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The Akron
and had included home decorating items, cookware, dining ware, food, clothing, electronics, live plants, and furniture. Many items were one of a kind

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The AkronFormer type Discount storeIndustry RetailFate store closures; most locations sold to Circuit CityFounded 1948; 70 years ago (1948) Los Angeles, CaliforniaFounders
  • Bernard Field
  • Hyman Fink
Defunct 1985; 33 years ago (1985)Headquarters Los Angeles, CaliforniaNumber of locations 24Areas served CaliforniaProducts home decor, imports, dining ware, clothing, furniture, electronics, artwork, tropical plants, live monkeys, imported foodParent
  • private (1948-1975)
  • Jack A. Levin & Associates (1975-1976)
  • Thrifty Corp. (1976-1982)
  • Cheong Shing Co. (1982-1985)
Subsidiaries Columbus

Akron Stores or The Akron was a Southern California-based imported goods and home decorating department store retail chain that was started in 1948 and was known to carry unusual merchandise, mostly imports.[1] The chain had over 24 stores throughout Southern California from as far south as San Diego to as far north as San Francisco before it was forced to close in 1985.

In a 2001 interview in Los Angeles Magazine, Fink described selling "everything from handkerchiefs to fire hydrants to motorcycles to live Mexican monkeys" in his stores.[1] The product mix offered in the stores is best described as eclectic and had included home decorating items, cookware, dining ware, food, clothing, electronics, live plants, and furniture. Many items were one of a kind and no one knew what would be in the stores the following week. A 1960 article in the Los Angeles Times described the store as "a pioneer in new and distinctive merchandising techniques" that "long specialized in decorator items from abroad" that included "original Italian oil paintings, native African sculptures from Kenya, and contemporary teakwood furniture from Denmark".[2] The company sometimes describe themselves as a chain of "decorator-style department stores".[3] Woman's Wear Daily called the chain a "serendipity" department store.[4]

Contents
  • 1 History
    • 1.1 Early years
    • 1.2 Expansion and growth
    • 1.3 Outside ownership and the slow decline
  • 2 Columbus
  • 3 See also
  • 4 References
  • 5 External links
History Early years

In 1948, Bernard Field and Hyman Fink opened the Akron Army & Navy Stores on Sunset Blvd. between Virgil Place and Fountain Avenue by selling mostly army surplus goods. One of their first ads appeared in classified ad section of the December 1948 issue of Popular Mechanics magazine for 2-way combat phones while another ad in the same issue advertised for Army identification bracelets. [5] The address given in the ad was 4379 Sunset, currently a parking lot for a television studio.

By 1950, Akron Army & Navy was purchasing conventional ads in magazines and in the Los Angeles Times, and had moved to their main location to 4400 Sunset Blvd. In their April 1950 ad in the Los Angeles Times, Akron was selling typewriters, watches, bunk beds, camping gear, power tools, and house paint.[6] Their September 1951 ad in Popular Mechanics was for hand-held power tools.[7] Their February 1952 ad in Popular Science offered telescopes and microscopes.[8] The last mention as the Akron Army & Navy Store occurred in an April 1952 article in the Los Angeles Times describing a fire that caused major damage to their warehouse that was adjacent to their store at 4400 Sunset Blvd.[9] Besides selling to walk-in customers at their store, Akron was selling nationwide via mail order through ads placed in Popular Mechanics and Popular Science magazines during the 1950s.[10]

Expansion and growth

In 1952 or 1953, the company was renamed The Akron. By June 1953, ads were beginning to appear in the Los Angeles Times in which the firm began to trade under the name The Akron. In these ads, the variety of advertised goods was getting larger, which included such items as clothes, furniture, and live plants. Around this time, the army-navy label was dropped since the new products offered by the firm began to sharply deviated from the usual goods obtain through government surplus.[11] In March 1955, the firm expanded into the San Fernando Valley by opening their first branch store in Burbank.[12] A third store was opened in West Los Angeles in June 1957,[13] followed by a fourth store in West Covina in August 1958.[14] Stores built during this time period occupied 40,000 square feet of retail space.

The growth rate of the firm accelerated during the 1960s. In 1960, Akron opened both their fifth store in Torrance[2][15] and sixth store in Anaheim.[16] According to a 1961 article in the Los Angeles Times, Akron had eight stores in Los Angeles and San Francisco and was in the process of build a new headquarters building that was separate from the main store at that time.[17] Unfortunately, the article does not mention how many stores were opened in the San Francisco area or when did it occur.[17] In early 1963, the chain replaced their original store on Sunset with a new larger building on the same property while still conducting business in the original building during the construction process.[18][19] The original building was located on the southwest side of the property while the newer building was on the northeast side of the property.

