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News Slideshows (08/31/2020 15 hours)


  • 1/81   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


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    Press Review


    John Thompson   Fournette   Jags   RIP Coach   Armstead   Minshew   Happy First Day of School   Tanking for Trevor   Leonard   Apple and Tesla   Jamal Murray   Van Gogh   Fear the Lord   New Week   John Oliver   Tobago   
  • 2/81   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


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  • 3/81   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


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  • 4/81   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


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  • 5/81   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


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  • 6/81   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


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  • 7/81   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


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  • 8/81   Do star athletes make too much money?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    With athletes in America's biggest sports leagues raking in salaries worth $300 million and more, is it time to reign in the big spending or do superstars deserve the big bucks they make?

    With athletes in America's biggest sports leagues raking in salaries worth $300 million and more, is it time to reign in the big spending or do superstars deserve the big bucks they make?


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  • 9/81   Live animal mascots: Cute or exploitative?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?


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  • 10/81   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


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  • 11/81   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


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  • 12/81   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


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  • 13/81   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


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  • 14/81   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


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  • 15/81   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


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  • 16/81   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


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  • 17/81   PHOTOS: Fluorescent turtle embryo wins forty-fifth annual Nikon Small World Competition

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.


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  • 18/81   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


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  • 19/81   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


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  • 20/81   What the CIA thinks of your anti-virus program

    PARIS (AP) — Peppering the 8,000 pages of purported Central Intelligence Agency hacking data released Tuesday by WikiLeaks are reviews of some of the world's most popular anti-virus products.

    PARIS (AP) — Peppering the 8,000 pages of purported Central Intelligence Agency hacking data released Tuesday by WikiLeaks are reviews of some of the world's most popular anti-virus products.


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  • 21/81   Google Patents Sticky Car Hood to Trap Pedestrians in a Collision

    The patent calls for a giant sticker to be placed on the front end of a vehicle, with a special coating over the layer that is only broken when something collides with the vehicle, exposing the adhesive and helping the colliding object to remain on the vehicle.  The idea is to prevent a pedestrian from being thrown after the impact and potentially sustaining even more injuries.

    The patent calls for a giant sticker to be placed on the front end of a vehicle, with a special coating over the layer that is only broken when something collides with the vehicle, exposing the adhesive and helping the colliding object to remain on the vehicle. The idea is to prevent a pedestrian from being thrown after the impact and potentially sustaining even more injuries.


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  • 22/81   Relax, Your Instagram Feed Likely Won't Change Tomorrow

    Relax, your Instagram feed likely isn't changing tomorrow.The great "Insta-freakout" of 2016 was unleashed this morning by a slew of celebrities, bloggers and social media aficionados after they alerted followers to turn on post notifications for future access to their photos, videos and messages. ...

    Relax, your Instagram feed likely isn't changing tomorrow.The great "Insta-freakout" of 2016 was unleashed this morning by a slew of celebrities, bloggers and social media aficionados after they alerted followers to turn on post notifications for future access to their photos, videos and messages. ...


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  • 23/81   'Hack the Pentagon' and get paid legally in new program

    Attention hackers: Time to re-watch “WarGames” and crack your knuckles, the Pentagon is about to pay you to break into some government systems.

    Attention hackers: Time to re-watch “WarGames” and crack your knuckles, the Pentagon is about to pay you to break into some government systems.


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  • 24/81   Elon Musk's Hyperloop Vision Could Be Ready for Passengers by 2018

    The Hyperloop, Elon Musk's vision of launching humans through pods inside a high-speed transportation system, could be ready for passengers by 2018, according to a company building a transportation track in California.  One company working to make Musk's vision a reality, Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, said it has filed for construction permits in Quay Valley, California, for a 5-mile track.  'We are announcing the filing of the first building permit to Kings County to the building of the first full-scale hyperloop, not a test track,' Bibop Gresta, the chief operating officer of Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, said today at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, during a CNBC/TradeShift event.

    The Hyperloop, Elon Musk's vision of launching humans through pods inside a high-speed transportation system, could be ready for passengers by 2018, according to a company building a transportation track in California. One company working to make Musk's vision a reality, Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, said it has filed for construction permits in Quay Valley, California, for a 5-mile track. 'We are announcing the filing of the first building permit to Kings County to the building of the first full-scale hyperloop, not a test track,' Bibop Gresta, the chief operating officer of Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, said today at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, during a CNBC/TradeShift event.


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  • 25/81   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


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  • 26/81   Man Proposes by Text Message While Stranded at Chicago's O’Hare Airport

    An Arizona man waiting to fly home to propose to his girlfriend was forced to propose to her via text message after spending 50 hours stranded at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport.  Danny Roderique, of Phoenix, had the diamond engagement ring in his pocket but the delay got in the way of the proposal he’d planned.  “I’ve been stranded now in the airport for 50 hours,” Roderique told a reporter from ABC affiliate WLS-TV while still waiting at O’Hare on Monday.

    An Arizona man waiting to fly home to propose to his girlfriend was forced to propose to her via text message after spending 50 hours stranded at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport. Danny Roderique, of Phoenix, had the diamond engagement ring in his pocket but the delay got in the way of the proposal he’d planned. “I’ve been stranded now in the airport for 50 hours,” Roderique told a reporter from ABC affiliate WLS-TV while still waiting at O’Hare on Monday.


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  • 27/81   Twitter Warns Some Users Over Possible Government Hacking

    It's unclear how many people received a letter from Twitter.  In October, Facebook said it would begin issuing alerts to users who the social network believes are being targeted by state-sponsored hackers, according to a message posted by Alex Stamos, Facebook's chief security officer.

    It's unclear how many people received a letter from Twitter. In October, Facebook said it would begin issuing alerts to users who the social network believes are being targeted by state-sponsored hackers, according to a message posted by Alex Stamos, Facebook's chief security officer.


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  • 28/81   Facebook Notifications Get Even More Personal

    Facebook notifications may now be your first stop in the morning to catch up on everything from friends' news to weather, sports scores and what to expect later in the day.  The social network announced this week it will be rolling out expanded, personalized notifications in the Facebook across iOS and Android devices for users in the United States.  The mobile update is bringing a set of new card-like notifications that will include information such as sports scores for teams you have liked, TV shows, weather information and friends' life events, among other updates.

    Facebook notifications may now be your first stop in the morning to catch up on everything from friends' news to weather, sports scores and what to expect later in the day. The social network announced this week it will be rolling out expanded, personalized notifications in the Facebook across iOS and Android devices for users in the United States. The mobile update is bringing a set of new card-like notifications that will include information such as sports scores for teams you have liked, TV shows, weather information and friends' life events, among other updates.


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  • 29/81   How to Tell Which Apps Are Draining Your iPhone Battery

    Some iOS 9 users have complained Facebook's app has been excessively eating away at their battery life, even when the background app refresh setting is disabled.  It's unclear what possible issue may be causing the battery drain.  Tapping the list will show how much of the battery drain was spent when the app was running in the background.

    Some iOS 9 users have complained Facebook's app has been excessively eating away at their battery life, even when the background app refresh setting is disabled. It's unclear what possible issue may be causing the battery drain. Tapping the list will show how much of the battery drain was spent when the app was running in the background.


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  • 30/81   Armed Robbery Suspect Tries Using Uber as Getaway Car, Police Say

    A 23-year-old man suspected of armed robbery tried to take an Uber car to help him get away after he held up a store outside Baltimore, police said.  The suspect, Dashawn Terrell Cochran, was at a store in Parkville, Maryland, early Wednesday morning when he allegedly took a bottle of Tylenol cold medicine to the register, the Baltimore County Police Department said.  Cochran was seen getting into the back of a silver Lexus, and when officers pulled the car over, the driver said he was an Uber driver, police said.

    A 23-year-old man suspected of armed robbery tried to take an Uber car to help him get away after he held up a store outside Baltimore, police said. The suspect, Dashawn Terrell Cochran, was at a store in Parkville, Maryland, early Wednesday morning when he allegedly took a bottle of Tylenol cold medicine to the register, the Baltimore County Police Department said. Cochran was seen getting into the back of a silver Lexus, and when officers pulled the car over, the driver said he was an Uber driver, police said.


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  • 31/81   Drone Popularity Draws Concern From Pilots, Federal Officials

    Roughly 700,000 drones are expected to be sold in the United States this year, according to the Consumer Electronics Association.  The Federal Aviation Administration plans to meet with Walmart, which has 19 different kinds of drones for sale on its website, to teach salespeople about what it should tell its customers about safe drone operation.  The Consumer Electronics Association projects the U.S. drone market to climb above $100 million in revenue this year, an increase of more than 50 percent from last year’s total.

    Roughly 700,000 drones are expected to be sold in the United States this year, according to the Consumer Electronics Association. The Federal Aviation Administration plans to meet with Walmart, which has 19 different kinds of drones for sale on its website, to teach salespeople about what it should tell its customers about safe drone operation. The Consumer Electronics Association projects the U.S. drone market to climb above $100 million in revenue this year, an increase of more than 50 percent from last year’s total.


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  • 32/81   Carly Fiorina: Why She Wants Everyone to Throw Out Their Flip Phones

    Carly Fiorina is putting flip phone users on notice: You’re going to have to upgrade under a President Fiorina.  “How many of you have a flip phone?” Fiorina recently asked a town hall in South Carolina.  It’s all part of a vision the Republican presidential candidate has to give citizens a direct line of communication – literally – to the president.

    Carly Fiorina is putting flip phone users on notice: You’re going to have to upgrade under a President Fiorina. “How many of you have a flip phone?” Fiorina recently asked a town hall in South Carolina. It’s all part of a vision the Republican presidential candidate has to give citizens a direct line of communication – literally – to the president.


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  • 33/81   How a 'Programming Error' Led to an Oregon Couple's $2 Million Cell Phone Bill

    A couple in Oregon say they spent 10 months trying to clear up a whopping $2 million phone bill, which they say has prevented them from buying the home of their dreams.  Ken Slusher and his girlfriend, of Damascus, Oregon, have a balance of $2,156,593.64 on a Verizon Wireless bill that was for a wireless account that they opened in November.  'Yeah, it's been very stressful to say the least,' Slusher told KPTV.com.

    A couple in Oregon say they spent 10 months trying to clear up a whopping $2 million phone bill, which they say has prevented them from buying the home of their dreams. Ken Slusher and his girlfriend, of Damascus, Oregon, have a balance of $2,156,593.64 on a Verizon Wireless bill that was for a wireless account that they opened in November. 'Yeah, it's been very stressful to say the least,' Slusher told KPTV.com.


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  • 34/81   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


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  • 35/81   Pranab Mukherjee: Former India president dies after Covid diagnosis
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Pranab Mukherjee had a long political career and also served on the boards of IMF and World Bank.

    Pranab Mukherjee had a long political career and also served on the boards of IMF and World Bank.


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  • 36/81   OfferUp and letgo Combine and Release New App That Brings Together Millions of Buyers and Sellers into One Marketplace
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Today, OfferUp announced that it has combined the OfferUp and letgo marketplaces into one with the new OfferUp & letgo app, creating an improved experience that brings together millions of buyers and sellers across the nation. Available to download today in the App Store and Google Play Store, the combined OfferUp & letgo marketplace has even more deals, and more buyers and sellers for a bigger, better community. Plus, everyone now has access to nationwide shipping, industry-leading safety programs like TruYou & Community MeetUp Spots and listings that never expire.

    Today, OfferUp announced that it has combined the OfferUp and letgo marketplaces into one with the new OfferUp & letgo app, creating an improved experience that brings together millions of buyers and sellers across the nation. Available to download today in the App Store and Google Play Store, the combined OfferUp & letgo marketplace has even more deals, and more buyers and sellers for a bigger, better community. Plus, everyone now has access to nationwide shipping, industry-leading safety programs like TruYou & Community MeetUp Spots and listings that never expire.


