatures 15 degrees higher than wealthier, whiter parts of town.Even small differences in heat can be dangerous, scientists have found. During a heat wave, every 1 degree increase in temperature can increase the risk of dying by 2.5%. Higher temperatures can strain the heart and make breathing more difficult, increasing hospitalization rates for cardiac arrest and respiratory diseases like asthma. Richmond's four hottest ZIP codes all have the city's highest rates of heat-related emergency-room visits.Few neighborhoods in Richmond have been as radically reshaped as Gilpin. In the early 20th century, Gilpin was part of Jackson Ward, a thriving area known as "Black Wall Street" and the cultural heart of the city's African American middle class, a place where people came to see Louis Armstrong or Ella Fitzgerald perform.But with redlining in the 1930s, Jackson Ward fell into decline. Black residents had a tougher time obtaining mortgages, and property values deteriorated. In the 1940s, the city embarked on "slum clearance" projects, razing acres of properties and replacing them with Richmond's first segregated public housing project, Gilpin Court, a set of austere, barracks-style buildings that were not designed with heat in mind.A decade later, over the objections of residents, Virginia's state government decided to build a new federal highway right through the neighborhood, destroying thousands of homes and isolating Gilpin.Today, Gilpin's community pool sits empty, unfixed by the city for years. Cinder block walls bake in the sun, unshaded by trees. While city officials and local utilities have provided many people with window air conditioners, residents said they often aren't enough, and old electric wiring means blown fuses are common."The air conditioning unit in my bedroom runs 24/7," said Taylor, the 40-year-old mother of two. "Air circulation is poor up here on the upper level of where I live."Gilpin is grappling with a mix of heat and poverty that illustrates how global warming can compound inequality.Sherrell Thompson, a community health worker in Gilpin, said residents have high rates of asthma, diabetes and high blood pressure, all conditions that can be worsened by heat. They are also exposed to air pollution from the six-lane highway next door.There are no doctor's offices nearby or grocery stores selling fresh produce, which means that people without cars face further health challenges in the heat."It becomes a whole circle of issues," Thompson said. "If you want to find any kind of healthy food, you need to walk at least a mile or catch two buses. If you have asthma but it's 103 degrees out and you're not feeling well enough to catch three buses to see your primary care physician, what do you do?"In Gilpin, the average life expectancy is 63 years. Just a short drive over the James River sits Westover Hills, a largely white, middle-income neighborhood that greets visitors with rows of massive oak trees spreading their leaves over quiet boulevards. Life expectancy there is 83 years.A broad array of socioeconomic factors drives this gap, but it is made worse by heat. Researchers have found that excess heat and a lack of green space can affect mental well-being and increase anxiety. Without parks or shady outdoor areas to gather, people are more likely to be isolated indoors during the summer, a dynamic worsened by the coronavirus pandemic."Especially when there's no green space nearby, the heat traps people in their homes," said Tevin Moore, 22, who grew up in Richmond's formerly redlined East End. "The heat definitely messes with you psychologically; people get frustrated over every little thing."Confronting Racial InequalityNationwide, the pattern is consistent: Neighborhoods that were once redlined see more extreme heat in the summer than those that weren't. But every city has its own story.In Denver, formerly redlined neighborhoods tend to have more Hispanic than Black residents today, but they remain hotter: Parks were intentionally placed in whiter, wealthier neighborhoods that then blocked construction of affordable housing nearby even after racial segregation was banned. In Baltimore, polluting industries were more likely to be located near communities of color. In Portland, zoning rules allowed multifamily apartment buildings to cover the entire lot and be built without any green space, a practice the city only recently changed.The problem worsens as global warming increases the number of hot days nationwide.Today, the Richmond area can expect about 43 days per year with temperatures of at least 90 degrees. By 2089, climate models suggest, the number of very hot days could double. "All of a sudden you're sitting on top of really unlivable temperatures," said Jeremy Hoffman, chief scientist at the Science Museum of Virginia and a co-author of the redlining study.For years, cities across the United States rarely thought about racial equity when designing their climate plans, which meant that climate protection measures, like green roofs on buildings, often disproportionately benefited whiter, wealthier residents. That's slowly starting to change.In Houston, officials recently passed an ordinance to prioritize disadvantaged neighborhoods for flood protection. Minneapolis and Portland are reworking zoning to allow denser, more affordable housing to be built in desirable neighborhoods. Denver has passed a new sales tax to fund parks and tree-planting, and city officials say they would like to add more green space in historically redlined areas.And in Richmond, a city in the midst of a major reckoning with its racist past, where crowds this summer tore down Confederate monuments and protested police brutality, officials are paying much closer attention to racial inequality as they draw up plans to adapt to global warming. The city has launched a new mapping tool that shows in detail how heat and flooding can disproportionately harm communities of color."We can see that racial equity and climate equity are inherently entwined, and we need to take that into account when we're building our capacity to prepare," said Alicia Zatcoff, the city's sustainability manager. "It's a new frontier in climate action planning, and there aren't a lot of cities that have really done it yet."Officials in Richmond's sustainability office are currently engaged in an intensive listening process with neighborhoods on the front lines of global warming to hear their concerns, as they work to put racial equity at the core of their climate action and resilience plan. Doing so "can mean confronting some very uncomfortable history," Zatcoff said. But "the more proponents there are of doing the work this way, the better off we'll all be for it."To start, the city has announced a goal of ensuring that everyone in Richmond is within a 10-minute walk of a park, working with the Science Museum of Virginia and community partners to identify city-owned properties in vulnerable neighborhoods that can be converted into green space. It's the city's first large-scale greening project since the 1970s.Green space can be transformative. Trees can cool down neighborhoods by several degrees during a heat wave, studies show, helping to lower electric bills as well as the risk of death. When planted near roads, trees can help filter air pollution. The presence of green space can even reduce stress levels for people living nearby.And trees have another climate benefit: Unlike paved surfaces, they can soak up water in their roots, reducing flooding during downpours.A few years ago, in Richmond's formerly redlined Southside, local nonprofits and residents sought to address the lack of green space and grocery stores by building a new community garden, a triangular park with a shaded veranda and fruit trees. "Almost instantly, the garden became a community space," said Duron Chavis of Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden, which backed the effort. "We have people holding cookouts; people doing yoga and meditation here; they can get to know their neighbors. It reduces social isolation."Richmond's long-term master plan, a draft of which was released in June, calls for increasing tree canopy in the hottest neighborhoods, redesigning buildings to increase air flow, reducing the number of paved lots and using more light-colored pavement to reflect the sun's energy. The plan explicitly mentions redlining as one of the historical forces that has shaped the city."Even people who don't believe institutionalized racism are struck when we show them these maps," said Cate Mingoya, director of capacity building at Groundwork USA, which has been highlighting links between redlining and heat in cities like Richmond. "We didn't get here by accident, and we're not going to get it fixed by accident."Still, the challenges are immense. Cities often face tight budgets, particularly as revenues have declined amid the coronavirus pandemic.And tree-planting can be politically charged. Some researchers have warned that building new parks and planting trees in lower-income neighborhoods of color can often accelerate gentrification, displacing longtime residents. In Richmond, city officials say they are looking to address this by building additional affordable housing alongside new green space.Richmond's draft master plan envisions building a park over Routes I-95 and I-64 to reconnect Gilpin with historical Jackson Ward, as well as redeveloping the public housing complex into a more walkable mixed-income neighborhood. That plan is not imminent, but local activists fear residents could eventually be priced out of this newer, greener area."My worry is that they won't build that park until the people who currently live here are removed," said Arthur Burton, director of the Kinfolk Community Empowerment Center, who has been working to build community gardens in historically redlined areas like Gilpin.While many are optimistic about Richmond's efforts to focus on racial equity, they warn there's still much work to be done to undo disparities built up over many decades. Inequality in housing, incomes, health and education "all make a difference when we're talking about vulnerability to climate change," said Rob Jones, executive director of Groundwork USA's Richmond chapter. "Greening the built environment is absolutely important," he said, "but it's only a start."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company