In 1963, a store was opened in Los Angeles on Rodeo Place in the Crenshaw district[20][21] and in Tarzana.[22][23][24] A 1963 article in the Times called the Crenshaw store the ninth store in the chain.[23]

The first mention of the Ventura-Oxnard store occurred in an ad in the September 1964 issue of the Times.[25] The ad listed the addresses for nine stores in the Southern California marketing area, including its first location in Ventura County.

In 1966, 20,000 square feet was added to the just two year-old West Los Angeles store to keep up with the increase of business.[26][27] Later in the same year, a store was opened at the Northpoint Shopping Center in San Francisco.[28] According to a 1966 article in the Times, this is the first store in San Francisco and the tenth in the chain.[28] Store counts as reported in the Los Angeles Times during the mid-1960s are sometimes confusing since some articles appear to include the Northern California stores in their count while other article do not.

In 1967, the firm's eleventh store opened in Pasadena[29][30] and their fourteenth store the following year in Orange.[31][32] A new service building was also constructed in Carson in 1968 to service all of the new locations.[33] The fifteenth store were opened in Lakewood[34][35] followed by another store in Monterey Park[36] in 1969.

The first mention of the Bakersfield store occurred in an ad in the July 1970 issue of the Times.[37] Two stores, the 17th and 18th in the chain, were open later in 1970 in San Bernardino and Granada Hills.[38] In early 1971, the company announced grandiose plans of adding 9 stores in new locations such as San Francisco, San Diego, and even out-of-state to their then current 18 locations.[3] Unfortunately, many of these additions failed to materialize.

Two stores opened later 1971 at Mission Valley and La Mesa in the San Diego metropolitan area.[39] An ad in the October 1971 issue of the Times that announced the opening of the San Diego stores also announced the remodeling and enlargement of the main store on Sunset and also mentions the expected opening of a store in Daly City the following month in the San Francisco Bay area.[40] The ad also listed the addresses for 18 Southern Californian stores, but none of the Northern California stores were included.

The first mention of the store in Santa Barbara occurred in an ad in the August 1972 issue of the Times.[41] The ad listed the addresses for 19 stores in the Southern California marketing area.

A hint that the firm was beginning to have cash flow problems occurred when it was announced that the firm had sold the real estate for three of its stores that it had owned in a 1972 sale leaseback scheme for its stores in Pasadena, Orange and Santa Clara (in the San Francisco Bay area).[42]

As recorded in the news media at that time, 1974 was a very interesting year for the firm. There were at least 3 articles in the trade journal Women's Wear Daily concerning the privately held company. One article reported that the firm was doing well with increasing sales volumes during the 1970s recession.[43] Another article reported that the three member executive team basically traded jobs with the president being appointed chairman, the vice-president/general manager/secretary appointed president, and the chairman appointed vice-president/secretary.[4] This was the first change in leadership since the company was formed two decades earlier. A third article reported that company officials had denied rumors that the firm was in negotiations that might lead to the firm's purchase by Thrifty Drug Stores.[44] By this time, the chain had 23 stores, all of which was located in California, and had started a fully owned subsidiary in the middle of the country called Columbus.

Outside ownership and the slow decline

After having trouble obtaining bank loans, The Akron announced in August 1975 that it had sold an 80% stake in the company to Jack A. Levin & Associates, which happened to be the company's largest supplier, while the three officers retained the remaining 20%.[45] Jack Levin became chairman and CEO while Hadel was retained as president. Levin eventually increased his share in the company to 90%. Eight months later in April 1976, Levin sold a 40% interest in the company to Thrifty Drug Stores Company, Inc. and a 10% interest to Richard Ralphs, former CEO of Ralphs Grocery Company.[46] Ralphs replaced Levin as chairman and CEO. A year later in March 1977, Thrifty increased their stake in Akron to 90% by purchasing the remaining 40% from Levin, 5% from president Richard Hadel, and 5% from Hadel's ex-wife.[47][48] The only shares that Thrifty did not owned at this time was the 10% owned by Ralphs, but Thrifty had an option purchase his shares anytime in the future. Under Thrifty, Hadel was retained as president until late 1977 or early 1978 when he had left to take a position at the Sunset House division of Carter Hawley Hale Stores.[49] By October 1977, Akron had 23 stores and Columbus had 5 stores. At this time, Akron was still losing money, but not as much as before.[50]

Although Akron was losing money, Thrifty still opened new stores in rapidly expanding areas of Southern California. In November 1977, a new store opened in Laguna Hills. According to a Los Angeles Times article, this store was the 23rd store in the chain, the 20th store in Southern California, and the third store in Orange County.[51] Later during the same month, another store was opened in Sunland-Tujunga.[51][52] A fourth store in Orange County was opened in Huntington Beach in March 1978.[53] In September of the same year, Thrifty tried something new by opening a new Akron adjacent to a new Thrifty Drug Store in the same shopping center in Whittier.[54] There is no record if this experiment had improved sales for either stores.