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  • 37/81   India GDP shows worst quarterly slump in decades
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    It contracted by 23.9% in the quarter from April to June, according to official data.

    It contracted by 23.9% in the quarter from April to June, according to official data.


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  • 38/81   FAA Certifies Cirrus Vision Jet’s Safe Return Becoming the First Jet Aircraft to be Certified with Garmin Autoland
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Once activated, Safe Return assumes control of the aircraft and transforms the Vision Jet into an autonomous vehicle that navigates to the nearest suitable airport for landing, communicates with air traffic control, lands and brings the aircraft safely to a complete stop.   The Vision Jet, with both Safe Return and the award-winning Cirrus Airframe Parachute System® (CAPS®), provides a comprehensive, must-have total safety solution unique to G2 Vision Jet operators. Duluth, Minn. & Knoxville, Tenn., Aug. 31, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Cirrus Aircraft and Garmin International, Inc. today announced Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certification of the Cirrus Vision Jet™ Safe Return™ system – a revolutionary system enabled by Garmin’s autoland technology that allows passengers to land the Vision Jet with just the touch of a button. The certification follows tremendous growth of the Vision Jet, including becoming the world’s best-selling jet in general aviation earlier this year and delivery of the 200th Vision Jet last month. Now, with Safe Return and the Collier award-winning Cirrus Airframe Parachute System® (CAPS®), the Vision Jet provides the most comprehensive, must-have total safety solution in general aviation.      “With Safe Return, we are making personal aviation more accessible, elevating the passenger experience and taking the next step towards autonomous flight,” said Zean Nielsen, Chief Executive Officer at Cirrus Aircraft. “The Vision Jet sets a new standard in personal travel with the combination of Safe Return and CAPS, offering the ultimate level of safety, control and comfort for the pilot and passengers.”    The Safe Return activation button is purposefully located on the ceiling in the Vision Jet's cabin for easy access by passengers and can be activated, if needed, within minutes of the aircraft’s take-off. Once activated by the touch of a button, Safe Return assumes control of the aircraft and transforms the Vision Jet into an autonomous vehicle that navigates to the nearest suitable airport for landing, communicates with air traffic control, lands and brings the aircraft safely to a complete stop, allowing passengers to exit the aircraft. This revolutionary system is powered by the Cirrus Perspective+ by Garmin® flight deck, which uses all available aircraft data to calculate a flight plan, avoid terrain and weather, initiate an approach and complete a fully autonomous landing without pilot or passenger intervention.    Additionally, the flight deck provides visual and aural updates to the passengers, including current location, remaining fuel, airport of arrival and estimated time of arrival. Safe Return can be easily disengaged by the pilot with a simple press of the Autopilot disconnect button on the yoke if a passenger inadvertently activates the system.    “Garmin and Cirrus share a passion for designing and engineering products without compromise. Together, we have delivered some of the finest safety-enhancing technologies to our customers over the years, and we are proud to now add the certification of Garmin Autoland in the Cirrus Vision Jet to that growing list of accomplishments,” said Phil Straub, Garmin Executive Vice President and Managing Director of Aviation. “Congratulations to our collective teams who contributed to the certification of Autoland on the Vision Jet, a technology that will undoubtedly have lasting impacts on the safety of our aviation industry and the lives of our customers.”    In 2016, Cirrus Aircraft ushered in a new era in personal transportation with the FAA certification of the world’s first single-engine Personal Jet – the Vision Jet. The turbine aircraft defined a new category in aviation with its spacious pilot and passenger-friendly cabin featuring panoramic windows, reclining seats, comfortable legroom for five adults and two children, and as the only turbine aircraft with a whole airframe parachute system as standard equipment. Then, in 2019, Cirrus Aircraft unveiled and began delivery of the G2 Vision Jet, offering enhanced performance, comfort and safety with increased cruise altitude, speed and range, and a newly-upgraded Perspective Touch+™ by Garmin® flight deck.    More information on Safe Return and the G2 Vision Jet can be found at www.cirrusaircraft.com/visionjet.    About Cirrus Aircraft  Cirrus Aircraft is the recognized global leader in personal aviation and the maker of the best-selling SR Series piston aircraft and the Vision Jet, the world’s first single-engine Personal Jet, as well as the recipient of the Robert J. Collier Trophy. Founded in 1984, the company has redefined performance, comfort and safety in aviation with innovations like the Cirrus Airframe Parachute System® (CAPS®) – the first FAA-certified whole-airframe parachute safety system included as standard equipment on an aircraft. To date, worldwide flight time on Cirrus aircraft has passed 11 million hours and 193 people have returned home safely to their families as a result of the inclusion of CAPS as a standard feature on all Cirrus aircraft. The company has four locations in the United States, located in Duluth, Minnesota; Grand Forks, North Dakota; Knoxville, Tennessee and McKinney, Texas. Find out more at www.cirrusaircraft.com.    About Garmin International  Garmin’s aviation business segment is a leading provider of solutions to OEM, aftermarket, military and government customers. Garmin’s portfolio includes navigation, communication, flight control, hazard avoidance, an expansive suite of ADS-B solutions and other products and services that are known for innovation, reliability, and value. For more information, visit www.garmin.com/aviation.Attachments  * Vision Jet_Safe Return_Activation_small  * Vision Jet_Safe Return_Air to Air            CONTACT: Erin Webb    Cirrus Aircraft    865.748.4377    ewebb@cirrusaircraft.com

    Once activated, Safe Return assumes control of the aircraft and transforms the Vision Jet into an autonomous vehicle that navigates to the nearest suitable airport for landing, communicates with air traffic control, lands and brings the aircraft safely to a complete stop. The Vision Jet, with both Safe Return and the award-winning Cirrus Airframe Parachute System® (CAPS®), provides a comprehensive, must-have total safety solution unique to G2 Vision Jet operators. Duluth, Minn. & Knoxville, Tenn., Aug. 31, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Cirrus Aircraft and Garmin International, Inc. today announced Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certification of the Cirrus Vision Jet™ Safe Return™ system – a revolutionary system enabled by Garmin’s autoland technology that allows passengers to land the Vision Jet with just the touch of a button. The certification follows tremendous growth of the Vision Jet, including becoming the world’s best-selling jet in general aviation earlier this year and delivery of the 200th Vision Jet last month. Now, with Safe Return and the Collier award-winning Cirrus Airframe Parachute System® (CAPS®), the Vision Jet provides the most comprehensive, must-have total safety solution in general aviation.   “With Safe Return, we are making personal aviation more accessible, elevating the passenger experience and taking the next step towards autonomous flight,” said Zean Nielsen, Chief Executive Officer at Cirrus Aircraft. “The Vision Jet sets a new standard in personal travel with the combination of Safe Return and CAPS, offering the ultimate level of safety, control and comfort for the pilot and passengers.” The Safe Return activation button is purposefully located on the ceiling in the Vision Jet's cabin for easy access by passengers and can be activated, if needed, within minutes of the aircraft’s take-off. Once activated by the touch of a button, Safe Return assumes control of the aircraft and transforms the Vision Jet into an autonomous vehicle that navigates to the nearest suitable airport for landing, communicates with air traffic control, lands and brings the aircraft safely to a complete stop, allowing passengers to exit the aircraft. This revolutionary system is powered by the Cirrus Perspective+ by Garmin® flight deck, which uses all available aircraft data to calculate a flight plan, avoid terrain and weather, initiate an approach and complete a fully autonomous landing without pilot or passenger intervention. Additionally, the flight deck provides visual and aural updates to the passengers, including current location, remaining fuel, airport of arrival and estimated time of arrival. Safe Return can be easily disengaged by the pilot with a simple press of the Autopilot disconnect button on the yoke if a passenger inadvertently activates the system. “Garmin and Cirrus share a passion for designing and engineering products without compromise. Together, we have delivered some of the finest safety-enhancing technologies to our customers over the years, and we are proud to now add the certification of Garmin Autoland in the Cirrus Vision Jet to that growing list of accomplishments,” said Phil Straub, Garmin Executive Vice President and Managing Director of Aviation. “Congratulations to our collective teams who contributed to the certification of Autoland on the Vision Jet, a technology that will undoubtedly have lasting impacts on the safety of our aviation industry and the lives of our customers.” In 2016, Cirrus Aircraft ushered in a new era in personal transportation with the FAA certification of the world’s first single-engine Personal Jet – the Vision Jet. The turbine aircraft defined a new category in aviation with its spacious pilot and passenger-friendly cabin featuring panoramic windows, reclining seats, comfortable legroom for five adults and two children, and as the only turbine aircraft with a whole airframe parachute system as standard equipment. Then, in 2019, Cirrus Aircraft unveiled and began delivery of the G2 Vision Jet, offering enhanced performance, comfort and safety with increased cruise altitude, speed and range, and a newly-upgraded Perspective Touch+™ by Garmin® flight deck. More information on Safe Return and the G2 Vision Jet can be found at www.cirrusaircraft.com/visionjet. About Cirrus Aircraft Cirrus Aircraft is the recognized global leader in personal aviation and the maker of the best-selling SR Series piston aircraft and the Vision Jet, the world’s first single-engine Personal Jet, as well as the recipient of the Robert J. Collier Trophy. Founded in 1984, the company has redefined performance, comfort and safety in aviation with innovations like the Cirrus Airframe Parachute System® (CAPS®) – the first FAA-certified whole-airframe parachute safety system included as standard equipment on an aircraft. To date, worldwide flight time on Cirrus aircraft has passed 11 million hours and 193 people have returned home safely to their families as a result of the inclusion of CAPS as a standard feature on all Cirrus aircraft. The company has four locations in the United States, located in Duluth, Minnesota; Grand Forks, North Dakota; Knoxville, Tennessee and McKinney, Texas. Find out more at www.cirrusaircraft.com. About Garmin International Garmin’s aviation business segment is a leading provider of solutions to OEM, aftermarket, military and government customers. Garmin’s portfolio includes navigation, communication, flight control, hazard avoidance, an expansive suite of ADS-B solutions and other products and services that are known for innovation, reliability, and value. For more information, visit www.garmin.com/aviation.Attachments * Vision Jet_Safe Return_Activation_small * Vision Jet_Safe Return_Air to Air CONTACT: Erin Webb Cirrus Aircraft 865.748.4377 ewebb@cirrusaircraft.com


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  • 39/81   Coronavirus live updates: FDA could approve vaccine before testing is complete; US nears 6M cases; US Open without fans starts Monday
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    The U.S. Open tennis tournament, without fans, starts Monday. U.S. nears 6M cases. India reports world's worst one-day case total. Latest COVID news

    The U.S. Open tennis tournament, without fans, starts Monday. U.S. nears 6M cases. India reports world's worst one-day case total. Latest COVID news


