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News Slideshows (09/14/2020 15 hours)


  • 1/72   News Photos Slideshows
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D

    News Photos Slideshows - Hot Trends - Click on the image to view in augmented reality or in stereo 3D


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    Press Review


    Lancaster   Victory Monday   Miracle Whip   Kid Rock   Back Door   New Week   sanha   George Floyd   Venus   Pokimane   Oracle   emma chamberlain   Nevada Gov   Bermuda   Ramsey   Gulf Coast   Aaron Donald   Doobie Brothers   taeyeon   Reality Winner   Nvidia   HYUNJIN   Goblet of Fire   monday night football   STREAM DYNAMITE   haechan   Pfizer   McCarthy   Oates   logan lerman   
  • 2/72   Oscars diversity rules: Progress or patronizing?
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The Academy Awards will require Best Picture nominees to meet certain diversity requirements starting in 2024. Will the rules improve representation or are they an empty gesture?

    The Academy Awards will require Best Picture nominees to meet certain diversity requirements starting in 2024. Will the rules improve representation or are they an empty gesture?


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  • 3/72   Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.

    But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.


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  • 4/72   Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.

    Iconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.


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  • 5/72   Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison

    Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison


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  • 6/72   'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...

    'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...


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  • 7/72   Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me.  Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home.  During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.

    The 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August.'Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal,' Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on 'Good Morning America.' 'And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with 'GMA' at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an 'exacerbation' of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.


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  • 8/72   They won't be loved: Maroon 5 play it safe with dullest halftime show of all time
    PEOPLE TOPIC NEWS

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.

    Maroon 5 could have silenced their many haters with a spectacular performance. But they didn’t do that.


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  • 9/72   Do star athletes make too much money?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    With athletes in America's biggest sports leagues raking in salaries worth $300 million and more, is it time to reign in the big spending or do superstars deserve the big bucks they make?

    With athletes in America's biggest sports leagues raking in salaries worth $300 million and more, is it time to reign in the big spending or do superstars deserve the big bucks they make?


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  • 10/72   Live animal mascots: Cute or exploitative?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?

    Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?


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  • 11/72   Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.

    Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


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  • 12/72   After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.

    The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


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  • 13/72   Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


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  • 14/72   Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.

    “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


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  • 15/72   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.

    It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


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  • 16/72   Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.

    Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


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  • 17/72   For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness
    SPORTS TOPIC NEWS

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.

    Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.


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  • 18/72   PHOTOS: Fluorescent turtle embryo wins forty-fifth annual Nikon Small World Competition

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.

    The winners of the 45th annual competition showcase a spectacular blend of science and artistry under the microscope.


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  • 19/72   7 tax scams to watch out for this year

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.

    In case wringing your hands over the tax man weren’t enough, criminals are out there trying to swipe your hard-earned cash and personal information from right under your nose.


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  • 20/72   Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.

    The daughter's name is Nicarri.


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  • 21/72   What the CIA thinks of your anti-virus program

    PARIS (AP) — Peppering the 8,000 pages of purported Central Intelligence Agency hacking data released Tuesday by WikiLeaks are reviews of some of the world's most popular anti-virus products.

    PARIS (AP) — Peppering the 8,000 pages of purported Central Intelligence Agency hacking data released Tuesday by WikiLeaks are reviews of some of the world's most popular anti-virus products.


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  • 22/72   Google Patents Sticky Car Hood to Trap Pedestrians in a Collision

    The patent calls for a giant sticker to be placed on the front end of a vehicle, with a special coating over the layer that is only broken when something collides with the vehicle, exposing the adhesive and helping the colliding object to remain on the vehicle.  The idea is to prevent a pedestrian from being thrown after the impact and potentially sustaining even more injuries.

    The patent calls for a giant sticker to be placed on the front end of a vehicle, with a special coating over the layer that is only broken when something collides with the vehicle, exposing the adhesive and helping the colliding object to remain on the vehicle. The idea is to prevent a pedestrian from being thrown after the impact and potentially sustaining even more injuries.


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  • 23/72   Relax, Your Instagram Feed Likely Won't Change Tomorrow

    Relax, your Instagram feed likely isn't changing tomorrow.The great "Insta-freakout" of 2016 was unleashed this morning by a slew of celebrities, bloggers and social media aficionados after they alerted followers to turn on post notifications for future access to their photos, videos and messages. ...

    Relax, your Instagram feed likely isn't changing tomorrow.The great "Insta-freakout" of 2016 was unleashed this morning by a slew of celebrities, bloggers and social media aficionados after they alerted followers to turn on post notifications for future access to their photos, videos and messages. ...


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  • 24/72   'Hack the Pentagon' and get paid legally in new program

    Attention hackers: Time to re-watch “WarGames” and crack your knuckles, the Pentagon is about to pay you to break into some government systems.

    Attention hackers: Time to re-watch “WarGames” and crack your knuckles, the Pentagon is about to pay you to break into some government systems.


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  • 25/72   Elon Musk's Hyperloop Vision Could Be Ready for Passengers by 2018

    The Hyperloop, Elon Musk's vision of launching humans through pods inside a high-speed transportation system, could be ready for passengers by 2018, according to a company building a transportation track in California.  One company working to make Musk's vision a reality, Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, said it has filed for construction permits in Quay Valley, California, for a 5-mile track.  'We are announcing the filing of the first building permit to Kings County to the building of the first full-scale hyperloop, not a test track,' Bibop Gresta, the chief operating officer of Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, said today at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, during a CNBC/TradeShift event.

    The Hyperloop, Elon Musk's vision of launching humans through pods inside a high-speed transportation system, could be ready for passengers by 2018, according to a company building a transportation track in California. One company working to make Musk's vision a reality, Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, said it has filed for construction permits in Quay Valley, California, for a 5-mile track. 'We are announcing the filing of the first building permit to Kings County to the building of the first full-scale hyperloop, not a test track,' Bibop Gresta, the chief operating officer of Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, said today at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, during a CNBC/TradeShift event.


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  • 26/72   Avowed Apple Fan Jeb Bush Realizes His Apple Watch Can Take Phone Calls

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”

    Jeb Bush's love of Apple products has been widely documented, and the Republican presidential candidate continues to wear his Apple Watch on the campaign trail. Yesterday, in a meeting with The Des Moines Register editorial board documented by USA Today, Bush stumbled upon a feature he didn’t realize his smartwatch was capable of: taking phone calls. Somehow Bush managed to take a call without picking up his iPhone, and the sound of a person’s voice saying hello breaks through the meeting noise, to which Bush responds, “My watch can’t be talking.”


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  • 27/72   Man Proposes by Text Message While Stranded at Chicago's O’Hare Airport

    An Arizona man waiting to fly home to propose to his girlfriend was forced to propose to her via text message after spending 50 hours stranded at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport.  Danny Roderique, of Phoenix, had the diamond engagement ring in his pocket but the delay got in the way of the proposal he’d planned.  “I’ve been stranded now in the airport for 50 hours,” Roderique told a reporter from ABC affiliate WLS-TV while still waiting at O’Hare on Monday.

    An Arizona man waiting to fly home to propose to his girlfriend was forced to propose to her via text message after spending 50 hours stranded at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport. Danny Roderique, of Phoenix, had the diamond engagement ring in his pocket but the delay got in the way of the proposal he’d planned. “I’ve been stranded now in the airport for 50 hours,” Roderique told a reporter from ABC affiliate WLS-TV while still waiting at O’Hare on Monday.


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  • 28/72   Twitter Warns Some Users Over Possible Government Hacking

    It's unclear how many people received a letter from Twitter.  In October, Facebook said it would begin issuing alerts to users who the social network believes are being targeted by state-sponsored hackers, according to a message posted by Alex Stamos, Facebook's chief security officer.

    It's unclear how many people received a letter from Twitter. In October, Facebook said it would begin issuing alerts to users who the social network believes are being targeted by state-sponsored hackers, according to a message posted by Alex Stamos, Facebook's chief security officer.


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  • 29/72   Facebook Notifications Get Even More Personal

    Facebook notifications may now be your first stop in the morning to catch up on everything from friends' news to weather, sports scores and what to expect later in the day.  The social network announced this week it will be rolling out expanded, personalized notifications in the Facebook across iOS and Android devices for users in the United States.  The mobile update is bringing a set of new card-like notifications that will include information such as sports scores for teams you have liked, TV shows, weather information and friends' life events, among other updates.

    Facebook notifications may now be your first stop in the morning to catch up on everything from friends' news to weather, sports scores and what to expect later in the day. The social network announced this week it will be rolling out expanded, personalized notifications in the Facebook across iOS and Android devices for users in the United States. The mobile update is bringing a set of new card-like notifications that will include information such as sports scores for teams you have liked, TV shows, weather information and friends' life events, among other updates.


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  • 30/72   How to Tell Which Apps Are Draining Your iPhone Battery

    Some iOS 9 users have complained Facebook's app has been excessively eating away at their battery life, even when the background app refresh setting is disabled.  It's unclear what possible issue may be causing the battery drain.  Tapping the list will show how much of the battery drain was spent when the app was running in the background.

    Some iOS 9 users have complained Facebook's app has been excessively eating away at their battery life, even when the background app refresh setting is disabled. It's unclear what possible issue may be causing the battery drain. Tapping the list will show how much of the battery drain was spent when the app was running in the background.


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  • 31/72   Armed Robbery Suspect Tries Using Uber as Getaway Car, Police Say

    A 23-year-old man suspected of armed robbery tried to take an Uber car to help him get away after he held up a store outside Baltimore, police said.  The suspect, Dashawn Terrell Cochran, was at a store in Parkville, Maryland, early Wednesday morning when he allegedly took a bottle of Tylenol cold medicine to the register, the Baltimore County Police Department said.  Cochran was seen getting into the back of a silver Lexus, and when officers pulled the car over, the driver said he was an Uber driver, police said.

    A 23-year-old man suspected of armed robbery tried to take an Uber car to help him get away after he held up a store outside Baltimore, police said. The suspect, Dashawn Terrell Cochran, was at a store in Parkville, Maryland, early Wednesday morning when he allegedly took a bottle of Tylenol cold medicine to the register, the Baltimore County Police Department said. Cochran was seen getting into the back of a silver Lexus, and when officers pulled the car over, the driver said he was an Uber driver, police said.


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  • 32/72   Drone Popularity Draws Concern From Pilots, Federal Officials

    Roughly 700,000 drones are expected to be sold in the United States this year, according to the Consumer Electronics Association.  The Federal Aviation Administration plans to meet with Walmart, which has 19 different kinds of drones for sale on its website, to teach salespeople about what it should tell its customers about safe drone operation.  The Consumer Electronics Association projects the U.S. drone market to climb above $100 million in revenue this year, an increase of more than 50 percent from last year’s total.

    Roughly 700,000 drones are expected to be sold in the United States this year, according to the Consumer Electronics Association. The Federal Aviation Administration plans to meet with Walmart, which has 19 different kinds of drones for sale on its website, to teach salespeople about what it should tell its customers about safe drone operation. The Consumer Electronics Association projects the U.S. drone market to climb above $100 million in revenue this year, an increase of more than 50 percent from last year’s total.


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  • 33/72   Carly Fiorina: Why She Wants Everyone to Throw Out Their Flip Phones

    Carly Fiorina is putting flip phone users on notice: You’re going to have to upgrade under a President Fiorina.  “How many of you have a flip phone?” Fiorina recently asked a town hall in South Carolina.  It’s all part of a vision the Republican presidential candidate has to give citizens a direct line of communication – literally – to the president.

    Carly Fiorina is putting flip phone users on notice: You’re going to have to upgrade under a President Fiorina. “How many of you have a flip phone?” Fiorina recently asked a town hall in South Carolina. It’s all part of a vision the Republican presidential candidate has to give citizens a direct line of communication – literally – to the president.


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  • 34/72   How a 'Programming Error' Led to an Oregon Couple's $2 Million Cell Phone Bill

    A couple in Oregon say they spent 10 months trying to clear up a whopping $2 million phone bill, which they say has prevented them from buying the home of their dreams.  Ken Slusher and his girlfriend, of Damascus, Oregon, have a balance of $2,156,593.64 on a Verizon Wireless bill that was for a wireless account that they opened in November.  'Yeah, it's been very stressful to say the least,' Slusher told KPTV.com.

    A couple in Oregon say they spent 10 months trying to clear up a whopping $2 million phone bill, which they say has prevented them from buying the home of their dreams. Ken Slusher and his girlfriend, of Damascus, Oregon, have a balance of $2,156,593.64 on a Verizon Wireless bill that was for a wireless account that they opened in November. 'Yeah, it's been very stressful to say the least,' Slusher told KPTV.com.


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  • 35/72   Social media welcomes Pope Francis to the United States

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday.  As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit.  Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.