To be closer to the headquarters of their corporate parent, Akron moved their corporate headquarters from Melrose Avenue to Wilshire Boulevard in August 1978.[55][56] In November 1978, an announcement was made that Thrifty was selling 45% of the Akron to Pier 1.[57][58] At the time of the sale, there was no information if Ralphs had still owned 10% of Akron. If that was true, then the 45% represent half of Thrifty's interest in Akron. There is also no information about Pier 1's involvement in Akron and if and when Pier 1 sold its shares back to Thrifty. At this point in time, Akron and Pier 1 carried very similar merchandise.

To replace Richard Hadel as president, Akron hired Donn Fletcher from Pier 1 as his replacement in June 1979.[59] Fletcher shook up the company by closing unprofitable stores and changing the product mix. Clothing was eliminated.[60] Instead of being known as the "serendipity" store in which the customer does not know what the store may carry on any particular visit, Akron tried to carry consistent goods that a customer could depend on being in the store during their next visit. [61] The merchandise were also upgraded and made more similar to that carried by Pier 1.

In May 1980, Akron sold the ground lease for its Bakersfield store to RB Furniture.[60] At a Thrifty Corp. shareholders meeting in January 1981, the president of Thrifty announced that they decided to keep Akron since Akron had showed a profit during the past few months.[62] The unexpected death of CEO and chairman Richard Ralphs in August 1982[63] resulted in making Fletcher the senior executive in charge of Akron.

In December 1982, Thrifty sold Akron to a Hong Kong-based married couple, the owners of one of Akron's suppliers.[64] At the time of the sale, the chain was down to 21 stores.[60] The new owners' son, City of Industry-based Francis Chan was appointed chairman and chief executive officer.[65] In July 1983, a new store was opened at the Anaheim Plaza Shopping Center, the fifth store in Orange County and would be the final store that would be opened by the chain. At the time of this store opening, there were 20 stores that stretch from Santa Barbara to San Diego.[65] Apparently, all stores north of Santa Barbara had been closed by this time.

Unfortunately, the chain was in dire straits by 1984 and the Chan family decided that they needed to close most of the stores with the goal of trying to save the remainder. In October 1984, Akron negotiated with Circuit City to sell the leases for up to 17 of its 20 stores.[66][67] In February 1985, Akron told its employees, many of whom had been with the company for more than 20 years, to take a 50% cut and give up most of their fringe benefits in an attempt to keep the company operating.[68] Many of the stores were closed by Spring 1985. There is no record of any stores remaining open beyond this point.

Beginning in November 1985, Circuit City entered Southern California by opening stores at 12 former Akron locations in addition to 3 non-Akron locations.[69][70]

Columbus

Columbus was a fully owned subsidiary chain that was created by Akron to sell imported decorator products to high income customers at significantly higher prices. While most Akron locations were located in free-standing stores in high traffic areas, Columbus locations were located almost exclusively in the most expensive shopping mall that could be found that usually included such stores as Neiman Marcus, Tiffany & Co., and Lord & Taylor. The first location opened in Houston, Texas at The Galleria in the early 1970s, followed by a second Houston location and stores in Dallas, Texas; Phoenix, Arizona; and Denver, Colorado.[71] There were five Columbus stores by 1975.[45] The last mention of the chain in The Times was in 1977.[50] Coincidentally, the new chain also happened to share its name with another city in Ohio.