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  • 40/81   India’s Economy Plunges by Record 23.9% After Harsh Lockdown
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- India’s economy contracted by the most on record last quarter as the world’s biggest lockdown to stem the coronavirus pandemic brought key industries to a halt and rendered millions of people jobless.Gross domestic product shrank 23.9% in the three months to June from a year earlier, the Statistics Ministry said in a report Monday. That’s the sharpest decline since the nation started publishing quarterly figures in 1996, and was worse than any of the world’s biggest economies tracked by Bloomberg. The median estimate in a survey of economists was for an 18% contraction.??Once the world’s fastest-growing major economy, India is now on track for its first full-year contraction in more than four decades. While there are early signs that activity began picking up this quarter as lockdown restrictions were eased, the recovery is uncertain as India is quickly becoming the global epicenter for virus infections.Read More: India on Course to Top Brazil on Unrelenting Surge in InfectionsIndia reported more than 78,000 new infections on Sunday, the most by any country, with total cases nearing 4 million in a nation of 1.3 billion. That could delay the consumption-driven economy from fully reopening.“The dismal quarterly GDP print confirms the substantial cost that the harsh lockdown and lack of fiscal support inflicted on the economy,” said Priyanka Kishore, head of India and Southeast Asia economics at Oxford Economics Ltd. in Singapore. “While the start of the July-September quarter has likely benefited from a post-lockdown boost, those gains are already at risk of being lost amid the ongoing pandemic and New Delhi’s hesitance to open the fiscal taps.”Plunging OutputThe yield on India’s 10-year government bonds fell three basis points to 6.12%, with the securities capping their worst monthly decline in more than two years. The rupee weakened 0.3% to 73.62 per U.S. dollar.Details of the GDP report:Financial services -- the biggest component of India’s dominant services sector -- shrank 5.3% last quarter from a year ago.Trade, hotels, transport and communication declined 47%Manufacturing shrank 39.3%, while construction contracted 50.3%Mining output fell 23.3%, and electricity and gas dropped 7%Agriculture was the lone bright spot, growing at 3.4%A mix of monetary and fiscal measures so far to prop up the economy won’t prevent it from sliding into recession. The government has provided only limited fiscal support given constraints on revenue growth, while the central bank has cut interest rates by 115 basis points so far this year, boosted liquidity and transferred billions of rupees in dividends to the state.A separate report on Monday showed the government already breached its full-year budget deficit target in the first four months of the fiscal year that began April 1 as revenue receipts collapsed.Krishanmurthy Subramanian, the government’s chief economic adviser, said the quarterly slump was largely expected and due to an “exogenous shock that has been felt globally.” The economy is “experiencing a V-shaped recovery” after the lockdown eased, he said in comments distributed to reporters, adding “we should expect better performance in subsequent quarters.”Banking Woes?Even before the pandemic struck, Asia’s third-largest economy was in the midst of a slowdown as a crisis in the shadow bank sector hurt new loans and took a toll on consumption, which accounts for some 60% of India’s GDP. The lockdown from mid-March to contain the pandemic brought activity to a virtual halt as businesses shut down and millions of workers fled the cities for their rural homes.The pandemic has caused historic GDP contractions in economies around the world. In India, the situation is made worse by an acceleration in virus cases, more recently in rural areas where the bulk of the population live.The gloomy outlook puts pressure on authorities to deliver more stimulus, but there’s limited room to act. The government is facing a budget deficit of more than 7% of GDP this fiscal year, more than double its original target, while inflation is above the central bank’s 2%-6% goal, reducing the chances of more rate cuts.Even so, Reserve Bank of India Governor Shaktikanta Das told the Financial Times that the government is set to announce more growth-supporting measures and inflation will likely ease.Some economists expect growth to rebound to above 7% next year, mostly led by pent-up domestic demand, and a pickup in farming and exports. Yet, that’s likely to fall short of the recovery that followed the global financial crisis more than a decade ago, when growth averaged 8.2% in the two fiscal years after the crisis, boosted by massive fiscal spending, monetary easing and a swift global rebound.(Updates with comments from economist, government official and market reaction.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- India’s economy contracted by the most on record last quarter as the world’s biggest lockdown to stem the coronavirus pandemic brought key industries to a halt and rendered millions of people jobless.Gross domestic product shrank 23.9% in the three months to June from a year earlier, the Statistics Ministry said in a report Monday. That’s the sharpest decline since the nation started publishing quarterly figures in 1996, and was worse than any of the world’s biggest economies tracked by Bloomberg. The median estimate in a survey of economists was for an 18% contraction.??Once the world’s fastest-growing major economy, India is now on track for its first full-year contraction in more than four decades. While there are early signs that activity began picking up this quarter as lockdown restrictions were eased, the recovery is uncertain as India is quickly becoming the global epicenter for virus infections.Read More: India on Course to Top Brazil on Unrelenting Surge in InfectionsIndia reported more than 78,000 new infections on Sunday, the most by any country, with total cases nearing 4 million in a nation of 1.3 billion. That could delay the consumption-driven economy from fully reopening.“The dismal quarterly GDP print confirms the substantial cost that the harsh lockdown and lack of fiscal support inflicted on the economy,” said Priyanka Kishore, head of India and Southeast Asia economics at Oxford Economics Ltd. in Singapore. “While the start of the July-September quarter has likely benefited from a post-lockdown boost, those gains are already at risk of being lost amid the ongoing pandemic and New Delhi’s hesitance to open the fiscal taps.”Plunging OutputThe yield on India’s 10-year government bonds fell three basis points to 6.12%, with the securities capping their worst monthly decline in more than two years. The rupee weakened 0.3% to 73.62 per U.S. dollar.Details of the GDP report:Financial services -- the biggest component of India’s dominant services sector -- shrank 5.3% last quarter from a year ago.Trade, hotels, transport and communication declined 47%Manufacturing shrank 39.3%, while construction contracted 50.3%Mining output fell 23.3%, and electricity and gas dropped 7%Agriculture was the lone bright spot, growing at 3.4%A mix of monetary and fiscal measures so far to prop up the economy won’t prevent it from sliding into recession. The government has provided only limited fiscal support given constraints on revenue growth, while the central bank has cut interest rates by 115 basis points so far this year, boosted liquidity and transferred billions of rupees in dividends to the state.A separate report on Monday showed the government already breached its full-year budget deficit target in the first four months of the fiscal year that began April 1 as revenue receipts collapsed.Krishanmurthy Subramanian, the government’s chief economic adviser, said the quarterly slump was largely expected and due to an “exogenous shock that has been felt globally.” The economy is “experiencing a V-shaped recovery” after the lockdown eased, he said in comments distributed to reporters, adding “we should expect better performance in subsequent quarters.”Banking Woes?Even before the pandemic struck, Asia’s third-largest economy was in the midst of a slowdown as a crisis in the shadow bank sector hurt new loans and took a toll on consumption, which accounts for some 60% of India’s GDP. The lockdown from mid-March to contain the pandemic brought activity to a virtual halt as businesses shut down and millions of workers fled the cities for their rural homes.The pandemic has caused historic GDP contractions in economies around the world. In India, the situation is made worse by an acceleration in virus cases, more recently in rural areas where the bulk of the population live.The gloomy outlook puts pressure on authorities to deliver more stimulus, but there’s limited room to act. The government is facing a budget deficit of more than 7% of GDP this fiscal year, more than double its original target, while inflation is above the central bank’s 2%-6% goal, reducing the chances of more rate cuts.Even so, Reserve Bank of India Governor Shaktikanta Das told the Financial Times that the government is set to announce more growth-supporting measures and inflation will likely ease.Some economists expect growth to rebound to above 7% next year, mostly led by pent-up domestic demand, and a pickup in farming and exports. Yet, that’s likely to fall short of the recovery that followed the global financial crisis more than a decade ago, when growth averaged 8.2% in the two fiscal years after the crisis, boosted by massive fiscal spending, monetary easing and a swift global rebound.(Updates with comments from economist, government official and market reaction.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 41/81   Heritage to Participate in LD Micro Virtual Investor Conference
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Heritage Insurance Holdings, Inc. (NYSE: HRTG) ("Heritage" or the "Company"), a super-regional property and casualty insurance holding company, announced today that Arash Soleimani, Executive Vice President, will participate in the LD Micro virtual investor conference on Wednesday, September 2nd, 2020 through Friday, September 4th, 2020.

    Heritage Insurance Holdings, Inc. (NYSE: HRTG) ("Heritage" or the "Company"), a super-regional property and casualty insurance holding company, announced today that Arash Soleimani, Executive Vice President, will participate in the LD Micro virtual investor conference on Wednesday, September 2nd, 2020 through Friday, September 4th, 2020.


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  • 42/81   Filmmaker Michael Moore warns of 2016 redux, says Trump support is ‘OFF THE CHARTS’
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    This is not an affirmation of celebration from a Donald Trump supporter, but a warning from filmmaker Michael Moore.  The Oscar-winning documentary director posted on social media that signs are pointing to a Trump reelection come November.  Moore, an avid critic of the president and advocate of Sen. Bernie Sanders, took to his Facebook page to let his followers know that history may be repeating itself as the president’s poll numbers rise in swing states that will be critical to winning the electoral college.

    This is not an affirmation of celebration from a Donald Trump supporter, but a warning from filmmaker Michael Moore. The Oscar-winning documentary director posted on social media that signs are pointing to a Trump reelection come November. Moore, an avid critic of the president and advocate of Sen. Bernie Sanders, took to his Facebook page to let his followers know that history may be repeating itself as the president’s poll numbers rise in swing states that will be critical to winning the electoral college.


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  • 43/81   Mom rips gun and shoe from man accused of kidnapping her 1-year-old, Georgia cops say
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The child has since been found safe, officials say.

    The child has since been found safe, officials say.


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  • 44/81   Canada statue of John A Macdonald toppled by activists in Montreal
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    John A Macdonald was accused of letting famine and disease decimate indigenous Canadian communities.

    John A Macdonald was accused of letting famine and disease decimate indigenous Canadian communities.


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  • 45/81   Restaurant collapse in China's Shanxi kills 29
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Twenty-nine people were killed and seven seriously injured when a restaurant collapsed in northern China's Shanxi province, the country's emergencies ministry media said on Sunday.  The accident in the two-storey structure occurred as villagers and relatives gathered for a birthday party, and the rescue operation ended early on Sunday, state media said.  The Shanxi provincial government has set up a high-level team to investigate the accident in the county, which is under the jurisdiction of the city of Linfen, the emergency management ministry said.

    Twenty-nine people were killed and seven seriously injured when a restaurant collapsed in northern China's Shanxi province, the country's emergencies ministry media said on Sunday. The accident in the two-storey structure occurred as villagers and relatives gathered for a birthday party, and the rescue operation ended early on Sunday, state media said. The Shanxi provincial government has set up a high-level team to investigate the accident in the county, which is under the jurisdiction of the city of Linfen, the emergency management ministry said.


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  • 46/81   3-year-old girl safe after being lofted by kite in Taiwan
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    A 3-year-old girl in Taiwan was reported safe after becoming caught in the strings of a kite and lifted several meters into the air.  The unidentified girl was taking part in a kite festival Sunday in the seaside town of Nanlioao when she was caught up by a giant, long-tailed orange kite.

    A 3-year-old girl in Taiwan was reported safe after becoming caught in the strings of a kite and lifted several meters into the air. The unidentified girl was taking part in a kite festival Sunday in the seaside town of Nanlioao when she was caught up by a giant, long-tailed orange kite.


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  • 47/81   University of Alabama told professors to not tell students about COVID-19 cases among their classmates
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The school has counted over 500 coronavirus cases, but emails reported by the Daily Beast show university officials told professors to not speak up.

    The school has counted over 500 coronavirus cases, but emails reported by the Daily Beast show university officials told professors to not speak up.


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  • 48/81   German govt condemns 'unacceptable' attempt to storm Reichstag
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    The German government Sunday slammed the "unacceptable" behaviour of protesters during a mass rally against coronavirus restrictions in which hundreds were arrested and an attempt was made to storm the Reichstag parliament building.

    The German government Sunday slammed the "unacceptable" behaviour of protesters during a mass rally against coronavirus restrictions in which hundreds were arrested and an attempt was made to storm the Reichstag parliament building.


