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Drew Bledsoe
McQueen Bledsoe (born February 14, 1972) is a former American football quarterback who played 14 seasons in the National Football League (NFL). Bledsoe is

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Drew Bledsoe Bledsoe at Troy Brown's induction into
the Patriots Hall of Fame in 2012No. 11Position: QuarterbackPersonal informationBorn: (1972-02-14) February 14, 1972 (age 46)
Ellensburg, WashingtonHeight: 6 ft 5 in (1.96 m)Weight: 238 lb (108 kg)Career informationHigh school: Walla Walla
(Walla Walla, Washington)College: Washington StateNFL Draft: 1993 / Round: 1 / Pick: 1Career history
  • New England Patriots (1993–2001)
  • Buffalo Bills (2002–2004)
  • Dallas Cowboys (2005–2006)
Career highlights and awards
  • Super Bowl champion (XXXVI)
  • 4× Pro Bowl (1994, 1996, 1997, 2002)
  • NFL passing yards leader (1994)
  • Second-team All-American (1992)
  • Pac-10 Offensive Player of the Year (1992)
  • New England Patriots Hall of Fame
Career NFL statistics Completions: 3,839Attempts: 6,717Completion percentage: 57.2TD–INT: 251–206Passing yards: 44,611Passer rating: 77.1 Player stats at NFL.com

Drew McQueen Bledsoe (born February 14, 1972)[1] is a former American football quarterback who played 14 seasons in the National Football League (NFL). Bledsoe is best known as the starting quarterback for the New England Patriots from 1993 to 2001, before losing his job after sustaining an injury. He also played for the Buffalo Bills and Dallas Cowboys.

The first overall pick in 1993 NFL Draft, Bledsoe helped improve the fortunes of the Patriots, who had fallen on hard times.[2][3] Under his tenure as starting quarterback, the Patriots ended a seven-season postseason drought, qualified for the playoffs four times, and made one Super Bowl appearance. In his second season with the team, he was named to the 1995 Pro Bowl and was the youngest quarterback to appear in the NFL's all-star game at the time.

Following a period of declining success and two consecutive seasons where the Patriots missed the playoffs, Bledsoe suffered a near-fatal injury early in the 2001 season and was replaced as starter by Tom Brady. He was unable to regain his starting position after he was medically cleared to play due to Brady's success with the team, which culminated with the franchise's first Super Bowl win in Super Bowl XXXVI over the St. Louis Rams, although Bledsoe relieved Brady in the AFC Championship game and led the Patriots to victory to secure their berth in the Super Bowl.[4][5] Bledsoe then retired after short stints with the Bills and the Cowboys. For his accomplishments in New England, he was inducted into the Patriots Hall of Fame in 2010.

Contents
  • 1 High school years
  • 2 College years
  • 3 NFL career
    • 3.1 New England Patriots: 1993–2001
    • 3.2 Buffalo Bills: 2002–2004
    • 3.3 Dallas Cowboys: 2005–2006
    • 3.4 Retirement and legacy
  • 4 Personal life
  • 5 NFL career statistics and accolades
    • 5.1 Regular season
    • 5.2 Postseason records and statistics
    • 5.3 Accomplishments
  • 6 See also
  • 7 References
  • 8 External links
High school years

Bledsoe attended Walla Walla High School and was a letterman in football, basketball and track. In football, he was named a first team All-State selection by the Tacoma News Tribune. In track, he competed in the throwing events, recording top-throws of 45.34 meters in the discus throw and 54.70 meters in the javelin throw.[6]

College years

Bledsoe had a record-setting career in his three years at Washington State. After gaining the starting job in the end of the 1990 season as a true freshman (joined later by Jeff Tuel as the only two in school history), he quickly became the face of the Cougars offense. In 1992 Bledsoe led his team to a 9–3 record (ranking #10 in the coaches poll and #12 in the AP) and a 31–28 win against the Utah Utes in the Copper Bowl. Bledsoe completed 30-46 passes for 476 yards and 2 touchdowns in the game. He also established WSU records in single-game passing yards (476), single-season pass completions (241), and single-season passing yards (3,946). He was named the Pac-10 Offensive Player of the Year.

