Apparel Fabric
Apparel Fabric
apparel fabric, apparel fabric by the yard, apparel fabric stores near me, apparel fabric online, apparel fabric stores, apparel fabric stores dallas, apparel fabric characteristics, apparel fabrics wholesale, apparel fabric stores atlanta, apparel fabric dallas.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Go Back

Smartphone









Free the Animation VR / AR
Play to reveal 3D images and 3D models!
Demonstration A-Frame / Multiplayer
Android app on Google Play
 
vlrPhone / vlrFilter
Project of very low consumption, radiation and bitrate softphones, with the support of the spatial audio, of the frequency shifts and of the ultrasonic communications / Multifunction Audio Filter with Remote Control!



 

Vectors and 3D Models

City Images, Travel Images, Safe Images

Howto - How To - Illustrated Answers

 

Chenille fabric
1930s, usage for the tufted fabric became widely desirable for throws, mats, bedspreads, and carpets, but not as yet, apparel. Companies shifted handwork

View Wikipedia Article

Chenille yarn Chenille fabric Chenille yarn

Chenille may refer to either a type of yarn or fabric made from it. Chenille is the French word for caterpillar whose fur the yarn is supposed to resemble.

Contents
  • 1 History
  • 2 Description
    • 2.1 Improvements
  • 3 In quilting
  • 4 Care
  • 5 References
  • 6 External links
History

According to textile historians, chenille-type yarn is a recent invention, dating to the 18th century and believed to have originated in France. The original technique involved weaving a "leno" fabric and then cutting the fabric into strips to make the chenille yarn.

Alexander Buchanan, a foreman in a Paisley fabric mill, is credited with introducing chenille fabric to Scotland in the 1830s. Here he developed a way to weave fuzzy shawls. Tufts of coloured wool were woven together into a blanket that was then cut into strips. They were treated by heating rollers in order to create the frizz. This resulted in a very soft, fuzzy fabric named chenille. Another Paisley shawl manufacturer went on to further develop the technique. James Templeton and William Quiglay worked to refine this process while working on imitation oriental rugs[1]. The intricate patterns used to be difficult to reproduce by automation, but this technique solved that issue. These men patented the process but Quiglay soon sold out his interest. Templeton then went on to open a successful carpet company (James Templeton & Co) that became a leading carpet manufacturer throughout the 19th and 20th centuries.

In the 1920s and 1930s, Dalton in Northwest Georgia became the tufted bedspread capital of the US thanks to Catherine Evans (later adding Whitener) who initially revived the handcraft technique in the 1890s. Hand-tufted bedspreads with an embroidered appearance became increasingly popular and were referred to as "chenille" a term which stuck.[2] With effective marketing, chenille bedspreads appeared in city department stores and tufting subsequently became important to the economic development of North Georgia, maintaining families even through the Depression era.[2] Merchants organised "spread houses" where products tufted on farms were finished using heat washing to shrink and "set" the fabric. Trucks delivered pattern-stamped sheets and dyed chenille yarns to families for tufting before returning to pay the tufters and collect the spreads for finishing. By this time, tufters all over the state were creating not only bedspreads but pillow shams and mats and selling them by the highway.[2] The first to make a million dollars in the bedspread business, was Dalton County native, B. J. Bandy with the help of his wife, Dicksie Bradley Bandy, by the late 1930s, to be followed by many others.[2]

In the 1930s, usage for the tufted fabric became widely desirable for throws, mats, bedspreads, and carpets, but not as yet, apparel. Companies shifted handwork from the farms into factories for greater control and productivity, encouraged as they were to pursue centralized production by the wage and hour provisions of the National Recovery Administration's tufted bedspread code. With the trend towards mechanization, adapted sewing machines were used to insert raised yarn tufts.[2]

Chenille became popularized for apparel again with commercial production in the 1970s.

Standards of industrial production were not introduced until the 1990s, when the Chenille International Manufacturers Association (CIMA) was formed with the mission to improve and develop the manufacturing processes.[3] From the 1970s each machine head made two chenille yarns straight onto bobbins, a machine could have over 100 spindles (50 heads). Giesse was one of the first major machine manufacturers. Giesse acquired Iteco company in 2010 integrating the chenille yarn electronic quality control directly on their machine. Chenille fabrics are also often used in Letterman jackets also known as "varsity jackets", for the letter patches.