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  • 49/81   Austrian law extends citizenship to descendants of Jewish refugees
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Descendants of Jewish refugees expelled from Austria under Nazi rule can apply for Austrian citizenship under a new law that goes into effect Tuesday.About 120,000 Jews living in Austria fled persecution after Nazi Germany annexed its neighbor in 1938, with many going to the United States and the United Kingdom. Most refugees, The Observer notes, became naturalized citizens in their new countries, but post-war Austria banned dual citizenship, meaning those who left were considered foreigners in their homeland. Eventually, in 1993, former refugees were able to reclaim their Austrian citizenship, but descendants were left out, preventing the country from restoring its pre-war Jewish community, which numbered 200,000. That's unlikely to happen even now since the applicants will be dual citizens and won't necessarily reside in Austria. For instance, a major factor for eligible U.K. citizens, per the Observer, will likely be the desire to regain European Union citizenship post-Brexit through the program.Still, campaigners believe the law represents both historic justice and could potentially help sway change in Austria, where some citizens believe anti-minority sentiment is on the rise. Bini Guttman, the Austrian president of the European Union of Jewish Students, said the law can "help deliver justice" for the applicants' "successors here and for the future" if they exercise their voting rights.Hannah Lessing, secretary general of the National Fund of the Republic of Austria for Victims of National Socialism, applauded the law, but said "it can never truly make amends for the Holocaust." Read more at The Observer.More stories from theweek.com  5 more scathingly funny cartoons about the Republican National Convention  Portland shooting victim, possible suspect identified  Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez may have a lot to do with Joe Kennedy's primary struggles

    Descendants of Jewish refugees expelled from Austria under Nazi rule can apply for Austrian citizenship under a new law that goes into effect Tuesday.About 120,000 Jews living in Austria fled persecution after Nazi Germany annexed its neighbor in 1938, with many going to the United States and the United Kingdom. Most refugees, The Observer notes, became naturalized citizens in their new countries, but post-war Austria banned dual citizenship, meaning those who left were considered foreigners in their homeland. Eventually, in 1993, former refugees were able to reclaim their Austrian citizenship, but descendants were left out, preventing the country from restoring its pre-war Jewish community, which numbered 200,000. That's unlikely to happen even now since the applicants will be dual citizens and won't necessarily reside in Austria. For instance, a major factor for eligible U.K. citizens, per the Observer, will likely be the desire to regain European Union citizenship post-Brexit through the program.Still, campaigners believe the law represents both historic justice and could potentially help sway change in Austria, where some citizens believe anti-minority sentiment is on the rise. Bini Guttman, the Austrian president of the European Union of Jewish Students, said the law can "help deliver justice" for the applicants' "successors here and for the future" if they exercise their voting rights.Hannah Lessing, secretary general of the National Fund of the Republic of Austria for Victims of National Socialism, applauded the law, but said "it can never truly make amends for the Holocaust." Read more at The Observer.More stories from theweek.com 5 more scathingly funny cartoons about the Republican National Convention Portland shooting victim, possible suspect identified Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez may have a lot to do with Joe Kennedy's primary struggles


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  • 50/81   First confirmed case of COVID-19 reinfection is ‘not surprising,’ doctors say
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    Researchers in Hong Kong confirmed the first known case of coronavirus reinfection, but many doctors and public health officials say it isn't that surprising given what we know about waning immunity from other coronaviruses.

    Researchers in Hong Kong confirmed the first known case of coronavirus reinfection, but many doctors and public health officials say it isn't that surprising given what we know about waning immunity from other coronaviruses.


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  • 51/81   1 killed as Trump supporters, protesters clash in Portland
    POLITICS TOPIC NEWS

    One person was shot and killed late Saturday in Portland, Ore., as Trump supporters and Black Lives Matter protesters clashed, police said.

    One person was shot and killed late Saturday in Portland, Ore., as Trump supporters and Black Lives Matter protesters clashed, police said.


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  • 52/81   SpaceX calls off one launch, succeeds with another
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Bad weather blocked a morning launch, but SpaceX pressed ahead with an evening flight.

    Bad weather blocked a morning launch, but SpaceX pressed ahead with an evening flight.


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  • 53/81   Scientists see downsides to top COVID-19 vaccines from Russia, China
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    High-profile COVID-19 vaccines developed in Russia and China share a potential shortcoming: They are based on a common cold virus that many people have been exposed to, potentially limiting their effectiveness, some experts say.  CanSino Biologics' vaccine, approved for military use in China, is a modified form of adenovirus type 5, or Ad5.  The company is in talks to get emergency approval in several countries before completing large-scale trials, the Wall Street Journal reported last week.

    High-profile COVID-19 vaccines developed in Russia and China share a potential shortcoming: They are based on a common cold virus that many people have been exposed to, potentially limiting their effectiveness, some experts say. CanSino Biologics' vaccine, approved for military use in China, is a modified form of adenovirus type 5, or Ad5. The company is in talks to get emergency approval in several countries before completing large-scale trials, the Wall Street Journal reported last week.


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  • 54/81   How common cold viruses are being used in vaccines from Russia, China
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The modified adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) viruses used in these  vaccines were first created by Canadian researcher Dr. Frank Graham at a Dutch lab in the 1970s.  WHAT ARE VECTORS USED IN VACCINES AND HOW DO THEY WORK?  Vectors are materials used as mechanisms to carry genetic information into human cells.

    The modified adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) viruses used in these vaccines were first created by Canadian researcher Dr. Frank Graham at a Dutch lab in the 1970s. WHAT ARE VECTORS USED IN VACCINES AND HOW DO THEY WORK? Vectors are materials used as mechanisms to carry genetic information into human cells.


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  • 55/81   Scientists see downsides to top COVID-19 vaccines from Russia, China
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    High-profile COVID-19 vaccines developed in Russia and China share a potential shortcoming: They are based on a common cold virus that many people have been exposed to, potentially limiting their effectiveness, some experts say.  CanSino Biologics' vaccine, approved for military use in China, is a modified form of adenovirus type 5, or Ad5.  The company is in talks to get emergency approval in several countries before completing large-scale trials, the Wall Street Journal reported last week.

    High-profile COVID-19 vaccines developed in Russia and China share a potential shortcoming: They are based on a common cold virus that many people have been exposed to, potentially limiting their effectiveness, some experts say. CanSino Biologics' vaccine, approved for military use in China, is a modified form of adenovirus type 5, or Ad5. The company is in talks to get emergency approval in several countries before completing large-scale trials, the Wall Street Journal reported last week.


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  • 56/81   Explainer: How common cold viruses are being used in vaccines from Russia, China
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The modified adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) viruses used in these vaccines were first created by Canadian researcher Dr. Frank Graham at a Dutch lab in the 1970s.  WHAT ARE VECTORS USED IN VACCINES AND HOW DO THEY WORK?  Vectors are materials used as mechanisms to carry genetic information into human cells.

    The modified adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) viruses used in these vaccines were first created by Canadian researcher Dr. Frank Graham at a Dutch lab in the 1970s. WHAT ARE VECTORS USED IN VACCINES AND HOW DO THEY WORK? Vectors are materials used as mechanisms to carry genetic information into human cells.


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  • 57/81   India recorded 78,000 COVID-19 infections in a single day as the global number of cases passed 25 million
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The country now has more than 3.2 million COVID-19 cases, however it's thought the number of recorded cases could be far lower than the actual number.

    The country now has more than 3.2 million COVID-19 cases, however it's thought the number of recorded cases could be far lower than the actual number.


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  • 58/81   770-pound crocodile caught at Outback tourist destination
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Wildlife rangers have trapped a 4.4-meter (14.5-foot) saltwater crocodile at a tourist destination in Australia’s Northern Territory, the biggest caught in the area in years, a wildlife ranger said Monday.  The 350-kilogram (770-pound) male was caught in the Flora River at a remote nature park 120 kilometers (75 miles) southwest of the Outback town of Katherine, said Katherine senior wildlife ranger John Burke.  A larger 4.7-meter (15.5-foot) croc was trapped three years ago in the same wildlife management zone, but that one was caught in the Katherine River, which is closer to the sea, Burke said.

    Wildlife rangers have trapped a 4.4-meter (14.5-foot) saltwater crocodile at a tourist destination in Australia’s Northern Territory, the biggest caught in the area in years, a wildlife ranger said Monday. The 350-kilogram (770-pound) male was caught in the Flora River at a remote nature park 120 kilometers (75 miles) southwest of the Outback town of Katherine, said Katherine senior wildlife ranger John Burke. A larger 4.7-meter (15.5-foot) croc was trapped three years ago in the same wildlife management zone, but that one was caught in the Katherine River, which is closer to the sea, Burke said.


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  • 59/81   AstraZeneca diabetes drug improves survival in kidney disease patients study shows
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The British drugmaker said Farxiga was shown in a study to cut the risk of dying from any cause for people suffering from chronic kidney disease by 31% when compared to a group on placebo.  Farxiga is among AstaZeneca's five best-selling drugs and brought in revenues of $1.54 billion in 2019 for treating diabetes.  It also reduced the risk of deteriorating kidney function by 39% in the trial.

    The British drugmaker said Farxiga was shown in a study to cut the risk of dying from any cause for people suffering from chronic kidney disease by 31% when compared to a group on placebo. Farxiga is among AstaZeneca's five best-selling drugs and brought in revenues of $1.54 billion in 2019 for treating diabetes. It also reduced the risk of deteriorating kidney function by 39% in the trial.