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  • 55/81   California Gov. Gavin Newsom has a new plan for reopening businesses in the state after COVID-19 cases surged following an initial reopen attempt months earlier
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    "We're going to be more stubborn this time. This is a stringent, but we believe more steady, approach," Newsom said.

    "We're going to be more stubborn this time. This is a stringent, but we believe more steady, approach," Newsom said.


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  • 56/81   Researchers have identified a possible case of COVID-19 reinfection in Nevada, study suggests
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    The first possible case of coronavirus reinfection in the US was reported this week in Nevada after a man tested positive for COVID a second time.

    The first possible case of coronavirus reinfection in the US was reported this week in Nevada after a man tested positive for COVID a second time.


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  • 57/81   With Elon Musk’s help, ‘Three Little Pigs’ demonstrate Neuralink’s brain implant
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    With grudging assistance from a trio of pigs, Neuralink co-founder Elon Musk showed off the startup's state-of-the-art neuron-reading brain implant and announced that the system has received the Food and Drug Administration's preliminary blessing as an experimental medical device. During today's demonstration at Neuralink's headquarters in Fremont, Calif., it took a few minutes for wranglers to get the swine into their proper positions for what Musk called his "Three Little Pigs demonstration." One of the pigs was in her natural state, and roamed unremarkably around her straw-covered pen. Musk said the second pig had been given a brain implant that… Read More

    With grudging assistance from a trio of pigs, Neuralink co-founder Elon Musk showed off the startup's state-of-the-art neuron-reading brain implant and announced that the system has received the Food and Drug Administration's preliminary blessing as an experimental medical device. During today's demonstration at Neuralink's headquarters in Fremont, Calif., it took a few minutes for wranglers to get the swine into their proper positions for what Musk called his "Three Little Pigs demonstration." One of the pigs was in her natural state, and roamed unremarkably around her straw-covered pen. Musk said the second pig had been given a brain implant that… Read More


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  • 58/81   How to make your own hand sanitizer and cleaning wipes
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    As drugstores run low on hand sanitizers and cleansing wipes in response to the novel-coronavirus outbreak, learn how to make your own.