See also
  • List of defunct department stores of the United States
  • Building 19
  • Pier 1 Imports
  • Cost Plus, Inc.
  • Pic 'N' Save
  • 99 Cents Only Stores
References
  1. ^ a b Brott, Tamar (August 2001). "The Price is Right: Why Wall Street Loves Dave Gold's 99 Cent Only Empire". Los Angeles Magazine. 46 (8). pp. 42, 44, 46, 48, 50, 52, 54. ISSN 1522-9149. 
  2. ^ a b "Variety Store Opens Branch In Torrance". Los Angeles Times. March 27, 1960. p. F13. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  3. ^ a b "Akron Plans to Open Nine New Stores". Los Angeles Times. February 28, 1971. p. K16. (Subscription required (help)). With the opening of three "decorator-style" department stores during 1970, the Akron chain's stepped-up growth plans are expected to result in the opening of nine new Akron stores by the end of 1972. Akron now has 19 stores in operation and grosses more than $50 million annually. ...negotiations are nearing conclusion for two new stores in the San Francisco Bay area and two others in the San Diego area.  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  4. ^ a b "Fashion RTW: The Akron Stores realigns execs". Women's Wear Daily. 128 (32). February 14, 1974. p. 18. The Akron Stores, a 23-unit chain of "serendipity" department store... has realigned its executive team. Bernard Field, formerly president, has been elected chairman, succeeding Hyman Fink, who's been named vice president. Field also holds the title of vice-president and secretary of the privately held corporation. Elected president is Richard Hadel, formerly vice-president-general manager-secretary.  Link via ProQuest.
  5. ^ "Akron Army & Navy classified ads". Popular Mechanics. 90 (6). December 1948. p. 65. ISSN 0032-4558. 
  6. ^ "Akron Army & Navy Stores ad". Los Angeles Times. April 13, 1950. p. C3. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  7. ^ "Akron Army-Navy Stores ad". Popular Mechanics. 96 (3). September 1951. p. 299. ISSN 0032-4558. 
  8. ^ "Akron Army-Navy Stores ad". Popular Science. February 1952. p. 295. ISSN 0161-7370. 
  9. ^ "$100,000 Fire Hits Sunset Blvd. Store". Los Angeles Times. April 13, 1952. p. 7. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  10. ^ "The Akron ad". Popular Science. 168 (6). June 1956. p. 247. ISSN 0161-7370. 
  11. ^ "Akron ad". Los Angeles Times. June 11, 1953. p. 23. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  12. ^ "Akron ad announcing opening of Burbank store". Los Angeles Times. March 3, 1955. p. 19. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  13. ^ "Akron ad announcing opening of West Los Angeles store". Los Angeles Times. June 1, 1957. p. 7. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  14. ^ "Akron Store to Open at West Covina". Los Angeles Times. August 4, 1958. p. B9. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  15. ^ "Akron to Open Torrance Unit". Los Angeles Times. September 27, 1959. p. F10. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  16. ^ "Akron Chain's 6th Store Opened in Anaheim". Los Angeles Times. August 16, 1960. p. 17. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  17. ^ a b "Headquarters for Akron Set". Los Angeles Times. August 13, 1961. p. I28. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  18. ^ "Akron to Build Larger Store". Los Angeles Times. July 1, 1962. p. K6. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  19. ^ "Akron to Open New Hollywood Unit Tuesday". Los Angeles Times. February 17, 1963. p. I4. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  20. ^ "Akron to Open Crenshaw Unit". Los Angeles Times. May 5, 1963. p. I30. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  21. ^ "Akron Opens First of Two New Stores". Los Angeles Times. July 21, 1963. p. O8. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  22. ^ "Akron to Build Tarzana Store". Los Angeles Times. December 2, 1962. p. I28. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  23. ^ a b "Akron Store Opened in Tarzana". Los Angeles Times. August 21, 1963. p. D8D. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  24. ^ "Akron Will Build Store in West Valley". Los Angeles Times. May 5, 1963. p. I10. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  25. ^ "Akron ad". Los Angeles Times. September 9, 1964. p. 14. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  26. ^ "Remodeling Set for Akron Branch". Los Angeles Times. February 6, 1966. p. I28. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  27. ^ "Akron Store Remodels to Add Space". Los Angeles Times. July 31, 1966. p. M23. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  28. ^ a b "Akron Plans S.F. Unit". Los Angeles Times. October 3, 1966. p. B14. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  29. ^ "Construction Begun on Pasadena Akron". Los Angeles Times. March 19, 1967. p. M13. (Subscription required (help)). The 35,000-sq.-ft. facility will be the eleventh and the largest in the Akron chain.  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  30. ^ "New Akron Store Opens in Pasadena". Los Angeles Times. August 16, 1967. p. B8. (Subscription required (help)). The Akron, a department store and decorator house expanded its operation when it opened its 11th store Tuesday.  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  31. ^ "Akron's Largest Unit Under Way in Orange". Los Angeles Times. July 7, 1968. p. M8. (Subscription required (help)). Construction started Thursday on the 14th and largest unit in the Akron store chain at Chapman Ave. and Main St., Orange. Completion is expected in November.  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  32. ^ "Akron Store to Open Monday". Los Angeles Times. November 10, 1968. p. E9. (Subscription required (help)). The Akron will open the 14th store in its chain Monday at Chapman Avenue and Main St., Orange.  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  33. ^ "Akron Acquires Site for Service Building". Los Angeles Times. August 25, 1968. p. O17. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  34. ^ "Akron Plans Lakewood Unit". Los Angeles Times. December 15, 1968. p. I2. (Subscription required (help)). Akron, decorator-department store chain, will build a $1 million, 35,000-square-foot store at the Lakewood Shopping Center. Construction will commence after Jan. 1 and the store, the 15th for the Los Angeles-based firm, will be completed in July.  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  35. ^ "Akron Unit Under Way at Shopping Complex". Los Angeles Times. June 8, 1969. p. H10. (Subscription required (help)). The 15th outlet of the Akron chain of decorator-department stores is under the construction at Lakewood Shopping Center, the first time an Akron store has become part of such a center.  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  36. ^ "Akron ad announcing opening of Monterey Park store". Los Angeles Times. November 5, 1969. p. 21. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  37. ^ "Akron ad". Los Angeles Times. July 29, 1970. p. 16. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  38. ^ "Akron Plans To Open Two Stores In Month". Los Angeles Times. November 8, 1970. p. J13. (Subscription required (help)). The company's 17th store will open Wednesday ... San Bernardino. On Nov. 24, Akron will open its 18th store... in Granada Hills.  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  39. ^ "Akron Signs Leases for 2 New Locations". Los Angeles Times. July 11, 1971. p. H13. (Subscription required (help)). The Akron, Los Angeles-based import merchandise chain, has signed two 25-year leases totaling $2,725,000 for locations in Mission Valley and Grossmont in the San Diego area.  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  40. ^ "Akron ad announcing opening of San Diego area stores". Los Angeles Times. October 13, 1971. p. a17. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  41. ^ "Akron ad". Los Angeles Times. August 9, 1972. p. a12. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  42. ^ "Three Akron Outlets Purchased". Los Angeles Times. October 22, 1972. p. D18. (Subscription required (help)). Three Akron stores have been purchased from The Akron Department Stores on a sale-leaseback agreement. The stores are situated ... Pasadena, Orange, and Santa Clara.  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  43. ^ "The Akron Stores volume increased 14% for the year". Women's Wear Daily. 128 (32). February 14, 1974. p. 18. The Akron units range in size from 20,000 to 35,000 square feet, and this year, three stores will be added to the chain.  Link via ProQuest.
  44. ^ "Akron acquisition rumors are denied". Women's Wear Daily. 129 (7). July 10, 1974. p. 6. Reports in financial circles here that the Akron Stores were in negotiations leading to purchase by Thrifty Drug Stores, Inc., here were denied. Akron, a promotional department store chain with 23 units, also operates three decorator stores under the Columbus banner. The Columbus chain will add units in Houston Sept. 20 and in November in Denver.  Link via ProQuest.
  45. ^ a b "Akron Acquired by L.A.-Based Marketing Firm". Los Angeles Times. August 15, 1975. p. E14. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  46. ^ "Thrifty Drugs Buys 40% Interest in Akron Stores". Los Angeles Times. April 10, 1976. p. C11. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  47. ^ "Thrifty Drug Reportedly Increased Akron Holdings". WWD. 134 (46). March 8, 1977. p. 28.  Link via ProQuest.
  48. ^ "Thrifty Increases Stock In The Akron". WWD. 134 (48). March 10, 1977. p. 16.  Link via ProQuest.
  49. ^ "Business & People". Los Angeles Times. June 30, 1978. p. e21. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  50. ^ a b Auerbach, Alexander (October 30, 1977). "Thrifty Wants Its Stores to Look as Good as Its Profits". Los Angeles Times. p. H3. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  51. ^ a b "New Akron Due". Los Angeles Times. October 30, 1977. p. I5. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  52. ^ "Akron ad announcing opening of Foothill & Tujunga Canyon store". Los Angeles Times. November 20, 1977. p. gb4. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  53. ^ "New Akron Will Open". Los Angeles Times. March 19, 1978. p. I19. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  54. ^ "Two Stores Open". Los Angeles Times. September 24, 1978. p. f17. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  55. ^ "The Akron Moves Offices". Los Angeles Times. August 6, 1978. p. G17. (Subscription required (help)). The Akron, a retail import chain of 23 stores, has relocated its corporate headquarters from 5120 Melrose Ave. to 3540 Wilshire Blvd.  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  56. ^ "Torrance Akron Refurbished". Los Angeles Times. October 29, 1978. p. J21. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  57. ^ Rossman, Martin (November 4, 1978). "Pier 1 Buys 45% of Akron Stock From Thrifty Corp". Los Angeles Times. p. C12. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  58. ^ "Pier 1 buys 45% of The Akron stock". WWD. 137 (89). November 7, 1978. p. 31.  Link via ProQuest.
  59. ^ "Business & People". Los Angeles Times. June 1, 1979. p. d17. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  60. ^ a b c "Bakersfield Akron Store Sold To Bay Area Group". Los Angeles Times. May 25, 1980. p. I26. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  61. ^ Yoshihara, Nancy (May 12, 1981). "Akron Chain Sells Its 'New' Image". Los Angeles Times. p. E5. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  62. ^ "Thrifty Says It May Keep Akron Stores". Los Angeles Times. January 28, 1981. p. E1. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  63. ^ Townsend, Dorothy (August 26, 1982). "Richard Ralphs of Supermarket Family Dies". Los Angeles Times. p. e1. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  64. ^ Rivera, Nancy (December 22, 1982). "Thrifty Sells Akron to Hong Kong Investors". Los Angeles Times. p. f1. (Subscription required (help)). Thrifty Corp. has sold the 21 store Los Angeles-based Akron retailing chain to two Hong Kong investors.  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  65. ^ a b "Newest Akron Store Set for Anaheim Plaza". Los Angeles Times. July 17, 1983. p. I13. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  66. ^ Rivera, Nancy (October 18, 1984). "Akron May Sell Leases to Some of Its Outlets: Akron: Negotiating". Los Angeles Times. p. OC_C1. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  67. ^ Rivera, Nancy (November 10, 1984). "Akron to Sell Leases to 17 of Its 20 Stores". Los Angeles Times. p. D1. (Subscription required (help)).  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
  68. ^ Bernstein, Harry (February 6, 1985). "AFL-CIO Feels the Heat From Key Democrats: Problems at Akron". Los Angeles Times. 
  69. ^ Rivera, Nancy (October 21, 1985). "Firm Bets on 'Superstores' in Southland : Circuit City to Push Electronics Products at 15 New Outlets". Los Angeles Times. 
  70. ^ "Circuit City to Open 7th Store in Southland". Los Angeles Times. November 24, 1985. 
  71. ^ Auerbach, Alexander (September 3, 1974). "America Discovers Columbus: It's a More Expensive Akron: Columbus: It's Akron With High Price Tag". Los Angeles Times. p. d8. (Subscription required (help)). new chain of stores called "Columbus," carrying much of the same merchandise... in a more luxurious surroundings and at stiffer prices. he first Columbus store opened in a posh Houston shopping mall. A second Columbus store has opened in Houston and there is one each in Dallas and Phoenix. A Denver store will open soon. The 23 Akron stores all located in Los Angeles, San Francisco and San Diego.  Alternate Link via ProQuest.
External links
  • Kheradyar, Emma J. (August 18, 2010). "Return Trip: Does Anyone Remember the Akron Store?..." My Martha & Me (blog). 