Description

The chenille yarn is manufactured by placing short lengths of yarn, called the "pile", between two "core yarns" and then twisting the yarn together. The edges of these piles then stand at right angles to the yarn’s core, giving chenille both its softness and its characteristic look. Chenille will look different in one direction compared to another, as the fibers catch the light differently. Chenille can appear iridescent without actually using iridescent fibers. The yarn is commonly manufactured from cotton, but can also be made using acrylic, rayon and olefin.

Improvements

One of the problems with chenille yarns is that the tufts can work loose and create bare fabric. This was resolved by using a low melt nylon in the core of the yarn and then autoclaving (steaming) the hanks of yarn to set the pile in place.

In quilting

Since the late 1990s, chenille appeared in quilting in a number of yarns, yards or finishes. As a yarn, it is a soft, feathery synthetic that when stitched onto a backing fabric, gives a velvety appearance, also known as imitation or "faux chenille". Real chenille quilts are made using patches of chenille fabric in various patterns and colors, with or without "ragging" the seams.

The chenille effect by ragging the seams, has been adapted by quilters for a casual country look. A quilt with a so-called "chenille finish" is known as a "rag quilt" or, a "slash quilt" due to the frayed exposed seams of the patches and the method of achieving this. Layers of soft cotton are batted together in patches or blocks and sewn with wide, raw edges to the front. These edges are then cut, or slashed, to create a worn, soft, "chenille" effect.

Care

Many chenille fabrics should be dry cleaned. If hand or machine-washed, they should be machine-dried using low heat, or as a heavy textile, dried flat to avoid stretching, never hung.

References
  1. ^ "James Templeton & Co (1843-1938) - GSA Archives". www.gsaarchives.net..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output .citation q{quotes:"\"""\"""'""'"}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg/12px-Wikisource-logo.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{display:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  2. ^ a b c d e "Chenille bedspreads" at New Georgia Encyclopedia
  3. ^ "B&R Chenille". www.bathandrobes.com.
External links
  • Chenille at apparelsearch.com
  •  Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Chenille" . Encyclopædia Britannica. 6 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press.
  • v
  • t
  • e
FabricWoven
  • Aertex
  • Airdura
  • Airguard
  • Barathea
  • Barkcloth
  • Batiste
  • Bedford cord
  • Bengaline
  • Beta cloth
  • Bombazine
  • Brilliantine
  • Broadcloth
  • Buckram
  • Bunting
  • Burlap
  • Byrd Cloth
  • C change
  • Calico
  • Cambric
  • Canvas
  • Chambray
  • Capilene
  • Cedar bark
  • Challis
  • Char cloth
  • Charmeuse
  • Charvet
  • Cheesecloth
  • Chiffon
  • Chino
  • Chintz
  • Cloqué
  • Cloth of gold
  • Cordura
  • Corduroy
  • Duck
  • Coutil
  • Crape
  • Crêpe
  • Cretonne
  • Dazzle
  • Denim
  • Dimity
  • Donegal tweed
  • Dornix
  • Dowlas
  • Drill
  • Drugget
  • Eolienne
  • Flannel
  • Foulard
  • Fustian
  • Gabardine
  • Gauze
  • Gazar
  • Georgette
  • Ghalamkar
  • Gingham
  • Grenadine
  • Grenfell Cloth
  • Grosgrain
  • Habutai
  • Haircloth
  • Harris Tweed
  • Herringbone
  • Himroo
  • Hodden
  • Irish linen
  • Jamdani
  • Kerseymere
  • Khādī
  • Khaki drill
  • Kente cloth
  • Lamé
  • Lawn
  • Linsey-woolsey
  • Loden
  • Longcloth
  • Mackinaw
  • Madapolam
  • Madras
  • Moleskin
  • Muslin
  • Nainsook
  • Nankeen
  • Ninon
  • Oilskin
  • Organdy
  • Organza
  • Osnaburg
  • Ottoman
  • Oxford
  • Paduasoy
  • Percale
  • Pongee
  • Poplin
  • Rakematiz
  • Rayadillo
  • Rep
  • Rinzu
  • Ripstop
  • Russell cord
  • Saga Nishiki
  • Samite
  • Sateen
  • Satin
  • Saye
  • Scarlet
  • Seersucker
  • Sendal
  • Serge
  • Scrim
  • Shot silk
  • Stuff
  • Taffeta
  • Tais
  • Toile
  • Tucuyo
  • Tweed
  • Twill
  • Ultrasuede
  • Vegetable flannel
  • Ventile
  • Vinyl coated polyester
  • Viyella
  • Voile
  • Wadmal
  • Waffle
  • Wigan
  • Whipcord
  • Zephyr
  • Zorbeez
Figured woven
  • Brocade
  • Camlet
  • Damask
  • Lampas
  • Songket
Pile woven
  • Baize
  • Chenille
  • Corduroy
  • Crimplene
  • Fustian
  • Mockado
  • Moquette
  • Plush
  • Polar fleece
  • Terrycloth
  • Velours du Kasaï
  • Velvet
  • Velveteen
  • Zibeline
Nonwoven
  • Felt
  • Cedar bark
Knitted
  • Boiled wool
  • Coolmax
  • Machine knitting
  • Milliskin
  • Jersey
  • Velour
Netted
  • Bobbinet
  • Carbon fiber
  • Lace
  • Mesh
  • Needlerun net
  • Ninon
  • Tulle
Technical
  • Ballistic nylon
  • Ban-Lon
  • Conductive
  • Darlexx
  • E-textiles
  • Gannex
  • Gore-Tex
  • Lenticular
  • Silnylon
  • Spandex
  • Stub-tex
  • SympaTex
  • Windstopper
Patterns
  • Argyle
  • Bizarre silk
  • Chiné
  • Herringbone
  • Houndstooth
  • Paisley
  • Pin stripes
  • Polka dot
  • Shweshwe
  • Tartan (plaid)
  • Tattersall
Textile fibers
  • Acrylic
  • Alpaca
  • Angora
  • Cashmere
  • Coir
  • Cotton
  • Eisengarn
  • Hemp
  • Jute
  • Kevlar
  • Linen
  • Mohair
  • Nylon
  • Microfiber
  • Olefin
  • Pashmina
  • Polyester
  • Piña
  • Ramie
  • Rayon
  • Sea silk
  • Silk
  • Sisal
  • Spandex
  • Spider silk
  • Wool
Finishing and
printing
  • Androsia
  • Batik
  • Beetling
  • Bingata
  • Bògòlanfini
  • Burnout
  • Calendering
  • Decatising
  • Devoré
  • Finishing
  • Fulling
  • Heatsetting
  • Mercerization
  • Moire
  • Nap
  • Parchmentising
  • Rogan printing
  • Rōketsuzome
  • Roller printing
  • Sanforization
  • Tenterhook
  • Textile printing
  • Warp printing
  • Waxed cotton
  • Woodblock printing
  • Indienne
Fabric mills
  • Carlo Barbera
  • Cerruti
  • Dormeuil
  • Drago
  • Ermenegildo Zegna
  • E. Thomas
  • Holland & Sherry
  • Larusmiani
  • Loro Piana
  • Reda
  • Scabal
  • Vitale Barberis Canonico
Related
  • Dyeing
  • Fiber
  • History of textiles
  • History of silk
  • Knitting
  • Pandy
  • Shrinkage
  • Swatches and strike-offs
  • Synthetic fabric
  • Terminology
  • Manufacturing
  • Preservation
  • Weaving
  • Yarn


