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Pacific Islands
The Pacific Islands are the islands of the Pacific Ocean. Three major groups of islands in the Pacific Ocean are Polynesia, Micronesia and Melanesia. Depending

View Wikipedia Article

For the video game, see Pacific Islands (video game). Three of the major groups of islands in the Pacific Ocean.

The Pacific Islands are the islands of the Pacific Ocean. Three major groups of islands in the Pacific Ocean are Polynesia, Micronesia and Melanesia.

Depending on the context, Pacific Islands may refer to countries and islands with common Austronesian origins, islands once or currently colonized, or Oceania.

Contents
  • 1 Name ambiguity
  • 2 Pacific islands by area (over 10,000 square kilometers)
  • 3 List of islands
    • 3.1 Pacific islands by continent
      • 3.1.1 Antarctica
      • 3.1.2 Asia
      • 3.1.3 North America
      • 3.1.4 Oceania
      • 3.1.5 South America
  • 4 See also
  • 5 Footnotes
  • 6 References

Name ambiguity

In English, the umbrella term Pacific Islands may take on several meanings. Sometimes it refers to only those islands covered by the continent of Oceania. In some common uses, the term "Pacific Islands" refers to the islands of the Pacific Ocean once colonized by the British, French, Dutch, United States, and Japanese, such as the Pitcairn Islands, Taiwan, and Borneo. In other uses it may refer to islands with Austronesian heritage like Taiwan, Indonesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Myanmar islands, which found their genesis in the Neolithic cultures of the island of Taiwan. There are many other islands located within the boundaries of the Pacific Ocean that are not considered part of Oceania. These islands include the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador; the Aleutian Islands in Alaska, United States; Vancouver Island in Canada; the Russian islands of Sakhalin and Kuril Islands; the island nation of Taiwan and other islands of the Republic of China; the Philippines; islands in the South China Sea, which includes the disputed South China Sea Islands; most of the islands of Indonesia; and the island nation of Japan, which comprises the Japanese Archipelago.

Pacific islands by area (over 10,000 square kilometers)

This list includes all islands found in the geographic Pacific Ocean, with an area larger than 10,000 square kilometers.