    As drugstores run low on hand sanitizers and cleansing wipes in response to the novel-coronavirus outbreak, learn how to make your own.


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  • 59/81   Why California's wildfire year could be the worst in decades
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Record temperatures have exacerbated the state’s ongoing drought and triggered dry-lightning that started more than 700 fires, some in redwood rainforests and Joshua trees that do not normally burn.  Firefighters had a grip on the three largest blazes on Friday in the San Francisco Bay Area but warned residents to prepare for fall winds that typically drive the state’s largest fires.  With more than 1.6 million acres blackened this year, climatologist Zach Zobel said California was on track to overtake the nearly 2 million acres burned in 2018, when the state suffered its deadliest wildfire and the most acreage burned in records going back to at least 1987.

    Record temperatures have exacerbated the state’s ongoing drought and triggered dry-lightning that started more than 700 fires, some in redwood rainforests and Joshua trees that do not normally burn. Firefighters had a grip on the three largest blazes on Friday in the San Francisco Bay Area but warned residents to prepare for fall winds that typically drive the state’s largest fires. With more than 1.6 million acres blackened this year, climatologist Zach Zobel said California was on track to overtake the nearly 2 million acres burned in 2018, when the state suffered its deadliest wildfire and the most acreage burned in records going back to at least 1987.


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  • 60/81   Why California's wildfire year could be the worst in decades
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Record temperatures have exacerbated the state’s ongoing drought and triggered dry-lightning that started more than 700 fires, some in redwood rainforests and Joshua trees that do not normally burn.  Firefighters had a grip on the three largest blazes on Friday in the San Francisco Bay Area but warned residents to prepare for fall winds that typically drive the state’s largest fires.  With more than 1.6 million acres blackened this year, climatologist Zach Zobel said California was on track to overtake the nearly 2 million acres burned in 2018, when the state suffered its deadliest wildfire and the most acreage burned in records going back to at least 1987.

    Record temperatures have exacerbated the state’s ongoing drought and triggered dry-lightning that started more than 700 fires, some in redwood rainforests and Joshua trees that do not normally burn. Firefighters had a grip on the three largest blazes on Friday in the San Francisco Bay Area but warned residents to prepare for fall winds that typically drive the state’s largest fires. With more than 1.6 million acres blackened this year, climatologist Zach Zobel said California was on track to overtake the nearly 2 million acres burned in 2018, when the state suffered its deadliest wildfire and the most acreage burned in records going back to at least 1987.


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  • 61/81   Fossil Reveals 'One of the Cutest Dinosaurs' Ever Found
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Some 20 years ago, someone smuggled dinosaur eggs from Argentina to the United States illegally. The smuggler probably had little clue that inside one of the eggs was one of the best-preserved skulls of a dinosaur embryo ever found, which is now giving us new insights into the facial appearance of one line of our planet's erstwhile rulers."When I had a look at this specimen, I quickly realized how unique this is," said Martin Kundrat, a paleobiologist at the Center for Interdisciplinary Biosciences at Pavol Jozef Safarik University in Kosice, Slovakia, who's the lead author of a study published Thursday in Current Biology about the fossil. "It was really amazing to see that such a specimen could really be preserved and still keep a three-dimensional position."The skull is about the size of a table grape. Its right side is still entombed in mudstone and siltstone, and its mouth is closed. It isn't deformed, which is so often the case with bones buried in rock for millions and millions of years, and so it gives a first-of-its-kind glimpse into the start of life of a dinosaur that's part of a group called the titanosaurs -- long-neck dinosaurs that reached weights of 70 tons and lengths of 122 feet. And it has some surprises: It sports a horn on its nose, and its eye sockets face forward, like human eyes."I was pretty floored. I thought it was an amazing discovery," said Michael D'Emic, a vertebrate paleontologist and sauropod expert at Adelphi University in New York who was not involved in the new work, but has studied other sauropod embryos from Patagonia. Many of those skulls are warped and flattened like pancakes -- something that can hamper reconstructions of what the dinosaurs looked like in life."Just to have that sort of level of detail and preserved in 3D was just astonishing to me," he said.Kundrat first saw the skull in 2011, and began making detailed 3D scans of it. The scans let Kundrat and his team see the skull as a whole without damaging it, and it opened their eyes to something unusual about the embryo's eyes: The sockets angle toward the front of the skull. This is different from older sauropods, where the eyes face to the sides.Forward-facing eyes can give animals better depth perception, as with human eyes, D'Emic said. It's possible that this feature somehow helped the animals survive after they hatched -- especially because there's no evidence titanosaur parents cared for their hatchlings. But why younger sauropods and not older sauropods needed to be good at gauging the distances between things isn't at all clear."I won't even venture a guess," D'Emic said. "It's just totally a mystery."If the titanosaur could look forward after birth, it might have caught a glimpse of the other structure the team found: a horn on its nose."This little embryo is one of the cutest dinosaurs I've seen, and at the same time, one of the weirdest looking," said Stephen Brusatte, a vertebrate paleontologist at the University of Edinburgh who was not involved in the study. "You could call it a unicorn baby dinosaur, because it has a single horn on its head. But unlike the mythical unicorn, where the horn is on the forehead, this dinosaur has a small bumpy horn at the tip of its snout. I'm perplexed by why this horn was there, as we know that adult sauropod dinosaurs don't have such structures."Kundrat said he suspected that the hatchlings might have the horn for defense against predators, or to help them find food. But nothing is known about what titanosaurs ate, or what their interactions with predators were like, so, like the front-facing eyes, the horn's exact function will remain a topic for future study.Today, the skull sits in Los Angeles, in the hands of one of the new study's authors, Luis Chiappe, a vertebrate paleontologist at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. But as soon as the coronavirus pandemic eases, Kundrat and his team plan to repatriate the skull back to Argentina."This is a part of their national paleontological heritage," Kundrat said, "and in my opinion it's the right thing to do."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company