4-Way Stretch Nylon Spandex Matte Tricot | Suitable For Sportswear, Activewear, Swimwear, Dancewear, Yoga Wear, Table Cloth (Black)
4-Way Stretch Nylon Spandex Matte Tricot | Suitable For Sportswear, Activewear, Swimwear, Dancewear, Yoga Wear, Table Cloth (Black)
4-Way Stretch Nylon Spandex Matte Tricot is Durable 4-Way Stretch Fabric with Smooth Texture. Content: 80% Nylon, 20% Spandex Weight: 210 GSM Width: 58/60 Inches This Fabric is Suitable for Swimwear, Sportswear, Athletic wear, Activewear, Yoga pants, Leggings and more. 4-Way Stretch Nylon Spandex Matte Tricot is also Dyeable and Applicable for Wet or Digital Printing and Sublimation. This collection is available in 63 colors. Note: All Photos have been taken in studio with best possible lighting and by professional gear. Although we have tried our best to show colors in best way, but it is possible users encounter slight color change due to different color profiles and monitor calibration on various devices.

Click Here to view in augmented reality

$10.95



Stretch Velvet Fabric 60'' Wide by the Yard for Sewing Apparel Costumes Craft (1 YARD, Dusty Rose)
Stretch Velvet Fabric 60'' Wide by the Yard for Sewing Apparel Costumes Craft (1 YARD, Dusty Rose)
Stretch velvet fabric is 58/60" inches wide, 100% polyester and sold by the yard. This stretchy velvet fabric is great for apparel, costumes, dance wear, decorations and more. The velvet has a silky soft feeling and a 4-way stretch. Its 60" width also makes it an ideal fabric for wide-width crafts and apparel projects. All orders will come in continuous yard piece lengths, unless you ask us otherwise! All colors are available in large quantities.

