Bill Walton
Bill Walton
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Bill Walton
William Theodore Walton III (born November 5, 1952) is an American retired basketball player and television sportscaster. Walton became known playing

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For other people with similar names, see William Walton (disambiguation). Bill Walton Walton in 2008Personal informationBorn (1952-11-05) November 5, 1952 (age 65)
La Mesa, CaliforniaNationality AmericanListed height 6 ft 11 in (2.11 m)Listed weight 210 lb (95 kg)Career informationHigh school Helix (La Mesa, California)College UCLA (1971–1974)NBA draft 1974 / Round: 1 / Pick: 1st overall Selected by the Portland Trail BlazersPlaying career 1974–1987Position CenterNumber 32, 5Career history1974–1978 Portland Trail Blazers1979–1985 San Diego / Los Angeles Clippers1985–1987 Boston Celtics Career highlights and awards
  • 2× NBA champion (1977, 1986)
  • NBA Finals MVP (1977)
  • NBA Most Valuable Player (1978)
  • 2× NBA All-Star (1977, 1978)
  • All-NBA First Team (1978)
  • All-NBA Second Team (1977)
  • 2× NBA All-Defensive First Team (1977, 1978)
  • NBA Sixth Man of the Year (1986)
  • NBA rebounding leader (1977)
  • NBA blocks leader (1977)
  • No. 32 retired by Portland Trail Blazers
  • NBA 50th Anniversary Team
  • 2× NCAA champion (1972, 1973)
  • 2× NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player (1972, 1973)
  • 3× National college player of the year (1972–1974)
  • 3× Consensus first-team All-American (1972–1974)
  • No. 32 retired by UCLA
  • Oregon Sports Hall of Fame
Career NBA statisticsPoints 6,215 (13.3 ppg)Rebounds 4,923 (10.5 rpg)Blocks 1,034 (2.2 bpg) Stats at Basketball-Reference.com Basketball Hall of Fame as player College Basketball Hall of Fame
Inducted in 2006

William Theodore Walton III (born November 5, 1952) is an American retired basketball player and television sportscaster. Walton became known playing for John Wooden's powerhouse UCLA Bruins in the early 1970s, winning three successive College Player of the Year Awards, while leading the Bruins to two national titles. He then went on to have a prominent career in the National Basketball Association (NBA) where he was a league Most Valuable Player (MVP) and won two NBA championships. His professional career was significantly hampered by multiple foot injuries. Walton was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame on May 10, 1993[1] and the Oregon Sports Hall of Fame that same year.

Contents
  • 1 Early life and college career
  • 2 NBA career
    • 2.1 Portland Trail Blazers
    • 2.2 San Diego Clippers
    • 2.3 Boston Celtics
  • 3 NBA career statistics
    • 3.1 Regular season
    • 3.2 Playoffs
  • 4 After retirement
  • 5 Legacy
  • 6 Awards and honors
  • 7 Broadcasting
  • 8 Books
  • 9 Personal life
  • 10 In popular culture
  • 11 See also
  • 12 Further reading
  • 13 References
  • 14 External links
Early life and college career Walton during the 1974 season

Walton was born in La Mesa, California, the son of Gloria Anne (née Hickey) and William Theodore "Ted" Walton.[2] His listed adult playing height was 6 feet 11 inches; it has been reported that Walton is actually taller (7 feet 2 inches, or more) but does not like being categorized as a seven-footer.[3][4]

He played high school basketball at Helix High School.[5] At age 17, Walton played for the United States men's national basketball team at the 1970 FIBA World Championship.[6] He played college basketball for John Wooden at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) from 1971 to 1974, winning the national title in 1972 over Florida State and again in 1973 with an 87–66 win over Memphis State in which Walton made 21 of 22 field goal attempts and scored 44 points, representing more than half his team's total.

The Walton-led 1971–72 UCLA basketball team had a record of 30–0, in the process winning its games by an average margin of more than 30 points. He was the backbone of two consecutive 30–0 seasons and was also part of UCLA's NCAA men's basketball record 88-game winning streak. The UCLA streak contributed to a personal winning streak that lasted almost five years, in which Walton's high school, UCLA freshman (freshmen were ineligible for the varsity at that time) and UCLA varsity teams did not lose a game from the middle of his junior year of high school to the middle of his senior year in college.

Walton was the 1973 recipient of the James E. Sullivan Award as the top amateur athlete in the United States. Walton also received the USBWA College Player of the Year and Naismith College Player of the Year as the top college basketball player in the country three years in a row while attending UCLA, at the same time earning Academic All-American honors three times. Some college basketball historians rate Walton as the greatest who ever played the game at the college level.[7] In Walton's senior year during the 1973–74 season, the school's 88-game winning streak ended with a 71–70 loss to Notre Dame. During the same season, UCLA's record seven consecutive national titles was broken when North Carolina State defeated the Bruins 80–77 in double overtime in the NCAA semi-finals. With Walton's graduation in 1974 and Bruin coach John Wooden's retirement after UCLA's 1975 national title, the UCLA dynasty came to an end.

Prior to joining the varsity team, Walton (18.1 ppg, 68.6 percent field goal percentage), along with Greg Lee (17.9 ppg) and Keith Wilkes (20.0 ppg), was a member of the 20–0 UCLA Freshman team.[8]

NBA career Portland Trail Blazers Walton in 1975.

On leaving college, Walton was drafted by the San Diego Conquistadors of the American Basketball Association[9] and also taken as the number one overall by the Portland Trail Blazers in the 1974 NBA draft[9] and was hailed as the savior of the Portland franchise. He signed with the Trail Blazers but his first two seasons were marred by injury (at different times he broke his nose, foot, wrist and leg) and the Blazers missed the playoffs both years.

Walton and Jack Ramsay holding the 1977 NBA Championship Trophy

It was not until the 1976–77 season that he was healthy enough to play 65 games and, spurred by new head coach Jack Ramsay, the Trail Blazers became the Cinderella team of the NBA. Walton led the NBA in both rebounds per game and blocked shots per game that season, and he was selected to the NBA All-Star Game, but did not participate due to an injury. Walton was named to the NBA's First All-Defensive Team and the All-NBA Second Team for his regular season accomplishments. In the postseason, Walton led Portland to a sweep of the Los Angeles Lakers in the conference finals (arguably holding his own against Kareem Abdul-Jabbar during the series)[10] and went on to help the Trail Blazers to the NBA title over the favored Philadelphia 76ers despite losing the first two games of the series. Walton was named the Finals MVP.

The following year, the Blazers won 50 of their first 60 games before Walton suffered a broken foot in what turned out to be the first in a string of foot and ankle injuries that cut short his career. He nonetheless won the league MVP that season (1978) and the Sporting News NBA MVP, as well. He played in his only All-Star Game in 1978 and was named to both the NBA's First All-Defensive Team and the All-NBA First Team. Walton returned to action for the playoffs, but was reinjured in the second game of a series against the Seattle SuperSonics. Without Walton to lead them, Portland lost the series to Seattle in six games. As it turned out, Walton would never play for the Trail Blazers again. During the offseason, Walton demanded to be traded, citing unethical and incompetent treatment of his and other players' injuries by the Blazers' front office. He did not get his wish and sat out the 1978–79 season in protest, signing with the San Diego Clippers when he became a free agent in 1979.[11]

San Diego Clippers

Walton spent more time on the disabled list than on the court with his hometown San Diego Clippers. He only played 14 games for the Clippers during the 1979–80 season before missing all of the next two seasons, undergoing several reconstructive surgeries on his injured foot. Following extensive rehabilitation, Walton's foot began to improve; after playing only 14 games from 1979–82, he played 33 games in 1982–83, 55 games in 1983–84, and a then-career high 67 in 1984–85 by which time the Clippers had moved to Los Angeles.

Boston Celtics Michael Cooper watches as Walton grabs a rebound during the 1987 NBA Finals.

After the 1984–85 campaign, Walton called on two of the league's premier teams, the Boston Celtics and the Los Angeles Lakers. After several players on the Celtics said they liked the idea of having Walton as a teammate backing up Robert Parish and Kevin McHale, Red Auerbach made the deal happen. One anecdote that particularly illustrates Walton's decision to choose the Celtics over the Lakers involves Larry Bird, who happened to be in Auerbach's office when Walton called. Bird said that if Walton felt healthy enough to play that it was good enough for him, as opposed to Lakers GM Jerry West, who was hedging his interest in Walton pending a doctor's report. Boston acquired Walton by sending popular forward Cedric Maxwell to the Clippers along with a first-round draft pick. Providing a reliable backup to McHale and Parish, Walton played in a career-high 80 games and received the NBA Sixth Man Award that season en route to the NBA Championship, becoming the only player to have ever won an NBA Finals MVP, Sixth Man Award, and regular season MVP.

Walton injured himself again the following season, but returned for the 1987 playoffs. He spent the 1987–88 season on the injured list. He attempted a comeback in February 1990, but injury intervened and he retired from the game.