Name Area (km2) Country or Countries Population Population Density Notes New Guinea 785,753 Indonesia & Papua New Guinea 7,500,000 9.544 Honshu 227,960 Japan 103,000,000 451.8 Sulawesi 174,600 Indonesia 18,455,000 105.7 South Island 145,836 New Zealand 1,038,600 7.122 North Island 111,583 New Zealand 3,393,900 30.42 Luzon 109,965 Philippines 48,520,000 441.2 Mindanao 104,530 Philippines 25,281,000 241.9 Tasmania 90,758 Australia 514,700 5.671 Hokkaido 77,981 Japan 5,474,000 70.2 Sakhalin 72,493 Russia 580,000 8.001 Taiwan 35,883 Republic of China (Taiwan) 23,000,000 641 Kyushu 35,640 Japan 13,231,000 371.2 Hainan 35,400 People's Republic of China 8,900,000 251.4 New Britain 35,145 Papua New Guinea 513,926 14.62 Vancouver Island 31,285 Canada 759,366 24.27 Shikoku 18,800 Japan 4,141,955 220.3 New Caledonia 16,648 France 208,709 12.54 Palawan 12,189 Philippines 430,000 35.28 Viti Levu 10,531 Fiji 600,000 56.97 Hawaii 10,434 United States of America 185,079 17.74 List of islands Main article: List of islands in the Pacific Ocean Pacific islands by continent Antarctica
  • List of islands of Antarctica and the Southern Ocean
Asia
  • List of islands of Asia
North America
  • List of islands of North America
  • List of islands of Central America
  • List of islands of Canada, section British Columbia
  • List of islands of Mexico
  • List of islands of the United States
Oceania
  • List of islands of Australia
  • List of islands of Kiribati
  • List of islands of New Zealand
  • List of islands of the Marshall Islands
  • List of islands of the Solomon Islands
  • List of islands of Tonga
  • List of islands of Tuvalu
  • List of islands of Vanuatu
  • List of islands of France, section Pacific Islands
  • List of islands of the Pitcairn Islands
  • List of islands of Hawaii
  • List of islands of the United States, section Insular areas
South America
  • List of islands of South America
  • List of islands of Chile
  • List of islands of Colombia
  • List of islands of Ecuador
  • List of islands of Peru
See also
  • List of Antarctic and sub-Antarctic islands
  • List of islands in the Arctic Ocean
  • List of islands in the Atlantic Ocean
  • List of islands in the Indian Ocean
  • List of islands (islands around the world)
  • List of island countries
Footnotes
  1. ^ D'Arcy, Paul (March 2006). The People of the Sea: Environment, Identity, and History in Oceania. University Of Hawai'i Press. ISBN 978-0-8248-3297-1. Retrieved 14 December 2014. 
  2. ^ Rapaport, Moshe (April 2013). The Pacific Islands: Environment and Society, Revised Edition. University of Hawai'i Press. ISBN 978-0-8248-6584-9. JSTOR j.ctt6wqh08. This is the only contemporary text on the Pacific Islands that covers both environment and sociocultural issues and will thus be indispensable for any serious student of the region. Unlike other reviews, it treats the entirety of Oceania (with the exception of Australia) and is well illustrated with numerous photos and maps, including a regional atlas.  – via JSTOR (subscription required)
  3. ^ Wright, John K. (July 1942). "Pacific Islands". Geographical Review. 32 (3): 481–486. JSTOR 210391. doi:10.2307/210391.  – via JSTOR (subscription required)
  4. ^ Blundell, David (January 2011). "Taiwan Austronesian Language Heritage Connecting Pacific Island Peoples: Diplomacy and Values" (PDF). IJAPS. 7 (1): 75–91. Retrieved 2 May 2015. 
References
  • William Collins Sons & Co Ltd (1983), Collins Atlas of the World (revised 1995 ed.), London W6 8JB: HarperCollins, ISBN 0-00-448227-1 
  • v
  • t
  • e
Countries and territories of Oceania Sovereign states Entire
  • Australia
  • Federated States of Micronesia
  • Fiji
  • Kiribati
  • Marshall Islands
  • Nauru
  • New Zealand
  • Palau
  • Papua New Guinea
  • Samoa
  • Solomon Islands
  • Tonga
  • Tuvalu
  • Vanuatu
In part
  • Chile
    • Easter Island
    • Juan Fernández Islands
  • Indonesia
    • West Papua
    • Papua
  • Japan
    • Ogasawara
  • United States
    • Hawaii
    • Palmyra Atoll
Associated states
of New Zealand
  • Niue
  • Cook Islands
Dependencies and
other territories Australia
  • Ashmore and Cartier Islands
  • Christmas Island
  • Cocos (Keeling) Islands
  • Coral Sea Islands
  • Norfolk Island
United States
  • American Samoa
  • Baker Island
  • Guam
  • Howland Island
  • Jarvis Island
  • Johnston Atoll
  • Kingman Reef
  • Midway Atoll
  • Northern Mariana Islands
  • Wake Island
Others
  • French Polynesia / New Caledonia / Wallis and Futuna
    • France
  • Tokelau
    • New Zealand
  • Pitcairn Islands
    • UK
  • v
  • t
  • e
Regions of Oceania Australasia
  • Gulf of Carpentaria
  • New Guinea
    • Bonis Peninsula
    • Papuan Peninsula
    • Huon Peninsula
    • Huon Gulf
    • Bird's Head Peninsula
    • Gazelle Peninsula
  • New Zealand
    • South Island
    • North Island
      • Coromandel Peninsula
  • Zealandia
  • New Caledonia
  • Solomon Islands (archipelago)
  • Vanuatu
    • Kula Gulf
  • Australia
  • Capital Country
  • Eastern Australia
  • Lake Eyre basin
  • Murray–Darling basin
  • Northern Australia
  • Nullarbor Plain
  • Outback
  • Southern Australia
    • Maralinga
  • Sunraysia
  • Great Victoria Desert
  • Gulf of Carpentaria
  • Gulf St Vincent
  • Lefevre Peninsula
  • Fleurieu Peninsula
  • Yorke Peninsula
  • Eyre Peninsula
  • Mornington Peninsula
  • Bellarine Peninsula
  • Mount Henry Peninsula
Melanesia
  • Islands Region
    • Bismarck Archipelago
    • Solomon Islands Archipelago
  • Fiji
  • New Caledonia
  • Papua New Guinea
  • Vanuatu
Micronesia
  • Caroline Islands
    • Federated States of Micronesia
    • Palau
  • Guam
  • Kiribati
  • Marshall Islands
  • Nauru
  • Northern Mariana Islands
  • Wake Island
Polynesia
  • Easter Island
  • Hawaiian Islands
  • Cook Islands
  • French Polynesia
    • Austral Islands
    • Gambier Islands
    • Marquesas Islands
    • Society Islands
    • Tuamotu
  • Kermadec Islands
  • Mangareva Islands
  • Samoa
  • Tokelau
  • Tonga
  • Tuvalu
  • Ring of Fire
Authority control
  • WorldCat Identities
  • VIAF: 252978326
  • NDL: 00572514