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  • 60/81   The Climate Legacy of Racist Housing Policies
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    RICHMOND, Va. -- On a hot summer's day, the neighborhood of Gilpin quickly becomes one of the most sweltering parts of Richmond.There are few trees along the sidewalks to shield people from the sun's relentless glare. More than 2,000 residents, mostly Black, live in low-income public housing that lacks central air conditioning. Many front yards are paved with concrete, which absorbs and traps heat. The ZIP code has among the highest rates of heat-related ambulance calls in the city.There are places like Gilpin all across the United States. In cities like Baltimore, Dallas, Denver, Miami, Portland and New York, neighborhoods that are poorer and have more residents of color can be 5 to 20 degrees Fahrenheit hotter in summer than wealthier, whiter parts of the same city.And there's growing evidence that this is no coincidence. In the 20th century, local and federal officials, usually white, enacted policies that reinforced racial segregation in cities and diverted investment away from minority neighborhoods in ways that created large disparities in the urban heat environment.The consequences are being felt today.To escape the heat, Sparkle Veronica Taylor, a 40-year-old Gilpin resident, often walks with her two young boys more than a half-hour across Richmond to a tree-lined park in a wealthier neighborhood. Her local playground lacks shade, leaving the gyms and slides to bake in the sun. The trek is grueling in summer temperatures that regularly soar past 95 degrees, but it's worth it to find a cooler play area, she said."The heat gets really intense, I'm just zapped of energy by the end of the day," said Taylor, who doesn't own a car. "But once we get to that park, I'm struck by how green the space is. I feel calmer, better able to breathe. Walking through different neighborhoods, there's a stark difference between places that have lots of greenery and places that don't."To understand why many cities have such large heat disparities, researchers are looking closer at historical practices like redlining.In the 1930s, the federal government created maps of hundreds of cities, rating the riskiness of different neighborhoods for real estate investment by grading them "best," "still desirable," "declining" or "hazardous." Race played a defining role: Black and immigrant neighborhoods were typically rated "hazardous" and outlined in red, denoting a perilous place to lend money. For decades, people in redlined areas were denied access to federally backed mortgages and other credit, fueling a cycle of disinvestment.In 2016, these old redlining maps were digitized by historians at the University of Richmond. Researchers comparing them to today's cities have spotted striking patterns.Across more than 100 cities, a recent study found, formerly redlined neighborhoods are today 5 degrees hotter in summer, on average, than areas once favored for housing loans, with some cities seeing differences as large as 12 degrees. Redlined neighborhoods, which remain lower-income and more likely to have Black or Hispanic residents, consistently have far fewer trees and parks that help cool the air. They also have more paved surfaces, such as asphalt lots or nearby highways, that absorb and radiate heat."It's uncanny how often we see this pattern," said Vivek Shandas, a professor of urban studies and planning at Portland State University and a co-author of the study. "It tells us we really need to better understand what was going on in the past to create these land-use patterns."Heat is the nation's deadliest weather disaster, killing as many as 12,000 people a year. Now, as global warming brings ever more intense heat waves, cities like Richmond are drawing up plans to adapt -- and confronting a historical legacy that has left communities of color far more vulnerable to heat.A Redlined Past, a Hotter FutureThe appraisers in Richmond were transparent in their racism as they mapped the city in the 1930s as part of a Depression-era federal program to rescue the nation's collapsing housing markets.Every Black neighborhood, no matter its income level, was outlined in red and deemed a "hazardous" area for housing loans. The appraisers' notes made clear that race was a key factor in giving these neighborhoods the lowest grade.One part of town was outlined in yellow and rated as "declining" because, the appraisers wrote, Black families sometimes walked through.By contrast, white neighborhoods, described as containing "respectable people," were often outlined in blue and green and were subsequently favored for investment.Richmond, like many cities, was already segregated before the 1930s by racial zoning laws and restrictive covenants that barred Black families from moving into white neighborhoods. But the redlining maps, economists have found, deepened patterns of racial inequality in cities nationwide in ways that reverberated for decades. White families could more easily get loans and federal assistance to buy homes, building wealth to pass on to their children. Black families, all too often, could not.That inequity likely influenced urban heat patterns, too. Neighborhoods with white homeowners had more clout to lobby city governments for tree-lined sidewalks and parks. In Black neighborhoods, homeownership declined, and landlords rarely invested in green space. City planners also targeted redlined areas as cheap land for new industries, highways, warehouses and public housing, built with lots of heat-absorbing asphalt and little cooling vegetation.Disparities in access to housing finance "created a snowball effect that compounded over generations," said Nathan Connolly, a historian at Johns Hopkins who helped digitize the maps. Redlining wasn't the only factor driving racial inequality, but the maps offer a visible symbol of how federal policies codified housing discrimination.Congress outlawed redlining by the 1970s. But the practice has left lasting marks on cities.Neighborhoods to Richmond's west that were deemed desirable for investment, outlined in green on the old maps, remain wealthier and predominantly white, with trees and parks covering 42% of the land. Neighborhoods in Richmond's east and south that were once redlined are still poorer and majority Black, with much lower rates of homeownership and green space covering just 12% of the surface.These patterns largely persisted through cycles of white flight to the suburbs and, more recently, gentrification.Today, Richmond's formerly redlined neighborhoods are, on average, 5 degrees hotter on a summer day than greenlined neighborhoods, satellite analyses reveal. Some of the hottest areas, like the Gilpin neighborhood, can see temperatures 15 degrees higher than wealthier, whiter parts of town.Even small differences in heat can be dangerous, scientists have found. During a heat wave, every 1 degree increase in temperature can increase the risk of dying by 2.5%. Higher temperatures can strain the heart and make breathing more difficult, increasing hospitalization rates for cardiac arrest and respiratory diseases like asthma. Richmond's four hottest ZIP codes all have the city's highest rates of heat-related emergency-room visits.Few neighborhoods in Richmond have been as radically reshaped as Gilpin. In the early 20th century, Gilpin was part of Jackson Ward, a thriving area known as "Black Wall Street" and the cultural heart of the city's African American middle class, a place where people came to see Louis Armstrong or Ella Fitzgerald perform.But with redlining in the 1930s, Jackson Ward fell into decline. Black residents had a tougher time obtaining mortgages, and property values deteriorated. In the 1940s, the city embarked on "slum clearance" projects, razing acres of properties and replacing them with Richmond's first segregated public housing project, Gilpin Court, a set of austere, barracks-style buildings that were not designed with heat in mind.A decade later, over the objections of residents, Virginia's state government decided to build a new federal highway right through the neighborhood, destroying thousands of homes and isolating Gilpin.Today, Gilpin's community pool sits empty, unfixed by the city for years. Cinder block walls bake in the sun, unshaded by trees. While city officials and local utilities have provided many people with window air conditioners, residents said they often aren't enough, and old electric wiring means blown fuses are common."The air conditioning unit in my bedroom runs 24/7," said Taylor, the 40-year-old mother of two. "Air circulation is poor up here on the upper level of where I live."Gilpin is grappling with a mix of heat and poverty that illustrates how global warming can compound inequality.Sherrell Thompson, a community health worker in Gilpin, said residents have high rates of asthma, diabetes and high blood pressure, all conditions that can be worsened by heat. They are also exposed to air pollution from the six-lane highway next door.There are no doctor's offices nearby or grocery stores selling fresh produce, which means that people without cars face further health challenges in the heat."It becomes a whole circle of issues," Thompson said. "If you want to find any kind of healthy food, you need to walk at least a mile or catch two buses. If you have asthma but it's 103 degrees out and you're not feeling well enough to catch three buses to see your primary care physician, what do you do?"In Gilpin, the average life expectancy is 63 years. Just a short drive over the James River sits Westover Hills, a largely white, middle-income neighborhood that greets visitors with rows of massive oak trees spreading their leaves over quiet boulevards. Life expectancy there is 83 years.A broad array of socioeconomic factors drives this gap, but it is made worse by heat. Researchers have found that excess heat and a lack of green space can affect mental well-being and increase anxiety. Without parks or shady outdoor areas to gather, people are more likely to be isolated indoors during the summer, a dynamic worsened by the coronavirus pandemic."Especially when there's no green space nearby, the heat traps people in their homes," said Tevin Moore, 22, who grew up in Richmond's formerly redlined East End. "The heat definitely messes with you psychologically; people get frustrated over every little thing."Confronting Racial InequalityNationwide, the pattern is consistent: Neighborhoods that were once redlined see more extreme heat in the summer than those that weren't. But every city has its own story.In Denver, formerly redlined neighborhoods tend to have more Hispanic than Black residents today, but they remain hotter: Parks were intentionally placed in whiter, wealthier neighborhoods that then blocked construction of affordable housing nearby even after racial segregation was banned. In Baltimore, polluting industries were more likely to be located near communities of color. In Portland, zoning rules allowed multifamily apartment buildings to cover the entire lot and be built without any green space, a practice the city only recently changed.The problem worsens as global warming increases the number of hot days nationwide.Today, the Richmond area can expect about 43 days per year with temperatures of at least 90 degrees. By 2089, climate models suggest, the number of very hot days could double. "All of a sudden you're sitting on top of really unlivable temperatures," said Jeremy Hoffman, chief scientist at the Science Museum of Virginia and a co-author of the redlining study.For years, cities across the United States rarely thought about racial equity when designing their climate plans, which meant that climate protection measures, like green roofs on buildings, often disproportionately benefited whiter, wealthier residents. That's slowly starting to change.In Houston, officials recently passed an ordinance to prioritize disadvantaged neighborhoods for flood protection. Minneapolis and Portland are reworking zoning to allow denser, more affordable housing to be built in desirable neighborhoods. Denver has passed a new sales tax to fund parks and tree-planting, and city officials say they would like to add more green space in historically redlined areas.And in Richmond, a city in the midst of a major reckoning with its racist past, where crowds this summer tore down Confederate monuments and protested police brutality, officials are paying much closer attention to racial inequality as they draw up plans to adapt to global warming. The city has launched a new mapping tool that shows in detail how heat and flooding can disproportionately harm communities of color."We can see that racial equity and climate equity are inherently entwined, and we need to take that into account when we're building our capacity to prepare," said Alicia Zatcoff, the city's sustainability manager. "It's a new frontier in climate action planning, and there aren't a lot of cities that have really done it yet."Officials in Richmond's sustainability office are currently engaged in an intensive listening process with neighborhoods on the front lines of global warming to hear their concerns, as they work to put racial equity at the core of their climate action and resilience plan. Doing so "can mean confronting some very uncomfortable history," Zatcoff said. But "the more proponents there are of doing the work this way, the better off we'll all be for it."To start, the city has announced a goal of ensuring that everyone in Richmond is within a 10-minute walk of a park, working with the Science Museum of Virginia and community partners to identify city-owned properties in vulnerable neighborhoods that can be converted into green space. It's the city's first large-scale greening project since the 1970s.Green space can be transformative. Trees can cool down neighborhoods by several degrees during a heat wave, studies show, helping to lower electric bills as well as the risk of death. When planted near roads, trees can help filter air pollution. The presence of green space can even reduce stress levels for people living nearby.And trees have another climate benefit: Unlike paved surfaces, they can soak up water in their roots, reducing flooding during downpours.A few years ago, in Richmond's formerly redlined Southside, local nonprofits and residents sought to address the lack of green space and grocery stores by building a new community garden, a triangular park with a shaded veranda and fruit trees. "Almost instantly, the garden became a community space," said Duron Chavis of Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden, which backed the effort. "We have people holding cookouts; people doing yoga and meditation here; they can get to know their neighbors. It reduces social isolation."Richmond's long-term master plan, a draft of which was released in June, calls for increasing tree canopy in the hottest neighborhoods, redesigning buildings to increase air flow, reducing the number of paved lots and using more light-colored pavement to reflect the sun's energy. The plan explicitly mentions redlining as one of the historical forces that has shaped the city."Even people who don't believe institutionalized racism are struck when we show them these maps," said Cate Mingoya, director of capacity building at Groundwork USA, which has been highlighting links between redlining and heat in cities like Richmond. "We didn't get here by accident, and we're not going to get it fixed by accident."Still, the challenges are immense. Cities often face tight budgets, particularly as revenues have declined amid the coronavirus pandemic.And tree-planting can be politically charged. Some researchers have warned that building new parks and planting trees in lower-income neighborhoods of color can often accelerate gentrification, displacing longtime residents. In Richmond, city officials say they are looking to address this by building additional affordable housing alongside new green space.Richmond's draft master plan envisions building a park over Routes I-95 and I-64 to reconnect Gilpin with historical Jackson Ward, as well as redeveloping the public housing complex into a more walkable mixed-income neighborhood. That plan is not imminent, but local activists fear residents could eventually be priced out of this newer, greener area."My worry is that they won't build that park until the people who currently live here are removed," said Arthur Burton, director of the Kinfolk Community Empowerment Center, who has been working to build community gardens in historically redlined areas like Gilpin.While many are optimistic about Richmond's efforts to focus on racial equity, they warn there's still much work to be done to undo disparities built up over many decades. Inequality in housing, incomes, health and education "all make a difference when we're talking about vulnerability to climate change," said Rob Jones, executive director of Groundwork USA's Richmond chapter. "Greening the built environment is absolutely important," he said, "but it's only a start."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company