NBA career statistics Legend   GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game  FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw percentage  RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game  BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high † Denotes seasons in which Walton won an NBA championship * Led the league Regular season Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG 1974–75 Portland 35 – 32.9 .513 – .686 12.6 4.8 .8 2.7 12.8 1975–76 Portland 51 – 33.1 .471 – .583 13.4 4.3 1.0 1.6 16.1 1976–77† Portland 65 – 34.8 .528 – .697 14.4* 3.8 1.0 3.2* 18.6 1977–78 Portland 58 – 33.3 .522 – .720 13.2 5.0 1.0 2.5 18.9 1979–80 San Diego 14 – 24.1 .503 – .593 9.0 2.4 .6 2.7 13.9 1982–83 San Diego 33 32 33.3 .528 – .556 9.8 3.6 1.0 3.6 14.1 1983–84 San Diego 55 46 26.8 .556 .000 .597 8.7 3.3 .8 1.6 12.1 1984–85 L.A. Clippers 67 37 24.6 .521 .000 .680 9.0 2.3 .7 2.1 10.1 1985–86† Boston 80 2 19.3 .562 – .713 6.8 2.1 .5 1.3 7.6 1986–87 Boston 10 0 11.2 .385 – .533 3.1 .9 .1 1.0 2.8 Career 468 117 28.3 .521 .000 .660 10.5 3.4 .8 2.2 13.3 All-Star 1 1 31.0 .429 – 1.000 10.0 2.0 3.0 2.0 15.0 Playoffs Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG 1977† Portland 1939.7 .507 – .684 15.2 5.5 1.1 3.4 18.2 1978 Portland 2 – 24.5 .611 – .714 11.0 2.0 1.5 1.5 13.5 1986† Boston 16 0 18.2 .581 .000 .826 6.4 1.7 .4 .8 7.9 1987 Boston 12 0 8.5 .480 – .357 2.6 .8 .3 0.3 2.4 Career[9] 49 0 24.4 .525 .000 .673 9.1 3.0 .7 1.7 10.8 After retirement

His ankle problems became so severe years later that he had both his ankles surgically fused. His saga of injury and failed rehabs was connected to the use of painkillers by the doctor who was assigned to his case.[citation needed] Walton has said repeatedly in his broadcasts that he is just as much to blame for taking the medication as the doctor was for giving it to him. In a June 8, 2010 interview on The Dan Patrick Show, Walton admitted to contemplating suicide for a time due to the constant pain resulting from injuries sustained during his NBA career.[12] Walton's injuries, along with his 1978–1979 year-long protest, gave him an unpleasant, if not odd, record of missing the most games during an NBA playing career, when taking into account the number of years he was officially listed as a player on a team roster.[citation needed]

Legacy

Walton was inducted into both the Basketball Hall of Fame and the Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1993. Walton also had his number 32 retired by the Blazers in 1989. His number 32 was also retired by UCLA, in a joint ceremony with fellow basketball legend, number 33, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. He is also enshrined in the UCLA Hall of Fame. In 1996, he was named as one of the NBA's 50 Greatest Players of all time. He was added to the San Diego Hall of Champions in 1990.

Awards and honors Walton guarding the Pistons' Curtis Rowe in 1976. Coincidentally, the two players were only a few years apart at UCLA.
  • 2× NBA champion (1977, 1986)
  • NBA Finals MVP (1977)
  • NBA Most Valuable Player (1978)
  • 2× NBA All-Star (1977–1978)
  • All-NBA First Team (1978)
  • All-NBA Second Team (1977)
  • 2× NBA All-Defensive First Team (1977–1978)
  • NBA Sixth Man of the Year (1986)
  • NBA 50th Anniversary Team
  • No. 32 retired by Portland Trail Blazers
  • 2× NCAA champion (1972–1973)
  • 2× NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player (1972–1973)
  • 3× Naismith College Player of the Year (1972–1974)
  • 3× USBWA Player of the Year (1972–1974)
  • 3× Adolph Rupp Trophy (1972–1974)
  • 2× Helms Foundation College Player of the Year (1972–1973)
  • 3× Sporting News College Player of the Year (1972–1974)
  • 2× AP College Player of the Year (1972–1973)
  • 3× Consensus first-team All-American (1972–1974)
  • 3× First-team All-Pac-8 (1972–1974)
  • No. 32 retired by UCLA
Broadcasting

After his retirement as a player, Walton overcame a stuttering problem[13] to become a successful and controversial NBA color commentator for CBS (1990), NBC (1990–2002), the Los Angeles Clippers (1990–2002) and ABC/ESPN (2002–2009). After nineteen years working in broadcasting, he left ESPN in November 2009, as the result of back problems dating back to an injury suffered while playing at UCLA. Following surgery on his back, Walton returned to broadcasting as a part-time commentator for the Sacramento Kings for 2010–11 and 2011–12.

In July 2012, ESPN and the Pac-12 Network announced that he would return to full-time broadcasting as a game analyst for Pac-12 basketball coverage, starting with the 2012–13 season.[14] His commentary has been noted for his frequent use of catchphrases and hyperbole. Walton typically was paired with Steve "Snapper" Jones for national NBA games because he and Jones had a point-counterpoint banter during games.[15] Despite their frequent on-air argumentative banter they are friends, as was shown in Walton's short lived 2003 TV series Bill Walton's Long Strange Trip.

While broadcasting games of the Oregon Ducks, he frequently calls Ducks forward Dwayne Benjamin Snoop Dogg, because of his resemblance to the rapper.[16]

Books

His memoir, Back from the Dead: Searching for the Sound, Shining the Light and Throwing It Down, was released by Simon and Schuster in March 2016.[17] It remained on The New York Times bestseller list for two weeks in April 2016.[18]

Walton, who has a service dog,[19] wrote the foreword to the 2015 book Unconditional Honor: Wounded Warriors and their Dogs by author Cathy Scott.[20]

Personal life

Walton currently resides in his hometown of San Diego with his wife Lori. He and his first wife, Susie, had four sons: Adam, Nathan, Luke, and Chris. Luke played from 2003 to 2012 for the Los Angeles Lakers, won both the 2009 and 2010 NBA Finals, making Bill and Luke the first father-son pair to have both won multiple NBA championships. Luke was named head coach of the Lakers on April 29, 2016, after two years as an assistant for the Golden State Warriors. Another of Walton's sons, Chris, played for San Diego State. Nate, his middle son, played basketball at Princeton but then entered the corporate world and earned his MBA from Stanford University's Graduate School of Business. (Bill Walton attended Stanford Law School for two years but never graduated.) Nate was on the ballot for the 2003 California Recall Election, receiving 1,697 votes. Walton's other son, Adam, also played NCAA basketball at Louisiana State University.

Walton is a well-known fan of the Grateful Dead, Allman Brothers Band, Neil Young, Phish, and Bob Dylan. Walton is particularly attached to the Grateful Dead, whose concerts he started attending in 1967, while he was still in high school.[21] He attended more than 850[22] Grateful Dead concerts, including traveling with the band to Egypt for its famous 1978 performance before the Pyramids (joining the band on drums),[23] and quotes Grateful Dead lyrics in TV and radio interviews. To fellow Deadheads, Walton is fondly known as "Grateful Red" and the "Big Red Deadhead" and "World's Tallest Deadhead".[24][25][26] In the video for "Touch of Grey", Grateful Dead drummer Mickey Hart is wearing a Celtics jacket that was given to him by Walton.[citation needed] In 2001, Walton was inducted into The Grateful Dead Hall of Honor.[27] While broadcasting a game between the Oregon Ducks and USC Trojans, Walton talked about a speech Dylan gave at MusiCares, and ESPN actually had prepared graphics about Dylan's career highlights.[28]

Walton also considers himself a fan and friend of the late writer Ken Kesey. In 2015, he made a visit to the Ken Kesey Collection while on a stop at the University of Oregon.[29]

Walton expounds upon his music interests on his own satellite radio show, One More Saturday Night (named after the Dead song of the same name), heard during late prime time on Sirius Radio's Jam On and XM Radio's Grateful Dead channel. Walton has stated in his online introduction to his radio show column that he enjoys going to concerts alone because then he has fewer things in between him and reaching the omega point that all concert goers seek at shows.

Walton still has a committed relationship with the Celtics, if not professionally, as a fan. Despite the area where he grew up, and the team his son Luke played for, Walton is careful to point out, "Even though I grew up in the heart of Laker country, the Celtics were always MY team". He keeps a picture of the floor of the old Boston Garden in his kitchen. Walton joined the Celtics broadcast crew for a West Coast road trip in 2011.

In 1990, Walton was inducted by the San Diego Hall of Champions into the Breitbard Hall of Fame honoring San Diego's finest athletes both on and off the playing surface.[30]

In popular culture

Walton has cameo appearances in the films 88 and 1, Celtic Pride, Little Nicky and Semi-Pro, and appeared as Sven the Wise in the 2011 Capital One Visigoth SportsNet commercials. He is also mentioned by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 comedy Airplane! ("Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!")

Bill Walton is a playable character in the video games NBA Street Vol. 2 (2003), NBA Street V3 (2005), NBA 2K12 (2011), NBA 2K13 (2012), NBA 2K14 (2013), NBA 2K15 (2014), NBA 2K16 (2015) and NBA Jam: On Fire Edition (2011), and lent his voice to NBA 2K5 and NBA Shootout 2004.

Walton appeared in an episode of the reality TV show Shark Tank on January 20, 2012, where he helped to sell the "Clean Bottle", a water bottle that unscrews at both ends for easier cleaning.