    Pope Francis gets the social media treatment upon arriving in the U.S. Tuesday. As Pope Francis’s flight touched down in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, Twitter unveiled a new batch of emojis created for the highly anticipated papal visit. Until his departure from the United States on Sunday, Twitter users chronicling the Catholic leader’s East Coast journey will be able to include a cartoon image of the Pope’s face in front of the American flag on all Pope-related tweets by using the hashtag #PopeinUS.


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  • 36/72   Call for Award Applicants: Johnson & Johnson Seeks Female Researchers Working in Science, Technology, Engineering, Math, Manufacturing and Design
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Johnson & Johnson today announced that it is accepting applications for its 2021 Women in STEM2D (WiSTEM2D) Scholars Award, aimed at supporting assistant or associate academic professors in the disciplines of Science, Technology, Engineering, Math, Manufacturing and Design. For three years, each recipient will receive mentorship from leaders at Johnson & Johnson and a total $150,000 ($50,000 each year). The deadline for applications is Oct. 15, 2020 at 9 a.m. HST, and guidelines and additional details are available here: https://www.jnj.com/wistem2d-university-scholars.

    Johnson & Johnson today announced that it is accepting applications for its 2021 Women in STEM2D (WiSTEM2D) Scholars Award, aimed at supporting assistant or associate academic professors in the disciplines of Science, Technology, Engineering, Math, Manufacturing and Design. For three years, each recipient will receive mentorship from leaders at Johnson & Johnson and a total $150,000 ($50,000 each year). The deadline for applications is Oct. 15, 2020 at 9 a.m. HST, and guidelines and additional details are available here: https://www.jnj.com/wistem2d-university-scholars.


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  • 37/72   Kuwait Bourse Debuts in Region’s Best 1st-Day Pop for a Year
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- Boursa Kuwait surged more than 10-fold in its trading debut on Monday as it became only the third publicly traded exchange in the Middle East.Shares in the bourse operator rose as high as 1,210 fils, after being sold at 100 fills in an offering to Kuwaiti citizens last year. It’s the strongest debut of any stock in Europe, the Middle East and Africa for a year. They pared the increase to 1,055 fils at the close, with the country’s Premier Market finishing 0.4% higher.The trading debut was initially expected to take place in April and comes ahead of Kuwait’s upgrade to the group of countries classified as emerging market by MSCI Inc. in November, a move anticipated to trigger inflows from foreign investors.Boursa Kuwait joins Dubai Financial Market PJSC and Tel Aviv Stock Exchange Ltd. as publicly traded regional exchanges. The sale of 50% of the company to individuals followed a 44% sale to a consortium of domestic and international investors last year, and was the last stage of a privatization process. The remaining 6% is owned by the country’s Public Institute for Social Security.While Monday marked the stock’s exchange debut, the shares have been traded on the local over-the-counter platform since Jan. 15. The price of 100 fils a share was set by the Capital Markets Authority law that mandated the privatization of the Kuwait Stock Exchange.Boursa Kuwait “is being listed at a 40-50% discount to its EM peers, despite enjoying higher margins, returns on capital, and historical earnings growth,” said Gus Chehayeb, the chief investment officer at Sancta Capital Group Ltd. in Dubai. Sancta Capital has been buying Boursa Kuwait shares in the over-the-counter market since January.“Note that Kuwait has a history of redistributing its wealth among its citizens by essentially gifting them stakes in recently privatized lucrative state-owned assets,” said Chehayeb.The shares outstanding and traded on Kuwait’s exchange have a combined market value of about $91 billion, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. That compares to $157 billion for the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange and $265 billion for the combined markets of Dubai and Abu Dhabi.(Updates stock and index to closing price in second paragraph.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- Boursa Kuwait surged more than 10-fold in its trading debut on Monday as it became only the third publicly traded exchange in the Middle East.Shares in the bourse operator rose as high as 1,210 fils, after being sold at 100 fills in an offering to Kuwaiti citizens last year. It’s the strongest debut of any stock in Europe, the Middle East and Africa for a year. They pared the increase to 1,055 fils at the close, with the country’s Premier Market finishing 0.4% higher.The trading debut was initially expected to take place in April and comes ahead of Kuwait’s upgrade to the group of countries classified as emerging market by MSCI Inc. in November, a move anticipated to trigger inflows from foreign investors.Boursa Kuwait joins Dubai Financial Market PJSC and Tel Aviv Stock Exchange Ltd. as publicly traded regional exchanges. The sale of 50% of the company to individuals followed a 44% sale to a consortium of domestic and international investors last year, and was the last stage of a privatization process. The remaining 6% is owned by the country’s Public Institute for Social Security.While Monday marked the stock’s exchange debut, the shares have been traded on the local over-the-counter platform since Jan. 15. The price of 100 fils a share was set by the Capital Markets Authority law that mandated the privatization of the Kuwait Stock Exchange.Boursa Kuwait “is being listed at a 40-50% discount to its EM peers, despite enjoying higher margins, returns on capital, and historical earnings growth,” said Gus Chehayeb, the chief investment officer at Sancta Capital Group Ltd. in Dubai. Sancta Capital has been buying Boursa Kuwait shares in the over-the-counter market since January.“Note that Kuwait has a history of redistributing its wealth among its citizens by essentially gifting them stakes in recently privatized lucrative state-owned assets,” said Chehayeb.The shares outstanding and traded on Kuwait’s exchange have a combined market value of about $91 billion, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. That compares to $157 billion for the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange and $265 billion for the combined markets of Dubai and Abu Dhabi.(Updates stock and index to closing price in second paragraph.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 38/72   End of Easing Cycle Makes for a Picky Time in Emerging Markets
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    (Bloomberg) -- September is shaping up to be the month when the dial on the interest-rate compass no longer pointed so markedly south for the world’s developing economies.Of the six major emerging-market central banks due to decide policy in the coming week, only one -- South Africa’s -- is forecast to lower borrowing costs, extending a pattern that saw Malaysia, Peru, Ukraine and Chile keep rates unchanged this month.The diminishing willingness of policy makers to reduce interest rates -- not to mention their scope to do so -- underscores the growing recognition across the developing world that after the wave of stimulus thrown at these economies amid the Covid-19 pandemic, inflation is edging up again. It’s a realization illustrated by the surge in demand for emerging-market inflation-linked bonds, which has pushed down yields on some of the securities to record lows.Emerging-market “scope for further policy accommodation may be dwindling. Unlike in previous decades, EM now sorely lacks a compelling impetus for investment, with growth drivers weak and yield compensation low,” Societe Generale SA strategists led by Singapore-based Jason Daw wrote in a report. “Increasingly, EM appears to be running on fumes, presenting asymmetric downside risks against limited upside potential.”For BNP Paribas SA, the absence of a strong carry story as the policy-easing cycle comes to an end means the focus must be on finding value. The bank is cutting its exposure to Brazilian rates and credit, while reducing its allocation in developing-nation sovereign credit to almost zero in its recommended model.“Despite supportive financial conditions and ample dollar liquidity, the risk-reward of maintaining a substantial long allocation in emerging-market risk assets is no longer attractive,” Gabriel Gersztein, Sao Paulo-based head of global emerging-markets strategy at BNP Paribas, wrote in a report. “We have now switched to a more selective approach, in which idiosyncratic factors and political events play an increasingly important role in our trading choices.”There are plenty of country-specific risks to consider. Moody’s Investors Service on Friday cut Turkey’s debt to the lowest grade it’s ever given the country, warning of a possible balance-of-payments crisis. In Peru, President Martin Vizcarra is pushing back on an impeachment attempt that made the sol last week’s biggest decliner in emerging markets. Russian President Vladimir Putin, grappling with the fallout from the alleged poisoning of opposition leader Alexey Navalny, is tightening his embrace of Belarus President Alexander Lukashenko as the dictator intensifies a crackdown on protests.Emerging-market stocks ended a bad week on a improved note Friday even as U.S. tech stocks declined. Indexes of currencies and bonds were little changed as some investors geared up for the Federal Reserve’s two-day policy meeting starting Tuesday.Listen: EM Weekly Podcast: Rate Decisions, China Data, Turkey StressListen: Speaking of EM: Valuations Matter in EM Currencies (Podcast)South Africa to CutWith South Africa’s economy mired in the longest recession since 1992, the majority of economists are predicting a 25-basis-point reduction in interest rates on Thursday to round off a cycle that’s already seen five cuts totaling 300 basis points this yearThe nation reports retail sales for July on WednesdayThe rand’s three-month implied volatility against the dollar rose for a third week, the longest run since MarchBank of Russia will probably keep benchmark borrowing costs unchanged on Friday“Optimism about the pace of recovery lessens the urgency for another rate cut, while the slide in the ruble might prompt concerns about financial-market stability,” Bloomberg Economics said in a reportRussia reports PPI for August on Wednesday, followed by gold and FX reserves on ThursdayPoland will likely hold rates on TuesdayThe nation’s current-account balance probably narrowed in July as exports rose more than imports, data may show MondayPoland also reports inflation data on Wednesday, employment and wages on Thursday, and producer prices on FridayBank Indonesia is expected to stand pat Thursday as pressure remains on the nation’s currencyThe rupiah was the worst performer in the Asian sphere last week following renewed lockdown measures in Jakarta, despite the central bank’s pledge to defend the currencyTaiwan’s central bank is also predicted to remain on hold ThursdayThe Taiwan dollar has stayed around the 29.5 level over the past week, although intra-day moves continued to widenBrazil’s central bank will probably keep the key policy rate unchanged at 2% Wednesday, and investors will analyze the recently established forward guidance for clues on how long rates will remain at a record lowLatin America’s biggest economy will release tax-collection figures for August this week.Minutes from Chile’s September central bank meeting might suggest the possibility of slowly increasing rates at the end of its two-year forecast period, though policy makers will probably maintain a dovish tone and reiterate their commitment to provide additional accommodation if needed, according to Bloomberg EconomicsTurkey’s TroublesTurkish markets may be under pressure Monday after Moody’s cut its credit rating to B2, five levels below investment grade and on par with Egypt, Jamaica and RwandaThe nation’s standing with investors has suffered as President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has pursued an approach that prioritized growth. The nation’s credit-default swaps, local-currency debt and the lira have been the worst performers in emerging markets this quarterTurkey’s industrial-production rose 4.4% in July, below economists’ median forecast for a 4.8% increaseHome sales and the budget balance are due on Tuesday, and net bond investments by foreigners on ThursdayOther Data and EventsChina is expected to say on Tuesday the recovery in industrial production accelerated in August from a year earlier, along with some improvements for retail sales and fixed assets investmentChina’s 10-year bond yields edged down last week as risk aversion gripped local equity marketsIndia releases inflation data on Monday with August CPI seen remaining above the central bank’s tolerance level. High CPI has stalled the Reserve Bank of India’s rate-cutting cycle and has been identified as the rationale behind the central bank’s acceptance of a stronger rupeeAugust trade data due Tuesday is forecast to show a further swing into deficitThe second-quarter current account likely to be released as early as Tuesday may show a increase in the surplusThe rupee was the second-worst performing currency in Asia last weekThe Philippines releases overseas workers’ remittances for July on TuesdayArgentine consumer price inflation data, to be released on Wednesday, may flag an uptick in August, according to a Bloomberg Economics estimate. Budget-balance information for the same month is also dueColombia is expected to post retail sales and industrial production figures for July on Monday, which may show signs of a recovery in economic activity, according to economists surveyed by Bloomberg.In Uruguay, a reading of second-quarter gross domestic product is scheduled for release. The nation’s bonds are the best performers in emerging markets this year, according to a Bloomberg Barclays index of dollar debt.BinDawood Holding Co., one of Saudi Arabia’s largest grocery chains, is seeking to raise as much as $585 million from a share sale that started SundayFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    (Bloomberg) -- September is shaping up to be the month when the dial on the interest-rate compass no longer pointed so markedly south for the world’s developing economies.Of the six major emerging-market central banks due to decide policy in the coming week, only one -- South Africa’s -- is forecast to lower borrowing costs, extending a pattern that saw Malaysia, Peru, Ukraine and Chile keep rates unchanged this month.The diminishing willingness of policy makers to reduce interest rates -- not to mention their scope to do so -- underscores the growing recognition across the developing world that after the wave of stimulus thrown at these economies amid the Covid-19 pandemic, inflation is edging up again. It’s a realization illustrated by the surge in demand for emerging-market inflation-linked bonds, which has pushed down yields on some of the securities to record lows.Emerging-market “scope for further policy accommodation may be dwindling. Unlike in previous decades, EM now sorely lacks a compelling impetus for investment, with growth drivers weak and yield compensation low,” Societe Generale SA strategists led by Singapore-based Jason Daw wrote in a report. “Increasingly, EM appears to be running on fumes, presenting asymmetric downside risks against limited upside potential.”For BNP Paribas SA, the absence of a strong carry story as the policy-easing cycle comes to an end means the focus must be on finding value. The bank is cutting its exposure to Brazilian rates and credit, while reducing its allocation in developing-nation sovereign credit to almost zero in its recommended model.“Despite supportive financial conditions and ample dollar liquidity, the risk-reward of maintaining a substantial long allocation in emerging-market risk assets is no longer attractive,” Gabriel Gersztein, Sao Paulo-based head of global emerging-markets strategy at BNP Paribas, wrote in a report. “We have now switched to a more selective approach, in which idiosyncratic factors and political events play an increasingly important role in our trading choices.”There are plenty of country-specific risks to consider. Moody’s Investors Service on Friday cut Turkey’s debt to the lowest grade it’s ever given the country, warning of a possible balance-of-payments crisis. In Peru, President Martin Vizcarra is pushing back on an impeachment attempt that made the sol last week’s biggest decliner in emerging markets. Russian President Vladimir Putin, grappling with the fallout from the alleged poisoning of opposition leader Alexey Navalny, is tightening his embrace of Belarus President Alexander Lukashenko as the dictator intensifies a crackdown on protests.Emerging-market stocks ended a bad week on a improved note Friday even as U.S. tech stocks declined. Indexes of currencies and bonds were little changed as some investors geared up for the Federal Reserve’s two-day policy meeting starting Tuesday.Listen: EM Weekly Podcast: Rate Decisions, China Data, Turkey StressListen: Speaking of EM: Valuations Matter in EM Currencies (Podcast)South Africa to CutWith South Africa’s economy mired in the longest recession since 1992, the majority of economists are predicting a 25-basis-point reduction in interest rates on Thursday to round off a cycle that’s already seen five cuts totaling 300 basis points this yearThe nation reports retail sales for July on WednesdayThe rand’s three-month implied volatility against the dollar rose for a third week, the longest run since MarchBank of Russia will probably keep benchmark borrowing costs unchanged on Friday“Optimism about the pace of recovery lessens the urgency for another rate cut, while the slide in the ruble might prompt concerns about financial-market stability,” Bloomberg Economics said in a reportRussia reports PPI for August on Wednesday, followed by gold and FX reserves on ThursdayPoland will likely hold rates on TuesdayThe nation’s current-account balance probably narrowed in July as exports rose more than imports, data may show MondayPoland also reports inflation data on Wednesday, employment and wages on Thursday, and producer prices on FridayBank Indonesia is expected to stand pat Thursday as pressure remains on the nation’s currencyThe rupiah was the worst performer in the Asian sphere last week following renewed lockdown measures in Jakarta, despite the central bank’s pledge to defend the currencyTaiwan’s central bank is also predicted to remain on hold ThursdayThe Taiwan dollar has stayed around the 29.5 level over the past week, although intra-day moves continued to widenBrazil’s central bank will probably keep the key policy rate unchanged at 2% Wednesday, and investors will analyze the recently established forward guidance for clues on how long rates will remain at a record lowLatin America’s biggest economy will release tax-collection figures for August this week.Minutes from Chile’s September central bank meeting might suggest the possibility of slowly increasing rates at the end of its two-year forecast period, though policy makers will probably maintain a dovish tone and reiterate their commitment to provide additional accommodation if needed, according to Bloomberg EconomicsTurkey’s TroublesTurkish markets may be under pressure Monday after Moody’s cut its credit rating to B2, five levels below investment grade and on par with Egypt, Jamaica and RwandaThe nation’s standing with investors has suffered as President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has pursued an approach that prioritized growth. The nation’s credit-default swaps, local-currency debt and the lira have been the worst performers in emerging markets this quarterTurkey’s industrial-production rose 4.4% in July, below economists’ median forecast for a 4.8% increaseHome sales and the budget balance are due on Tuesday, and net bond investments by foreigners on ThursdayOther Data and EventsChina is expected to say on Tuesday the recovery in industrial production accelerated in August from a year earlier, along with some improvements for retail sales and fixed assets investmentChina’s 10-year bond yields edged down last week as risk aversion gripped local equity marketsIndia releases inflation data on Monday with August CPI seen remaining above the central bank’s tolerance level. High CPI has stalled the Reserve Bank of India’s rate-cutting cycle and has been identified as the rationale behind the central bank’s acceptance of a stronger rupeeAugust trade data due Tuesday is forecast to show a further swing into deficitThe second-quarter current account likely to be released as early as Tuesday may show a increase in the surplusThe rupee was the second-worst performing currency in Asia last weekThe Philippines releases overseas workers’ remittances for July on TuesdayArgentine consumer price inflation data, to be released on Wednesday, may flag an uptick in August, according to a Bloomberg Economics estimate. Budget-balance information for the same month is also dueColombia is expected to post retail sales and industrial production figures for July on Monday, which may show signs of a recovery in economic activity, according to economists surveyed by Bloomberg.In Uruguay, a reading of second-quarter gross domestic product is scheduled for release. The nation’s bonds are the best performers in emerging markets this year, according to a Bloomberg Barclays index of dollar debt.BinDawood Holding Co., one of Saudi Arabia’s largest grocery chains, is seeking to raise as much as $585 million from a share sale that started SundayFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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  • 39/72   Watch Dr. Greiwe Perform Shoulder Replacement Surgery--Live on Facebook from St. Elizabeth Healthcare
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Join Dr. R. Michael Greiwe on Wednesday, September 16, at 11 a.m., as he broadcasts a live shoulder replacement surgery on Facebook from St. Elizabeth Healthcare.