    Some 20 years ago, someone smuggled dinosaur eggs from Argentina to the United States illegally. The smuggler probably had little clue that inside one of the eggs was one of the best-preserved skulls of a dinosaur embryo ever found, which is now giving us new insights into the facial appearance of one line of our planet's erstwhile rulers."When I had a look at this specimen, I quickly realized how unique this is," said Martin Kundrat, a paleobiologist at the Center for Interdisciplinary Biosciences at Pavol Jozef Safarik University in Kosice, Slovakia, who's the lead author of a study published Thursday in Current Biology about the fossil. "It was really amazing to see that such a specimen could really be preserved and still keep a three-dimensional position."The skull is about the size of a table grape. Its right side is still entombed in mudstone and siltstone, and its mouth is closed. It isn't deformed, which is so often the case with bones buried in rock for millions and millions of years, and so it gives a first-of-its-kind glimpse into the start of life of a dinosaur that's part of a group called the titanosaurs -- long-neck dinosaurs that reached weights of 70 tons and lengths of 122 feet. And it has some surprises: It sports a horn on its nose, and its eye sockets face forward, like human eyes."I was pretty floored. I thought it was an amazing discovery," said Michael D'Emic, a vertebrate paleontologist and sauropod expert at Adelphi University in New York who was not involved in the new work, but has studied other sauropod embryos from Patagonia. Many of those skulls are warped and flattened like pancakes -- something that can hamper reconstructions of what the dinosaurs looked like in life."Just to have that sort of level of detail and preserved in 3D was just astonishing to me," he said.Kundrat first saw the skull in 2011, and began making detailed 3D scans of it. The scans let Kundrat and his team see the skull as a whole without damaging it, and it opened their eyes to something unusual about the embryo's eyes: The sockets angle toward the front of the skull. This is different from older sauropods, where the eyes face to the sides.Forward-facing eyes can give animals better depth perception, as with human eyes, D'Emic said. It's possible that this feature somehow helped the animals survive after they hatched -- especially because there's no evidence titanosaur parents cared for their hatchlings. But why younger sauropods and not older sauropods needed to be good at gauging the distances between things isn't at all clear."I won't even venture a guess," D'Emic said. "It's just totally a mystery."If the titanosaur could look forward after birth, it might have caught a glimpse of the other structure the team found: a horn on its nose."This little embryo is one of the cutest dinosaurs I've seen, and at the same time, one of the weirdest looking," said Stephen Brusatte, a vertebrate paleontologist at the University of Edinburgh who was not involved in the study. "You could call it a unicorn baby dinosaur, because it has a single horn on its head. But unlike the mythical unicorn, where the horn is on the forehead, this dinosaur has a small bumpy horn at the tip of its snout. I'm perplexed by why this horn was there, as we know that adult sauropod dinosaurs don't have such structures."Kundrat said he suspected that the hatchlings might have the horn for defense against predators, or to help them find food. But nothing is known about what titanosaurs ate, or what their interactions with predators were like, so, like the front-facing eyes, the horn's exact function will remain a topic for future study.Today, the skull sits in Los Angeles, in the hands of one of the new study's authors, Luis Chiappe, a vertebrate paleontologist at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. But as soon as the coronavirus pandemic eases, Kundrat and his team plan to repatriate the skull back to Argentina."This is a part of their national paleontological heritage," Kundrat said, "and in my opinion it's the right thing to do."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company


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  • 62/81   Letter from Africa: Why Kenyans are no longer cheering their constitution
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    It is a time of reflection 10 years after the country was promised a rebirth, writes Waihiga Mwaura.

    It is a time of reflection 10 years after the country was promised a rebirth, writes Waihiga Mwaura.


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  • 63/81   Non-stop protests keep pressure on Belarus' president to resign
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    On display was the first major demonstration since Russian President Vladimir Putin said last week that he would send in security forces? "if necessary."

    On display was the first major demonstration since Russian President Vladimir Putin said last week that he would send in security forces? "if necessary."


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  • 64/81   Africa's week in pictures: 21-27 August 2020
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    A selection of the week's best photos from across the continent and beyond.

    A selection of the week's best photos from across the continent and beyond.