See also
  • National Basketball Association portal
  • List of National Basketball Association annual rebounding leaders
Further reading
  • Heisler, Mark (2003). Giants: The 25 Greatest Centers of All Time. Chicago: Triumph Books. ISBN 1-57243-577-1. 
References
  1. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20061205053830/http://hoophall.com/halloffamers/Walton.htm. Archived from the original on December 5, 2006. Retrieved December 16, 2006.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  2. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20071024182509/http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~battle/celeb/walton.htm. Archived from the original on October 24, 2007. Retrieved March 19, 2007.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  3. ^ Araton, Harvey (June 8, 1994). "ON PRO BASKETBALL; Feet of Dancer, Touch of Surgeon, and a Shot, Too". The New York Times. Retrieved May 4, 2010. 
  4. ^ "Best Basketball Players Over 6-6". SI.com. Retrieved 2010-05-27. 
  5. ^ Salas, Dagny (March 8, 2010). "The Next Reinvention of Bill Walton". voiceofsandiego.org. Archived from the original on November 17, 2010. Retrieved November 16, 2010. 
  6. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20070824215543/http://www.usabasketball.com/history/mwc_1970.html. Archived from the original on August 24, 2007. Retrieved August 28, 2007.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  7. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20070224145709/http://sportsline.com/collegebasketball/mayhem/history/yearbyyear/1973. Archived from the original on February 24, 2007. Retrieved April 7, 2007.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  8. ^ 1972 Official Collegiate Basketball Guide, College Athletics Publishing Service, 1971
  9. ^ a b c "Bill Walton Past Stats, Playoff Stats, Statistics, History, and Awards". Databasebasketball.com. 1952-11-05. Archived from the original on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2016-02-25. 
  10. ^ "L.a. Couldn't Move The Mountain". CNN. May 23, 1977. Archived from the original on May 30, 2009. Retrieved April 26, 2010. 
  11. ^ Love, Matt (2007). Red Hot and Rollin': A Retrospection of the Portland Trail Blazers' 1976–77 NBA Championship Season. Pacific City, Oregon: Nestucca Spit Press. p. 119. ISBN 978-0-9744364-8-7. 
  12. ^ "Walton talks about painful periods in life, Wooden, NBA finals". Archived from the original on June 13, 2010. Retrieved June 8, 2010. 
  13. ^ Jordan, Pat (October 28, 2001). "Bill Walton's Inside Game". The New York Times. Retrieved 2010-05-27. 
  14. ^ "Hiestand: Bill Walton talks about his return to ESPN". USA Today. 2012-07-16. 
  15. ^ Curtis, Bryan (12 June 2002). "Bill Walton, Broadcasting Genius". Slate. 
  16. ^ Rodger Sherman (12 February 2015). "Bill Walton keeps calling Oregon's Dwayne Benjamin 'Snoop Dogg'". SBNation.com. Vox Media. 
  17. ^ "BACK FROM THE DEAD by Bill Walton – Kirkus Reviews". kirkusreviews.com. 
  18. ^
  19. ^ "NBA Legend Bill Walton's Career Advice: 'You Cannot Finish Unless You Start'". ABC News. 25 March 2016. 
  20. ^ "Author To Lecture And Sign Book About Wounded Warriors And Their Dogs". coronadonewsca.com. 
  21. ^ Varga, George. "Bill Walton has seen the Dead 850+ times". sandiegouniontribune.com. Retrieved 8 September 2018. 
  22. ^ Edgers, Geoff (12 June 2015). "The strange story of Grateful Dead's path to the summer's hottest ticket" – via washingtonpost.com. 
  23. ^ Hilton, Lisette (2000-09-25). Walton hit the boards. ESPN. Retrieved 2008-11-01. 
  24. ^ "GRATEFUL RED BILL WALTON SHARES STRANGE JOURNEY | THE OFFICIAL SITE OF THE PHOENIX SUNS". www.nba.com. Retrieved 2018-02-20. 
  25. ^ "Basketball legend and very tall Deadhead Bill Walton to write a book". NY Daily News. Retrieved 2018-02-20. 
  26. ^ "World's tallest Deadhead can't contain his excitement". Chicago Sun-Times. Retrieved 2018-02-20. 
  27. ^ Administrator. "Grateful Dead Hall of Honor". www.billwalton.com. Retrieved 2018-02-20. 
  28. ^ Rodger Sherman (12 February 2015). "Bill Walton talked about Bob Dylan on air for 3 whole minutes of a basketball game". SBNation.com. Vox Media. 
  29. ^ "Basketball Legend Bill Walton and Kesey's Merry Pranksters Visit UO Libraries SCUA". library.uoregon.edu. Retrieved 5 February 2015. 
  30. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20090103153636/http://www.sdhoc.com/awards/hall-of-fame/basketball/bill-walton/. Archived from the original on January 3, 2009. Retrieved June 23, 2009.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
External links Wikimedia Commons has media related to Bill Walton.
  • Career statistics and player information from Basketball-Reference.com
  • Bill Walton's official site
  • Bill Walton's Historical Profile on NBA.com
  • Bill Walton commentary on Pete Maravich on YouTube
Links to related articles
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1974 NBA DraftFirst round
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  • Tommy Burleson
  • John Shumate
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  • Tom McMillen
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  • Keith Wilkes
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  • Al Eberhard
  • Cliff Pondexter
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Second round
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Portland Trail Blazers 1976–77 NBA champions
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Boston Celtics 1985–86 NBA champions
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  • 32 McHale
  • 33 Bird (Finals MVP)
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  • 44 Ainge
  • 45 Thirdkill
  • 50 Kite
  • Head coach Jones
  • Assistant coaches Rodgers
  • Ford
  • Badger
  • Regular season
  • Playoffs
  • v
  • t
  • e
Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame Class of 1993Players
  • Walt Bellamy
  • Julius Erving
  • Dan Issel
  • Dick McGuire
  • Ann Meyers
  • Calvin Murphy
  • Uljana Semjonova
  • Bill Walton
  • v
  • t
  • e
Members of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of FamePlayersGuards
  • R. Allen
  • Archibald
  • Beckman
  • Belov
  • Bing
  • Blazejowski
  • Borgmann
  • Brennan
  • Cervi
  • Cheeks
  • Clayton
  • Cooper-Dyke
  • Cousy
  • Dampier
  • Davies
  • Drexler
  • Dumars
  • Edwards
  • Frazier
  • Friedman
  • Galis
  • Gervin
  • Goodrich
  • Greer
  • Guerin
  • Hanson
  • Haynes
  • Holman
  • Hyatt
  • Isaacs
  • Iverson
  • Jeannette
  • D. Johnson
  • E. Johnson
  • K. Jones
  • S. Jones
  • Jordan
  • Kidd
  • Lieberman
  • Maravich
  • Marcari
  • Marčiulionis
  • Martin
  • McDermott
  • McGrady
  • D. McGuire
  • Meyers
  • R. Miller
  • Monroe
  • C. Murphy
  • Nash
  • Page
  • Payton
  • Petrović
  • Phillip
  • Posey
  • Richmond
  • Robertson
  • Rodgers
  • Roosma
  • J. Russell
  • Schommer
  • Scott
  • Sedran
  • Sharman
  • K. Smith
  • Staley
  • Steinmetz
  • Stockton
  • Swoopes
  • Thomas
  • Thompson
  • Vandivier
  • Wanzer
  • West
  • J. White
  • Wilkens
  • Woodard
  • Wooden
Forwards
  • Arizin
  • Barkley
  • Barry
  • Baylor
  • Bird
  • Bradley
  • R. Brown
  • Cunningham
  • Curry
  • Dalipagić
  • Dantley
  • DeBusschere
  • Dehnert
  • Endacott
  • English
  • Erving
  • Foster
  • Fulks
  • Gale
  • Gates
  • Gola
  • Hagan
  • Havlicek
  • Hawkins
  • Hayes
  • Haywood
  • Heinsohn
  • Hill
  • Howell
  • G. Johnson
  • King
  • Lucas
  • Luisetti
  • K. Malone
  • McClain
  • B. McCracken
  • J. McCracken
  • McGinnis
  • McHale
  • Mikkelsen
  • C. Miller
  • Mullin
  • Pettit
  • Pippen
  • Pollard
  • Radja
  • Ramsey
  • Rodman
  • Schayes
  • E. Schmidt
  • O. Schmidt
  • Stokes
  • C. Thompson
  • T. Thompson
  • Twyman
  • Walker
  • Washington
  • N. White
  • Wilkes
  • Wilkins
  • Worthy
  • Yardley
Centers
  • Abdul-Jabbar
  • Barlow
  • Beaty
  • Bellamy
  • Chamberlain
  • Ćosić
  • Cowens
  • Crawford
  • Daniels
  • DeBernardi
  • Donovan
  • Ewing
  • Gallatin
  • Gilmore
  • Gruenig
  • Harris-Stewart
  • Houbregs
  • Issel
  • W. Johnson
  • Johnston
  • M. Krause
  • Kurland
  • Lanier
  • Leslie
  • Lovellette
  • Lapchick
  • Macauley
  • M. Malone
  • McAdoo
  • Meneghin
  • Mikan
  • Mourning
  • S. Murphy
  • Mutombo
  • Olajuwon
  • O'Neal
  • Parish
  • Pereira
  • Reed
  • Risen
  • Robinson
  • B. Russell
  • Sabonis
  • Sampson
  • Semjonova
  • Thurmond
  • Unseld
  • Wachter
  • Walton
  • Yao
Coaches
  • Alexeeva
  • P. Allen
  • Anderson
  • Auerbach
  • Auriemma
  • Barmore
  • Barry
  • Blood
  • Boeheim
  • L. Brown
  • Calhoun
  • Calipari
  • Cann
  • Carlson
  • Carnesecca
  • Carnevale
  • Carril
  • Case
  • Chancellor
  • Chaney
  • Conradt
  • Crum
  • Daly
  • Dean
  • Díaz-Miguel
  • Diddle
  • Drake
  • Driesell
  • Ferrándiz
  • Gaines
  • Gamba
  • Gardner
  • Gaze
  • Gill
  • Gomelsky
  • Gunter
  • Hannum
  • Harshman
  • Haskins
  • Hatchell
  • Heinsohn
  • Hickey
  • Hobson
  • Holzman
  • Hughes
  • Hurley
  • Iba
  • Izzo
  • P. Jackson
  • Julian
  • Keaney
  • Keogan
  • Knight
  • Krzyzewski
  • Kundla
  • Lambert
  • Leonard
  • Lewis
  • Litwack
  • Loeffler
  • Lonborg
  • Magee
  • McCutchan
  • McGraw
  • A. McGuire
  • F. McGuire
  • McLendon
  • Meanwell
  • Meyer
  • Miller
  • Moore
  • Nelson
  • Nikolić
  • Novosel
  • Olson