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Homemory Realistic and Bright Flickering Bulb Battery Operated Flameless LED Tea Light for Seasonal & Festival Celebration, Pack of 12, Electric Fake Candle in Warm White and Wave Open
Homemory Realistic and Bright Flickering Bulb Battery Operated Flameless LED Tea Light for Seasonal & Festival Celebration, Pack of 12, Electric Fake Candle in Warm White and Wave Open
Tired of Traditional Candles that Melt, Drip, Smoking, risk of fire when Lighting. THEN YOU'VE COME TO THE RIGHT PLACE!PREMIUM QUALITY AND DURABLE BATTERY TEA LIGHTS: Homemory Wavy Battery Operated Tea Lights are made from the best quality materials. They come with batteries included and last a long time with their flickering light being very realistic. They can be used as decor for many occasions and places; the Homemory Warm White Flameless Candles add an atmospheric ambience to any place. Safe for usage in any setting or occasion because these Flameless LED Tealights doesn't have an open flame and it doesn't heat up during usage. These electronic tea light can also be given away as gifts or party favors. They are easily portable and can be used for a long period of time without having to change the battery. The Warm White Tea light Candle is designed to flicker in a realistic way so that one can feel the ambience of an actual candle flame without any hazard or hassles. Very easy to use, these Fake candles can be turned on and off by the flick of a switch. Specification: 1.Material: LED+PP. 2.Size: Diameter 3.7cm/1.4inch+ Height 3.2cm/1.25inch. 3.Battery: CR2032 button cell. 4.Battery life: 100+hours. 5.Light color: warm white.6.Appearance color: white.Package include: 12 X LED tea light Candle. Homemory- is a registered trademark protected by the US Trademark Law. Homemory products are sold by authorized sellers only. Each Product has its own package with Homemory Logo