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  • 65/81   'Fanning the flames': Dems accuse Trump of stoking violence
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Democrats on Sunday accused President Donald Trump of trying to inflame racial tensions and incite violence to benefit his campaign as he praised supporters who clashed with protesters in Portland, Oregon, where one man died overnight, and announced he will travel to Kenosha, Wisconsin, amid anger over the shooting of another Black man by police.  Trump unleashed a flurry of tweets and retweets the day after a man identified as a supporter of a right-wing group was shot and killed in Portland, where a large caravan of Trump supporters and Black Lives Matter protesters clashed in the city's streets.  Trump praised the caravan participants as “GREAT PATRIOTS!” and retweeted what appeared to be the dead man's name along with a message to “Rest in peace.”

    Democrats on Sunday accused President Donald Trump of trying to inflame racial tensions and incite violence to benefit his campaign as he praised supporters who clashed with protesters in Portland, Oregon, where one man died overnight, and announced he will travel to Kenosha, Wisconsin, amid anger over the shooting of another Black man by police. Trump unleashed a flurry of tweets and retweets the day after a man identified as a supporter of a right-wing group was shot and killed in Portland, where a large caravan of Trump supporters and Black Lives Matter protesters clashed in the city's streets. Trump praised the caravan participants as “GREAT PATRIOTS!” and retweeted what appeared to be the dead man's name along with a message to “Rest in peace.”


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  • 66/81   Alarm as FDA willing to issue Covid-19 vaccine before stringent safety testing
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    FDA under intensifying pressure from Trump, who wants to see a vaccine come on stream or ready to announce before the electionPublic health experts have reacted with alarm to remarks by the head of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that he might give the green light for a US Covid-19 vaccine before the normal clinical trial process had reached its conclusion.As the US was on the verge of 6m coronavirus cases on Sunday, Stephen Hahn, the FDA commissioner, told the Financial Times in an interview published on Sunday that he was prepared to issue emergency use authorization for a Covid-19 vaccine before the end of Phase 3 human trials that put the drug through stringent testing for safety and efficacy.He said the standard he would apply instead would be “that the benefit outweighs the risk in a public health emergency”.Hahn told the newspaper that his decision would not be swayed by political pressure amid the febrile atmosphere of the upcoming US presidential election. “This is going to be a science, medicine, data decision. This is not going to be a political decision,” he said.But several public health experts expressed their concern on Sunday about an apparent willingness to consider fast-tracking a vaccine outside what is considered the gold standard testing process.The FDA has come under intensifying pressure in recent weeks from Donald Trump, who wants to see a vaccine come on stream or ready to announce before the November election, and has a public-private vaccine development funding program underway called Operation Warp Speed.Trump has openly attacked the FDA, baselessly citing a supposed “deep state” within it of dragging its feet on the vaccine approval process, despite no evidence to support the latest version of a right-wing conspiracy theory that even one of its most enthusiastic, original Trump administration propagators, Steve Bannon, has dismissed.The number of confirmed cases of Covid-19 was approaching 6m in the US by Sunday afternoon, according to figures from Johns Hopkins University, while recorded deaths stand at a catastrophic 182,612 – almost a quarter of all global fatalities.Over the weekend California became the first state to pass 700,000 confirmed cases.Since the beginning of the pandemic in January, Trump has consistently downplayed the severity of the crisis and sidelined scientists, including those at the FDA.Hahn has been criticized for misleading the public about the efficacy of convalescent plasma treatment which takes blood plasma from Covid-19 survivors and injects it into sufferers.At a White House media launch last week Hahn, standing beside Trump, said the plasma treatment would save 35 lives out of every 100 patients when in fact studies put the figure at 3 to 5 lives. He was forced to apologise.Scientists and public health specialists were quick to issue warnings about Hahn’s comments about cutting short the vaccine trials.Dr Angela Rasmussen, a virologist at New York’s Columbia University, said: “We absolutely cannot tolerate or accept an emergency authorization for any Covid-19 vaccine without reliable safety and efficacy data from phase three clinical trials”.Writing on Twitter, she said it would be unethical to give the go-ahead before the trials had conclusively proved that both the safety and efficacy of the vaccine.It would place “huge numbers of people at risk for massive potential harm” and would deal “a catastrophic blow to public confidence in both vaccines and the regulatory mechanisms in place”, she wrote.Eric Topol of the Scripps Translational Research Institute said that it would take many months for the safety of the vaccine to be fully determined at trial, “irrespective of Stephen Hahn’s subservience to Trump… Any shortcuts will imperil the ultimate rollout of the vaccine and lose the public trust for getting immunized, which is already compromised.”Hahn’s predecessor as head of the FDA, Scott Gottlieb, told CBS’s Face the Nation that “I don’t know what is meant by saying before the phase 3 trials are completed… They are going to wait for these trials to read out before they can make a decision about the efficacy of these vaccines.”The news earlier this month that Russia had produced a vaccine was greeted with widespread skepticism because it had been approved and was being given to people, including one of Vladimir Putin’s daughters, before phase three trials.