The Conquering Tide: War in the Pacific Islands, 1942-1944
The Conquering Tide: War in the Pacific Islands, 1942-1944
New York TimesBestseller “A beautiful blend of history and prose and proves again Mr. Toll’s mastery of the naval-war narrative.” ―Wall Street JournalThis masterful history encompasses the heart of the Pacific War―the period between mid-1942 and mid-1944―when parallel Allied counteroffensives north and south of the equator washed over Japan's far-flung island empire like a "conquering tide," concluding with Japan's irreversible strategic defeat in the Marianas. It was the largest, bloodiest, most costly, most technically innovative and logistically complicated amphibious war in history, and it fostered bitter interservice rivalries, leaving wounds that even victory could not heal.Often overlooked, these are the years and fights that decided the Pacific War. Ian W. Toll's battle scenes―in the air, at sea, and in the jungles―are simply riveting. He also takes the reader into the wartime councils in Washington and Tokyo where politics and strategy often collided, and into the struggle to mobilize wartime production, which was the secret of Allied victory. Brilliantly researched, the narrative is propelled and colored by firsthand accounts―letters, diaries, debriefings, and memoirs―that are the raw material of the telling details, shrewd judgment, and penetrating insight of this magisterial history.This volume―continuing the "marvelously readable dramatic narrative" (San Francisco Chronicle) of Pacific Crucible―marks the second installment of the Pacific War Trilogy, which will stand as the first history of the entire Pacific War to be published in at least twenty-five years. 32 pages of illustrations

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$13.42
-$6.53(-33%)



Cheap Meat: Flap Food Nations in the Pacific Islands
Cheap Meat: Flap Food Nations in the Pacific Islands
Cheap Meat follows the controversial trade in inexpensive fatty cuts of lamb or mutton, called “flaps,” from the farms of New Zealand and Australia to their primary markets in the Pacific islands of Papua New Guinea, Tonga, and Fiji. Deborah Gewertz and Frederick Errington address the evolution of the meat trade itself along with the changing practices of exchange in Papua New Guinea. They show that flaps―which are taken from the animals’ bellies and are often 50 percent fat―are not mere market transactions but evidence of the social nature of nutrition policies, illustrating and reinforcing Pacific Islanders’ presumed second-class status relative to the white populations of Australia and New Zealand.