    RICHMOND, Va. -- On a hot summer's day, the neighborhood of Gilpin quickly becomes one of the most sweltering parts of Richmond.There are few trees along the sidewalks to shield people from the sun's relentless glare. More than 2,000 residents, mostly Black, live in low-income public housing that lacks central air conditioning. Many front yards are paved with concrete, which absorbs and traps heat. The ZIP code has among the highest rates of heat-related ambulance calls in the city.There are places like Gilpin all across the United States. In cities like Baltimore, Dallas, Denver, Miami, Portland and New York, neighborhoods that are poorer and have more residents of color can be 5 to 20 degrees Fahrenheit hotter in summer than wealthier, whiter parts of the same city.And there's growing evidence that this is no coincidence. In the 20th century, local and federal officials, usually white, enacted policies that reinforced racial segregation in cities and diverted investment away from minority neighborhoods in ways that created large disparities in the urban heat environment.The consequences are being felt today.To escape the heat, Sparkle Veronica Taylor, a 40-year-old Gilpin resident, often walks with her two young boys more than a half-hour across Richmond to a tree-lined park in a wealthier neighborhood. Her local playground lacks shade, leaving the gyms and slides to bake in the sun. The trek is grueling in summer temperatures that regularly soar past 95 degrees, but it's worth it to find a cooler play area, she said."The heat gets really intense, I'm just zapped of energy by the end of the day," said Taylor, who doesn't own a car. "But once we get to that park, I'm struck by how green the space is. I feel calmer, better able to breathe. Walking through different neighborhoods, there's a stark difference between places that have lots of greenery and places that don't."To understand why many cities have such large heat disparities, researchers are looking closer at historical practices like redlining.In the 1930s, the federal government created maps of hundreds of cities, rating the riskiness of different neighborhoods for real estate investment by grading them "best," "still desirable," "declining" or "hazardous." Race played a defining role: Black and immigrant neighborhoods were typically rated "hazardous" and outlined in red, denoting a perilous place to lend money. For decades, people in redlined areas were denied access to federally backed mortgages and other credit, fueling a cycle of disinvestment.In 2016, these old redlining maps were digitized by historians at the University of Richmond. Researchers comparing them to today's cities have spotted striking patterns.Across more than 100 cities, a recent study found, formerly redlined neighborhoods are today 5 degrees hotter in summer, on average, than areas once favored for housing loans, with some cities seeing differences as large as 12 degrees. Redlined neighborhoods, which remain lower-income and more likely to have Black or Hispanic residents, consistently have far fewer trees and parks that help cool the air. They also have more paved surfaces, such as asphalt lots or nearby highways, that absorb and radiate heat."It's uncanny how often we see this pattern," said Vivek Shandas, a professor of urban studies and planning at Portland State University and a co-author of the study. "It tells us we really need to better understand what was going on in the past to create these land-use patterns."Heat is the nation's deadliest weather disaster, killing as many as 12,000 people a year. Now, as global warming brings ever more intense heat waves, cities like Richmond are drawing up plans to adapt -- and confronting a historical legacy that has left communities of color far more vulnerable to heat.A Redlined Past, a Hotter FutureThe appraisers in Richmond were transparent in their racism as they mapped the city in the 1930s as part of a Depression-era federal program to rescue the nation's collapsing housing markets.Every Black neighborhood, no matter its income level, was outlined in red and deemed a "hazardous" area for housing loans. The appraisers' notes made clear that race was a key factor in giving these neighborhoods the lowest grade.One part of town was outlined in yellow and rated as "declining" because, the appraisers wrote, Black families sometimes walked through.By contrast, white neighborhoods, described as containing "respectable people," were often outlined in blue and green and were subsequently favored for investment.Richmond, like many cities, was already segregated before the 1930s by racial zoning laws and restrictive covenants that barred Black families from moving into white neighborhoods. But the redlining maps, economists have found, deepened patterns of racial inequality in cities nationwide in ways that reverberated for decades. White families could more easily get loans and federal assistance to buy homes, building wealth to pass on to their children. Black families, all too often, could not.That inequity likely influenced urban heat patterns, too. Neighborhoods with white homeowners had more clout to lobby city governments for tree-lined sidewalks and parks. In Black neighborhoods, homeownership declined, and landlords rarely invested in green space. City planners also targeted redlined areas as cheap land for new industries, highways, warehouses and public housing, built with lots of heat-absorbing asphalt and little cooling vegetation.Disparities in access to housing finance "created a snowball effect that compounded over generations," said Nathan Connolly, a historian at Johns Hopkins who helped digitize the maps. Redlining wasn't the only factor driving racial inequality, but the maps offer a visible symbol of how federal policies codified housing discrimination.Congress outlawed redlining by the 1970s. But the practice has left lasting marks on cities.Neighborhoods to Richmond's west that were deemed desirable for investment, outlined in green on the old maps, remain wealthier and predominantly white, with trees and parks covering 42% of the land. Neighborhoods in Richmond's east and south that were once redlined are still poorer and majority Black, with much lower rates of homeownership and green space covering just 12% of the surface.These patterns largely persisted through cycles of white flight to the suburbs and, more recently, gentrification.Today, Richmond's formerly redlined neighborhoods are, on average, 5 degrees hotter on a summer day than greenlined neighborhoods, satellite analyses reveal. Some of the hottest areas, like the Gilpin neighborhood, can see temperatures 15 degrees higher than wealthier, whiter parts of town.Even small differences in heat can be dangerous, scientists have found. During a heat wave, every 1 degree increase in temperature can increase the risk of dying by 2.5%. Higher temperatures can strain the heart and make breathing more difficult, increasing hospitalization rates for cardiac arrest and respiratory diseases like asthma. Richmond's four hottest ZIP codes all have the city's highest rates of heat-related emergency-room visits.Few neighborhoods in Richmond have been as radically reshaped as Gilpin. In the early 20th century, Gilpin was part of Jackson Ward, a thriving area known as "Black Wall Street" and the cultural heart of the city's African American middle class, a place where people came to see Louis Armstrong or Ella Fitzgerald perform.But with redlining in the 1930s, Jackson Ward fell into decline. Black residents had a tougher time obtaining mortgages, and property values deteriorated. In the 1940s, the city embarked on "slum clearance" projects, razing acres of properties and replacing them with Richmond's first segregated public housing project, Gilpin Court, a set of austere, barracks-style buildings that were not designed with heat in mind.A decade later, over the objections of residents, Virginia's state government decided to build a new federal highway right through the neighborhood, destroying thousands of homes and isolating Gilpin.Today, Gilpin's community pool sits empty, unfixed by the city for years. Cinder block walls bake in the sun, unshaded by trees. While city officials and local utilities have provided many people with window air conditioners, residents said they often aren't enough, and old electric wiring means blown fuses are common."The air conditioning unit in my bedroom runs 24/7," said Taylor, the 40-year-old mother of two. "Air circulation is poor up here on the upper level of where I live."Gilpin is grappling with a mix of heat and poverty that illustrates how global warming can compound inequality.Sherrell Thompson, a community health worker in Gilpin, said residents have high rates of asthma, diabetes and high blood pressure, all conditions that can be worsened by heat. They are also exposed to air pollution from the six-lane highway next door.There are no doctor's offices nearby or grocery stores selling fresh produce, which means that people without cars face further health challenges in the heat."It becomes a whole circle of issues," Thompson said. "If you want to find any kind of healthy food, you need to walk at least a mile or catch two buses. If you have asthma but it's 103 degrees out and you're not feeling well enough to catch three buses to see your primary care physician, what do you do?"In Gilpin, the average life expectancy is 63 years. Just a short drive over the James River sits Westover Hills, a largely white, middle-income neighborhood that greets visitors with rows of massive oak trees spreading their leaves over quiet boulevards. Life expectancy there is 83 years.A broad array of socioeconomic factors drives this gap, but it is made worse by heat. Researchers have found that excess heat and a lack of green space can affect mental well-being and increase anxiety. Without parks or shady outdoor areas to gather, people are more likely to be isolated indoors during the summer, a dynamic worsened by the coronavirus pandemic."Especially when there's no green space nearby, the heat traps people in their homes," said Tevin Moore, 22, who grew up in Richmond's formerly redlined East End. "The heat definitely messes with you psychologically; people get frustrated over every little thing."Confronting Racial InequalityNationwide, the pattern is consistent: Neighborhoods that were once redlined see more extreme heat in the summer than those that weren't. But every city has its own story.In Denver, formerly redlined neighborhoods tend to have more Hispanic than Black residents today, but they remain hotter: Parks were intentionally placed in whiter, wealthier neighborhoods that then blocked construction of affordable housing nearby even after racial segregation was banned. In Baltimore, polluting industries were more likely to be located near communities of color. In Portland, zoning rules allowed multifamily apartment buildings to cover the entire lot and be built without any green space, a practice the city only recently changed.The problem worsens as global warming increases the number of hot days nationwide.Today, the Richmond area can expect about 43 days per year with temperatures of at least 90 degrees. By 2089, climate models suggest, the number of very hot days could double. "All of a sudden you're sitting on top of really unlivable temperatures," said Jeremy Hoffman, chief scientist at the Science Museum of Virginia and a co-author of the redlining study.For years, cities across the United States rarely thought about racial equity when designing their climate plans, which meant that climate protection measures, like green roofs on buildings, often disproportionately benefited whiter, wealthier residents. That's slowly starting to change.In Houston, officials recently passed an ordinance to prioritize disadvantaged neighborhoods for flood protection. Minneapolis and Portland are reworking zoning to allow denser, more affordable housing to be built in desirable neighborhoods. Denver has passed a new sales tax to fund parks and tree-planting, and city officials say they would like to add more green space in historically redlined areas.And in Richmond, a city in the midst of a major reckoning with its racist past, where crowds this summer tore down Confederate monuments and protested police brutality, officials are paying much closer attention to racial inequality as they draw up plans to adapt to global warming. The city has launched a new mapping tool that shows in detail how heat and flooding can disproportionately harm communities of color."We can see that racial equity and climate equity are inherently entwined, and we need to take that into account when we're building our capacity to prepare," said Alicia Zatcoff, the city's sustainability manager. "It's a new frontier in climate action planning, and there aren't a lot of cities that have really done it yet."Officials in Richmond's sustainability office are currently engaged in an intensive listening process with neighborhoods on the front lines of global warming to hear their concerns, as they work to put racial equity at the core of their climate action and resilience plan. Doing so "can mean confronting some very uncomfortable history," Zatcoff said. But "the more proponents there are of doing the work this way, the better off we'll all be for it."To start, the city has announced a goal of ensuring that everyone in Richmond is within a 10-minute walk of a park, working with the Science Museum of Virginia and community partners to identify city-owned properties in vulnerable neighborhoods that can be converted into green space. It's the city's first large-scale greening project since the 1970s.Green space can be transformative. Trees can cool down neighborhoods by several degrees during a heat wave, studies show, helping to lower electric bills as well as the risk of death. When planted near roads, trees can help filter air pollution. The presence of green space can even reduce stress levels for people living nearby.And trees have another climate benefit: Unlike paved surfaces, they can soak up water in their roots, reducing flooding during downpours.A few years ago, in Richmond's formerly redlined Southside, local nonprofits and residents sought to address the lack of green space and grocery stores by building a new community garden, a triangular park with a shaded veranda and fruit trees. "Almost instantly, the garden became a community space," said Duron Chavis of Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden, which backed the effort. "We have people holding cookouts; people doing yoga and meditation here; they can get to know their neighbors. It reduces social isolation."Richmond's long-term master plan, a draft of which was released in June, calls for increasing tree canopy in the hottest neighborhoods, redesigning buildings to increase air flow, reducing the number of paved lots and using more light-colored pavement to reflect the sun's energy. The plan explicitly mentions redlining as one of the historical forces that has shaped the city."Even people who don't believe institutionalized racism are struck when we show them these maps," said Cate Mingoya, director of capacity building at Groundwork USA, which has been highlighting links between redlining and heat in cities like Richmond. "We didn't get here by accident, and we're not going to get it fixed by accident."Still, the challenges are immense. Cities often face tight budgets, particularly as revenues have declined amid the coronavirus pandemic.And tree-planting can be politically charged. Some researchers have warned that building new parks and planting trees in lower-income neighborhoods of color can often accelerate gentrification, displacing longtime residents. In Richmond, city officials say they are looking to address this by building additional affordable housing alongside new green space.Richmond's draft master plan envisions building a park over Routes I-95 and I-64 to reconnect Gilpin with historical Jackson Ward, as well as redeveloping the public housing complex into a more walkable mixed-income neighborhood. That plan is not imminent, but local activists fear residents could eventually be priced out of this newer, greener area."My worry is that they won't build that park until the people who currently live here are removed," said Arthur Burton, director of the Kinfolk Community Empowerment Center, who has been working to build community gardens in historically redlined areas like Gilpin.While many are optimistic about Richmond's efforts to focus on racial equity, they warn there's still much work to be done to undo disparities built up over many decades. Inequality in housing, incomes, health and education "all make a difference when we're talking about vulnerability to climate change," said Rob Jones, executive director of Groundwork USA's Richmond chapter. "Greening the built environment is absolutely important," he said, "but it's only a start."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company


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  • 61/81   California Gov. Gavin Newsom has a new plan for reopening businesses in the state after COVID-19 cases surged following an initial reopen attempt months earlier
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    "We're going to be more stubborn this time. This is a stringent, but we believe more steady, approach," Newsom said.

    "We're going to be more stubborn this time. This is a stringent, but we believe more steady, approach," Newsom said.