    FDA under intensifying pressure from Trump, who wants to see a vaccine come on stream or ready to announce before the electionPublic health experts have reacted with alarm to remarks by the head of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that he might give the green light for a US Covid-19 vaccine before the normal clinical trial process had reached its conclusion.As the US was on the verge of 6m coronavirus cases on Sunday, Stephen Hahn, the FDA commissioner, told the Financial Times in an interview published on Sunday that he was prepared to issue emergency use authorization for a Covid-19 vaccine before the end of Phase 3 human trials that put the drug through stringent testing for safety and efficacy.He said the standard he would apply instead would be “that the benefit outweighs the risk in a public health emergency”.Hahn told the newspaper that his decision would not be swayed by political pressure amid the febrile atmosphere of the upcoming US presidential election. “This is going to be a science, medicine, data decision. This is not going to be a political decision,” he said.But several public health experts expressed their concern on Sunday about an apparent willingness to consider fast-tracking a vaccine outside what is considered the gold standard testing process.The FDA has come under intensifying pressure in recent weeks from Donald Trump, who wants to see a vaccine come on stream or ready to announce before the November election, and has a public-private vaccine development funding program underway called Operation Warp Speed.Trump has openly attacked the FDA, baselessly citing a supposed “deep state” within it of dragging its feet on the vaccine approval process, despite no evidence to support the latest version of a right-wing conspiracy theory that even one of its most enthusiastic, original Trump administration propagators, Steve Bannon, has dismissed.The number of confirmed cases of Covid-19 was approaching 6m in the US by Sunday afternoon, according to figures from Johns Hopkins University, while recorded deaths stand at a catastrophic 182,612 – almost a quarter of all global fatalities.Over the weekend California became the first state to pass 700,000 confirmed cases.Since the beginning of the pandemic in January, Trump has consistently downplayed the severity of the crisis and sidelined scientists, including those at the FDA.Hahn has been criticized for misleading the public about the efficacy of convalescent plasma treatment which takes blood plasma from Covid-19 survivors and injects it into sufferers.At a White House media launch last week Hahn, standing beside Trump, said the plasma treatment would save 35 lives out of every 100 patients when in fact studies put the figure at 3 to 5 lives. He was forced to apologise.Scientists and public health specialists were quick to issue warnings about Hahn’s comments about cutting short the vaccine trials.Dr Angela Rasmussen, a virologist at New York’s Columbia University, said: “We absolutely cannot tolerate or accept an emergency authorization for any Covid-19 vaccine without reliable safety and efficacy data from phase three clinical trials”.Writing on Twitter, she said it would be unethical to give the go-ahead before the trials had conclusively proved that both the safety and efficacy of the vaccine.It would place “huge numbers of people at risk for massive potential harm” and would deal “a catastrophic blow to public confidence in both vaccines and the regulatory mechanisms in place”, she wrote.Eric Topol of the Scripps Translational Research Institute said that it would take many months for the safety of the vaccine to be fully determined at trial, “irrespective of Stephen Hahn’s subservience to Trump… Any shortcuts will imperil the ultimate rollout of the vaccine and lose the public trust for getting immunized, which is already compromised.”Hahn’s predecessor as head of the FDA, Scott Gottlieb, told CBS’s Face the Nation that “I don’t know what is meant by saying before the phase 3 trials are completed… They are going to wait for these trials to read out before they can make a decision about the efficacy of these vaccines.”The news earlier this month that Russia had produced a vaccine was greeted with widespread skepticism because it had been approved and was being given to people, including one of Vladimir Putin’s daughters, before phase three trials.


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  • 67/81   Key air monitors offline after Laura hits Louisiana gas hub
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Hazardous emissions from a chlorine plant fire, abruptly shuttered oil and gas refineries and still-to-be assessed plant damage are seeping into the air after Hurricane Laura, regulators say, but some key state and federal monitors to alert the public of air dangers remain offline in Louisiana.  While  the chlorine fire was being monitored as a potential health threat, Louisiana environmental spokesman Greg Langley says he knows of no other major industrial health risks from the storm in the state.  With dozens of petroleum, petrochemical and other industrial sites, Louisiana is home to communities with some of the nation's highest cancer risks, according to Environmental Protection Agency rankings.

    Hazardous emissions from a chlorine plant fire, abruptly shuttered oil and gas refineries and still-to-be assessed plant damage are seeping into the air after Hurricane Laura, regulators say, but some key state and federal monitors to alert the public of air dangers remain offline in Louisiana. While the chlorine fire was being monitored as a potential health threat, Louisiana environmental spokesman Greg Langley says he knows of no other major industrial health risks from the storm in the state. With dozens of petroleum, petrochemical and other industrial sites, Louisiana is home to communities with some of the nation's highest cancer risks, according to Environmental Protection Agency rankings.


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  • 68/81   French virus surge threatens nationwide back-to-school plan
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Not all French classrooms can safely reopen Tuesday, the country's education minister acknowledged Sunday, as a persistent rise in coronavirus infections jeopardizes the government’s push to get France’s 12.9 million schoolchildren back into class this week.  Like many governments around the world, France and Britain want to reopen schools starting Tuesday to reduce the learning gaps between rich and poor students that were worsened by the virus lockdown this spring, and to get parents back to work and revive the ailing economy.  With several thousand new infections now reported in France every day, Education Minister Jean-Michel Blanquer told the Journal du Dimanche newspaper that some classes will remain closed when the nationwide reopening begins Tuesday, but “as few as possible.”