  • Pitino
  • Ramsay
  • Richardson
  • Riley
  • Rubini
  • Rupp
  • Rush
  • Sachs
  • Self
  • Sharman
  • Shelton
  • Sloan
  • D. Smith
  • Stringer
  • Summitt
  • Tarkanian
  • Taylor
  • Teague
  • J. Thompson
  • VanDerveer
  • Wade
  • Watts
  • Wilkens
  • G. Williams
  • R. Williams
  • Wooden
  • Woolpert
  • Wootten
  • Yow
Contributors
  • Abbott
  • Barksdale
  • Bee
  • Biasone
  • H. Brown
  • W. Brown
  • Bunn
  • Buss
  • Clifton
  • Colangelo
  • Cooper
  • Davidson
  • Douglas
  • Duer
  • Embry
  • Fagan
  • Fisher
  • Fleisher
  • Gavitt
  • Gottlieb
  • Granik
  • Gulick
  • Harrison
  • Hearn
  • Henderson
  • Hepp
  • Hickox
  • Hinkle
  • Irish
  • M. Jackson
  • Jernstedt
  • Jones
  • Kennedy
  • Knight
  • J. Krause
  • Lemon
  • Liston
  • Lloyd
  • McLendon
  • Lobo
  • Mokray
  • Morgan
  • Morgenweck
  • Naismith
  • Newell
  • Newton
  • J. O'Brien
  • L. O'Brien
  • Olsen
  • Podoloff
  • Porter
  • Raveling
  • Reid
  • Reinsdorf
  • Ripley
  • Sanders
  • Saperstein
  • Schabinger
  • St. John
  • Stagg
  • Stanković
  • Steitz
  • Stern
  • Taylor
  • Thorn
  • Tower
  • Trester
  • Vitale
  • Wells
  • Welts
  • Wilke
  • Winter
  • Zollner
Referees
  • Bavetta
  • Enright
  • Garretson
  • Hepbron
  • Hoyt
  • Kennedy
  • Leith
  • Mihalik
  • Nichols
  • Nucatola
  • Quigley
  • Rudolph
  • Shirley
  • Strom
  • Tobey
  • Walsh
Teams
  • 1960 United States Olympic Team
  • 1992 United States Olympic Team
  • All-American Red Heads
  • Buffalo Germans
  • The First Team
  • Harlem Globetrotters
  • Immaculata College
  • New York Renaissance
  • Original Celtics
  • Texas Western
  • v
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National Basketball Association's 50 Greatest Players in NBA History
  • Kareem Abdul-Jabbar
  • Nate Archibald
  • Paul Arizin
  • Charles Barkley
  • Rick Barry
  • Elgin Baylor
  • Dave Bing
  • Larry Bird
  • Wilt Chamberlain
  • Bob Cousy
  • Dave Cowens
  • Billy Cunningham
  • Dave DeBusschere
  • Clyde Drexler
  • Julius Erving
  • Patrick Ewing
  • Walt Frazier
  • George Gervin
  • Hal Greer
  • John Havlicek
  • Elvin Hayes
  • Magic Johnson
  • Sam Jones
  • Michael Jordan
  • Jerry Lucas
  • Karl Malone
  • Moses Malone
  • Pete Maravich
  • Kevin McHale
  • George Mikan
  • Earl Monroe
  • Hakeem Olajuwon
  • Shaquille O'Neal
  • Robert Parish
  • Bob Pettit
  • Scottie Pippen
  • Willis Reed
  • Oscar Robertson
  • David Robinson
  • Bill Russell
  • Dolph Schayes
  • Bill Sharman
  • John Stockton
  • Isiah Thomas
  • Nate Thurmond
  • Wes Unseld
  • Bill Walton
  • Jerry West
  • Lenny Wilkens
  • James Worthy
  • v
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  • e
Bill Russell NBA Finals Most Valuable Player Award
  • 1969: West
  • 1970: Reed
  • 1971: Alcindor
  • 1972: Chamberlain
  • 1973: Reed
  • 1974: Havlicek
  • 1975: Barry
  • 1976: White
  • 1977: Walton
  • 1978: Unseld
  • 1979: D. Johnson
  • 1980: E. Johnson
  • 1981: Maxwell
  • 1982: E. Johnson
  • 1983: Malone
  • 1984: Bird
  • 1985: Abdul-Jabbar
  • 1986: Bird
  • 1987: E. Johnson
  • 1988: Worthy
  • 1989: Dumars
  • 1990: Thomas
  • 1991: Jordan
  • 1992: Jordan
  • 1993: Jordan
  • 1994: Olajuwon
  • 1995: Olajuwon
  • 1996: Jordan
  • 1997: Jordan
  • 1998: Jordan
  • 1999: Duncan
  • 2000: O'Neal
  • 2001: O'Neal
  • 2002: O'Neal
  • 2003: Duncan
  • 2004: Billups
  • 2005: Duncan
  • 2006: Wade
  • 2007: Parker
  • 2008: Pierce
  • 2009: Bryant
  • 2010: Bryant
  • 2011: Nowitzki
  • 2012: James
  • 2013: James
  • 2014: Leonard
  • 2015: Iguodala
  • 2016: James
  • 2017: Durant
  • 2018: Durant
  • v
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  • e
NBA Most Valuable Player Award
  • 1956: Pettit
  • 1957: Cousy
  • 1958: Russell
  • 1959: Pettit
  • 1960: Chamberlain
  • 1961: Russell
  • 1962: Russell
  • 1963: Russell
  • 1964: Robertson
  • 1965: Russell
  • 1966: Chamberlain
  • 1967: Chamberlain
  • 1968: Chamberlain
  • 1969: Unseld
  • 1970: Reed
  • 1971: Alcindor
  • 1972: Abdul-Jabbar
  • 1973: Cowens
  • 1974: Abdul-Jabbar
  • 1975: McAdoo
  • 1976: Abdul-Jabbar
  • 1977: Abdul-Jabbar
  • 1978: Walton
  • 1979: M. Malone
  • 1980: Abdul-Jabbar
  • 1981: Erving
  • 1982: M. Malone
  • 1983: M. Malone
  • 1984: Bird
  • 1985: Bird
  • 1986: Bird
  • 1987: Johnson
  • 1988: Jordan
  • 1989: Johnson
  • 1990: Johnson
  • 1991: Jordan
  • 1992: Jordan
  • 1993: Barkley
  • 1994: Olajuwon
  • 1995: Robinson
  • 1996: Jordan
  • 1997: K. Malone
  • 1998: Jordan
  • 1999: K. Malone
  • 2000: O'Neal
  • 2001: Iverson
  • 2002: Duncan
  • 2003: Duncan
  • 2004: Garnett
  • 2005: Nash
  • 2006: Nash
  • 2007: Nowitzki
  • 2008: Bryant
  • 2009: James
  • 2010: James
  • 2011: Rose
  • 2012: James
  • 2013: James
  • 2014: Durant
  • 2015: Curry
  • 2016: Curry
  • 2017: Westbrook
  • 2018: Harden
  • v
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  • e
NBA Sixth Man of the Year Award
  • 1983: Jones
  • 1984: McHale
  • 1985: McHale
  • 1986: Walton
  • 1987: Pierce
  • 1988: Tarpley
  • 1989: Johnson
  • 1990: Pierce
  • 1991: Schrempf
  • 1992: Schrempf
  • 1993: Robinson
  • 1994: Curry
  • 1995: Mason
  • 1996: Kukoč
  • 1997: Starks
  • 1998: Manning
  • 1999: Armstrong
  • 2000: Rogers
  • 2001: McKie
  • 2002: Williamson
  • 2003: Jackson
  • 2004: Jamison
  • 2005: B. Gordon
  • 2006: Miller
  • 2007: Barbosa
  • 2008: Ginóbili
  • 2009: Terry
  • 2010: Crawford
  • 2011: Odom
  • 2012: Harden
  • 2013: Smith
  • 2014: Crawford
  • 2015: Williams
  • 2016: Crawford
  • 2017: E. Gordon
  • 2018: Williams
  • v
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  • e
NBA season rebounding leaders
  • 1951: Schayes
  • 1952: Foust and Hutchins
  • 1953: Mikan
  • 1954: Gallatin
  • 1955: Johnston
  • 1956: Pettit
  • 1957: Stokes
  • 1958: Russell
  • 1959: Russell
  • 1960: Chamberlain
  • 1961: Chamberlain
  • 1962: Chamberlain
  • 1963: Chamberlain
  • 1964: Russell
  • 1965: Russell
  • 1966: Chamberlain
  • 1967: Chamberlain
  • 1968: Chamberlain
  • 1969: Chamberlain
  • 1970: Hayes
  • 1971: Chamberlain
  • 1972: Chamberlain
  • 1973: Chamberlain
  • 1974: Hayes
  • 1975: Unseld
  • 1976: Abdul-Jabbar
  • 1977: Walton
  • 1978: T. Robinson
  • 1979: Malone
  • 1980: Nater
  • 1981: Malone
  • 1982: Malone
  • 1983: Malone
  • 1984: Malone
  • 1985: Malone
  • 1986: Laimbeer
  • 1987: Barkley
  • 1988: Cage
  • 1989: Olajuwon
  • 1990: Olajuwon
  • 1991: D. Robinson
  • 1992: Rodman
  • 1993: Rodman
  • 1994: Rodman
  • 1995: Rodman
  • 1996: Rodman
  • 1997: Rodman
  • 1998: Rodman
  • 1999: Webber
  • 2000: Mutombo
  • 2001: Mutombo
  • 2002: Wallace
  • 2003: Wallace
  • 2004: Garnett
  • 2005: Garnett
  • 2006: Garnett
  • 2007: Garnett
  • 2008: Howard
  • 2009: Howard
  • 2010: Howard
  • 2011: Love
  • 2012: Howard
  • 2013: Howard
  • 2014: Jordan
  • 2015: Jordan
  • 2016: Drummond
  • 2017: Whiteside
  • 2018: Drummond
  • v
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  • e
NBA season blocks leaders
  • 1974: Smith
  • 1975: Abdul-Jabbar
  • 1976: Abdul-Jabbar
  • 1977: Walton
  • 1978: Johnson
  • 1979: Abdul-Jabbar
  • 1980: Abdul-Jabbar
  • 1981: Johnson
  • 1982: Johnson
  • 1983: Rollins
  • 1984: Eaton
  • 1985: Eaton
  • 1986: Bol
  • 1987: Eaton
  • 1988: Eaton
  • 1989: Bol
  • 1990: Olajuwon
  • 1991: Olajuwon
  • 1992: Robinson
  • 1993: Olajuwon
  • 1994: Mutombo
  • 1995: Mutombo
  • 1996: Mutombo
  • 1997: Bradley
  • 1998: Camby
  • 1999: Mourning
  • 2000: Mourning
  • 2001: Ratliff
  • 2002: Wallace
  • 2003: Ratliff
  • 2004: Ratliff
  • 2005: Kirilenko
  • 2006: Camby
  • 2007: Camby
  • 2008: Camby
  • 2009: Howard
  • 2010: Howard
  • 2011: Bogut
  • 2012: Ibaka
  • 2013: Ibaka
  • 2014: Davis
  • 2015: Davis
  • 2016: Whiteside
  • 2017: Gobert
  • 2018: Davis
  • v
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  • e
NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament Most Outstanding Player
  • 1939: Hull
  • 1940: Huffman
  • 1941: Kotz
  • 1942: Dallmar
  • 1943: Sailors
  • 1944: Ferrin
  • 1945: Kurland
  • 1946: Kurland
  • 1947: Kaftan
  • 1948: Groza
  • 1949: Groza
  • 1950: Dambrot
  • 1951: Spivey
  • 1952: Lovellette
  • 1953: Born
  • 1954: Gola
  • 1955: Russell
  • 1956: Lear
  • 1957: Chamberlain
  • 1958: Baylor
  • 1959: West
  • 1960: Lucas
  • 1961: Lucas
  • 1962: Hogue
  • 1963: Heyman
  • 1964: Hazzard
  • 1965: Bradley
  • 1966: Chambers
  • 1967: Alcindor
  • 1968: Alcindor
  • 1969: Alcindor
  • 1970: Wicks
  • 1971: Porter *
  • 1972: Walton
  • 1973: Walton
  • 1974: Thompson
  • 1975: Washington
  • 1976: Benson
  • 1977: Lee
  • 1978: Givens
  • 1979: Johnson
  • 1980: Griffith
  • 1981: Thomas
  • 1982: Worthy
  • 1983: Olajuwon
  • 1984: Ewing
  • 1985: Pinckney
  • 1986: Ellison
  • 1987: Smart
  • 1988: Manning
  • 1989: Rice
  • 1990: Hunt
  • 1991: Laettner
  • 1992: Hurley
  • 1993: Williams
  • 1994: Williamson
  • 1995: O'Bannon
  • 1996: Delk
  • 1997: Simon
  • 1998: Sheppard
  • 1999: Hamilton
  • 2000: Cleaves
  • 2001: Battier
  • 2002: Dixon
  • 2003: Anthony
  • 2004: Okafor
  • 2005: May
  • 2006: Noah
  • 2007: Brewer
  • 2008: Chalmers
  • 2009: Ellington
  • 2010: Singler
  • 2011: Walker
  • 2012: Davis
  • 2013: Hancock
  • 2014: Napier
  • 2015: Jones
  • 2016: Arcidiacono
  • 2017: Berry
  • 2018: DiVincenzo