    Join Dr. R. Michael Greiwe on Wednesday, September 16, at 11 a.m., as he broadcasts a live shoulder replacement surgery on Facebook from St. Elizabeth Healthcare.


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  • 40/72   Western Wildfires: Trump to visit with firefighters; 'elevated' fire conditions expected today; air quality may not improve until October
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Meteorologist Dan Borsum said strong southerly winds and low humidity Monday will result in elevated fire weather conditions across the region.

    Meteorologist Dan Borsum said strong southerly winds and low humidity Monday will result in elevated fire weather conditions across the region.


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  • 41/72   Ford says emissions regulations will keep a V8 out of the Bronco
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Ford doused cold water on the rumors claiming the born-again Bronco will sooner or later gain an optional V8 engine.  While an eight-cylinder might fit, the company needs to keep the SUV's CO2 emissions in check.

    Ford doused cold water on the rumors claiming the born-again Bronco will sooner or later gain an optional V8 engine. While an eight-cylinder might fit, the company needs to keep the SUV's CO2 emissions in check.


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  • 42/72   Wisconsin Trucking Company Service One Transportation Celebrates National Truck Driver Appreciation Week 2020
    TECHNOLOGY TOPIC NEWS

    Service One Transportation, a leading Wisconsin trucking and logistics company, is proud to recognize its team of dedicated tractor trailer operators during National Truck Driver Appreciation Week. The annual event, which was established by American Trucking Associations (ATA), takes place the second week of September and aims to raise awareness of the key role America's truck drivers play as an essential element in "the lifeblood of the U.S. economy."* This year's event runs September 13–19, 2020.

    Service One Transportation, a leading Wisconsin trucking and logistics company, is proud to recognize its team of dedicated tractor trailer operators during National Truck Driver Appreciation Week. The annual event, which was established by American Trucking Associations (ATA), takes place the second week of September and aims to raise awareness of the key role America's truck drivers play as an essential element in "the lifeblood of the U.S. economy."* This year's event runs September 13–19, 2020.


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  • 43/72   Climate change: Warmth shatters section of Greenland ice shelf
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    A big chunk of ice breaks away from the Arctic's largest remaining ice shelf - 79N, or Nioghalvfjerdsfjorden.

    A big chunk of ice breaks away from the Arctic's largest remaining ice shelf - 79N, or Nioghalvfjerdsfjorden.


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  • 44/72   Vaccine-Makers Keep Safety Details Quiet, Alarming Scientists
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The morning after the world learned that a closely watched clinical trial of a coronavirus vaccine had been halted last week over safety concerns, the company's chief executive disclosed that a person given the vaccine had experienced serious neurological symptoms.But the remarks were not public. Instead, the chief executive, Pascal Soriot of AstraZeneca, spoke at a closed meeting organized by J.P. Morgan, the investment bank.AstraZeneca said Saturday that an outside panel had cleared its trial in Britain to begin again, but the company still has not given any details about the patient's medical condition, nor has it released a transcript of Soriot's remarks to investors, which were reported by the news outlet STAT and later confirmed by an analyst for J.P. Morgan.Another front-runner in the vaccine race, Pfizer, made a similarly terse announcement Saturday: The company is proposing to expand its clinical trial to include thousands more participants, but it gave few other details about its plan, including how it would determine the effectiveness of the vaccine in its larger study.It is standard for drug companies to withhold details of clinical trials until after they are completed, tenaciously guarding their intellectual property and competitive edge. But these are extraordinary times, and now there is a growing outcry among independent scientists and public health experts who are pushing the companies to be far more open with the public in the midst of a pandemic that has killed more than 193,000 people in the United States.These experts say American taxpayers are entitled to know more since the federal government has committed billions of dollars to vaccine research and to buying the vaccines once they are approved. And greater transparency could also help bolster faltering public confidence in vaccines at a time when a growing number of Americans fear President Donald Trump will pressure federal regulators to approve a vaccine before it is proved safe and effective."Trust is in short supply," said Dr. Harlan Krumholz, a cardiologist and health care researcher at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, who has spent years prodding companies and academic researchers to share more trial data with outside scientists. "And the more that they can share, the better off we are."Last week, nine pharmaceutical companies, including AstraZeneca and Pfizer, pledged to "stand with science" and rigorously vet any vaccine for the coronavirus -- an unusual pact among competitors. But the researchers said that missing from the joint statement was a promise to share more critical details about their research with the public and the scientific community.None of the three companies with coronavirus vaccines in advanced clinical trials in the United States have made public the protocols and statistical analysis plans for those trials -- the detailed road maps that could help the independent scientists better understand how the trials were designed and hold the companies accountable if they were to deviate from their plans. In some cases, crucial details about how the trials have been set up -- such as at what points an independent board can review early study results or under what conditions a trial could be stopped early -- have not been made public."We've never had such an important clinical trial -- or series of clinical trials -- in recent history," said Dr. Eric Topol, a professor of molecular medicine at Scripps Research in La Jolla, California, and a longtime expert on clinical trials. "Everything should be transparent."Public confidence in the drug companies' findings and federal regulators' rigor will be critical in persuading Americans to get vaccinated. A growing number of people are skeptical. A poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation last week found that nearly two-thirds of Americans -- 62% -- are worried that the Food and Drug Administration will rush to approve a coronavirus vaccine without making sure it is safe and effective, under political pressure from Trump.Pharmaceutical companies are counting on their vaccine research to help them rebuild reputations that have been tarnished by soaring drug prices and the industry's role in fueling the opioid epidemic.In an effort to restore public trust, senior regulators at the FDA took the highly unusual step of promising in a USA Today op-ed piece Thursday to uphold the scientific integrity of the process of evaluating treatments and vaccines and to maintain the agency's independence.Representatives for the three companies with vaccine candidates in large, advanced trials in the United States -- Moderna, Pfizer and AstraZeneca -- said they had released many details about the trials.Pfizer said in a statement that the novelty of the virus and the fast-moving nature of the coronavirus crisis had meant that the protocol had to be flexible "to enable us to enhance the evaluation of the potential vaccine's safety and efficacy." The company said it would publish the full protocol from the trial as part of its submission to a medical journal "that will include results, enrollment criteria and final number of participants enrolled."On Saturday, Pfizer said it would ask the FDA for permission to expand its trial to 44,000 participants, from its initial target of 30,000. But the announcement raised new questions about how the company would be able to know the results by its goal of the end of October with so many new participants. A Pfizer spokeswoman, Amy Rose, said, "We are not going to speak to timing or specifics of any interim analyses."AstraZeneca did not initially report that a participant's illness had halted its clinical trials around the world. The studies were paused Sept. 6 but not reported until the news was broken by STAT on Tuesday. The company still has not disclosed the patient's illness that led to the pause, even though it has discussed the medical condition of another participant who developed multiple sclerosis in July, which led to another brief halt of the trial. That illness was determined to be unrelated to the vaccine.The company said that Soriot's appearance at the J.P. Morgan meeting was part of a long-planned event and that he largely discussed the company's business outlook, with a few questions about the trial. The New York Times has reported that the patient developed symptoms consistent with transverse myelitis, or inflammation of the spinal cord.A spokeswoman for AstraZeneca, Michele Meixell, said that while trial sponsors were required to notify the doctors operating clinical trial sites if an "unexplained event" occurred, "it is not common practice for those pauses to be communicated beyond the clinical community involved in a trial -- including the media -- in order to protect the privacy of individual participants and maintain the integrity of the trial."There is precedent for greater transparency. The large Recovery trial being run by the University of Oxford in Britain -- which helped determine that the steroid dexamethasone reduces deaths in patients with COVID-19 -- has published its trial protocol and statistical analysis plans.While the broad outlines of the vaccine trial designs have been made available -- including on a federal clinical trial registry -- crucial details remain a mystery.For example, Pfizer's chief executive has said the company could apply to the FDA for emergency authorization of its vaccine as early as October. But the company has not said how many times -- and at what point in the trial -- it will allow an independent review board to examine its study data to evaluate whether the evidence of safety and efficacy is strong enough that it can stop the trial early and apply for an emergency approval from federal regulators.And none of the companies have published the criteria they will use to determine when these outside boards would advise stopping the trial, which could happen if the vaccine showed overwhelming efficacy, if it showed that it did not protect against COVID-19 or if it was linked to serious safety issues.These so-called interim analyses are the subject of intense interest because they are the only way that late-stage trials could be halted early.Company executives have provided some trial details when they have spoken on discussion panels, at investor conferences or in news releases. But researchers looking for clues have had to comb through transcripts, videos and articles posted online rather than examine documents that the companies provided.The lack of transparency is unacceptable, several researchers said, given that the federal government has billion-dollar deals with each of the companies."Look, we paid for it," said Saad Omer, director of the Yale Institute for Global Health. "So it's reasonable to ask for it."A federal clinical trial registry details the number of trial participants, who should be included and excluded from the study, and the main outcomes. But it only skims the surface, Krumholz said. "The protocols are much more detailed."Peter Doshi, who is on the faculty at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy in Baltimore and is an editor with The BMJ, a medical journal, said he recently requested the protocols from Pfizer, Moderna and AstraZeneca. None of the companies shared them, he said."I imagine most of the public would like to believe scientists are all sharing their data, that this process is open to scrutiny among the scientific community," said Doshi, who has helped pressure drugmakers to share trial records with researchers. "Just not true."Doshi said the protocols could help researchers answer important questions about the studies and possibly to critique them. For example, can the trials determine whether the vaccine can prevent COVID-19 and complications in high-risk groups like older adults? When the researchers test for the coronavirus, how do they account for false results?Other independent scientists said they were eager to examine the trials' statistical analysis plans, which would guide them in analyzing the results."Frankly, I would love to know what they're planning to do and how they're planning to do it," said Dr. Judith Feinberg, vice chairwoman for research in medicine at West Virginia University in Morgantown.By making these documents public, outside experts said they would be able to hold the companies accountable if they changed the way they analyzed the results."There's no downside" to sharing the documents, said Dr. Paul Offit, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia who serves on the FDA advisory committee that will review coronavirus vaccines. "People are skittish about these vaccines. I think it helps to be transparent."Omer said he was in favor of the companies releasing the protocols and analysis plans, but he said he also worried that, in the wrong hands, the technical documents could be misinterpreted."You cannot kid around with this kind of stuff," he said. In the long run, however, he said it was to the companies' advantage to allow qualified researchers to evaluate the plans.If independent researchers agreed the trials were set up properly -- and Omer said he expected that would be the case -- that could help enhance their credibility. They can say, "Hold your horses. No need to jump up and down."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company