Following an impressive junior year Bledsoe decided to forgo his senior season and enter the 1993 NFL Draft. In the 34 starts of his collegiate career he amassed 9,373 yards, 532 completions and 66 touchdowns.[7]

NFL career New England Patriots: 1993–2001

Bledsoe was drafted first overall in the 1993 NFL Draft by the New England Patriots. He started right away for the Patriots in his rookie season, as they improved from two to five wins.

On November 13, 1994, the Patriots had won just three of their first nine games and were losing, 20–3, to the Minnesota Vikings at halftime. Bledsoe led a comeback victory in which the Patriots won, 26–20, in overtime, as he set single game records in pass completions (45) and attempts (70).[8] Due to his performance, Bledsoe was selected to his first Pro Bowl as an alternate.

Following a difficult 1995 season, Bledsoe turned it around in 1996 ranking among the top passers in the league with the help of wide receiver Terry Glenn, thus pushing the Patriots to reach the playoffs again and winning the AFC championship against the Jacksonville Jaguars, 20–6. This led to an appearance in Super Bowl XXXI, where they lost to the Green Bay Packers by the score of 35–21. Bledsoe completed 25 of 48 passes for 253 yards, with two touchdowns and four interceptions in the loss. He was also named a starter for the Pro Bowl that season, the second of his career.

Bledsoe in 2001, during his tenure with the Patriots.

During the 1997 season, Bledsoe helped the Patriots win five of their final seven games to once again qualify for the playoffs, the fourth time in eight years as a Patriots starter he would lead the team to a postseason appearance. The Patriots lost in the second round to the Pittsburgh Steelers, however Bledsoe built a career-high 87.7 passer rating, passed for 3,706 yards, tossed 28 touchdowns, and earned his third Pro Bowl invitation.

The following year, he became the first NFL quarterback to complete game-winning touchdown passes in the final 30 seconds of two consecutive games.[9] In doing so, he propelled New England into the postseason for the third straight year. He completed these come-from-behind efforts while playing with a broken index finger on his throwing hand, an injury that would later sideline him for the postseason.

Bledsoe started the 1999 season very strong, with 13 touchdowns and only four interceptions as the Patriots held a 6–2 mid-season record. However, Bledsoe subsequently threw only six touchdowns versus 17 interceptions, and the team finished with an 8–8 record. The team's slide continued into the 2000 season as the Patriots ended with a record of 5–11. While Bledsoe threw a then-career low 13 interceptions that year, he was sacked 45 times.[citation needed]

In March 2001, Bledsoe was signed to a then-record ten-year, $103 million contract.[10] Bledsoe did not finish his career with the Patriots, nor see the opening of the new Gillette Stadium. During the second game of the 2001 season, Bledsoe was hit by New York Jets linebacker Mo Lewis and suffered a sheared blood vessel in his chest, which almost resulted in his death.[11] Replacing Bledsoe, backup Tom Brady took the starting position and led New England to the playoffs. Though he never regained his starting role, Bledsoe proved integral to his team's playoff run when he replaced a hobbled Brady in the AFC Championship Game against Pittsburgh. Bledsoe, starting from the Steelers 40-yard line, capped a scoring drive with an 11-yard touchdown pass to David Patten to seal a 24–17 victory. In winning the conference championship game, Bledsoe completed 10 of 21 passes for 102 yards and a touchdown, with no interceptions. It was the second time in six years (1996 and 2001) that Bledsoe was an integral part in leading the Patriots to a Super Bowl appearance, and during the on-field trophy presentation Bledsoe tossed his father a game ball.[12] Tom Brady started as quarterback as the Patriots won Super Bowl XXXVI, with kicker Adam Vinatieri hitting a game-winning 48-yard field goal as time expired.[13]