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$29.95



Music in Pacific Island Cultures: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture (Global Music Series)
Music in Pacific Island Cultures: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture (Global Music Series)
Music in Pacific Island Cultures is one of several case-study volumes that can be used along with Thinking Musically, Second Edition, the core book in the Global Music Series. Thinking Musically incorporates music from many diverse cultures and establishes the framework for exploring the practice of music around the world. It sets the stage for an array of case-study volumes, each of which focuses on a single area of the world. Each case study uses the contemporary musical situation as a point of departure, covering historical information and traditions as they relate to the present.The islands of Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia are steeped in diverse musical traditions that reach far beyond the expanse of the Pacific Ocean. Music in Pacific Island Cultures is the first brief, single-volume text to provide a thematic, succinct introduction to the music of the Pacific Islands--a region of the world that has long been underrepresented in ethnomusicological studies.Based on the authors' extensive fieldwork and experiences in Pacific Island cultures, the text draws on interviews with performers, eyewitness accounts of performances, vivid illustrations, and insights gained from ongoing participation in Pacific music. The authors use four themes--colonialism, belief systems, musical flows, and the re/presentation of Pacific cultures--to survey the region and draw parallels and contrasts between its various musical traditions.Packaged with a 70-minute audio CD containing musical examples discussed in the book, Music in Pacific Island Cultures features numerous listening activities that engage students with the music. The companion website includes a comprehensive Instructor's Manual with suggested classroom activities.Visit www.oup.com/us/globalmusic for a list of books in the Global Music Series. The website also includes instructional materials to accompany each volume.

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$51.07
-$3.88(-7%)



Pacific Alamo: The Battle for Wake Island
Pacific Alamo: The Battle for Wake Island
It happened in the shadow of Pearl Harbor-mere hours after the first attack on the day that would "live in infamy." But few know the full story of Wake Island. Now a prominent military historian, breaking new ground on the assault, relates the compelling events of that day and the heroic struggle that followed. Thanks to the brave Marines stationed there-and the civilian construction workers who selflessly put their lives on the line to defend the island-what was supposed to be an easy victory became a protracted and costly battle for Imperial Japan. This is the story of that battle, from survivors on both sides, and with a gallery of historic photos.

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$10.61
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Islands of the Damned: A Marine at War in the Pacific
Islands of the Damned: A Marine at War in the Pacific
The true story of R.V. Burgin, the real-life World War II Marine Corps hero featured in HBO®'s The Pacific. “Read his story and marvel at the man...and those like him.”—Tom Hanks When a young Texan named R.V. Burgin joined the Marines 1942, he never imagined what was waiting for him a world away in the Pacific. There, amid steamy jungles, he encountered a ferocious and desperate enemy in the Japanese, engaging them in some of the most grueling and deadly fights of the war.   In this remarkable memoir, Burgin reveals his life as a special breed of Marine. Schooled by veterans who had endured the cauldron of Guadalcanal, Burgin’s company soon confronted snipers, repulsed jungle ambushes, encountered abandoned corpses of hara-kiri victims, and warded off howling banzai attacks as they island-hopped from one bloody battle to the next. In his two years at war, Burgin rose from a green private to a seasoned sergeant, fighting from New Britain through Peleliu and on to Okinawa, where he earned a Bronze Star for valor.   With unforgettable drama and an understated elegance, Burgin’s gripping narrative stands alongside those of classic Pacific chroniclers like Robert Leckie and Eugene Sledge—indeed, Burgin was even Sledge’s platoon sergeant. Here is a deeply moving account of World War II, bringing to life the hell that was the Pacific War.

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$9.49
-$6.51(-41%)