    The morning after the world learned that a closely watched clinical trial of a coronavirus vaccine had been halted last week over safety concerns, the company's chief executive disclosed that a person given the vaccine had experienced serious neurological symptoms.But the remarks were not public. Instead, the chief executive, Pascal Soriot of AstraZeneca, spoke at a closed meeting organized by J.P. Morgan, the investment bank.AstraZeneca said Saturday that an outside panel had cleared its trial in Britain to begin again, but the company still has not given any details about the patient's medical condition, nor has it released a transcript of Soriot's remarks to investors, which were reported by the news outlet STAT and later confirmed by an analyst for J.P. Morgan.Another front-runner in the vaccine race, Pfizer, made a similarly terse announcement Saturday: The company is proposing to expand its clinical trial to include thousands more participants, but it gave few other details about its plan, including how it would determine the effectiveness of the vaccine in its larger study.It is standard for drug companies to withhold details of clinical trials until after they are completed, tenaciously guarding their intellectual property and competitive edge. But these are extraordinary times, and now there is a growing outcry among independent scientists and public health experts who are pushing the companies to be far more open with the public in the midst of a pandemic that has killed more than 193,000 people in the United States.These experts say American taxpayers are entitled to know more since the federal government has committed billions of dollars to vaccine research and to buying the vaccines once they are approved. And greater transparency could also help bolster faltering public confidence in vaccines at a time when a growing number of Americans fear President Donald Trump will pressure federal regulators to approve a vaccine before it is proved safe and effective."Trust is in short supply," said Dr. Harlan Krumholz, a cardiologist and health care researcher at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, who has spent years prodding companies and academic researchers to share more trial data with outside scientists. "And the more that they can share, the better off we are."Last week, nine pharmaceutical companies, including AstraZeneca and Pfizer, pledged to "stand with science" and rigorously vet any vaccine for the coronavirus -- an unusual pact among competitors. But the researchers said that missing from the joint statement was a promise to share more critical details about their research with the public and the scientific community.None of the three companies with coronavirus vaccines in advanced clinical trials in the United States have made public the protocols and statistical analysis plans for those trials -- the detailed road maps that could help the independent scientists better understand how the trials were designed and hold the companies accountable if they were to deviate from their plans. In some cases, crucial details about how the trials have been set up -- such as at what points an independent board can review early study results or under what conditions a trial could be stopped early -- have not been made public."We've never had such an important clinical trial -- or series of clinical trials -- in recent history," said Dr. Eric Topol, a professor of molecular medicine at Scripps Research in La Jolla, California, and a longtime expert on clinical trials. "Everything should be transparent."Public confidence in the drug companies' findings and federal regulators' rigor will be critical in persuading Americans to get vaccinated. A growing number of people are skeptical. A poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation last week found that nearly two-thirds of Americans -- 62% -- are worried that the Food and Drug Administration will rush to approve a coronavirus vaccine without making sure it is safe and effective, under political pressure from Trump.Pharmaceutical companies are counting on their vaccine research to help them rebuild reputations that have been tarnished by soaring drug prices and the industry's role in fueling the opioid epidemic.In an effort to restore public trust, senior regulators at the FDA took the highly unusual step of promising in a USA Today op-ed piece Thursday to uphold the scientific integrity of the process of evaluating treatments and vaccines and to maintain the agency's independence.Representatives for the three companies with vaccine candidates in large, advanced trials in the United States -- Moderna, Pfizer and AstraZeneca -- said they had released many details about the trials.Pfizer said in a statement that the novelty of the virus and the fast-moving nature of the coronavirus crisis had meant that the protocol had to be flexible "to enable us to enhance the evaluation of the potential vaccine's safety and efficacy." The company said it would publish the full protocol from the trial as part of its submission to a medical journal "that will include results, enrollment criteria and final number of participants enrolled."On Saturday, Pfizer said it would ask the FDA for permission to expand its trial to 44,000 participants, from its initial target of 30,000. But the announcement raised new questions about how the company would be able to know the results by its goal of the end of October with so many new participants. A Pfizer spokeswoman, Amy Rose, said, "We are not going to speak to timing or specifics of any interim analyses."AstraZeneca did not initially report that a participant's illness had halted its clinical trials around the world. The studies were paused Sept. 6 but not reported until the news was broken by STAT on Tuesday. The company still has not disclosed the patient's illness that led to the pause, even though it has discussed the medical condition of another participant who developed multiple sclerosis in July, which led to another brief halt of the trial. That illness was determined to be unrelated to the vaccine.The company said that Soriot's appearance at the J.P. Morgan meeting was part of a long-planned event and that he largely discussed the company's business outlook, with a few questions about the trial. The New York Times has reported that the patient developed symptoms consistent with transverse myelitis, or inflammation of the spinal cord.A spokeswoman for AstraZeneca, Michele Meixell, said that while trial sponsors were required to notify the doctors operating clinical trial sites if an "unexplained event" occurred, "it is not common practice for those pauses to be communicated beyond the clinical community involved in a trial -- including the media -- in order to protect the privacy of individual participants and maintain the integrity of the trial."There is precedent for greater transparency. The large Recovery trial being run by the University of Oxford in Britain -- which helped determine that the steroid dexamethasone reduces deaths in patients with COVID-19 -- has published its trial protocol and statistical analysis plans.While the broad outlines of the vaccine trial designs have been made available -- including on a federal clinical trial registry -- crucial details remain a mystery.For example, Pfizer's chief executive has said the company could apply to the FDA for emergency authorization of its vaccine as early as October. But the company has not said how many times -- and at what point in the trial -- it will allow an independent review board to examine its study data to evaluate whether the evidence of safety and efficacy is strong enough that it can stop the trial early and apply for an emergency approval from federal regulators.And none of the companies have published the criteria they will use to determine when these outside boards would advise stopping the trial, which could happen if the vaccine showed overwhelming efficacy, if it showed that it did not protect against COVID-19 or if it was linked to serious safety issues.These so-called interim analyses are the subject of intense interest because they are the only way that late-stage trials could be halted early.Company executives have provided some trial details when they have spoken on discussion panels, at investor conferences or in news releases. But researchers looking for clues have had to comb through transcripts, videos and articles posted online rather than examine documents that the companies provided.The lack of transparency is unacceptable, several researchers said, given that the federal government has billion-dollar deals with each of the companies."Look, we paid for it," said Saad Omer, director of the Yale Institute for Global Health. "So it's reasonable to ask for it."A federal clinical trial registry details the number of trial participants, who should be included and excluded from the study, and the main outcomes. But it only skims the surface, Krumholz said. "The protocols are much more detailed."Peter Doshi, who is on the faculty at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy in Baltimore and is an editor with The BMJ, a medical journal, said he recently requested the protocols from Pfizer, Moderna and AstraZeneca. None of the companies shared them, he said."I imagine most of the public would like to believe scientists are all sharing their data, that this process is open to scrutiny among the scientific community," said Doshi, who has helped pressure drugmakers to share trial records with researchers. "Just not true."Doshi said the protocols could help researchers answer important questions about the studies and possibly to critique them. For example, can the trials determine whether the vaccine can prevent COVID-19 and complications in high-risk groups like older adults? When the researchers test for the coronavirus, how do they account for false results?Other independent scientists said they were eager to examine the trials' statistical analysis plans, which would guide them in analyzing the results."Frankly, I would love to know what they're planning to do and how they're planning to do it," said Dr. Judith Feinberg, vice chairwoman for research in medicine at West Virginia University in Morgantown.By making these documents public, outside experts said they would be able to hold the companies accountable if they changed the way they analyzed the results."There's no downside" to sharing the documents, said Dr. Paul Offit, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia who serves on the FDA advisory committee that will review coronavirus vaccines. "People are skittish about these vaccines. I think it helps to be transparent."Omer said he was in favor of the companies releasing the protocols and analysis plans, but he said he also worried that, in the wrong hands, the technical documents could be misinterpreted."You cannot kid around with this kind of stuff," he said. In the long run, however, he said it was to the companies' advantage to allow qualified researchers to evaluate the plans.If independent researchers agreed the trials were set up properly -- and Omer said he expected that would be the case -- that could help enhance their credibility. They can say, "Hold your horses. No need to jump up and down."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company


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  • 45/72   After decades of climate change, 42 square miles of ice broke away from the largest remaining Arctic shelf and shattered
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The Spalte Glacier in northeast Greenland has split off the Arctic's largest ice shelf and is adrift at sea, after record temperature rises.

    The Spalte Glacier in northeast Greenland has split off the Arctic's largest ice shelf and is adrift at sea, after record temperature rises.


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  • 46/72   Burned jaguars, fire tornadoes: Blazes in Brazil wetland deliver climate warning
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    POCONÉ, Brazil (Reuters) - A fire has been burning since mid-July in the remote wetlands of west-central Brazil, leaving in its wake a vast charred desolation bigger than New York City.  This massive fire is one of thousands of blazes sweeping the Brazilian Pantanal - the world's largest wetland - this year in what climate scientists fear could become a new normal, echoing the rise in climate-driven fires from California to Australia.  The Pantanal is smaller and less-known than its famous cousin, the Amazon jungle.