Appreciative of his lengthy tenure with the team, Patriots fans cheered Bledsoe in each of his three returns to New England as a visiting player.[14]

Buffalo Bills: 2002–2004

A change of scenery—by way of a trade[15]—to Bledsoe's former division rival Buffalo seemed to give him a bit of rejuvenation in 2002. He had one of his best seasons ever, passing for 4,359 yards and 24 touchdowns and making his fourth trip to the Pro Bowl. In Week 2 against the Minnesota Vikings, Bledsoe set a team record with 463 yards passing in an overtime win. He continued his strong play in 2003 as the Bills began the year 2–0. However, a flurry of injuries stymied the Bills offense; they failed to score a touchdown in three consecutive games en route to a 6–10 season. In 2004, they fell one game short of making the playoffs; a late season winning streak was wasted when Bledsoe and the Bills performed poorly against the Pittsburgh Steelers backups in the season finale.[16]

Bledsoe was released by the Bills after the 2004 season to make way for backup quarterback J. P. Losman. When Bledsoe was later signed by the Dallas Cowboys, he expressed bitterness with the Bills for the move, stating "I can't wait to go home and dress my kids in little stars and get rid of the other team's stuff."[17]

Bledsoe stretching before a game with the Cowboys in 2005. Dallas Cowboys: 2005–2006 Bledsoe with Greg Ellis in a 2006 game.

Bledsoe went on to sign with the Dallas Cowboys, where he was reunited with former coach Bill Parcells. Bledsoe was intended to be a long-term solution as quarterback for the Cowboys. Said Bledsoe on the day he signed with Dallas, "Bill wants me here, and being the starter. I anticipate that being the case and not for one year." He signed for $23 million for three years.[18]

During his tenure with the Cowboys, he threw for over 3,000 yards in a season for the ninth time in his career, tying Warren Moon for fourth in NFL history. That season, Bledsoe led five 4th quarter/OT game-winning drives to keep the Cowboys' playoff hopes alive until the final day of the season.[19] Though the team ultimately failed to reach the playoffs, Bledsoe had led them to a 9-7 record, an improvement over the 6-10 mark that Vinny Testaverde had finished with in 2004.

However, in 2006, his final season with the Cowboys, Bledsoe's play became erratic, so much so that six games into the season he was replaced by then-backup and soon to be Pro-Bowler Tony Romo. Shortly after the end of the 2006 season, Bledsoe was released by the Cowboys. Unwilling to be relegated to a backup position, Bledsoe announced his retirement from the NFL on April 11, 2007.[20]

Retirement and legacy

When Bledsoe retired in April 2007, he left fifth in NFL history in pass attempts (6,717) and completions (3,839), seventh in passing yards (44,611), and 13th in touchdown passes (251).[citation needed]

On May 16, 2011, Bledsoe was voted by Patriots fans into the Patriots Hall of Fame.[21] He was formally inducted in a public ceremony outside The Hall at Patriot Place on September 17, 2011. Bledsoe beat former head coach Bill Parcells and defensive lineman Houston Antwine in a fan vote.

In July 2012, Bledsoe was named the 30th greatest quarterback of the NFL's post-merger era by Football Nation.[22]

In January 2018, Bledsoe was named honorary captain of the New England Patriots as they hosted the Jacksonville Jaguars in the AFC Championship Game. Bledsoe's Patriots had beaten the Jaguars 20–6 in the 1997 AFC Championship Game to advance to their second Super Bowl. Patriots owner Robert Kraft said in a statement "Drew Bledsoe played such an integral role in our efforts to rebuild the Patriots. He gave fans hope for the future by providing many memorable moments during his record-breaking career. For a franchise that had only hosted one playoff game in its first 35 years, winning the AFC Championship Game at home in Foxboro and taking the Patriots to the playoffs for three consecutive years were unimaginable goals prior to his arrival."[23][24] The Patriots defeated the Jaguars 24–20 to advance to their tenth Super Bowl appearance and Bledsoe presented the Lamar Hunt Trophy to Kraft.[25]