Winding up the British Empire in the Pacific Islands (Oxford History of the British Empire Companion Series)
Winding up the British Empire in the Pacific Islands (Oxford History of the British Empire Companion Series)
Little has been written about when, how and why the British Government changed its mind about giving independance to the Pacific Islands. Using recently opened archives, Winding Up the British Empire in the Pacific Islands gives the first detailed account of this event. As Britain began to dissolve the Empire in Asia in the aftermath of the Second World War, it announced that there were some countries that were so small, remote, and lacking in resources that they could never become independent states. However, between 1970 and 1980 there was a rapid about-turn. Accelerated decolonization suddenly became the order of the day. Here was the death warrant of the Empire, and hastily-arranged independence ceremonies were performed for six new states - Tonga, Fiji, Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Kiribati, and Vanuatu. The rise of anti-imperialist pressures in the United Nations had a major role in this change in policy, as did the pioneering examples marked by the release of Western Samoa by New Zealand in 1962 and Nauru by Australia in 1968. The tenacity of Pacific Islanders in maintaining their cultures was in contrast to more strident Afro-Asia nationalisms. The closing of the Colonial Office, by merger with the Commonwealth Relations Office in 1966, followed by the joining of the Commonwealth and Foreign Offices in 1968, became a major turning point in Britain's relations with the Islands. In place of long-nurtured traditions of trusteeship for indigenous populations that had evolved in the Colonial Office, the new Foreign & Commonwealth Office concentrated on fostering British interests, which came to mean reducing distant commitments and focussing on the Atlantic world and Europe.

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$26.00
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Pacific Express: The Critical Role of Military Logistics in World War II: Volume 3 (Amphibious Operations in the South Pacific in WWII series)
Pacific Express: The Critical Role of Military Logistics in World War II: Volume 3 (Amphibious Operations in the South Pacific in WWII series)
Under one cover, an edited collection of the best works by military historians on the importance of military logistics in World War II. The Marine Corps Commandant's pick for required reading on Logistics. Consider this: In World War II, 16.1 million men and women served in the U.S. Armed Forces. For every individual who served in combat, there were ten supportive personnel, both overseas and on the home front. Victory may be won or lost in battle, but all military history shows that adequate logistics support is essential to the winning of the battles. The author profiles the many major components that made up the "Pacific express" in WWII including:U.S. Navy Seabees and U.S. Marine Corps Engineers who built the Advance Bases. U.S. Navy crews who manned the amphibious force and Fleet s floating mobile Service Squadrons throughout the vast reaches of the Pacific. U.S. Merchant Marine and U.S. Naval Armed Guard who manned and defended the thousands of WSA cargo ships, transports, and tankers to "deliver the goods." U.S. Coast Guardsmen who manned hundreds of U.S. Army and Navy long-haul vessels and thousands of battle-loaded amphibious landing ships and craft.111 b&w photos, 7 maps, 21 figures, tables & charts, plus appendix, notes, bibliography, and index.FROM THE FOREWORD:"As the grandson of three World War II veterans, read this book and you will understand what it took to win this war and why the men and women who made it happen are called the Greatest Generation."-Dennis R. Blocker II, Pacific War Historian for the USS LCI (Landing Craft, Infantry) National Association, and researcher for the acclaimed "The Heart of Hell". OTHER TITLES IN THE SERIES:Vol. I, THE AMPHIBIANS ARE COMING! Emergence of the 'Gator Navy and its Revolutionary Landing CraftVol. II, THE SOLOMONS CAMPAIGNS, 1942-1943: From Guadalcanal to Bougainville, Pacific War Turning Point

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$36.67
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Pacific Island Soy Sauce, American Made, Fat-Free, Gluten-Free, No Sugars, Non-GMO, No Carbs, MSG-Free, Corn-Free, Vegan-Friendly, No Preservatives, Naturally Fermented, Lowest Sodium Real Soy Sauce
Pacific Island Soy Sauce, American Made, Fat-Free, Gluten-Free, No Sugars, Non-GMO, No Carbs, MSG-Free, Corn-Free, Vegan-Friendly, No Preservatives, Naturally Fermented, Lowest Sodium Real Soy Sauce
THE BEST TASTING, HEALTHIEST AND ONLY AMERICAN MADE SOY SAUCE IS NOW AVAILABLE FOR YOU TODAY! GREAT FOR FOOD MIXING, DIPPING SAUCE AND MARINATES! Now you can buy American with Soy Sauce! Up until now, soy sauce has been a product produced by foreign companies for the United States. This Chamorro (Guamanian) recipe is manufactured right here in the United States. No sugars, naturally fermented, no Corn and Non-GMO! Having no sugars means DIABETIC FRIENDLY! Almost 99% of soy is still Genetically Modified. We naturally ferment each bottle of soy sauce to ensure there are no animal products and have absolutely no Corn in our recipe which means no GMOs from corn, no corn starch, corn syrup or hidden corn ingredients like dextrose, cellulose or natural colors! We use non-GMO soy beans to ensure no Genetically Modified Organisms are going into your body! 50% less sodium than any other Real Lite Soy Sauce! Our formula for soy sauce allows you to experience the lowest sodium real soy sauce in the market, even 50% less sodium than other real lite soy sauces available. That is amazing! Gluten-Free, fat-free, no Carbs! Gluten-Free for those who experience gluten allergies and health issues. Fat-free and no carbohydrates means no worries about your weight. Eat as much as you like. We stand behind our product 100%. We guarantee our product ingredients are what we describe for the soy sauce. If for any reason you find this not true, you are welcome for a complete refund for that purchase. This introductory sales price for 3 bottles is for a very limited time as pricing will be increasing soon! Grab your 3-pack or 6-pack of the best American Made Soy Sauce Right NOW by clicking the "See All Buying Options" button and then "Add to Cart" button on the right!