    POCONÉ, Brazil (Reuters) - A fire has been burning since mid-July in the remote wetlands of west-central Brazil, leaving in its wake a vast charred desolation bigger than New York City. This massive fire is one of thousands of blazes sweeping the Brazilian Pantanal - the world's largest wetland - this year in what climate scientists fear could become a new normal, echoing the rise in climate-driven fires from California to Australia. The Pantanal is smaller and less-known than its famous cousin, the Amazon jungle.


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  • 47/72   First US spring flight to Antarctica aims to keep out virus
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The first U.S. flight into Antarctica following months of winter darkness arrived Monday with crews taking extra precautions to keep out the coronavirus.  Antarctica is the only continent without the virus, and there is a global effort to make sure incoming scientists and workers don’t bring it with them.  The U.S. Air Force flight left Monday from the gateway city of Christchurch carrying 106 passengers and crew, said Tony German, the U.S. Antarctic program's representative in New Zealand.

    The first U.S. flight into Antarctica following months of winter darkness arrived Monday with crews taking extra precautions to keep out the coronavirus. Antarctica is the only continent without the virus, and there is a global effort to make sure incoming scientists and workers don’t bring it with them. The U.S. Air Force flight left Monday from the gateway city of Christchurch carrying 106 passengers and crew, said Tony German, the U.S. Antarctic program's representative in New Zealand.


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  • 48/72   A top disease expert is warning of 'another 12 to 14 months of a really hard road ahead of us,' and says the US has no national plan to stop it
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Osterholm doubled down on Dr. Anthony Fauci's warning that Americans should expect to "hunker down" this fall and winter.

    Osterholm doubled down on Dr. Anthony Fauci's warning that Americans should expect to "hunker down" this fall and winter.


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  • 49/72   Groups turn to hotels to shelter fire evacuees amid virus
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    Fearing one disaster will feed another, relief groups are putting some people who fled their homes during West Coast wildfires into hotels to reduce the spread of the coronavirus, stringing up shower curtains to separate people in group shelters and delivering box lunches instead of setting up buffets.  Large disaster response organizations like the American Red Cross are still operating some traditional shelters in gyms and churches, where they require masks, clean and disinfect often and try to keep evacuees at least 6 feet (2 meters) apart.  The groups say they can reduce the risk of COVID-19 in a shelter but can't keep people safe if they don't evacuate from the flames.

    Fearing one disaster will feed another, relief groups are putting some people who fled their homes during West Coast wildfires into hotels to reduce the spread of the coronavirus, stringing up shower curtains to separate people in group shelters and delivering box lunches instead of setting up buffets. Large disaster response organizations like the American Red Cross are still operating some traditional shelters in gyms and churches, where they require masks, clean and disinfect often and try to keep evacuees at least 6 feet (2 meters) apart. The groups say they can reduce the risk of COVID-19 in a shelter but can't keep people safe if they don't evacuate from the flames.


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  • 50/72   When the Otters Vanished, Everything Else Started to Crumble
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    In 1970, Jim Estes made his first trek up to Alaska's Aleutian Islands. He was greeted by an ocean filled with furry faces.Everywhere the young biologist looked, there were sea otters -- lollygagging on kelp beds, shelling sea urchins, exchanging their signature squeals. Back then, crowds of these charismatic creatures shrouded the sprawling archipelago, congregating in "rafts and bunches, as many as 500 at once," said Estes, an ecologist at the University of California, Santa Cruz. "There were so many of them, we couldn't keep track."Now, Estes said, more than 90% of those otters are gone. In just a few decades, this bustling civilization has withered into a ghost town. "You can travel down 10 miles of coastline and never see an animal," he said.The loss is more than cosmetic. In the Aleutians' delicate seascape, otters hold the entire ecosystem together. As they have disappeared, the rest of the local food web has started to crumble -- a process that's been accelerated and compounded by climate change, Estes and his colleagues report in a paper published Thursday in the journal Science.Without otters to keep them in check, populations of sea urchins have boomed, carpeting the sea floor in spiny spheres that mow down entire forests of kelp. Now, even the living, red-algae reefs on which the swirling stands of kelp once stood are in peril."These long-lived reefs are disappearing before our eyes," said Doug Rasher, a marine ecologist at the Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences in Maine and the study's first author.Softened by warming and acidifying waters, the coral-like structures have quickly succumbed to the urchins' tiny teeth, which can annihilate years of fragile algae in a single bite.The findings point to the importance of otters in the Aleutians, where the marine mammals act not just as predators, but protectors, maintaining biological balance through their voracious appetites. A single sea otter can scarf down nearly 1,000 sea urchins a day. "They eat them like popcorn," Estes said."The amount of things they control in this ecosystem is pretty astonishing," said Anjali Boyd, a marine ecologist at Duke University who wasn't involved in the study. "For their size and how cute they are, they are aggressive eaters."Aleutian sea otters have been in flux before. Fur traders in the 18th and 19th centuries hunted the animals to the brink of extinction, allowing sea urchin numbers to skyrocket, Rasher said. Although the urchins eagerly descended upon the local smorgasbord of kelp, the bubblegum-pink reef beneath them seems to have persisted -- in part because healthy algae produce a protective limestone layer that can thwart even the most determined grazers. When otter populations recovered after trapping was restricted, the reef rebounded, too.But against the backdrop of climate change, Rasher said, the reef's safety net is gone. In the past several decades, a glut of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has acidified ocean waters, making it harder for algae to armor themselves. "The reefs are producing less dense skeletons," Rasher said. "And temperature exacerbates that issue."To quantify the damage, Rasher and his colleagues braved high winds and freezing waters to collect samples over several years of the dwindling algae and analyzed them in the lab. When the oceans had been healthy, the team found, nips from urchins had barely scuffed the algae's surface. But met with weakened reef layers, urchins excavated chasms several millimeters deep -- the equivalent of up to seven years of growth.From 2014 through 2017, some reefs shrank by up to 64%. Where algae had once coated the Aleutian sea floor like a swath of pink pavement, only patches remained.Warmer temperatures also speed animal metabolism, driving urchins to eat even more enthusiastically than usual. "Given those two things happening simultaneously, it's really getting hit from both sides," said Alyssa Griffin, an ocean biogeochemist at the University of California, Davis, who wasn't involved in the study.The algae's decline also seems to be speeding up. When the researchers grew urchins and algae under conditions that simulated the preindustrial past, the present and a projected future in the lab, they found that contemporary circumstances spurred urchins to gnaw away at algae up to 60% faster. Changes yet to come will likely prompt the grazers to pick up the pace even more, the team's analysis showed, barring sweeping change in carbon emissions."Just seeing that trend is staggering," Boyd said.The findings add yet another example to the list of ecosystems being ravaged by an ever-warming world, and underscore how food chain alterations and climate change can disastrously collide. "Predator loss can impact the environment in ways we haven't even thought of," Griffin said.But these hidden relationships might contain hints of remedies. Repatriating otters could help reefs in the near-term, Rasher said, perhaps "buying us time to get our act together in terms of curbing global carbon emissions."That could be a difficult task, given the probable cause of the Aleutian Islands' stunning vanishing of otters. Estes suspects that starving orcas -- perhaps deprived of their preferred gray whale prey by industrial whaling -- have turned in desperation to the little mammals, which they can gulp down by the hundreds or thousands a year. That could make it hard to sustain larger otter populations: Once introduced, they might just disappear all over again.Estes, who is 74, hasn't visited the Aleutians since 2015.He doubts he will live to see the otters return. But he holds out hope that the islands will someday boomerang back to the breathtaking ecosystem he witnessed as a young man. "There was this incredible diversity," he said. "It was spectacularly beautiful."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company

    In 1970, Jim Estes made his first trek up to Alaska's Aleutian Islands. He was greeted by an ocean filled with furry faces.Everywhere the young biologist looked, there were sea otters -- lollygagging on kelp beds, shelling sea urchins, exchanging their signature squeals. Back then, crowds of these charismatic creatures shrouded the sprawling archipelago, congregating in "rafts and bunches, as many as 500 at once," said Estes, an ecologist at the University of California, Santa Cruz. "There were so many of them, we couldn't keep track."Now, Estes said, more than 90% of those otters are gone. In just a few decades, this bustling civilization has withered into a ghost town. "You can travel down 10 miles of coastline and never see an animal," he said.The loss is more than cosmetic. In the Aleutians' delicate seascape, otters hold the entire ecosystem together. As they have disappeared, the rest of the local food web has started to crumble -- a process that's been accelerated and compounded by climate change, Estes and his colleagues report in a paper published Thursday in the journal Science.Without otters to keep them in check, populations of sea urchins have boomed, carpeting the sea floor in spiny spheres that mow down entire forests of kelp. Now, even the living, red-algae reefs on which the swirling stands of kelp once stood are in peril."These long-lived reefs are disappearing before our eyes," said Doug Rasher, a marine ecologist at the Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences in Maine and the study's first author.Softened by warming and acidifying waters, the coral-like structures have quickly succumbed to the urchins' tiny teeth, which can annihilate years of fragile algae in a single bite.The findings point to the importance of otters in the Aleutians, where the marine mammals act not just as predators, but protectors, maintaining biological balance through their voracious appetites. A single sea otter can scarf down nearly 1,000 sea urchins a day. "They eat them like popcorn," Estes said."The amount of things they control in this ecosystem is pretty astonishing," said Anjali Boyd, a marine ecologist at Duke University who wasn't involved in the study. "For their size and how cute they are, they are aggressive eaters."Aleutian sea otters have been in flux before. Fur traders in the 18th and 19th centuries hunted the animals to the brink of extinction, allowing sea urchin numbers to skyrocket, Rasher said. Although the urchins eagerly descended upon the local smorgasbord of kelp, the bubblegum-pink reef beneath them seems to have persisted -- in part because healthy algae produce a protective limestone layer that can thwart even the most determined grazers. When otter populations recovered after trapping was restricted, the reef rebounded, too.But against the backdrop of climate change, Rasher said, the reef's safety net is gone. In the past several decades, a glut of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has acidified ocean waters, making it harder for algae to armor themselves. "The reefs are producing less dense skeletons," Rasher said. "And temperature exacerbates that issue."To quantify the damage, Rasher and his colleagues braved high winds and freezing waters to collect samples over several years of the dwindling algae and analyzed them in the lab. When the oceans had been healthy, the team found, nips from urchins had barely scuffed the algae's surface. But met with weakened reef layers, urchins excavated chasms several millimeters deep -- the equivalent of up to seven years of growth.From 2014 through 2017, some reefs shrank by up to 64%. Where algae had once coated the Aleutian sea floor like a swath of pink pavement, only patches remained.Warmer temperatures also speed animal metabolism, driving urchins to eat even more enthusiastically than usual. "Given those two things happening simultaneously, it's really getting hit from both sides," said Alyssa Griffin, an ocean biogeochemist at the University of California, Davis, who wasn't involved in the study.The algae's decline also seems to be speeding up. When the researchers grew urchins and algae under conditions that simulated the preindustrial past, the present and a projected future in the lab, they found that contemporary circumstances spurred urchins to gnaw away at algae up to 60% faster. Changes yet to come will likely prompt the grazers to pick up the pace even more, the team's analysis showed, barring sweeping change in carbon emissions."Just seeing that trend is staggering," Boyd said.The findings add yet another example to the list of ecosystems being ravaged by an ever-warming world, and underscore how food chain alterations and climate change can disastrously collide. "Predator loss can impact the environment in ways we haven't even thought of," Griffin said.But these hidden relationships might contain hints of remedies. Repatriating otters could help reefs in the near-term, Rasher said, perhaps "buying us time to get our act together in terms of curbing global carbon emissions."That could be a difficult task, given the probable cause of the Aleutian Islands' stunning vanishing of otters. Estes suspects that starving orcas -- perhaps deprived of their preferred gray whale prey by industrial whaling -- have turned in desperation to the little mammals, which they can gulp down by the hundreds or thousands a year. That could make it hard to sustain larger otter populations: Once introduced, they might just disappear all over again.Estes, who is 74, hasn't visited the Aleutians since 2015.He doubts he will live to see the otters return. But he holds out hope that the islands will someday boomerang back to the breathtaking ecosystem he witnessed as a young man. "There was this incredible diversity," he said. "It was spectacularly beautiful."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company


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  • 51/72   Black scientists call out racism in the field and counter it
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    University of Washington ecologist Christopher Schell is studying how coronavirus shutdowns have affected wildlife in Seattle and other cities.  “I wear the nerdiest glasses I have and often a jacket that has my college logo, so that people don’t mistake me for what they think is a thug or hooligan,” said Schell, who is African American.  Tanisha Williams, a botanist at Bucknell University, knows exactly which plants she's looking for.