    Not all French classrooms can safely reopen Tuesday, the country's education minister acknowledged Sunday, as a persistent rise in coronavirus infections jeopardizes the government’s push to get France’s 12.9 million schoolchildren back into class this week. Like many governments around the world, France and Britain want to reopen schools starting Tuesday to reduce the learning gaps between rich and poor students that were worsened by the virus lockdown this spring, and to get parents back to work and revive the ailing economy. With several thousand new infections now reported in France every day, Education Minister Jean-Michel Blanquer told the Journal du Dimanche newspaper that some classes will remain closed when the nationwide reopening begins Tuesday, but “as few as possible.”


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  • 69/81   Mauritius oil spill: Thousands march in Port Louis
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Massive amounts of oil spilled into a wildlife sanctuary, and 39 dead dolphins have been discovered.

    Massive amounts of oil spilled into a wildlife sanctuary, and 39 dead dolphins have been discovered.


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  • 70/81   Austrian law extends citizenship to descendants of Jewish refugees
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Descendants of Jewish refugees expelled from Austria under Nazi rule can apply for Austrian citizenship under a new law that goes into effect Tuesday.About 120,000 Jews living in Austria fled persecution after Nazi Germany annexed its neighbor in 1938, with many going to the United States and the United Kingdom. Most refugees, The Observer notes, became naturalized citizens in their new countries, but post-war Austria banned dual citizenship, meaning those who left were considered foreigners in their homeland. Eventually, in 1993, former refugees were able to reclaim their Austrian citizenship, but descendants were left out, preventing the country from restoring its pre-war Jewish community, which numbered 200,000. That's unlikely to happen even now since the applicants will be dual citizens and won't necessarily reside in Austria. For instance, a major factor for eligible U.K. citizens, per the Observer, will likely be the desire to regain European Union citizenship post-Brexit through the program.Still, campaigners believe the law represents both historic justice and could potentially help sway change in Austria, where some citizens believe anti-minority sentiment is on the rise. Bini Guttman, the Austrian president of the European Union of Jewish Students, said the law can "help deliver justice" for the applicants' "successors here and for the future" if they exercise their voting rights.Hannah Lessing, secretary general of the National Fund of the Republic of Austria for Victims of National Socialism, applauded the law, but said "it can never truly make amends for the Holocaust." Read more at The Observer.More stories from theweek.com  5 more scathingly funny cartoons about the Republican National Convention  Air travel in the coronavirus era  Biden's latest ad puts Trump's weirdest moments and empty rallies to a Bad Bunny song

    Descendants of Jewish refugees expelled from Austria under Nazi rule can apply for Austrian citizenship under a new law that goes into effect Tuesday.About 120,000 Jews living in Austria fled persecution after Nazi Germany annexed its neighbor in 1938, with many going to the United States and the United Kingdom. Most refugees, The Observer notes, became naturalized citizens in their new countries, but post-war Austria banned dual citizenship, meaning those who left were considered foreigners in their homeland. Eventually, in 1993, former refugees were able to reclaim their Austrian citizenship, but descendants were left out, preventing the country from restoring its pre-war Jewish community, which numbered 200,000. That's unlikely to happen even now since the applicants will be dual citizens and won't necessarily reside in Austria. For instance, a major factor for eligible U.K. citizens, per the Observer, will likely be the desire to regain European Union citizenship post-Brexit through the program.Still, campaigners believe the law represents both historic justice and could potentially help sway change in Austria, where some citizens believe anti-minority sentiment is on the rise. Bini Guttman, the Austrian president of the European Union of Jewish Students, said the law can "help deliver justice" for the applicants' "successors here and for the future" if they exercise their voting rights.Hannah Lessing, secretary general of the National Fund of the Republic of Austria for Victims of National Socialism, applauded the law, but said "it can never truly make amends for the Holocaust." Read more at The Observer.More stories from theweek.com 5 more scathingly funny cartoons about the Republican National Convention Air travel in the coronavirus era Biden's latest ad puts Trump's weirdest moments and empty rallies to a Bad Bunny song


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  • 71/81   The woman leading the fight against Putin '24/7' after poisoning of Navalny
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Lyubov Sobol was already among the most visible dissidents in Vladimir Putin’s Russia. At 32, she has fronted a protest movement, calling thousands to the streets when she and other opposition candidates were barred from standing in Moscow city elections last year. She staged a hunger strike and a sit-in at the offices of the Moscow election commission, eventually being lifted out of the building on a sofa after she refused to stand for police officers. A laughing Ms Sobol broadcast the incident live from her phone to her vast social media following. She has been sued by one of the most powerful businessmen in the country, and her husband has survived a poisoning. In 2016 an unknown assailant jabbed a syringe into his leg and injected a psychotropic substance that left him convulsing and unconscious, an attack Ms Sobol believes was linked to her activism. Now, with opposition leader Alexei Navalny in a coma in a German hospital after another suspected poisoning, the telegenic lawyer finds herself at the helm of his anti-Kremlin organisation. Doctors at Berlin’s Charite Hospital, where Mr Navalny was transferred from a Siberian clinic, have said he will probably survive the ordeal but may sustain long-term damage.