*Ruled ineligible after tournament

  • v
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  • e
Naismith Men's College Player of the Year
  • 1969: Alcindor
  • 1970: Maravich
  • 1971: Carr
  • 1972: Walton
  • 1973: Walton
  • 1974: Walton
  • 1975: Thompson
  • 1976: May
  • 1977: M. Johnson
  • 1978: Lee
  • 1979: Bird
  • 1980: Aguirre
  • 1981: Sampson
  • 1982: Sampson
  • 1983: Sampson
  • 1984: Jordan
  • 1985: Ewing
  • 1986: Dawkins
  • 1987: D. Robinson
  • 1988: Manning
  • 1989: Ferry
  • 1990: Simmons
  • 1991: L. Johnson
  • 1992: Laettner
  • 1993: Cheaney
  • 1994: G. Robinson
  • 1995: Smith
  • 1996: Camby
  • 1997: Duncan
  • 1998: Jamison
  • 1999: Brand
  • 2000: Martin
  • 2001: Battier
  • 2002: Williams
  • 2003: Ford
  • 2004: Nelson
  • 2005: Bogut
  • 2006: Redick
  • 2007: Durant
  • 2008: Hansbrough
  • 2009: Griffin
  • 2010: Turner
  • 2011: Fredette
  • 2012: Davis
  • 2013: Burke
  • 2014: McDermott
  • 2015: Kaminsky
  • 2016: Hield
  • 2017: Mason III
  • 2018: Brunson
  • v
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  • e
Oscar Robertson Trophy winners
  • 1959: Robertson
  • 1960: Robertson
  • 1961: Lucas
  • 1962: Lucas
  • 1963: Heyman
  • 1964: Hazzard
  • 1965: Bradley
  • 1966: Russell
  • 1967: Alcindor
  • 1968: Alcindor
  • 1969: Maravich
  • 1970: Maravich
  • 1971: Wicks
  • 1972: Walton
  • 1973: Walton
  • 1974: Walton
  • 1975: Thompson
  • 1976: Dantley
  • 1977: M. Johnson
  • 1978: Ford
  • 1979: Bird
  • 1980: Aguirre
  • 1981: Sampson
  • 1982: Sampson
  • 1983: Sampson
  • 1984: Jordan
  • 1985: Mullin
  • 1986: Berry
  • 1987: D. Robinson
  • 1988: Hawkins
  • 1989: Ferry
  • 1990: Simmons
  • 1991: L. Johnson
  • 1992: Laettner
  • 1993: Cheaney
  • 1994: G. Robinson
  • 1995: O'Bannon
  • 1996: Camby
  • 1997: Duncan
  • 1998: Jamison
  • 1999: Brand
  • 2000: Martin
  • 2001: Battier
  • 2002: Williams
  • 2003: West
  • 2004: Nelson
  • 2005: Bogut
  • 2006: Morrison & Redick
  • 2007: Durant
  • 2008: Hansbrough
  • 2009: Griffin
  • 2010: Turner
  • 2011: Fredette
  • 2012: Davis
  • 2013: Burke
  • 2014: McDermott
  • 2015: Kaminsky
  • 2016: Hield
  • 2017: Mason III
  • 2018: Brunson
  • v
  • t
  • e
Adolph Rupp Trophy winners
  • 1972: Walton
  • 1973: Walton
  • 1974: Walton
  • 1975: Thompson
  • 1976: May
  • 1977: Johnson
  • 1978: Lee
  • 1979: Bird
  • 1980: Aguirre
  • 1981: Sampson
  • 1982: Sampson
  • 1983: Sampson
  • 1984: Jordan
  • 1985: Ewing
  • 1986: Berry
  • 1987: D. Robinson
  • 1988: Hawkins
  • 1989: Elliott
  • 1990: Simmons
  • 1991: O'Neal
  • 1992: Laettner
  • 1993: Cheaney
  • 1994: G. Robinson
  • 1995: Smith
  • 1996: Camby
  • 1997: Duncan
  • 1998: Jamison
  • 1999: Brand
  • 2000: Martin
  • 2001: Battier
  • 2002: Williams
  • 2003: West
  • 2004: Nelson
  • 2005: Redick
  • 2006: Redick
  • 2007: Durant
  • 2008: Hansbrough
  • 2009: Griffin
  • 2010: Wall
  • 2011: Fredette
  • 2012: Davis
  • 2013: Oladipo
  • 2014: McDermott
  • 2015: Kaminsky
  • v
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  • e
Associated Press Men's College Basketball Player of the Year
  • 1961: Lucas
  • 1962: Lucas
  • 1963: Heyman
  • 1964: Bradds
  • 1965: Bradley
  • 1966: Russell
  • 1967: Alcindor
  • 1968: Hayes
  • 1969: Alcindor
  • 1970: Maravich
  • 1971: Carr
  • 1972: Walton
  • 1973: Walton
  • 1974: Thompson
  • 1975: Thompson
  • 1976: May
  • 1977: Johnson
  • 1978: Lee
  • 1979: Bird
  • 1980: Aguirre
  • 1981: Sampson
  • 1982: Sampson
  • 1983: Sampson
  • 1984: Jordan
  • 1985: Ewing
  • 1986: Berry
  • 1987: D. Robinson
  • 1988: Hawkins
  • 1989: Elliott
  • 1990: Simmons
  • 1991: O'Neal
  • 1992: Laettner
  • 1993: Cheaney
  • 1994: G. Robinson
  • 1995: Smith
  • 1996: Camby
  • 1997: Duncan
  • 1998: Jamison
  • 1999: Brand
  • 2000: Martin
  • 2001: Battier
  • 2002: Williams
  • 2003: West
  • 2004: Nelson
  • 2005: Bogut
  • 2006: Redick
  • 2007: Durant
  • 2008: Hansbrough
  • 2009: Griffin
  • 2010: Turner
  • 2011: Fredette
  • 2012: Davis
  • 2013: Burke
  • 2014: McDermott
  • 2015: Kaminsky
  • 2016: Valentine
  • 2017: Mason III
  • 2018: Brunson
  • v
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  • e
UPI College Basketball Player of the Year Award winners
  • 1955: Gola
  • 1956: B. Russell
  • 1957: Forte
  • 1958: Robertson
  • 1959: Robertson
  • 1960: Robertson
  • 1961: Lucas
  • 1962: Lucas
  • 1963: Heyman
  • 1964: Bradds
  • 1965: Bradley
  • 1966: C. Russell
  • 1967: Alcindor
  • 1968: Hayes
  • 1969: Alcindor
  • 1970: Maravich
  • 1971: Carr
  • 1972: Walton
  • 1973: Walton
  • 1974: Walton
  • 1975: Thompson
  • 1976: May
  • 1977: Johnson
  • 1978: Lee
  • 1979: Bird
  • 1980: Aguirre
  • 1981: Sampson
  • 1982: Sampson
  • 1983: Sampson
  • 1984: Jordan
  • 1985: Mullin
  • 1986: Berry
  • 1987: D. Robinson
  • 1988: Hawkins
  • 1989: Ferry
  • 1990: Simmons
  • 1991: O'Neal
  • 1992: Jackson
  • 1993: Cheaney
  • 1994: G. Robinson
  • 1995: Smith
  • 1996: Allen
  • v
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  • e
Helms Foundation College Basketball Player of the Year
  • 1905: Steinmetz
  • 1906: Grebenstein
  • 1907: Kinney
  • 1908: Keinath
  • 1909: Schommer
  • 1910: Page
  • 1911: Kiendl
  • 1912: Stangel
  • 1913: Calder
  • 1914: Halstead
  • 1915: Houghton
  • 1916: Levis
  • 1917: Woods
  • 1918: Chandler
  • 1919: Platou
  • 1920: Cann
  • 1921: Williams
  • 1922: Carney
  • 1923: Endacott
  • 1924: Black
  • 1925: Mueller
  • 1926: Cobb
  • 1927: Hanson
  • 1928: Holt
  • 1929: C. Thompson
  • 1930: Hyatt
  • 1931: Carlton
  • 1932: Wooden
  • 1933: Sale
  • 1934: Bennett
  • 1935: Edwards
  • 1936: Moir
  • 1937: Luisetti
  • 1938: Luisetti
  • 1939: Jaworski
  • 1940: Glamack
  • 1941: Glamack
  • 1942: Modzelewski
  • 1943: Senesky
  • 1944: Mikan
  • 1945: Mikan
  • 1946: Kurland
  • 1947: Tucker
  • 1948: Macauley
  • 1949: Lavelli
  • 1950: Arizin
  • 1951: Groat
  • 1952: Lovellette
  • 1953: Houbregs
  • 1954: Gola
  • 1955: B. Russell
  • 1956: B. Russell
  • 1957: Rosenbluth
  • 1958: Baylor
  • 1959: Robertson
  • 1960: Robertson
  • 1961: Lucas
  • 1962: Hogue
  • 1963: Heyman
  • 1964: Hazzard
  • 1965: Bradley & Goodrich
  • 1966: C. Russell
  • 1967: Alcindor
  • 1968: Alcindor
  • 1969: Alcindor
  • 1970: Maravich & Wicks
  • 1971: Carr & Wicks
  • 1972: Walton
  • 1973: Walton
  • 1974: D. Thompson
  • 1975: D. Thompson
  • 1976: Benson & May
  • 1977: Johnson
  • 1978: Givens
  • 1979: Bird
  • v
  • t
  • e
Sporting News Men's College Basketball Player of the Year
  • 1943: Phillip
  • 1944: Hall
  • 1945: Mikan
  • 1946: Kurland
  • 1947–49: None selected
  • 1950: Arizin
  • 1951: White
  • 1952–57: None selected
  • 1958: Robertson
  • 1959: Robertson
  • 1960: Robertson
  • 1961: Lucas
  • 1962: Lucas
  • 1963: Heyman
  • 1964: Bradley
  • 1965: Bradley
  • 1966: Russell
  • 1967: Alcindor
  • 1968: Hayes
  • 1969: Alcindor
  • 1970: Maravich
  • 1971: Wicks
  • 1972: Walton
  • 1973: Walton
  • 1974: Walton
  • 1975: Thompson
  • 1976: May
  • 1977: M. Johnson
  • 1978: P. Ford
  • 1979: Bird
  • 1980: Griffith
  • 1981: Aguirre
  • 1982: Sampson
  • 1983: Jordan
  • 1984: Jordan
  • 1985: Ewing
  • 1986: Berry
  • 1987: D. Robinson
  • 1988: Hawkins
  • 1989: King
  • 1990: Scott
  • 1991: L. Johnson
  • 1992: Laettner
  • 1993: Cheaney
  • 1994: G. Robinson
  • 1995: Respert
  • 1996: Camby
  • 1997: Duncan
  • 1998: Jamison
  • 1999: Brand
  • 2000: Martin
  • 2001: Battier
  • 2002: Williams
  • 2003: T. J. Ford
  • 2004: Nelson
  • 2005: Brown
  • 2006: Redick
  • 2007: Durant
  • 2008: Hansbrough
  • 2009: Griffin
  • 2010: Turner
  • 2011: Fredette
  • 2012: Davis
  • 2013: Oladipo
  • 2014: McDermott
  • 2015: Kaminsky
  • 2016: Hield
  • 2017: Mason III
  • 2018: Brunson
  • v
  • t
  • e
James E. Sullivan Award winners
  • 1930: Jones
  • 1931: Berlinger
  • 1932: Bausch
  • 1933: Cunningham
  • 1934: Bonthron
  • 1935: Little
  • 1936: Morris
  • 1937: Budge
  • 1938: Lash
  • 1939: Burk
  • 1940: Rice
  • 1941: MacMitchell
  • 1942: Warmerdam
  • 1943: Dodds
  • 1944: Curtis
  • 1945: Blanchard
  • 1946: Tucker
  • 1947: Kelly Jr.
  • 1948: Mathias
  • 1949: Button
  • 1950: Wilt
  • 1951: Richards
  • 1952: Ashenfelter
  • 1953: Lee
  • 1954: Whitfield
  • 1955: Dillard
  • 1956: McCormick
  • 1957: Morrow
  • 1958: Davis
  • 1959: O'Brien
  • 1960: R. Johnson
  • 1961: Rudolph
  • 1962: Beatty
  • 1963: Pennel
  • 1964: Schollander
  • 1965: Bradley
  • 1966: Ryun
  • 1967: Matson
  • 1968: Meyer
  • 1969: Toomey
  • 1970: Kinsella
  • 1971: Spitz
  • 1972: Shorter
  • 1973: Walton
  • 1974: Wohlhuter
  • 1975: Shaw
  • 1976: Jenner
  • 1977: Naber
  • 1978: Caulkins
  • 1979: Thomas
  • 1980: Heiden