    University of Washington ecologist Christopher Schell is studying how coronavirus shutdowns have affected wildlife in Seattle and other cities. “I wear the nerdiest glasses I have and often a jacket that has my college logo, so that people don’t mistake me for what they think is a thug or hooligan,” said Schell, who is African American. Tanisha Williams, a botanist at Bucknell University, knows exactly which plants she's looking for.


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  • 52/72   A scientist won $1.8 million to study how parasitic worms suppress our immune systems with venom to live inside us undetected
    SCIENCE TOPIC NEWS

    The NIH has awarded Adler Dillman $1.8 million to figure out how parasitic worms, or nematodes, use their venom to live undetected in our bodies.

    The NIH has awarded Adler Dillman $1.8 million to figure out how parasitic worms, or nematodes, use their venom to live undetected in our bodies.


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  • 53/72   Trump says he gets along with 'tougher,' 'meaner' leaders in new Bob Woodward tape
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    In an exclusive interview with TODAY, Bob Woodward says Trump “possessed specific knowledge that could have saved lives” during the coronavirus pandemic. He also discusses the president’s affinity for despotic rulers like Vladimir Putin and Kim Jong Un.

    In an exclusive interview with TODAY, Bob Woodward says Trump “possessed specific knowledge that could have saved lives” during the coronavirus pandemic. He also discusses the president’s affinity for despotic rulers like Vladimir Putin and Kim Jong Un.


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  • 54/72   France and Sweden confirm Alexei Navalny was poisoned with Novichok, Germany says
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Three European laboratories have confirmed Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny was poisoned with the Soviet-era nerve agent Novichok, the German government said on Monday. Doctors at the Berlin hospital where Mr Navalny is being treated said earlier this month that he had been poisoned with Novichok, prompting accusations from the Kremlin that they had “rushed to conclusions”. “Three laboratories have now confirmed independently of one another the proof of a nerve agent of the Novichok group as the cause of Mr Navalny's poisoning,” German government spokesman Steffen Seibert said in a statement. He added that the Hague-based Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons was also testing samples. German Chancellor Angela Merkel earlier said the use of such a substance raised “very serious questions that only the Russian government can answer” and suggested Moscow’s multi-billion-dollar Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline could be pulled if those answers are not forthcoming. Mr Navalny, Russia’s most outspoken critic of President Vladimir Putin, fell suddenly ill on a flight from Siberia to Moscow last month.

    Three European laboratories have confirmed Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny was poisoned with the Soviet-era nerve agent Novichok, the German government said on Monday. Doctors at the Berlin hospital where Mr Navalny is being treated said earlier this month that he had been poisoned with Novichok, prompting accusations from the Kremlin that they had “rushed to conclusions”. “Three laboratories have now confirmed independently of one another the proof of a nerve agent of the Novichok group as the cause of Mr Navalny's poisoning,” German government spokesman Steffen Seibert said in a statement. He added that the Hague-based Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons was also testing samples. German Chancellor Angela Merkel earlier said the use of such a substance raised “very serious questions that only the Russian government can answer” and suggested Moscow’s multi-billion-dollar Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline could be pulled if those answers are not forthcoming. Mr Navalny, Russia’s most outspoken critic of President Vladimir Putin, fell suddenly ill on a flight from Siberia to Moscow last month.


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  • 55/72   Mercy Baguma: Woman who died with crying baby in Glasgow buried in Uganda
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Mercy Baguma was found next to her crying baby - her case sparked criticism of Britain's asylum system.

    Mercy Baguma was found next to her crying baby - her case sparked criticism of Britain's asylum system.


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  • 56/72   A family struggle as pandemic worsens food insecurity
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    At the peak of the coronavirus pandemic this spring, Sharawn Vinson often woke up crying.  Meanwhile some of the largest protests against racial injustice in decades were transpiring right outside their window, after the family had experienced its own terrifying encounter with police earlier in the year.  “I needed them to breathe,” Vinson said, wiping away tears in her living room of peeling gray walls in a Brooklyn housing development.

    At the peak of the coronavirus pandemic this spring, Sharawn Vinson often woke up crying. Meanwhile some of the largest protests against racial injustice in decades were transpiring right outside their window, after the family had experienced its own terrifying encounter with police earlier in the year. “I needed them to breathe,” Vinson said, wiping away tears in her living room of peeling gray walls in a Brooklyn housing development.


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  • 57/72   I’m 29 In New York But 31 In Seoul, & Being Single Feels Complicated
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    .branding-banner{background-color: transparent !important;} /* Background color */ body { background-color: ea1dc !important; } /* Color of entire page, except footer, up to 2000px */ article, .r29-article { background-color: eae1dc !important; } /* Ad BG Color */ .section-ad, .row-ad { background-color: eae1dc !important; } /* Advertisement label */ .section-ad span { color: eae1dc !important; } /* Headline font color */ h1.title { color: 2d2d2d !important; font-weight: 600 !important; } /* Author and details font color */ .main-contributors, .modified { color: 2d2d2d !important; } /* Page font colors */ .section-text { color: 2d2d2d !important; } .section-text h2 { font-family: Playfair Display Black, georgia, times, serif; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: -0.025em; font-size: 42px; text-align: center; } /* Credits font colors */ footer .byline, footer .featured-name { color: 2d2d2d !important; } /* Credits module divider color */ .byline.breadcrumbs:after, .byline.other-contributors:after { background-color: b5dffc !important; } /* Sticky header with headline and share */ .condensed-header { background-color: b5dffc !important; max-width: 1800px !important; border-bottom: 0 !important; } .condensed-title span { color: 000 !important; } /* Dividers */ squiggly_coral, squiggly_grey, squiggly_green, squiggly_blue, .divider svg { display: none !important; } .section-divider .divider, .r29-article .squiggly-line { margin: 40px auto 20px !important; height: 1px !important; border-bottom: 2px solid 000; text-align: center; opacity: 1.0; max-width: 720px !important; width: 100% !important; } .section-divider .divider { text-align: center !important; } @media only screen and (max-width: 760px) { .section-text h2 { font-size: 26px; color: 2d2d2d !important; } .section-text h3 { font-size: 18px; color: 2d2d2d !important; } } Welcome to The Single Files, Refinery29’s new bi-monthly column. Each installment will feature a personal essay that explores the unique joys and challenges of being single right now. In the inaugural column, we’re hearing from a woman who went from age 29 to 31 virtually overnight — and how the leap made her question her happily single status. Have your own idea you’d like to submit? Email single.files@vice.com. There was always a joke to be made about “Dirty Thirty.” Every time a friend celebrated their 30th birthday, I would slide in a coy line about how they can now, at last, be truly dirty, to the word’s fullest potential. I don’t even really know what that would mean. I just like the way it rhymes.When 2020 came along, my own 30th birthday finally loomed on the horizon. But my ambitions to “be dirty” didn’t quite come through as planned. Instead, coronavirus entered the scene, and I found myself stuck at home. Being single, for months my closest contact with anyone other than my roommate was through Zoom. At first, I had no time to be lonely. The pandemic put an indefinite hold on new job prospects, forcing me to hustle and keep myself busy with every freelance writing job I could get. During my down time, I focused on home Pilates, Netflix marathons, and mastering Candy Crush. My K-pop stanning level reached an all-time high.But after quarantining for over three months in New York City, I decided I needed to get out of my apartment. Back in Seoul, where I grew up and where I had been living just eight months before, my friends were living an almost normal life, out and about as if everything was business as usual. Their lives looked so good on Instagram Stories, and I wanted to be there.I booked a flight to Korea and landed in Seoul on July 1, excited to see my family and to make new plans with any semblance of social activity. Little did I know how different things would be from the year before. Something had drastically changed, practically overnight. Namely, my age. As soon as I touched down in Korea, I leapfrogged from 29 to 31. That meant I was over 30 and single.First, let me explain: South Korea calculates age differently than the rest of the world. It’s not as straightforward as knowing when your birthday is. In Korea, you are one year old when you are born, and you turn a year older on New Year’s Day, not your birthday. This method of age calculation, called “East Asian Age Reckoning,” is said to come from China, as its numerals begin with one, not zero. (Some claim that Asians used to count a fetus’ time in the womb as part of their life, but that’s not historically confirmed.) Countries like China, Japan, Vietnam, Mongolia, and even North Korea mostly stopped using this age system as recently as the 1980s. South Korea remains the only country in the world that still commonly uses it.For legal matters, Korea uses conventional “birthday” age, referred to as “full age” or “international age.” But “Korean age” or “nominal age” is more widely used in cultural contexts. When someone asks how old you are in Korea, you don’t answer with your full age, you answer with the year you were born.Adding to the complication is the country’s notion of “early birth.” South Koreans born in January and February have the same nominal age as those born the year before. This is because of the local education system. Children are required to enroll in school at (international) age six. The semester begins in March, and kids with January/February birthdays enter the same grade as kids born between March and December of the previous year. Although this rule was nullified in 2009, it applied to me. (I was born in February 1991; I entered school with kids born in March through December of 1990.) Doing the math, that makes me 29 in America and 31 in Korea.At first, it seemed like entering my third decade meant more to my family and friends in Korea than it did to me. I didn’t feel very different, but everything else around me was. Dad’s nagging spiked tenfold (“You’re 30 now! When are you going to buy a house?”). I was being invited to a wedding every week. “You should meet someone!” said almost everyone.Most people count “30” as a kind of landmark. That’s when you shift from your still-figuring-it-out 20s to your getting-it-together 30s — at least in theory. And that extends to relationships. People talk about the condition of being “single at 30” as something to be avoided. I’ve never been one to stress over the idea of marriage. I like being single now, and I’m not trying to change that. But even before moving to Korea, my nonchalance toward dating had begun to feel like an anomaly in my social circle. I had less and less in common with friends who were prioritizing settling down and having kids. It felt like within a year, we went from talking about our dream jobs to freezing our eggs. My trip to Seoul exacerbated this feeling — both by catapulting me into the “over-30” bracket overnight, and by shining a spotlight on my single status. Koreans are hypersensitive to dating. Every 14th day of the month is an unofficial local holiday for couples to celebrate. In addition to Valentine’s Day, there’s White Day, Black Day, Rose Day, and Pepero Day. Koreans celebrate not only anniversaries but every 100th day of their romantic relationships. On billboards, television commercials, and subway ads, it’s normal to see actors model for matchmaking services. It’s considered shocking if you’ve never gone on a blind date set up by friends. While I am mostly ambivalent about when and if I find a long-term partner, meeting my Korean friends again made me obsess over my age and relationship status. I wondered if I’m supposed to be doing things differently. Am I supposed to feel lonely?It’s still shocking to me that in a way, my twenties are no more. Fears started circulating in my mind: Will guys want me less now that I’m (kind of) over 30? If I don’t meet someone now, will I miss my prime for marriage? Will I regret not having kids when I am younger? Will I be alone forever? As more and more friends started announcing their wedding plans, I also felt alienated from the rest of the world. I felt somehow behind in life, as though being single and wanting to stay that way at “my age” makes me less of a grown-up. What’s quieted those fears is one simple but profound-to-me revelation: Today is the youngest I can be for the remainder of my life. So rather than longing for the past, or worrying about what will happen in the future, I might as well enjoy each day.This thought came to me out of the blue one day, with no precipitating interaction or event. But as soon as it settled into my mind, I immediately felt better. I’ve held onto it as a mantra since, letting it calm me and restore me to center when I find myself comparing my mindset or lifestyle to the people around me. I know that for now, I’d rather focus on myself than on anyone or anything else. Plus, I still have my actual 30th birthday celebration to look forward to next year. I already have a name for it: Thirty and Dirty, Whatever That Means.Like what you see? How about some more R29 goodness, right here?Why Should Single Women "Settle Down"?Imposter Syndrome Can Be Felt In Relationships TooCan We Stop Using Single People For Entertainment?