Personal life

Bledsoe's parents were school teachers in Ellensburg, Washington. His father was a coach who ran a football camp in Washington state, and Drew was able to interact with the professional players and coaches who helped his father run the camp.[26]

The Bledsoe family moved five times before Drew was in the sixth grade. They finally settled in Walla Walla, Washington, where Bledsoe's father coached football at the high school. The only time Drew played a whole season of football without ever starting at quarterback was in seventh grade at Pioneer Junior High. In high school, with his father as his coach, he won numerous awards, including selection to the Western 100 and Washington State Player of the Year. He was heavily recruited by colleges such as the University of Miami and the University of Washington, but he decided to attend Washington State, which was a mere two-hour drive from home.[26]

Drew and his wife Maura live in Bend, Oregon and have four children: sons Stuart, John, Henry, and daughter Healy. He coached his sons, Stuart and John, at Summit High School.[27] His son John was a walk-on player on the Washington State football team in 2017.[28]

While playing for the New England Patriots, Drew Bledsoe lived in Bridgewater, Massachusetts on Tabway Lane, and in Medfield, Massachusetts, in a house that was later purchased by retired Major League Baseball player Curt Schilling.[29]

After his retirement in 2007, Bledsoe founded the Doubleback Winery along with close friend Chris Figgins.[30] The company's grapes, mostly Cabernet Sauvignon and Chardonnay, are harvested from McQueen Vineyards and Flying B Vineyards, located in and around Walla Walla, Washington[31]. The wine has had success recently,[when?] placing 53rd overall in Wine Spectator's Top 100 wines.[32] His first vintage which was 2007 vintage quickly sold out of its initial 600 cases.[33] In 2012, Marvin R. Shanken invited Ernie Els, Greg Norman, Tom Seaver and Bledsoe to introduce his wines, despite Shanken's disdain for the New England Patriots.[34] He also recorded a message to both Tony Romo and Dak Prescott in 2017 in his home, which also showed his red wine collection.[35]

In his spare time, Bledsoe works with many philanthropic organizations.[27]

Bledsoe is the offensive coordinator/quarterbacks coach at Summit High School in Bend, Oregon, having held the position since 2012.[36]