  • 1981: Lewis
  • 1982: Decker
  • 1983: Moses
  • 1984: Louganis
  • 1985: Benoit
  • 1986: Joyner-Kersee
  • 1987: Abbott
  • 1988: Griffith Joyner
  • 1989: Evans
  • 1990: Smith
  • 1991: Powell
  • 1992: Blair
  • 1993: Ward
  • 1994: Jansen
  • 1995: Baumgartner
  • 1996: M. Johnson
  • 1997: Manning
  • 1998: Holdsclaw
  • 1999: C. Miller & K. Miller
  • 2000: Gardner
  • 2001: Kwan
  • 2002: Hughes
  • 2003: Phelps
  • 2004: Hamm
  • 2005: Redick
  • 2006: Long
  • 2007: Tebow
  • 2008: S. Johnson
  • 2009: Palmeiro-Winters
  • 2010: Lysacek
  • 2011: Rodriguez
  • 2012: Franklin
  • 2013: Urschel
  • 2014: Elliott
  • 2015: Stewart & Reynolds
  • 2016: Carlini
  • 2017: Snyder
  • v
  • t
  • e
1972 NCAA Men's Basketball Consensus All-AmericansFirst Team
  • Henry Bibby
  • Jim Chones
  • Bo Lamar
  • Bob McAdoo
  • Ed Ratleff
  • Tom Riker
  • Bill Walton
Second Team
  • Rich Fuqua
  • Barry Parkhill
  • Jim Price
  • Bud Stallworth
  • Henry Wilmore
  • v
  • t
  • e
1973 NCAA Men's Basketball Consensus All-AmericansFirst Team
  • Doug Collins
  • Ernie DiGregorio
  • Bo Lamar
  • Ed Ratleff
  • David Thompson
  • Bill Walton
  • Keith Wilkes
Second Team
  • Jim Brewer
  • Tommy Burleson
  • Larry Finch
  • Kevin Joyce
  • Tom McMillen
  • Kermit Washington
  • v
  • t
  • e
1974 NCAA Men's Basketball Consensus All-AmericansFirst Team
  • Marvin Barnes
  • John Shumate
  • David Thompson
  • Bill Walton
  • Keith Wilkes
Second Team
  • Len Elmore
  • Larry Fogle
  • Bobby Jones
  • Billy Knight
  • Campy Russell
  • v
  • t
  • e
Portland Trail Blazers
  • Founded in 1970
  • Based in Portland, Oregon
Franchise
  • Franchise
  • All-time roster
  • History
  • Expansion draft
  • Draft history
  • Records
  • Head coaches
  • Seasons
  • Current season
Arenas
  • Memorial Coliseum
  • Moda Center
General Managers
  • Glickman
  • Inman
  • Spoelstra
  • Petrie
  • Whitsitt
  • Nash
  • Patterson
  • Leiweke
  • Pritchard
  • Cho
  • Buchanan
  • Olshey
Presidents
  • Sarkowsky
  • Weinberg
  • Whitsitt
  • Glickman
  • Patterson
  • Leiweke
  • Miller
  • McGowan
G League affiliate
  • None
Administration
Owner
Paul Allen
General Manager
Neil Olshey
Head Coach
Terry Stotts
List of executives
Retired numbers
  • 1
  • 13
  • 14
  • 15
  • 20
  • 22
  • 30 (Gross)
  • 30 (Porter)
  • 32
  • 36
  • 45
  • 77
Culture
  • Blazermania
  • Rip City
  • The Breaks of the Game
  • "Duck"
  • Rose Garden arena bankruptcy
  • Larry Weinberg
  • Bill Walton
  • Jack Ramsay
  • Mike Barrett and Mike Rice
  • Clyde the Glide
  • The Schonz
  • Memorial Day Miracle
  • Blaze the Trail Cat
  • Portland Indians
  • Portland Fire
  • Portlandia
NBA Championships (1)
  • 1977
Western Conference
Championships (3)
  • 1977
  • 1990
  • 1992
Division Championships (5)
  • 1978
  • 1991
  • 1992
  • 1999
  • 2015
Media
TV
NBC Sports Northwest
Radio
KPOJ
Trail Blazers Radio Network
Announcers
Kevin Calabro
Lamar Hurd
Bill Schonely
Brian Wheeler
  • v
  • t
  • e
NBA on NBCRelated programs
  • NBA Showtime
  • NBA Inside Stuff
  • NBA on USA
Non-NBA programs
  • College Basketball on NBC
  • Olympics on NBC
Related articles
  • Ratings (NBA Finals)
  • NBA Showtime: NBA on NBC
  • Like Mike
  • 2002 FIBA World Championship
NBC Sports Regional Networks
Bay Area (Golden State Warriors)
Boston (Boston Celtics)
California (Sacramento Kings)
Chicago (Chicago Bulls)
Northwest (Portland Trail Blazers)
Philadelphia (Philadelphia 76ers)
Washington (Washington Wizards)
Commentators
  • All-Star Game
  • NBA Finals
  • WNBA Finals
Key figures
  • Marv Albert
  • Mike Breen
  • Bob Costas
  • Don Criqui
  • Jerry Doggett
  • Dick Enberg
  • Marty Glickman
  • Jim Gordon
  • Curt Gowdy
  • Greg Gumbel
  • Tom Hammond
  • Dan Hicks
  • Jim Lampley
  • Joel Meyers
  • Bob Neal
  • Lindsey Nelson
  • Bill O'Donnell
  • Bud Palmer
  • Paul Sunderland
  • Bob Wolff
Color commentators
  • Quinn Buckner
  • P. J. Carlesimo
  • Doug Collins
  • Chuck Daly
  • Mike Dunleavy Sr.
  • Cotton Fitzsimmons
  • Mike Fratello
  • Matt Guokas
  • Dan Issel
  • Steve Jones
  • Magic Johnson
  • Joe Lapchick
  • Ron Rothstein
  • Isiah Thomas
  • Bill Walton
Sideline reporters
  • Jim Gray
  • Lewis Johnson
  • Andrea Joyce
  • Lisa Malosky
  • Ahmad Rashād
  • Hannah Storm
Studio analysts
  • Pat Croce
  • Julius Erving
  • Kevin Johnson
  • Pat Riley
  • John Salley
  • Tom Tolbert
  • Peter Vecsey
  • Jayson Williams
NBA Finals
  • 1955 (Games 2, 6)
  • 1956 (Game 1)
  • 1957 (Games 1, 7)
  • 1958 (Game 1)
  • 1959 (Games 1-2)
  • 1960 (Games 1, 3-4, 7)
  • 1961 (Games 1, 3-4)
  • 1962 (Games 1-2)
  • 1991
  • 1992
  • 1993
  • 1994
  • 1995
  • 1996
  • 1997
  • 1998
  • 1999
  • 2000
  • 2001
  • 2002
WNBA Finals
  • 1997 (Game 1)
  • 1998 (Games 1-2)
  • 1999 (Games 2-3)
  • 2000 (Game 2)
  • 2001 (Game 2)
  • 2002 (Game 2)
All-Star Game
  • 1959
  • 1991
  • 1992
  • 1993
  • 1994
  • 1995
  • 1996
  • 1997
  • 1998
  • 2000
  • 2001
  • 2002
Music
  • "All Fired Up"
  • "An American Symphony"
  • "Cliffhanger Theme"
  • "Crockett's Theme"
  • "Desert Ride"
  • "Fly Away" (1999 NBA Finals)
  • "Gettysburg" (main theme)
  • "How's It Going to Be"
  • "I Believe I Can Fly" (1997 NBA Finals)
  • "Return to Innocence"
  • "Roundball Rock"
  • "The Dream Is Still Alive (1991 NBA Finals)
  • "These Are Days"
  • "Titan Spirit"
  • "To the Flemish Cap"
  • "Unbelievable"
  • "Winning It All" (1992-1996)
Lore
  • Christmas Day
  • O.J. Simpson's low-speed freeway chase
  • The Clock Incident
  • Clutch City
  • Game 6 of the 1998 NBA Finals
  • Memorial Day Miracle
Rivalries
Bulls–Knicks
Jazz–Rockets
Website: NBA - NBC Sports
  • v
  • t
  • e
NBA on ABCRelated
programs
  • NBA Countdown
  • NBA Access with Ahmad Rashad
  • NBA Inside Stuff
  • NBA Saturday Primetime
  • NBA Sunday Showcase
NBA on ESPN
  • Radio
  • NBA Wednesday
  • NBA Friday
  • WNBA on ESPN
NBA Drafts
  • 2003
  • 2004
  • 2005
  • 2006
  • 2007
  • 2008
  • 2009
  • 2010
  • 2011
  • 2012
  • 2013
  • 2014
  • 2015
  • 2016
  • 2017
  • 2018
Non-NBA programs
  • ESPN College Basketball on ABC
  • Olympics on ABC
Related articles
  • Ratings (NBA Finals)
  • Game history
Key figures
  • All-Star Game
  • ESPN
  • NBA Finals
  • WNBA Finals
Play-by-play
  • Mike Breen
  • Jim Durham
  • Bill Flemming
  • Chet Forte
  • Jim Gordon
  • Curt Gowdy
  • Chuck Howard
  • Keith Jackson
  • Mark Jones
  • Jim McKay
  • Al Michaels
  • Brent Musburger
  • Brad Nessler
  • Dave Pasch
  • John Saunders
  • Chris Schenkel
Color commentators
  • Greg Anthony
  • Hubie Brown
  • Bob Cousy
  • Sean Elliott
  • Len Elmore
  • Tim Legler
  • Mark Jackson
  • Steve Jones
  • Johnny Kerr
  • Dan Majerle
  • Jack Ramsay
  • Doc Rivers
  • Bill Russell
  • Tom Tolbert
  • Jack Twyman
  • Jeff Van Gundy
  • Bill Walton
  • Jerry West
Sideline reporters
  • David Aldridge
  • Doris Burke
  • Howard Cosell
  • Heather Cox
  • Dave Diles
  • Israel Gutierrez
  • Mark Jones
  • Sal Masekela
  • Tom Rinaldi
  • Craig Sager
  • Lisa Salters
  • Michele Tafoya
  • Bob Wolff
Studio hosts
  • Mike Greenberg
  • Michelle Beadle
  • Rachel Nichols
  • Sage Steele
  • Hannah Storm
Studio analysts
  • Jon Barry
  • Chauncey Billups
  • Chris Broussard
  • Doug Collins
  • Steve Javie
  • Avery Johnson
  • Magic Johnson
  • George Karl
  • Scottie Pippen
  • Jalen Rose
  • Byron Scott
  • Bill Simmons
ABC Radio announcers
  • Marv Albert
  • Dave Barnett
  • Chick Hearn
  • Rod Hundley
  • Steve Jones
  • Fred Manfra
  • Earl Monroe
  • Johnny Most
  • Oscar Robertson
  • Dick Vitale
NBA Finals
  • 1965 (Games 1, 5)
  • 1966 (Games 1, 5)
  • 1967 (Games 2, 5)
  • 1968 (Games 1, 4)
  • 1969 (Games 3, 5-7)
  • 1970
  • 1971
  • 1972
  • 1973
  • 2003
  • 2004
  • 2005
  • 2006
  • 2007
  • 2008
  • 2009
  • 2010
  • 2011
  • 2012
  • 2013
  • 2014
  • 2015
  • 2016
  • 2017
  • 2018
ABC Radio's coverage
  • 1985
  • 1986
  • 1987
  • 1988
  • 1989
  • 1990
WNBA Finals
  • 2003 (Game 2 on ABC)
  • 2004
  • 2005 (Game 3 on ABC)
  • 2006
  • 2007
  • 2008
  • 2009
  • 2010 (Game 1 on ABC)
  • 2011
  • 2012
  • 2013
  • 2014 (Game 1 on ABC)
  • 2015 (Game 1 on ABC)
  • 2016 (Game 1 on ABC)
  • 2017 (Game 1 on ABC)
All-Star Game
  • 1968
  • 1969
  • 1970
  • 1971
  • 1972
  • 1973
ABC Radio's coverage
  • 1985
  • 1986
  • 1987
  • 1988
  • 1989
  • 1990
Lore
  • Music
  • "I think we see Willis coming out!"
  • "The Block"
  • Christmas Day
Rivalries
  • Bryant–O'Neal
  • Lakers–Pistons
  • Celtics–Lakers
  • Cavaliers–Warriors
  • ESPN lore
    • Pacers–Pistons brawl
    Authority control
    • WorldCat Identities
    • BNF: cb150449960 (data)
    • ISNI: 0000 0000 7846 2847
    • LCCN: n50026460
    • SNAC: w6156p7j
    • VIAF: 55390012