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$12.99
-$3.00(-23%)



Apple Barrel Acrylic Paint Set, 18 Piece (2-Ounce), PROMOABI Assorted Colors I
Apple Barrel Acrylic Paint Set, 18 Piece (2-Ounce), PROMOABI Assorted Colors I
Apple Barrel 2 oz Paint-Best Selling Colors Features: Quality selection and value. Formulated for use on all surfaces including wood, styrofoam, plaster, terra cotta and tin. These matte colors glide on smoothly, dry quickly and stay beautiful as the day they were painted. Can be brushed, stamped, stenciled or sponged on. Easy cleanup with soap and water. Apple Barrel 2 oz Paint-Best Selling Colors. Contains 18-2 oz bottles: White Black Flag Red Jack-O-Lantern Bright Blue Melted Chocolate Nutmeg Brown Bright Yellow New Shamrock Bimini Blue Purple Iris Too Blue Holly Branch Fuchsia Yellow Flame Pewter Grey Bright Magenta Parrot Blue

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$18.36
-$7.79(-30%)



Joseph Joseph 20085 Adjustable Rolling Pin with Removable Rings, Multicolored
Joseph Joseph 20085 Adjustable Rolling Pin with Removable Rings, Multicolored
Joseph Joseph is ever conscious of the space restrictions imposed by modern urban living. The Adjustable Rolling Pin will take the guess work out of preparing pizza and pie crusts, cookies, lasagna sheets, and filo pastry. The rolling pin has four pairs of colorful, removable discs which raise the rolling pin to the required thickness of 1/16-inch, 1/6-inch, 1/4-inch and 3/8-inch off the work surface. This clever design will ensure that the pastry or dough is rolled to an even thickness throughout. The rings can are held to the rolling pin with plastic screws. Also etched into the wood is a width measurement guide. Pin is made of beech wood and measures 16.5 inches long and 2.5 inches in diameter. Hand-wash for best results. Do not submerge in water; dry immediately after washing.

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$13.99
-$6.01(-30%)



YIHONG 2 Set String Lights 8 Modes 50LED Fairy Lights Battery Operated 16.4FT Twinkle Firefly Lights with Remote Timer for Bedroom Patio Garden Wedding Party Christmas Indoor Decor- White
YIHONG 2 Set String Lights 8 Modes 50LED Fairy Lights Battery Operated 16.4FT Twinkle Firefly Lights with Remote Timer for Bedroom Patio Garden Wedding Party Christmas Indoor  Decor- White
Waterproof for Outdoor Decors -- the battery case is waterproof for outdoor use, and copper wire parts of the string lights are submersible; you can easily wrap them on your front porch,pergola,terrace, to add twinkling lighting to your home;and wrap around plants to make unique flower arrangement;even put them into your water fountain to create amazing water scenes;or pack them to your camping trip, adding more fun to your adventure; Perfect Party Decorations -- With little twinkling micro LEDs,these starry string lights would be great to decorate your wedding party,Halloween,Christmas or just to make twinkling centerpiece for your dinner party. DIY Night Lights -- Feel free to put them into a Glass Jar to make lovely night lights for your bedroom;with a remote nearby to turn them on/off without getting out of bed, enjoy your sweet dreams!!! A Remote Changes Every Thing!!! -- with a remote in hand, you can easily set them to flash in various patterns; to set them on timer to auto light up for 6 hours and auto turn off for 18 hours per day; to turn on or turn off the lights, or to dim the lights as you want; show your friends some magic with this remote fairy string lights and enjoy their compliments!!! Specifications: String length per light: 16.4ft LED Qty: 50pcs Light Color: daylight whiteColor Temperature: 6500K Power supply: 3xAA battery (not included) CR2025 coin battery for remote (included) Battery case size:3''*2.4''*0.9''/8*6*2.2cm Wireless operating range up to 12ft/3.6M (please point the remote to the battery case) 2 remote included,one remote can control several lights at the same time. Package Includes: 2x Fairy string lights battery operated(16.4feet) 2x remote

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$15.99



Toilet Night Light[2Pack]by Ailun,Motion Activated LED Light,8 Colors Changing Toilet Bowl Nightlight for Bathroom[Battery Not Included] Perfect Decorating Combination Along with Water Faucet Light
Toilet Night Light[2Pack]by Ailun,Motion Activated LED Light,8 Colors Changing Toilet Bowl Nightlight for Bathroom[Battery Not Included] Perfect Decorating Combination Along with Water Faucet Light
Pack Includes: 2* Toilet Night Light Ailun Ailun develops and markets its own products and services that deliver new experience, greater convenience and enhanced value to every customer Ailun designs, develops, and sells all kinds of Cell Phone Accessories Kits, including but not limited to Cell Phone&Pad Protective Cases, Screen Protectors, etc. Ailun appoints Siania as an exclusive distributor on Amazon, all sales of Ailun printed products shall only from Siania. Ailun exclusively grants Siania to promote and provides after-sale services. Buying from Siania is the effective way to avoid counterfeit Ailun products and to get guaranteed after-sale service.