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The Turn of the Tide in the Pacific War: Strategic Initiative, Intelligence, and Command, 1941-1943 (Modern War Studies)
The Turn of the Tide in the Pacific War: Strategic Initiative, Intelligence, and Command, 1941-1943 (Modern War Studies)
Midway through 1942, Japanese and Allied forces found themselves fighting on two fronts—in New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. These concurrent campaigns, conducted between July 1942 and February 1943, proved a critical turning point in the war being waged in the Pacific, as the advantage definitively shifted from the Japanese to the Americans. Key to this shift was the Allies seizing of the strategic initiative—a concept that Sean Judge examines in this book, particularly in the context of the Pacific War.The concept of strategic initiative, in this analysis, helps to explain why and how contending powers design campaigns and use military forces to alter the trajectory of war. Judge identifies five factors that come into play in capturing and maintaining the initiative: resources, intelligence, strategic acumen, combat effectiveness, and chance, all of which are affected by political will. His book uses the dual campaigns in New Guinea and the Solomon Islands as a case study in strategic initiative by reconstructing the organizations, decisions, and events that influenced the shift of initiative from one adversary to the other. Perhaps the most critical factor in this case is strategic acumen, without which the other advantages are easily squandered. Specifically, Judge details how General Douglas MacArthur and Admiral Chester Nimitz, in designing and executing these campaigns, provided the strategic leadership essential to reversing the tide of war—whose outcome, Judge contends, was not as inevitable as conventional wisdom tells us.The strategic initiative, once passed to American and Allied forces in the Pacific, would never be relinquished. In its explanation of how and why this happened, The Turn of the Tide in the Pacific War holds important lessons for students of military history and for future strategic leaders.

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Rascals in Paradise
Rascals in Paradise
In a thrilling collection of nonfiction adventure stories, James A. Michener returns to the most dazzling place on Earth: the islands that inspired Tales of the South Pacific. Co-written with A. Grove Day, Rascals in Paradise offers portraits of ten scandalous men and women, some infamous and some overlooked, including Sam Comstock, a mutinous sailor whose delusions of grandeur became a nightmare; Will Mariner, a golden-haired youth who used his charm to win over his captors; and William Bligh, the notorious HMS Bounty captain who may not have been the monster history remembers him as. From lifelong buccaneers to lapsed noblemen, in Michener and Day’s capable hands these rogues become the stuff of legend.   Praise for Rascals in Paradise   “The best book about those far-scattered islands that has appeared in a long time . . . a portfolio of rare and ruthless personalities that is calculated to make the curliest hair stand straight on end.”—The New York Times   “[Combines] research and scholarship (A. Grove Day was a professor at the University of Hawaii) with a gift for spinning a yarn and depicting character (Michener, journalist and novelist, needs no introduction).”—Kirkus ReviewsFrom the Paperback edition.

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$7.68
-$9.32(-55%)


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