    Back from the Dead
    Back from the Dead
    This inspiring memoir from sports and cultural icon Bill Walton recounts his devastating injuries and amazing recoveries, set in the context of his UCLA triumphs under John Wooden, his storied NBA career, and his affinity for music and the Grateful Dead.In February 2008, Bill Walton suffered a catastrophic spinal collapse—the culmination of a lifetime of injuries—that left him unable to move. He spent three years on the floor of his house, eating his meals there and crawling to the bathroom, where he could barely hoist himself up onto the toilet. The excruciating pain and slow recovery tested Walton to the fullest. But with extraordinary patience, fortitude, determination, and sacrifice—and pioneering surgery—he recovered, and now shares his life story in this remarkable and unique memoir. Walton grew up in San Diego in the 1950s and 1960s and was deeply influenced by the political and cultural upheavals of that period. Although he strongly identified with the cool people, particularly in music and politics, his greatest role model outside his family was super-straight UCLA basketball coach John Wooden, a thoughtful, rigorous mentor who seemed immune to the turmoil of the times. Although there was always tension and conflict between them, the two men would speak nearly every day for forty-three years, until Wooden’s death at age ninety-nine. Despite a lifelong stuttering affliction, Walton chose a career in broadcasting after his playing days ended. He eventually won an Emmy Award and other accolades for broadcasting and was recognized as a leading media pundit. John Wooden once said that no greatness ever came without sacrifice. Nothing better illustrates this saying than the real story of Walton’s life. In his own words, Back from the Dead shares this dramatic story, including his basketball and broadcasting careers, his many setbacks and rebounds, and his ultimate triumph as the toughest of champions.