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  • 62/81   Shift on Election Briefings Could Create an Information Gap for Voters
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The decision by the nation's top intelligence official to halt classified, in-person briefings to Congress about foreign interference in a presidential election that is just nine weeks away exposes the fundamental tension about who needs to know this information: just the president, or the voters whose election infrastructure, and minds, are the target of the hacking?The intelligence agencies are built to funnel a stream of secret findings to the president, his staff and the military to inform their actions.President Donald Trump has made it abundantly clear that he does not believe the overwhelming evidence, detailed in thousands of pages of investigative reports by the Republican-led Senate Intelligence Committee and indictments of Russian intelligence officers by his own Justice Department, that Moscow interfered in the 2016 election, and is at it again.One of the bitter lessons of the last election is that intelligence about hacking into voter registration systems and the spreading of disinformation must be handled in a very different way. Those defending against misinformation include state and city election officials; Facebook, Twitter and Google; and voters themselves, who need to know who is generating or amplifying the messages they see running across their screens.And if they do not understand the threat assessments, they will enter the most critical phase of the election -- those vulnerable weeks when everything counts and adversaries have a brief window to take their best shot -- without understanding the battle space.So it is no surprise that as soon as word leaked about the decision by the director of national intelligence, John Ratcliffe, to give Congress only written updates about the latest intelligence, former Vice President Joe Biden led the parade of accusations that Trump is paving the way for a second round of election interference."Nothing is more important than the security and integrity of our elections," Biden, the Democratic nominee, said in a statement on Saturday. "And we know that President Trump is unwilling to take action to protect them. That leaves Congress as the best defender of our democracy.""There can be only one conclusion: President Trump is hoping Vladimir Putin will once more boost his candidacy and cover his horrific failures to lead our country through the multiple crises we are facing," Biden added. "And he does not want the American people to know the steps Vladimir Putin is taking to help Trump get reelected or why Putin is eager to intervene, because Donald Trump's foreign policy has been a gift to the Kremlin."Whether or not Biden's accusation of malicious intent is correct, the White House is once again seeking to marginalize Congress and the committees that are charged with overseeing, and funding, the $80 billion intelligence enterprise.Intelligence officials sorting through the complexities of the 2020 intelligence note that the real danger arises from the swirl of conflicting signals about how the Russians, the Chinese and the Iranians are writing new playbooks for 2020.Interpreting their intentions -- and their feints -- would be hard enough in normal times.Ratcliffe, a Trump partisan who is new to his job, is discovering that he does not have a monopoly on the intelligence. Every week dozens of cybersecurity firms issue reports that sift through evidence of malware and disinformation.So Trump and Ratcliffe will not be stopping the flow of data about what foreign actors are up to, or whether they are succeeding. They will just be pulling the U.S. intelligence services back from publicly assessing what is important and what is background noise -- at the most critical moment in a highly contested, highly divisive race that the president himself declared a month ago will be "the most rigged election" in history.(Trump was referring to the surge in mail-in ballots, which he claimed, without evidence, that Russia and China could gain access to. Intelligence agencies last week contradicted those claims.)Until a few days ago, there seemed to be a movement inside the intelligence agencies to say a bit more about election threats -- but not much more. Under pressure from congressional Democrats, who demanded more public disclosures about Russian activity, intelligence officials this month issued a new public warning about Moscow's interference. But they also cautioned that China and Iran were coming in on Biden's behalf, even though their activities so far have been marginal at best.Meanwhile, the director of the National Security Agency, who also serves as commander of Cyber Command, the vast military operation designed to push back in the daily cyberconflict among nations, published a vaguely worded essay in Foreign Affairs magazine reminding American rivals that the United States was pursuing a new strategy of "persistent engagement" deep inside adversary computer networks -- but he was not specific about the threats."This is a new concept for the intelligence community," Sen. Angus King, I-Maine, who led a lengthy congressional study into enhancing the nation's cyberdefenses, said in an interview on Saturday. "Their fallback position is always secret. And their second fallback position is that we only give this to the national security apparatus. Maybe we will give it to Congress. We will never give it to the American people unless someone demands it.""But I argue the American people are the decision-makers and they are entitled to the information and it has to be given to them in a form that is useful and thoroughly examined," he added, noting that "a cold written statement" does not meet that standard because those statements can be watered down to fit Trump's agenda.In fact, the challenge is that U.S. intelligence analysts do not write for the public. They employ code words understandable to those who read their reports, but which need translation for a public that is struggling to comprehend spear-phishing and ransomware and cannot agree on what constitutes disinformation. The result is that even the best-intentioned warnings often fail at their purpose.That is one reason Democrats are pressing to interrogate the analysts and force them to state their conclusions in plain terms. Ratcliffe insists that is too risky.In an appearance on Fox News on Sunday, Ratcliffe said he had decided to end in-person briefings on election security because, a few weeks ago, "within minutes of one of those briefings ending, a number of members of Congress went to a number of different publications and leaked classified information, again, for political purposes to create a narrative that simply isn't true: that somehow Russia is a greater national security threat than China."Ratcliffe insisted there was "a pandemic of information being leaked out of the intelligence community, and I'm going to take the measures to make sure that that stops."King disputes that any sources and methods were compromised, and several federal officials agreed.What Ratcliffe ignored was the risk ahead. If the complaint about the intelligence agencies under President Barack Obama in 2016 was that they had their radar off and never saw the Russians coming until it was too late, the concern in 2020 may be a deliberate failure to communicate.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company

    The decision by the nation's top intelligence official to halt classified, in-person briefings to Congress about foreign interference in a presidential election that is just nine weeks away exposes the fundamental tension about who needs to know this information: just the president, or the voters whose election infrastructure, and minds, are the target of the hacking?The intelligence agencies are built to funnel a stream of secret findings to the president, his staff and the military to inform their actions.President Donald Trump has made it abundantly clear that he does not believe the overwhelming evidence, detailed in thousands of pages of investigative reports by the Republican-led Senate Intelligence Committee and indictments of Russian intelligence officers by his own Justice Department, that Moscow interfered in the 2016 election, and is at it again.One of the bitter lessons of the last election is that intelligence about hacking into voter registration systems and the spreading of disinformation must be handled in a very different way. Those defending against misinformation include state and city election officials; Facebook, Twitter and Google; and voters themselves, who need to know who is generating or amplifying the messages they see running across their screens.And if they do not understand the threat assessments, they will enter the most critical phase of the election -- those vulnerable weeks when everything counts and adversaries have a brief window to take their best shot -- without understanding the battle space.So it is no surprise that as soon as word leaked about the decision by the director of national intelligence, John Ratcliffe, to give Congress only written updates about the latest intelligence, former Vice President Joe Biden led the parade of accusations that Trump is paving the way for a second round of election interference."Nothing is more important than the security and integrity of our elections," Biden, the Democratic nominee, said in a statement on Saturday. "And we know that President Trump is unwilling to take action to protect them. That leaves Congress as the best defender of our democracy.""There can be only one conclusion: President Trump is hoping Vladimir Putin will once more boost his candidacy and cover his horrific failures to lead our country through the multiple crises we are facing," Biden added. "And he does not want the American people to know the steps Vladimir Putin is taking to help Trump get reelected or why Putin is eager to intervene, because Donald Trump's foreign policy has been a gift to the Kremlin."Whether or not Biden's accusation of malicious intent is correct, the White House is once again seeking to marginalize Congress and the committees that are charged with overseeing, and funding, the $80 billion intelligence enterprise.Intelligence officials sorting through the complexities of the 2020 intelligence note that the real danger arises from the swirl of conflicting signals about how the Russians, the Chinese and the Iranians are writing new playbooks for 2020.Interpreting their intentions -- and their feints -- would be hard enough in normal times.Ratcliffe, a Trump partisan who is new to his job, is discovering that he does not have a monopoly on the intelligence. Every week dozens of cybersecurity firms issue reports that sift through evidence of malware and disinformation.So Trump and Ratcliffe will not be stopping the flow of data about what foreign actors are up to, or whether they are succeeding. They will just be pulling the U.S. intelligence services back from publicly assessing what is important and what is background noise -- at the most critical moment in a highly contested, highly divisive race that the president himself declared a month ago will be "the most rigged election" in history.(Trump was referring to the surge in mail-in ballots, which he claimed, without evidence, that Russia and China could gain access to. Intelligence agencies last week contradicted those claims.)Until a few days ago, there seemed to be a movement inside the intelligence agencies to say a bit more about election threats -- but not much more. Under pressure from congressional Democrats, who demanded more public disclosures about Russian activity, intelligence officials this month issued a new public warning about Moscow's interference. But they also cautioned that China and Iran were coming in on Biden's behalf, even though their activities so far have been marginal at best.Meanwhile, the director of the National Security Agency, who also serves as commander of Cyber Command, the vast military operation designed to push back in the daily cyberconflict among nations, published a vaguely worded essay in Foreign Affairs magazine reminding American rivals that the United States was pursuing a new strategy of "persistent engagement" deep inside adversary computer networks -- but he was not specific about the threats."This is a new concept for the intelligence community," Sen. Angus King, I-Maine, who led a lengthy congressional study into enhancing the nation's cyberdefenses, said in an interview on Saturday. "Their fallback position is always secret. And their second fallback position is that we only give this to the national security apparatus. Maybe we will give it to Congress. We will never give it to the American people unless someone demands it.""But I argue the American people are the decision-makers and they are entitled to the information and it has to be given to them in a form that is useful and thoroughly examined," he added, noting that "a cold written statement" does not meet that standard because those statements can be watered down to fit Trump's agenda.In fact, the challenge is that U.S. intelligence analysts do not write for the public. They employ code words understandable to those who read their reports, but which need translation for a public that is struggling to comprehend spear-phishing and ransomware and cannot agree on what constitutes disinformation. The result is that even the best-intentioned warnings often fail at their purpose.That is one reason Democrats are pressing to interrogate the analysts and force them to state their conclusions in plain terms. Ratcliffe insists that is too risky.In an appearance on Fox News on Sunday, Ratcliffe said he had decided to end in-person briefings on election security because, a few weeks ago, "within minutes of one of those briefings ending, a number of members of Congress went to a number of different publications and leaked classified information, again, for political purposes to create a narrative that simply isn't true: that somehow Russia is a greater national security threat than China."Ratcliffe insisted there was "a pandemic of information being leaked out of the intelligence community, and I'm going to take the measures to make sure that that stops."King disputes that any sources and methods were compromised, and several federal officials agreed.What Ratcliffe ignored was the risk ahead. If the complaint about the intelligence agencies under President Barack Obama in 2016 was that they had their radar off and never saw the Russians coming until it was too late, the concern in 2020 may be a deliberate failure to communicate.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company


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  • 63/81   2020 Watch: Can Trump ignore reality as Election Day nears?
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Both sides are pleased with their convention performances which offered dramatically different versions of reality to the American electorate.  President Donald Trump is essentially asking voters to judge him based on pre-pandemic America.  Joe Biden is asking voters to judge the incumbent on conditions as they actually exist, with the pandemic's death toll mounting, the economy struggling and racial tensions again exploding.

    Both sides are pleased with their convention performances which offered dramatically different versions of reality to the American electorate. President Donald Trump is essentially asking voters to judge him based on pre-pandemic America. Joe Biden is asking voters to judge the incumbent on conditions as they actually exist, with the pandemic's death toll mounting, the economy struggling and racial tensions again exploding.


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  • 64/81   Israeli plane makes history with flight to UAE
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    An Israeli airliner made a historic first flight from Tel Aviv to the United Arab Emirates on Monday, emphasising new diplomatic ties between the two countries. The El Al Boeing 737 – with the word "peace" printed in Arabic, English and Hebrew above the cockpit – took off from Tel Aviv bound for the UAE capital, Abu Dhabi, with a joint delegation of American and Israeli diplomats aboard, including Jared Kushner, President Trump’s son-in-law and senior advisor. The flight from Ben Gurion airport was expected to land in Abu Dhabi around 1.05pm (BST), after flying over Saudi Arabia, one of many countries that has continued a historic boycott of Israel that followed the 1967 Arab-Israeli war. Earlier this month the UAE announced it would become only the third Middle Eastern country to normalise relations with Israel, in a deal motivated by a common hostility to Iran. It has been condemned as a “betrayal” by the Palestinian leadership. Ahead of the symbolic flight, Mr Kushner claimed that other Arab countries would soon follow the UAE’s lead, although he did not specify when. “While this peace agreement was thought by many to be impossible, the stage is now set for even more,” he said, adding that normalisation would bring “previously unthinkable” economic, security ties and tourism between the two countries. “We must seize that optimism and we must continue to push to make this region achieve the potential that it truly has,” he said.