    .branding-banner{background-color: transparent !important;} /* Background color */ body { background-color: ea1dc !important; } /* Color of entire page, except footer, up to 2000px */ article, .r29-article { background-color: eae1dc !important; } /* Ad BG Color */ .section-ad, .row-ad { background-color: eae1dc !important; } /* Advertisement label */ .section-ad span { color: eae1dc !important; } /* Headline font color */ h1.title { color: 2d2d2d !important; font-weight: 600 !important; } /* Author and details font color */ .main-contributors, .modified { color: 2d2d2d !important; } /* Page font colors */ .section-text { color: 2d2d2d !important; } .section-text h2 { font-family: Playfair Display Black, georgia, times, serif; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: -0.025em; font-size: 42px; text-align: center; } /* Credits font colors */ footer .byline, footer .featured-name { color: 2d2d2d !important; } /* Credits module divider color */ .byline.breadcrumbs:after, .byline.other-contributors:after { background-color: b5dffc !important; } /* Sticky header with headline and share */ .condensed-header { background-color: b5dffc !important; max-width: 1800px !important; border-bottom: 0 !important; } .condensed-title span { color: 000 !important; } /* Dividers */ squiggly_coral, squiggly_grey, squiggly_green, squiggly_blue, .divider svg { display: none !important; } .section-divider .divider, .r29-article .squiggly-line { margin: 40px auto 20px !important; height: 1px !important; border-bottom: 2px solid 000; text-align: center; opacity: 1.0; max-width: 720px !important; width: 100% !important; } .section-divider .divider { text-align: center !important; } @media only screen and (max-width: 760px) { .section-text h2 { font-size: 26px; color: 2d2d2d !important; } .section-text h3 { font-size: 18px; color: 2d2d2d !important; } } Welcome to The Single Files, Refinery29’s new bi-monthly column. Each installment will feature a personal essay that explores the unique joys and challenges of being single right now. In the inaugural column, we’re hearing from a woman who went from age 29 to 31 virtually overnight — and how the leap made her question her happily single status. Have your own idea you’d like to submit? Email single.files@vice.com. There was always a joke to be made about “Dirty Thirty.” Every time a friend celebrated their 30th birthday, I would slide in a coy line about how they can now, at last, be truly dirty, to the word’s fullest potential. I don’t even really know what that would mean. I just like the way it rhymes.When 2020 came along, my own 30th birthday finally loomed on the horizon. But my ambitions to “be dirty” didn’t quite come through as planned. Instead, coronavirus entered the scene, and I found myself stuck at home. Being single, for months my closest contact with anyone other than my roommate was through Zoom. At first, I had no time to be lonely. The pandemic put an indefinite hold on new job prospects, forcing me to hustle and keep myself busy with every freelance writing job I could get. During my down time, I focused on home Pilates, Netflix marathons, and mastering Candy Crush. My K-pop stanning level reached an all-time high.But after quarantining for over three months in New York City, I decided I needed to get out of my apartment. Back in Seoul, where I grew up and where I had been living just eight months before, my friends were living an almost normal life, out and about as if everything was business as usual. Their lives looked so good on Instagram Stories, and I wanted to be there.I booked a flight to Korea and landed in Seoul on July 1, excited to see my family and to make new plans with any semblance of social activity. Little did I know how different things would be from the year before. Something had drastically changed, practically overnight. Namely, my age. As soon as I touched down in Korea, I leapfrogged from 29 to 31. That meant I was over 30 and single.First, let me explain: South Korea calculates age differently than the rest of the world. It’s not as straightforward as knowing when your birthday is. In Korea, you are one year old when you are born, and you turn a year older on New Year’s Day, not your birthday. This method of age calculation, called “East Asian Age Reckoning,” is said to come from China, as its numerals begin with one, not zero. (Some claim that Asians used to count a fetus’ time in the womb as part of their life, but that’s not historically confirmed.) Countries like China, Japan, Vietnam, Mongolia, and even North Korea mostly stopped using this age system as recently as the 1980s. South Korea remains the only country in the world that still commonly uses it.For legal matters, Korea uses conventional “birthday” age, referred to as “full age” or “international age.” But “Korean age” or “nominal age” is more widely used in cultural contexts. When someone asks how old you are in Korea, you don’t answer with your full age, you answer with the year you were born.Adding to the complication is the country’s notion of “early birth.” South Koreans born in January and February have the same nominal age as those born the year before. This is because of the local education system. Children are required to enroll in school at (international) age six. The semester begins in March, and kids with January/February birthdays enter the same grade as kids born between March and December of the previous year. Although this rule was nullified in 2009, it applied to me. (I was born in February 1991; I entered school with kids born in March through December of 1990.) Doing the math, that makes me 29 in America and 31 in Korea.At first, it seemed like entering my third decade meant more to my family and friends in Korea than it did to me. I didn’t feel very different, but everything else around me was. Dad’s nagging spiked tenfold (“You’re 30 now! When are you going to buy a house?”). I was being invited to a wedding every week. “You should meet someone!” said almost everyone.Most people count “30” as a kind of landmark. That’s when you shift from your still-figuring-it-out 20s to your getting-it-together 30s — at least in theory. And that extends to relationships. People talk about the condition of being “single at 30” as something to be avoided. I’ve never been one to stress over the idea of marriage. I like being single now, and I’m not trying to change that. But even before moving to Korea, my nonchalance toward dating had begun to feel like an anomaly in my social circle. I had less and less in common with friends who were prioritizing settling down and having kids. It felt like within a year, we went from talking about our dream jobs to freezing our eggs. My trip to Seoul exacerbated this feeling — both by catapulting me into the “over-30” bracket overnight, and by shining a spotlight on my single status. Koreans are hypersensitive to dating. Every 14th day of the month is an unofficial local holiday for couples to celebrate. In addition to Valentine’s Day, there’s White Day, Black Day, Rose Day, and Pepero Day. Koreans celebrate not only anniversaries but every 100th day of their romantic relationships. On billboards, television commercials, and subway ads, it’s normal to see actors model for matchmaking services. It’s considered shocking if you’ve never gone on a blind date set up by friends. While I am mostly ambivalent about when and if I find a long-term partner, meeting my Korean friends again made me obsess over my age and relationship status. I wondered if I’m supposed to be doing things differently. Am I supposed to feel lonely?It’s still shocking to me that in a way, my twenties are no more. Fears started circulating in my mind: Will guys want me less now that I’m (kind of) over 30? If I don’t meet someone now, will I miss my prime for marriage? Will I regret not having kids when I am younger? Will I be alone forever? As more and more friends started announcing their wedding plans, I also felt alienated from the rest of the world. I felt somehow behind in life, as though being single and wanting to stay that way at “my age” makes me less of a grown-up. What’s quieted those fears is one simple but profound-to-me revelation: Today is the youngest I can be for the remainder of my life. So rather than longing for the past, or worrying about what will happen in the future, I might as well enjoy each day.This thought came to me out of the blue one day, with no precipitating interaction or event. But as soon as it settled into my mind, I immediately felt better. I’ve held onto it as a mantra since, letting it calm me and restore me to center when I find myself comparing my mindset or lifestyle to the people around me. I know that for now, I’d rather focus on myself than on anyone or anything else. Plus, I still have my actual 30th birthday celebration to look forward to next year. I already have a name for it: Thirty and Dirty, Whatever That Means.Like what you see? How about some more R29 goodness, right here?Why Should Single Women "Settle Down"?Imposter Syndrome Can Be Felt In Relationships TooCan We Stop Using Single People For Entertainment?


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  • 58/72   The Maitre d' Will Take Your Temperature Now
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    In recent weeks, a new cadre of gatekeepers armed with thermometer guns has appeared at the entrances of hospitals, office buildings and manufacturing plants to screen out feverish individuals who may carry the coronavirus.Employees at some companies must report their temperature on apps to get clearance to come in. And when indoor dining resumes at restaurants in New York City later this month, temperature checks will be done at the door.Since the beginning of the pandemic, the practice of checking for fever has become more and more commonplace, causing a surge in sales of infrared contact-free thermometers and body temperature scanners even as the scientific evidence indicating they are of little value has solidified.Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York last week called for checking patrons' temperatures as one of several ground rules for resuming indoor dining in restaurants, along with strict limits on the number of tables and a mask mandate for diners when they are not seated. Restaurants also will be required to obtain contact information from one guest at each table.There is ample reason for concern. Coronavirus outbreaks -- like one in East Lansing, Michigan, this summer that infected 187 people -- have been traced to superspreading gatherings at bars and restaurants. And a new study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that one difference between people who contracted the virus and those who did not is that infected individuals were twice as likely to have eaten at a restaurant in the two weeks preceding their illness. The study, however, did not distinguish between outdoor dining and indoor seating, which most experts consider more hazardous.But while health officials have endorsed masks and social distancing as effective measures for curbing the spread of the coronavirus, some experts scoff at fever checks. Taking temperatures at entry points is nothing more than theater, they say, a gesture that is unlikely to screen out many infected individuals, and one that offers little more than the illusion of safety.Cuomo has allowed businesses to demand that patrons undergo temperature checks and to deny admission to those who refuse or have a fever, and he is requiring restaurants in New York City that resume indoor dining to check customers' temperatures. The CDC defines a fever as a temperature of 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit or higher; some reports have questioned the accuracy of thermometer guns, however.While temperature checks may identify people who are seriously ill, those are the people who probably won't be socializing much or going out for meals. And a growing body of evidence suggests that many of those who are driving transmission are so-called silent carriers -- people who have been infected but feel fine and don't have a fever or any other symptoms.Earlier this week, the CDC -- which in May told employers to consider checking workers daily for symptoms like fever but appeared to reverse itself in July -- said it would stop requiring airport health screenings beginning Sept. 14 for international passengers from China, Iran, Brazil and other countries because the checks can't identify silent carriers."We now have a better understanding of COVID-19 transmission that indicates symptom-based screening has limited effectiveness because people with COVID-19 may have no symptoms or fever at the time of screening, or only mild symptoms," the CDC said in a statement.Temperature checks are akin to "getting the oil checked before you go on a long car trip," said Dr. David Thomas, an infectious disease specialist at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. "It makes you feel better, but it's not going to keep you from wrecking the car or prevent the tires from falling off. It's not going to make your trip any safer."It's something you can do, and it makes you feel like you're doing something," he said. "But it won't catch most people who are spreading COVID."Most people who spike a fever feel lousy and presumably would cancel their dinner plans, said Dr. Thomas McGinn, Northwell Health's senior vice president and deputy physician in chief. Temperature checks might pick up a few individuals who are unaware of their fever, he said.But the absence of fever "means nothing," he said. "It's not a very sensitive test."It does, however, convey a strong public health message, serving as a reminder that people must take precautions, and that itself may be of benefit, McGinn said. "It makes people think twice and reminds them that this is a big deal, we still need to be careful, you need someone to stand by the door to do that," he said.But here's the rub: While fever can be a symptom of COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, not everyone infected with the virus develops a fever -- or many other symptoms, for that matter. Physicians writing in the New England Journal of Medicine have called the phenomenon of symptomless spread the "Achilles' heel of COVID-19 pandemic control."Evidence of asymptomatic spread dates back to early in the pandemic but has been mounting ever since. A recent study from South Korea published in JAMA Internal Medicine in August offered even more proof, finding that infected individuals who don't feel ill may carry just as much virus in their nose, throat and lungs as those with symptoms -- and for almost as long.A. David Paltiel, a professor of health policy and management at Yale School of Public Health, said these individuals are the "silent spreaders" who are driving transmission and sparking superspreading events."You are maximally infectious before you exhibit symptoms, if you exhibit any symptoms at all," Paltiel said. "You can be exposed and incubating the virus, and be beginning to shed massive amounts of transmissible virus and be a superspreader, without actually exhibiting any symptoms like a fever."Temperature checks will do nothing to stop these "ticking time bombs," he said. "It's a bad idea."Instead, he said, restaurants should push for access to rapid-turnaround, point-of-care tests for patrons.Interestingly, even seriously ill coronavirus patients who need medical attention don't always have a temperature. Of nearly 6,000 patients in the New York area who were so sick last spring that they were admitted to Northwell Health hospitals, only 30% were febrile when they came in, according to a study by McGinn that was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.The trend is consistent with earlier reports, including a study from China that looked at more than 1,000 patients admitted to 552 hospitals through the end of January. The study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, reported that only 44% of the patients had an elevated temperature when they were admitted, though most (88%) developed a fever during the course of their hospital stay.In July, the CDC quietly updated its guidance to businesses, acknowledging that symptom and temperature checks "will not be completely effective" because asymptomatic individuals and those with vague symptoms will pass the screenings. But even as the agency warned that "health checks are not a replacement for other protective measures such as social distancing," it provided detailed guidelines for doing temperature checks, advising the use of disposable or noncontact thermometers and saying screeners should change gloves in between checks.The bottom line, officials from the federal health agency said, is that screening employees for COVID-19, including using temperatures checks, before they return to work is "an optional strategy businesses can consider implementing depending on their local situation."Peter Kuhn, a professor of biological science, medicine and engineering at the University of Southern California, said his studies suggested that fever is often a first symptom of the coronavirus. And while temperature checks may be useful, he said they should be used in conjunction with a comprehensive package of safety measures that include requiring masks and social distancing and ensuring good ventilation and access to a flow of fresh air."Temperature checks are one part of that, but they are only one part," Kuhn said. "If anyone would argue that they can provide complete safety for indoor dining, that is completely wrong. It's not a magic bullet."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company