    Click Here to view in augmented reality

    $9.98
    -$17.02(-63%)



    The Breaks of the Game
    The Breaks of the Game
    More than 6 years after his death David Halberstam remains one of this country's most respected journalists and revered authorities on American life and history in the years since WWII. A Pulitzer Prize-winner for his ground-breaking reporting on the Vietnam War, Halberstam wrote more than 20 books, almost all of them bestsellers. His work has stood the test of time and has become the standard by which all journalists measure themselves.The New York Times bestseller, now with a new introduction! The Breaks of the Game focuses on one grim season (1979-80) in the life of the Bill Walton-led Portland Trail Blazers, a team that only three years before had been NBA champions.The tactile authenticity of Halberstam's knowledge of the basketball world is unrivaled. Yet he is writing here about far more than just basketball. This is a story about a place in our society where power, money, and talent collide and sometimes corrupt, a place where both national obsessions and naked greed are exposed. It's about the influence of big media, the fans and the hype they subsist on, the clash of ethics, the terrible physical demands of modern sports (from drugs to body size), the unreal salaries, the conflicts of race and class, and the consequences of sport converted into mass entertainment and athletes transformed into superstars--all presented in a way that puts the reader in the room and on the court, and The Breaks of the Game in a league of its own.

    Click Here to view in augmented reality



    Bill Walton: On the road with the Portland Trail Blazers
    Bill Walton: On the road with the Portland Trail Blazers
    Book by Scott, Jack

    Click Here to view in augmented reality

    $78.78



    You Haven't Taught Until They Have Learned: John Wooden's Teaching Principles and Practices
    You Haven't Taught Until They Have Learned: John Wooden's Teaching Principles and Practices
    Co-author Swen Nater, one of John Wooden's former basketball players at UCLA, provides insightful first-hand accounts on the many life lessons he learned from Wooden that has applied to his life since becoming a teacher himself. Wooden's principles, conveyed by Nater and co-author Ronald Gallimore in this book, can be studied and applied by teachers, coaches, parents and anyone else who is responsible for, works with, or supervises others. In this revised version of the book, the authors include an afterword, in which specific examples and anecdotes are provided of how You Haven't Taught Until They Have Learned has impacted people in the teaching, coaching, and business industries.

    Click Here to view in augmented reality

    $17.16
    -$2.79(-14%)



    Bill Walton's Total Book of Bicycling
    Bill Walton's Total Book of Bicycling
    Traces the history of bicycling, looks at various types of bikes, clothing and equipment, and discusses racing, touring, maintenance, and safety

    Click Here to view in augmented reality



    Walton Ford: Pancha Tantra
    Walton Ford: Pancha Tantra
    Beauty and the beasts: Walton Ford’s sinister wildlife scenes   At first glance, Walton Ford’s large-scale, highly-detailed watercolors of animals recall the prints of 19th century illustrators John James Audubon and Edward Lear. A closer look reveals a complex and disturbingly anthropomorphic universe, full of symbols, sly jokes, and allusions to the ‘operatic’ nature of traditional natural history.In this stunning but sinister visual universe, beasts and birds are not mere aesthetic objects but rather dynamic actors in allegorical struggles: a wild turkey crushes a small parrot in its claw; a troupe of monkeys wreak havoc on a formal dinner table; an American buffalo is surrounded by bloodied white wolves. In dazzling watercolor, the images come to impress as much for their impeccable naturalism as they do for their complex narratives.This updated edition of Pancha Tantra features the artist’s most recent works and contextualizes his collection of bestial tableaux with an in-depth exploration of his oeuvre, a complete biography, and excerpts from his textual inspirations: Vietnamese folktales and the letters of Benjamin Franklin, the Autobiography of Benvenuto Cellini, and Audubon’s Ornithological Biography.   Text in English, French, and German

    Click Here to view in augmented reality

    $39.99



    The Ultimate Bill Walton Fun Fact And Trivia Book
    The Ultimate Bill Walton Fun Fact And Trivia Book
    Are you looking for trivia about Bill Walton, the Boston Celtics, the Los Angeles Clippers, the Portland Trail Blazers, or the UCLA Bruins?If so, The Ultimate Bill Walton Fun Fact And Trivia Book just may be for you.In it, you will find out great information like:-How many points per game did Bill Walton average during his senior year of high school?-What was the most points Bill Walton ever scored during a college basketball game?-How many times in college did Bill Walton score 30 or more points?-Before taking Bill Walton, how many players had the Portland Trail Blazers drafted out of UCLA before him?-How many NBA games did Bill Walton play in before he fouled out for the very first time in his pro basketball career?-Who did the Clippers have to send to the Trail Blazers as compensation for signing Bill Walton?-What two jersey numbers did Bill Walton wear during his NBA career?-How many points did Bill Walton score in his first game with the Boston Celtics?-How many points did Bill Walton score in his final regular season NBA game? How many did he score in the last postseason game of his NBA career?Plus a whole bunch of other fun facts and trivia items!The Ultimate Bill Walton Fun Fact and Trivia Book contains well over 200 pieces of trivia, little known information, and fun facts about one of the greatest basketball players ever. This is perfect for you if you are curious about your favorite player, want to impress your co-workers, need information for a trivia contest, or even if you want to win a bet or two with family or friends. There are some hard to find tidbits in here including stuff related to his pro days, college days, and even his life away from basketball. This is exactly what the title says it is, the Ultimate Bill Walton Fun Fact And Trivia Book.

    Click Here to view in augmented reality


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