    An Israeli airliner made a historic first flight from Tel Aviv to the United Arab Emirates on Monday, emphasising new diplomatic ties between the two countries. The El Al Boeing 737 – with the word "peace" printed in Arabic, English and Hebrew above the cockpit – took off from Tel Aviv bound for the UAE capital, Abu Dhabi, with a joint delegation of American and Israeli diplomats aboard, including Jared Kushner, President Trump’s son-in-law and senior advisor. The flight from Ben Gurion airport was expected to land in Abu Dhabi around 1.05pm (BST), after flying over Saudi Arabia, one of many countries that has continued a historic boycott of Israel that followed the 1967 Arab-Israeli war. Earlier this month the UAE announced it would become only the third Middle Eastern country to normalise relations with Israel, in a deal motivated by a common hostility to Iran. It has been condemned as a “betrayal” by the Palestinian leadership. Ahead of the symbolic flight, Mr Kushner claimed that other Arab countries would soon follow the UAE’s lead, although he did not specify when. “While this peace agreement was thought by many to be impossible, the stage is now set for even more,” he said, adding that normalisation would bring “previously unthinkable” economic, security ties and tourism between the two countries. “We must seize that optimism and we must continue to push to make this region achieve the potential that it truly has,” he said.


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  • 65/81   First direct Israel-UAE flight lands in Abu Dhabi amid deal
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    A Star of David-adorned El Al plane flew from Israel to the United Arab Emirates on Monday, carrying a high-ranking American and Israeli delegation to Abu Dhabi in the first-ever direct commercial passenger flight between the two countries.  The Israeli flag carrier’s flight marked the implementation of the historic U.S.-brokered deal to normalize relations between the two nations and solidifies the long-clandestine ties between them that have evolved over years of shared enmity toward Iran.  With the U.S. as matchmaker, Israel and the UAE agreed earlier this month to work toward normalization, which would make the UAE the third Arab nation to have full relations with Israel, after Egypt and Jordan.

    A Star of David-adorned El Al plane flew from Israel to the United Arab Emirates on Monday, carrying a high-ranking American and Israeli delegation to Abu Dhabi in the first-ever direct commercial passenger flight between the two countries. The Israeli flag carrier’s flight marked the implementation of the historic U.S.-brokered deal to normalize relations between the two nations and solidifies the long-clandestine ties between them that have evolved over years of shared enmity toward Iran. With the U.S. as matchmaker, Israel and the UAE agreed earlier this month to work toward normalization, which would make the UAE the third Arab nation to have full relations with Israel, after Egypt and Jordan.


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  • 66/81   Diplomat tapped to be PM vows reforms in crisis-hit Lebanon
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Lebanon's prime minister-designate on Monday called for a new government to be formed “in record time,” pledging to speed up the investigation into the massive Beirut explosion and implement reforms after winning the backing of major parties in the crisis-hit country.  Mustapha Adib, Lebanon's ambassador to Germany, spoke to reporters shortly after he was appointed by the president to form a new government, after he secured 90 votes among the legislators in the 128-member parliament.  The breakthrough came hours before French President Emmanuel Macron was due to arrive for a two day-visit, during which he is expected to press Lebanese officials to formulate a new political pact to lift the country out of its multiple crises.

    Lebanon's prime minister-designate on Monday called for a new government to be formed “in record time,” pledging to speed up the investigation into the massive Beirut explosion and implement reforms after winning the backing of major parties in the crisis-hit country. Mustapha Adib, Lebanon's ambassador to Germany, spoke to reporters shortly after he was appointed by the president to form a new government, after he secured 90 votes among the legislators in the 128-member parliament. The breakthrough came hours before French President Emmanuel Macron was due to arrive for a two day-visit, during which he is expected to press Lebanese officials to formulate a new political pact to lift the country out of its multiple crises.


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  • 67/81   Turning 100: Lebanon, a nation branded by upheaval, crises
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    It was a century ago on Sept. 1, 1920, that a French general, Henri Gouraud, stood on the porch of a Beirut palace surrounded by local politicians and religious leaders and declared the State of Greater Lebanon — the precursor of the modern state of Lebanon.  The current French president, Emmanuel Macron, is visiting Lebanon to mark the occasion, 100 years later.  Lebanon has been hit by a series of catastrophes, including a financial crash.

    It was a century ago on Sept. 1, 1920, that a French general, Henri Gouraud, stood on the porch of a Beirut palace surrounded by local politicians and religious leaders and declared the State of Greater Lebanon — the precursor of the modern state of Lebanon. The current French president, Emmanuel Macron, is visiting Lebanon to mark the occasion, 100 years later. Lebanon has been hit by a series of catastrophes, including a financial crash.


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  • 68/81   In aftermath of Hurricane Laura, residents worry about help
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    In a matter of hours last week, Hurricane Laura tore through the tire shop Layla Winbush's family started just under a year ago, reducing most of it to rubble and scattering hundreds of tires across the lot.  Federal and state officials are now on the ground to help residents with home repairs and hotel stays.  As evacuated Lake Charles residents began returning home, many worried that they wouldn’t have enough support from the both the federal and state governments as they face a rebuilding process certain to take several months, if not longer.

    In a matter of hours last week, Hurricane Laura tore through the tire shop Layla Winbush's family started just under a year ago, reducing most of it to rubble and scattering hundreds of tires across the lot. Federal and state officials are now on the ground to help residents with home repairs and hotel stays. As evacuated Lake Charles residents began returning home, many worried that they wouldn’t have enough support from the both the federal and state governments as they face a rebuilding process certain to take several months, if not longer.


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  • 69/81   George Floyd? Donald Trump? Hero statue nominations are in
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Americans' suggestions of suitable statues for President Donald Trump's planned National Garden of American Heroes are in, and they look considerably different from the predominantly white worthies that the administration has locked in for many of the pedestals.  The outside nominations are more activist, browner and far more indigenous.  The administration also is leaving open the possibility of a statue of Trump himself in the Trump-created statue park after receiving what it said were “multiple nominations' of the president.

    Americans' suggestions of suitable statues for President Donald Trump's planned National Garden of American Heroes are in, and they look considerably different from the predominantly white worthies that the administration has locked in for many of the pedestals. The outside nominations are more activist, browner and far more indigenous. The administration also is leaving open the possibility of a statue of Trump himself in the Trump-created statue park after receiving what it said were “multiple nominations' of the president.


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  • 70/81   When Trump talks law and order, some Wisconsin voters listen
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Alexis Arnold says she's sympathetic toward protesters who have peacefully fought racial injustice this summer.  The uncertainty is drawing her to whatever stability President Donald Trump can offer.  “The public just needs something to make them feel comfortable and safe again,' said Arnold, who is white, has voted for Democrats in the past and is raising a biracial daughter.

    Alexis Arnold says she's sympathetic toward protesters who have peacefully fought racial injustice this summer. The uncertainty is drawing her to whatever stability President Donald Trump can offer. “The public just needs something to make them feel comfortable and safe again,' said Arnold, who is white, has voted for Democrats in the past and is raising a biracial daughter.


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  • 71/81   Uncertainty dominates presidential campaign's final stretch
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Within President Donald Trump’s campaign, some privately feared the worst heading into the national conventions.  “This campaign has always known that it’s going to be a close race, it’s going to be a tough race,” Biden’s senior adviser Anita Dunn said, noting that no Democratic presidential candidate since 1964 has earned more than 52.9% of the vote.  Each side cast the other as an existential threat to America’s future as they offered voters starkly different versions of reality over the last two weeks of carefully scripted conventions.

    Within President Donald Trump’s campaign, some privately feared the worst heading into the national conventions. “This campaign has always known that it’s going to be a close race, it’s going to be a tough race,” Biden’s senior adviser Anita Dunn said, noting that no Democratic presidential candidate since 1964 has earned more than 52.9% of the vote. Each side cast the other as an existential threat to America’s future as they offered voters starkly different versions of reality over the last two weeks of carefully scripted conventions.


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  • 72/81   Two conventions — one masked, the other mostly not — offer contrasting views on coronavirus
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    The two conventions offered very divergent views for a nation still struggling with a pandemic.

    The two conventions offered very divergent views for a nation still struggling with a pandemic.


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  • 73/81   Ron DeSantis sidelined his health department. Florida paid the price.
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Florida's surgeon general lost all influence after an April 13 briefing, leading to "craziness" within the health department, an official said.

    Florida's surgeon general lost all influence after an April 13 briefing, leading to "craziness" within the health department, an official said.


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  • 74/81   'You don't want people to vote,' Democrat Marcia Fudge tells Republicans
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Comments by Ohio Rep. Marcia Fudge summed up many Democrats’ concerns about Republican resistance to mail-in voting.

    Comments by Ohio Rep. Marcia Fudge summed up many Democrats’ concerns about Republican resistance to mail-in voting.


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  • 75/81   Did the RNC boost Trump’s reelection odds?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    President Trump closed out the Republican National Convention with a speech filled with fierce attacks against Joe Biden. Did the controversial event help him gain ground with voters?

    President Trump closed out the Republican National Convention with a speech filled with fierce attacks against Joe Biden. Did the controversial event help him gain ground with voters?


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  • 76/81   A thousand kids and counselors went to summer camp in Maine. Only 3 got the coronavirus.
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Out of 1,022 people who attended or worked at several summer camps in Maine that implemented measures to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, only three tested positive for it, a new study says. And those three cases did not result in secondary infections because proper measures were taken.

    Out of 1,022 people who attended or worked at several summer camps in Maine that implemented measures to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, only three tested positive for it, a new study says. And those three cases did not result in secondary infections because proper measures were taken.


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  • 77/81   Trump administration defends 'inexplicable' changes to coronavirus testing guidelines
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    A top Trump administration official defended new guidelines that say that people without symptoms do not need a coronavirus test, a development that has been widely criticized as unproductive since it was issued on Tuesday. 

    A top Trump administration official defended new guidelines that say that people without symptoms do not need a coronavirus test, a development that has been widely criticized as unproductive since it was issued on Tuesday. 


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  • 78/81   Should colleges discount tuition when they go remote?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Students at colleges across the country are demanding tuition be reduced because classes are being held online. Schools say any discount would cripple them financially.

    Students at colleges across the country are demanding tuition be reduced because classes are being held online. Schools say any discount would cripple them financially.


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  • 79/81   Coronavirus an afterthought as RNC opens
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    “Donald Trump truly moved mountains to save lives,” said one RNC speaker, an assertion at odds with what many have called President Trump’s inattentive and even self-sabotaging response to the pandemic, which has killed nearly 180,000 people in the U.S.

    “Donald Trump truly moved mountains to save lives,” said one RNC speaker, an assertion at odds with what many have called President Trump’s inattentive and even self-sabotaging response to the pandemic, which has killed nearly 180,000 people in the U.S.


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  • 80/81   5 takeaways from day 1 of the RNC
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    The theme of the first night of the Republican National Convention was “America, Land of Promise,” a hopeful message belied by speeches that warned of impending national collapse if Donald Trump isn’t reelected in November.

    The theme of the first night of the Republican National Convention was “America, Land of Promise,” a hopeful message belied by speeches that warned of impending national collapse if Donald Trump isn’t reelected in November.


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  • 81/81   What to Feed Your Family When the Power Goes Out
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    When a big storm or other natural disaster knocks out the power or makes it hard to leave your house for a few days, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer...

    When a big storm or other natural disaster knocks out the power or makes it hard to leave your house for a few days, what to feed your family becomes a major concern. The food experts at Consumer...


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