    In recent weeks, a new cadre of gatekeepers armed with thermometer guns has appeared at the entrances of hospitals, office buildings and manufacturing plants to screen out feverish individuals who may carry the coronavirus.Employees at some companies must report their temperature on apps to get clearance to come in. And when indoor dining resumes at restaurants in New York City later this month, temperature checks will be done at the door.Since the beginning of the pandemic, the practice of checking for fever has become more and more commonplace, causing a surge in sales of infrared contact-free thermometers and body temperature scanners even as the scientific evidence indicating they are of little value has solidified.Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York last week called for checking patrons' temperatures as one of several ground rules for resuming indoor dining in restaurants, along with strict limits on the number of tables and a mask mandate for diners when they are not seated. Restaurants also will be required to obtain contact information from one guest at each table.There is ample reason for concern. Coronavirus outbreaks -- like one in East Lansing, Michigan, this summer that infected 187 people -- have been traced to superspreading gatherings at bars and restaurants. And a new study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that one difference between people who contracted the virus and those who did not is that infected individuals were twice as likely to have eaten at a restaurant in the two weeks preceding their illness. The study, however, did not distinguish between outdoor dining and indoor seating, which most experts consider more hazardous.But while health officials have endorsed masks and social distancing as effective measures for curbing the spread of the coronavirus, some experts scoff at fever checks. Taking temperatures at entry points is nothing more than theater, they say, a gesture that is unlikely to screen out many infected individuals, and one that offers little more than the illusion of safety.Cuomo has allowed businesses to demand that patrons undergo temperature checks and to deny admission to those who refuse or have a fever, and he is requiring restaurants in New York City that resume indoor dining to check customers' temperatures. The CDC defines a fever as a temperature of 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit or higher; some reports have questioned the accuracy of thermometer guns, however.While temperature checks may identify people who are seriously ill, those are the people who probably won't be socializing much or going out for meals. And a growing body of evidence suggests that many of those who are driving transmission are so-called silent carriers -- people who have been infected but feel fine and don't have a fever or any other symptoms.Earlier this week, the CDC -- which in May told employers to consider checking workers daily for symptoms like fever but appeared to reverse itself in July -- said it would stop requiring airport health screenings beginning Sept. 14 for international passengers from China, Iran, Brazil and other countries because the checks can't identify silent carriers."We now have a better understanding of COVID-19 transmission that indicates symptom-based screening has limited effectiveness because people with COVID-19 may have no symptoms or fever at the time of screening, or only mild symptoms," the CDC said in a statement.Temperature checks are akin to "getting the oil checked before you go on a long car trip," said Dr. David Thomas, an infectious disease specialist at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. "It makes you feel better, but it's not going to keep you from wrecking the car or prevent the tires from falling off. It's not going to make your trip any safer."It's something you can do, and it makes you feel like you're doing something," he said. "But it won't catch most people who are spreading COVID."Most people who spike a fever feel lousy and presumably would cancel their dinner plans, said Dr. Thomas McGinn, Northwell Health's senior vice president and deputy physician in chief. Temperature checks might pick up a few individuals who are unaware of their fever, he said.But the absence of fever "means nothing," he said. "It's not a very sensitive test."It does, however, convey a strong public health message, serving as a reminder that people must take precautions, and that itself may be of benefit, McGinn said. "It makes people think twice and reminds them that this is a big deal, we still need to be careful, you need someone to stand by the door to do that," he said.But here's the rub: While fever can be a symptom of COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, not everyone infected with the virus develops a fever -- or many other symptoms, for that matter. Physicians writing in the New England Journal of Medicine have called the phenomenon of symptomless spread the "Achilles' heel of COVID-19 pandemic control."Evidence of asymptomatic spread dates back to early in the pandemic but has been mounting ever since. A recent study from South Korea published in JAMA Internal Medicine in August offered even more proof, finding that infected individuals who don't feel ill may carry just as much virus in their nose, throat and lungs as those with symptoms -- and for almost as long.A. David Paltiel, a professor of health policy and management at Yale School of Public Health, said these individuals are the "silent spreaders" who are driving transmission and sparking superspreading events."You are maximally infectious before you exhibit symptoms, if you exhibit any symptoms at all," Paltiel said. "You can be exposed and incubating the virus, and be beginning to shed massive amounts of transmissible virus and be a superspreader, without actually exhibiting any symptoms like a fever."Temperature checks will do nothing to stop these "ticking time bombs," he said. "It's a bad idea."Instead, he said, restaurants should push for access to rapid-turnaround, point-of-care tests for patrons.Interestingly, even seriously ill coronavirus patients who need medical attention don't always have a temperature. Of nearly 6,000 patients in the New York area who were so sick last spring that they were admitted to Northwell Health hospitals, only 30% were febrile when they came in, according to a study by McGinn that was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.The trend is consistent with earlier reports, including a study from China that looked at more than 1,000 patients admitted to 552 hospitals through the end of January. The study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, reported that only 44% of the patients had an elevated temperature when they were admitted, though most (88%) developed a fever during the course of their hospital stay.In July, the CDC quietly updated its guidance to businesses, acknowledging that symptom and temperature checks "will not be completely effective" because asymptomatic individuals and those with vague symptoms will pass the screenings. But even as the agency warned that "health checks are not a replacement for other protective measures such as social distancing," it provided detailed guidelines for doing temperature checks, advising the use of disposable or noncontact thermometers and saying screeners should change gloves in between checks.The bottom line, officials from the federal health agency said, is that screening employees for COVID-19, including using temperatures checks, before they return to work is "an optional strategy businesses can consider implementing depending on their local situation."Peter Kuhn, a professor of biological science, medicine and engineering at the University of Southern California, said his studies suggested that fever is often a first symptom of the coronavirus. And while temperature checks may be useful, he said they should be used in conjunction with a comprehensive package of safety measures that include requiring masks and social distancing and ensuring good ventilation and access to a flow of fresh air."Temperature checks are one part of that, but they are only one part," Kuhn said. "If anyone would argue that they can provide complete safety for indoor dining, that is completely wrong. It's not a magic bullet."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company


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  • 59/72   Belarus' embattled president meets Russia's Putin amid ongoing protests
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The embattled president of Belarus, Alexander Lukashenko, is meeting his last ally standing Monday, Russia's Vladimir Putin, less than 24 hours after more than 100,000 people took to the streets in the latest protest to demand his resignation.  The pair are to hold a “working meeting” at the Russian Black Sea resort of Sochi — their first face-to-face meeting since a protest movement emerged across Belarus after the contested Aug. 9 president election.  Protesters accuse Lukashenko of rigging the election in his favor.

    The embattled president of Belarus, Alexander Lukashenko, is meeting his last ally standing Monday, Russia's Vladimir Putin, less than 24 hours after more than 100,000 people took to the streets in the latest protest to demand his resignation. The pair are to hold a “working meeting” at the Russian Black Sea resort of Sochi — their first face-to-face meeting since a protest movement emerged across Belarus after the contested Aug. 9 president election. Protesters accuse Lukashenko of rigging the election in his favor.


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  • 60/72   Attacks on journalists during protests increasing: UNESCO
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The number of incidents of violence against journalists covering protests across the world has risen sharply, with police and security forces the main culprits, the United Nations cultural agency said on Monday.

    The number of incidents of violence against journalists covering protests across the world has risen sharply, with police and security forces the main culprits, the United Nations cultural agency said on Monday.


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  • 61/72   Lukashenko to meet Putin for talks on 'integration'
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko on Monday flew to Russia for one-to-one talks with his counterpart Vladimir Putin as Moscow has offered security aid while urging closer integration with its neighbour.

    Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko on Monday flew to Russia for one-to-one talks with his counterpart Vladimir Putin as Moscow has offered security aid while urging closer integration with its neighbour.


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  • 62/72   UN atomic watchdog: Hopeful of greater trust with Iran
    WORLD TOPIC NEWS

    The head of the United Nations' atomic watchdog agency told board members on Monday he is hopeful Iran's decision to let inspectors in to two disputed sites could lead to greater trust with Tehran.  Rafael Grossi, director general of the International Atomic Energy Agency, in late August secured an agreement with Iran to inspect the two sites where the country is suspected of having stored or used undeclared nuclear material and possibly having conducted nuclear-related activities.  The agreement, which came after Grossi personally visited Tehran to meet with Iranian leaders, ended a months-long impasse over two locations thought to be from the early 2000s.

    The head of the United Nations' atomic watchdog agency told board members on Monday he is hopeful Iran's decision to let inspectors in to two disputed sites could lead to greater trust with Tehran. Rafael Grossi, director general of the International Atomic Energy Agency, in late August secured an agreement with Iran to inspect the two sites where the country is suspected of having stored or used undeclared nuclear material and possibly having conducted nuclear-related activities. The agreement, which came after Grossi personally visited Tehran to meet with Iranian leaders, ended a months-long impasse over two locations thought to be from the early 2000s.


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  • 63/72   Fallout from Trump's coronavirus admissions
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    President Trump told journalist Bob Woodward that he was deliberately downplaying the risks of the coronavirus in the early months of the pandemic. What impact will these statements have?

    President Trump told journalist Bob Woodward that he was deliberately downplaying the risks of the coronavirus in the early months of the pandemic. What impact will these statements have?


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  • 64/72   Children transmit the coronavirus, Utah study suggests, but don't get sick themselves
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    The new findings could help shape the debate about how to reopen schools safely as the coronavirus continues to sicken thousands and kill hundreds daily.

    The new findings could help shape the debate about how to reopen schools safely as the coronavirus continues to sicken thousands and kill hundreds daily.


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  • 65/72   Biden campaign jumps on Woodward interview to pin COVID deaths on Trump's 'playing it down'
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    As the revelations by journalist Bob Woodward of how President Trump misled the American people about the severity of the coronavirus reverberated this week, the Biden campaign did its best to keep the story alive with scathing digital advertising.

    As the revelations by journalist Bob Woodward of how President Trump misled the American people about the severity of the coronavirus reverberated this week, the Biden campaign did its best to keep the story alive with scathing digital advertising.


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  • 66/72   New York speeds to open restaurants for indoor dining despite scientists' concerns over COVID-19 spread
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    A new CDC study found that people infected with the coronavirus were twice as likely to have been at a restaurant than those who had not. Even with social distancing mandates in place, restaurants could become coronavirus hot spots.

    A new CDC study found that people infected with the coronavirus were twice as likely to have been at a restaurant than those who had not. Even with social distancing mandates in place, restaurants could become coronavirus hot spots.


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  • 67/72   2 Black Senate hopefuls look to make history in the South — and fix health care while they're at it
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Shreveport Mayor Adrian Perkins from Louisiana and Jaime Harrison from South Carolina envision a “new South” to address issues they say have been largely ignored by their longtime incumbent opponents.

    Shreveport Mayor Adrian Perkins from Louisiana and Jaime Harrison from South Carolina envision a “new South” to address issues they say have been largely ignored by their longtime incumbent opponents.


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  • 68/72   Post-COVID heart damage alarms researchers: 'There was a black hole' in infected cells
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    While more studies are needed, researchers and doctors throughout the country are warning of a likely connection between COVID-19 and a serious heart condition.

    While more studies are needed, researchers and doctors throughout the country are warning of a likely connection between COVID-19 and a serious heart condition.


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  • 69/72   A new COVID-19 forecast predicts more than 400,000 deaths by the end of 2020. Will the fall wave really be that big?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Experts have long feared that colder weather and other factors could create a fall wave of the coronavirus with the potential to dwarf previous peaks — and America’s most prominent COVID-19 modelers are projecting just that. So is it time to freak out about the fall? Maybe not just yet.

    Experts have long feared that colder weather and other factors could create a fall wave of the coronavirus with the potential to dwarf previous peaks — and America’s most prominent COVID-19 modelers are projecting just that. So is it time to freak out about the fall? Maybe not just yet.


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  • 70/72   Exclusive: White House orders end to COVID-19 airport screenings for international travelers
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    The screening operations have been held at select airports since January.

    The screening operations have been held at select airports since January.


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  • 71/72   Is it time for colleges to drop the SAT and ACT?
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    Hundreds of colleges have made the SAT and ACT optional for applicants because of the pandemic. Should they ditch the standardized tests for good?

    Hundreds of colleges have made the SAT and ACT optional for applicants because of the pandemic. Should they ditch the standardized tests for good?


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  • 72/72   Sturgis motorcycle rally was a 'superspreader event'
    HEALTH TOPIC NEWS

    A month after 460,000 motorcycle enthusiasts converged on Sturgis, S.D., researchers have found that thousands have been sickened across the nation, leading them to brand the rally a “superspreader” event that will involve more than $12 billion in health care costs.

    A month after 460,000 motorcycle enthusiasts converged on Sturgis, S.D., researchers have found that thousands have been sickened across the nation, leading them to brand the rally a “superspreader” event that will involve more than $12 billion in health care costs.


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