Click Here to view in augmented reality

$7.99



Robert Kaufman Effervescence Single Border Mod Bubbles Primary Fabric by The Yard, Primary
Robert Kaufman Effervescence Single Border Mod Bubbles Primary Fabric by The Yard, Primary
Designed by Amelia Caruso for Robert Kaufman Fabrics this cotton print fabric features an abstract pattern that appears as a burst of colors. It's perfect for quilting and craft projects as well as apparel and home décor accents. Features an 8.5'' single border stripe parallel to the selvage. Colors include red white blue purple green yellow orange tan aqua and black.

Click Here to view in augmented reality

$9.55
-$0.19(-2%)



Cotton Polyester Broadcloth Fabric Premium Apparel Quilting 60" Wide Sold By the Yard Wholesale (1 YARD, Royal Blue)
Cotton Polyester Broadcloth Fabric Premium Apparel Quilting 60" Wide Sold By the Yard Wholesale (1 YARD, Royal Blue)
Cotton Polyester Broadcloth is sold by the yard and available in 45 inches wide fabric. This solid colored broadcloth blend fabric is perfect for shirts, blouses, linings and any other apparel needs. It is also a great fabric for event decorations because of the vibrant and lively colors. Our cotton polyester broadcloth fabric is available in several colors and one of our most popular products. We stock thousands of yards of this cotton broadcloth year round, so get ready to whip out those sewing kits!

Click Here to view in augmented reality

$4.58



Telio Swiss Dot Floral Border Print White/Multi Fabric, Gold/Red/Black, Fabric By The Yard
Telio Swiss Dot Floral Border Print White/Multi Fabric, Gold/Red/Black, Fabric By The Yard
This cotton shirting fabric features Swiss dots or ''clip" dots on a floral print with a double border measuring approximately 15" on each side. It is perfect for heirloom projects or adding texture to quilting apparel such as dresses and blouses and home decor accents such as very lightweight curtains bed skirts or ruffle accents. Colors include white shades of pink red golden yellow and shades of green.

Click Here to view in augmented reality

$7.98
-$1.20(-13%)



Timeless Treasures Plume Diamonds Black/Blue Fabric By The Yard
Timeless Treasures Plume Diamonds Black/Blue Fabric By The Yard
From Timeless Treasures this cotton print fabric is perfect for quilts home décor accents craft projects and apparel. Colors include black jade blue and metallic gold accents.

Click Here to view in augmented reality

$12.00



Ben Textiles Mi Amor Duchess Satin Blush Pink Fabric by The Yard, Blush Pink
Ben Textiles Mi Amor Duchess Satin Blush Pink Fabric by The Yard, Blush Pink
This satin has a beautiful low luster sheen (known as Lamour or Mystique Satin) soft hand and wonderful drape. Perfect for special occasion apparel create blouses dresses and skirts.

Click Here to view in augmented reality

$4.23
-$2.65(-39%)



Textile Creations Indian Batik Montego Bay Gold Abstract Bright Multi Metallic Fabric by The Yard, Bright Multicolor
Textile Creations Indian Batik Montego Bay Gold Abstract Bright Multi Metallic Fabric by The Yard, Bright Multicolor
From Textile Creations this Indian batik is perfect for quilting apparel and home decor accents. Colors include aqua green lime yellow peach orange purple pink and coral with gold metallic accents.

Click Here to view in augmented reality

$8.73
-$2.79(-24%)



A.S Flowers Print - Egyptian Cotton Fine Quality Fabric From Italy-SUMMER IN TUSCANY- Sell by the Yard
A.S Flowers Print - Egyptian Cotton Fine Quality Fabric From Italy-SUMMER IN TUSCANY- Sell by the Yard
Egyptian Cotton Fabric. Imported from Como Italy. Very Fine High Quality Cotton Fabric

Click Here to view in augmented reality

$2.99



Timeless Treasures 0350520 Glow in The Dark Constellations Midnight Fabric by The Yard
Timeless Treasures 0350520 Glow in The Dark Constellations Midnight Fabric by The Yard
From Timeless Treasures this cotton print is perfect for quilting apparel and home decor accents. Colors include white and shades of blue. This fabric features white glow in the dark stars.

Click Here to view in augmented reality

$10.91
-$1.72(-14%)


Twitter
 
Facebook
 
LinkedIn
 
 

 
 

WhmSoft Moblog
Copyright (C) 2006-2020 WhmSoft
All Rights Reserved