    Lyubov Sobol was already among the most visible dissidents in Vladimir Putin’s Russia. At 32, she has fronted a protest movement, calling thousands to the streets when she and other opposition candidates were barred from standing in Moscow city elections last year. She staged a hunger strike and a sit-in at the offices of the Moscow election commission, eventually being lifted out of the building on a sofa after she refused to stand for police officers. A laughing Ms Sobol broadcast the incident live from her phone to her vast social media following. She has been sued by one of the most powerful businessmen in the country, and her husband has survived a poisoning. In 2016 an unknown assailant jabbed a syringe into his leg and injected a psychotropic substance that left him convulsing and unconscious, an attack Ms Sobol believes was linked to her activism. Now, with opposition leader Alexei Navalny in a coma in a German hospital after another suspected poisoning, the telegenic lawyer finds herself at the helm of his anti-Kremlin organisation. Doctors at Berlin’s Charite Hospital, where Mr Navalny was transferred from a Siberian clinic, have said he will probably survive the ordeal but may sustain long-term damage.


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  • 72/81   Two conventions — one masked, the other mostly not — offer contrasting views on coronavirus
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    The two conventions offered very divergent views for a nation still struggling with a pandemic.

    The two conventions offered very divergent views for a nation still struggling with a pandemic.


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  • 73/81   First confirmed case of COVID-19 reinfection is ‘not surprising,’ doctors say
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Researchers in Hong Kong confirmed the first known case of coronavirus reinfection, but many doctors and public health officials say it isn't that surprising given what we know about waning immunity from other coronaviruses.

    Researchers in Hong Kong confirmed the first known case of coronavirus reinfection, but many doctors and public health officials say it isn't that surprising given what we know about waning immunity from other coronaviruses.


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  • 74/81   Ron DeSantis sidelined his health department. Florida paid the price.
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Florida's surgeon general lost all influence after an April 13 briefing, leading to "craziness" within the health department, an official said.

    Florida's surgeon general lost all influence after an April 13 briefing, leading to "craziness" within the health department, an official said.


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  • 75/81   'You don't want people to vote,' Democrat Marcia Fudge tells Republicans
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Comments by Ohio Rep. Marcia Fudge summed up many Democrats’ concerns about Republican resistance to mail-in voting.

    Comments by Ohio Rep. Marcia Fudge summed up many Democrats’ concerns about Republican resistance to mail-in voting.


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  • 76/81   Did the RNC boost Trump’s reelection odds?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    President Trump closed out the Republican National Convention with a speech filled with fierce attacks against Joe Biden. Did the controversial event help him gain ground with voters?

    President Trump closed out the Republican National Convention with a speech filled with fierce attacks against Joe Biden. Did the controversial event help him gain ground with voters?


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  • 77/81   A thousand kids and counselors went to summer camp in Maine. Only 3 got the coronavirus.
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Out of 1,022 people who attended or worked at several summer camps in Maine that implemented measures to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, only three tested positive for it, a new study says. And those three cases did not result in secondary infections because proper measures were taken.

    Out of 1,022 people who attended or worked at several summer camps in Maine that implemented measures to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, only three tested positive for it, a new study says. And those three cases did not result in secondary infections because proper measures were taken.


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  • 78/81   Trump administration defends 'inexplicable' changes to coronavirus testing guidelines
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    A top Trump administration official defended new guidelines that say that people without symptoms do not need a coronavirus test, a development that has been widely criticized as unproductive since it was issued on Tuesday. 

    A top Trump administration official defended new guidelines that say that people without symptoms do not need a coronavirus test, a development that has been widely criticized as unproductive since it was issued on Tuesday. 


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  • 79/81   Should colleges discount tuition when they go remote?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Students at colleges across the country are demanding tuition be reduced because classes are being held online. Schools say any discount would cripple them financially.

    Students at colleges across the country are demanding tuition be reduced because classes are being held online. Schools say any discount would cripple them financially.


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  • 80/81   Coronavirus an afterthought as RNC opens
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    “Donald Trump truly moved mountains to save lives,” said one RNC speaker, an assertion at odds with what many have called President Trump’s inattentive and even self-sabotaging response to the pandemic, which has killed nearly 180,000 people in the U.S.

    “Donald Trump truly moved mountains to save lives,” said one RNC speaker, an assertion at odds with what many have called President Trump’s inattentive and even self-sabotaging response to the pandemic, which has killed nearly 180,000 people in the U.S.


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  • 81/81   5 takeaways from day 1 of the RNC
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    The theme of the first night of the Republican National Convention was “America, Land of Promise,” a hopeful message belied by speeches that warned of impending national collapse if Donald Trump isn’t reelected in November.

    The theme of the first night of the Republican National Convention was “America, Land of Promise,” a hopeful message belied by speeches that warned of impending national collapse if Donald Trump isn’t reelected in November.


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