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$14.89



ITOMTE Handmade Swedish Gnome, Scandinavian Tomte, Nordic Christmas Nisse Figurine, Plush Toy Decorations, Yule Santa Decorations, Winter Table Desk Ornaments, Xmas Elf Gifts - 16 Inches, Grey
ITOMTE Handmade Swedish Gnome, Scandinavian Tomte, Nordic Christmas Nisse Figurine, Plush Toy Decorations, Yule Santa Decorations, Winter Table Desk Ornaments, Xmas Elf Gifts - 16 Inches, Grey
What is a gnome? Gnome also known as a Tomte or Nisse.Not many people have seen them because they are very shy and live in the woods. They are known only to live in Smaland or maybe it is so that people only have seen them there. For those who have not seen gnomes I decided to reproduce them so everyone gets a chance to see them. Invite an old friends over for the holidays: The gnomes body is crafted from brown soft wool. The long white beard is made from genuine sheepskins and a wire in his ridiculously tall hat in order to pose it for maximum whimsy and ridiculousness!. He will stand on his own and has a weighted bottom. He is a lucky gnome. Gnome or Tomte, according to Scandinavian folklore , bearded men who guard homes, farms and children, particularly at night, protecting them from misfortune. He is a lucky gnome. SIZE: 16 " tall , 3.5 " wide. Each gnome is individually handmade with lots of love! All items come from smoke free environment. Dont you think this adorable gnome are welcome any time of the year? We do. Thanks so much for looking! If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to contact us! ASIN List of all kinds of Gnomes (Frequently Bought Together) No.1 Black (B01LJVOCUC), White (B01LJVOD7E), Two Pack (B01LJVODOM) No.2 Grey (B01LJVOELY), Red (B01LJVONTM),Two Pack (B01LJVOPL8) No3. Grey (B01LJVOS8I),Red (B01LJVOUGI), Two Pack (B01LJVOV9Y)No.4 Black (B01LJVP71K), Grey (B01LJVOWQ6), Two Pack (B01LJVPMI8) No.5 (B01LJVGM28) No.6 Grey (B01LJVPQ5M), Red (B01LJVOCY8), Two Pack (B01LJVODB0) No.7 Yellow(B01LJVODWY), Red (B01LJVOF9K), Two Pack (B01LJVOGBW)

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$27.99
-$13.00(-46%)



Beardaments Beard Ornaments, 12pc Colorful Christmas Facial Hair Baubles for Men in the Holiday Spirit, Easy Attach Mini Mustache, Sideburns, Goatee Whisker Clips, Festive Red, Green, Gold, Silver Mix
Beardaments Beard Ornaments, 12pc Colorful Christmas Facial Hair Baubles for Men in the Holiday Spirit, Easy Attach Mini Mustache, Sideburns, Goatee Whisker Clips, Festive Red, Green, Gold, Silver Mix
**Important: Look out for counterfeit sellers! Only purchase the Beardaments that are sold by Beardaments and shipped from Amazon FBA. Express Your Holiday Joy by Adding Fun, Vibrant Colors to Your Beard with Colorful Beard Ornaments! The holiday season is the perfect time to stand out, make someone smile, or just add a little brightness to the world; and nothing gets people talking and having fun more than looking at a man with beautiful, colorful beard ornaments hanging down like a hairy Christmas tree! That's why we at Beardaments created these fun beard baubles with built-in mini clips that let you quickly attach them to your mustache, beard, or hair for a unique look that's sure to put you on Santa's nice list. Beard ornaments are a fun gift to go along with that ugly Christmas sweater, and make a great addition to any man who wants to show off this holiday season. Product Details: Beard Ornaments (12-Pack) Small, Compact and Lightweight Gentle on Facial Hair Attach to Most Beard Lengths Four (4) Colors: Gold, Green, Red, Silver Includes Mini Hanging Clips

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$9.99
-$10.00(-50%)



Holiday Joy - 4 Christmas Safety Grip Stocking Holders - Hang Stockings Without Damage!
Holiday Joy - 4 Christmas Safety Grip Stocking Holders - Hang Stockings Without Damage!
Holiday Joy's safety-grip stocking hooks are the safest way to hang stockings. This is a new spin on a traditional holiday decorating accessory that is safer than the alternative large, metal mantel hooks. The soft gripper won't scratch your delicate surfaces, and they are designed to grip more firmly as stocking weight increases. Your safety-grip stocking hook will hold up to 10-pound.

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$13.99


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