NFL career statistics and accolades Legend Led the league Team won the Super Bowl Bold Career high Regular season Year Team Games Passing Rushing G GS Att Comp Pct Yds TD Int Rtg Att Yds Avg TD 1993 NE 13 12 429 214 49.9 2,494 15 15 65.0 32 82 2.6 0 1994 NE 16 16 691 400 57.9 4,555 25 27 73.6 44 40 0.9 0 1995 NE 15 15 636 323 50.8 3,507 13 16 63.7 20 28 1.4 0 1996 NE 16 16 623 373 59.9 4,086 27 15 83.7 24 27 1.1 0 1997 NE 16 16 522 314 60.2 3,706 28 15 87.7 28 55 2.0 0 1998 NE 14 14 481 263 54.7 3,633 20 14 80.9 28 44 1.6 0 1999 NE 16 16 539 305 56.6 3,985 19 21 75.6 42 101 2.4 0 2000 NE 16 16 531 312 58.8 3,291 17 13 77.3 47 158 3.4 2 2001 NE 2 2 66 40 60.6 400 2 2 75.3 5 18 3.4 0 2002 BUF 16 16 610 375 61.5 4,359 24 15 86.0 27 67 2.5 2 2003 BUF 16 16 471 274 58.2 2,860 11 12 73.0 24 29 1.2 2 2004 BUF 16 16 450 256 56.9 2,932 20 16 76.6 22 37 1.7 0 2005 DAL 16 16 499 300 60.1 3,639 23 17 83.7 34 50 1.5 2 2006 DAL 6 6 170 90 53.3 1,164 7 8 69.2 8 28 3.5 2 Career 194 193 6,717 3,839 57.2 44,611 251 206 77.2 385 764 2.0 10 Postseason records and statistics This section of a biography of a living person needs additional citations for verification. Please help by adding reliable sources. Contentious material about living persons that is unsourced or poorly sourced must be removed immediately, especially if potentially libelous or harmful. (January 2015) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)
  • 4–3 record in postseason
  • 3–3 in the postseason as a starter (3-0 at home)
  • 252 passes attempted
  • 129 passes completed
  • 51.1 Completion Percentage
  • 54.9 QB Rating
  • 1335 passing yards
  • 6 passing touchdowns
  • 12 passes intercepted
  • 21 passing attempts per interception in the postseason
  • 42 passing attempts per TD in the postseason
  • 2–0 in AFC Championship games (in last Patriots appearance came off bench for injured Brady to win at Pittsburgh January 2002)
  • 2 Super Bowl Appearances 1 Super Bowl championship (2001, New England Patriots)
Accomplishments This section of a biography of a living person needs additional citations for verification. Please help by adding reliable sources. Contentious material about living persons that is unsourced or poorly sourced must be removed immediately, especially if potentially libelous or harmful. (January 2015) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)
  • His 4,452 pass attempts in his first eight seasons rank second to Brett Favre whose 4,456 attempts are the most by a quarterback during any eight-year period in NFL history
  • He passed for 3,291 yards in 2000, his seventh consecutive season with at least 3,000 yards passing.
  • Bledsoe was durable during his career, playing in 126 of his first 132 games since entering the league in 1993, and never missing a start after leaving NE until benched in 2006.
  • In 2002, his first season in Buffalo, he set single season records for yards, attempts, completions on an offense that had 7 other franchise records.
  • In 1998, he directed the Patriots to the playoffs for the fourth time in six seasons.
  • In 1994, he set Patriots franchise single-season passing records for attempts (691), completions (400) and yards passing (4,555; surpassed by Tom Brady in 2007).
  • In 1995, he set a franchise record by attempting 179 consecutive passes without an interception (10/23/95 to 11/26/95; since surpassed by Tom Brady).
  • At the age of 23, he became the youngest player in NFL history to surpass the 10,000-yard passing plateau when he connected with Ben Coates on a 6-yard completion just before the half vs. the Jets (12/10/95).
  • Prior to 1994, the Patriots' single-season record for passing yards was 3,465 yards. Bledsoe eclipsed that mark six consecutive seasons.
  • At the age of 22, he became the youngest quarterback in NFL history to play in the Pro Bowl.
  • Led 31 career 4th quarter/OT game-winning drives and holds the record for most TD passes in overtime with 4.
  • Bledsoe was the last quarterback to have led the Buffalo Bills to a winning season until Kyle Orton did so in 2014.

While Bledsoe has thrown for a high number of yards and attempts, a frequent criticism is that they are based on volume (attempts, completions, yards) rather than efficiency (passer rating, TD-to-INT ratio, yards per attempt) proving only that he has thrown a great number of times, not that he has thrown well.[37] According to sports writer Don Banks, Bledsoe's large career totals "reveal more about his longevity than about his excellence".[38]

Bledsoe ranks fifth all-time in completions (3,839), seventh in passing yards (44,611), and 13th in touchdown passes (251). Bledsoe's career (57.2) completion percentage is lower than all recent[when?] Hall of Fame quarterbacks with the exception of John Elway. Bledsoe's NFL career passer rating of (77.1) surpasses nine Hall of Fame Quarterbacks. Bledsoe's 37 regular season 300-yard passing games ranks 9th in league history. He also ranks 6th (with 6) in most career regular season 400-yard passing games by an NFL quarterback. He was selected to the Pro Bowl four times (in 1994, 1996, 1997, 2002). Bledsoe was eligible for the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2011.

See also
  • List of NFL quarterbacks who have passed for 400 or more yards in a game
  • List of NFL quarterbacks who have posted a perfect passer rating
  • List of celebrities who own wineries and vineyards
  • Most consecutive starts by a quarterback (NFL)
References
  1. ^ "Drew Bledsoe Biography". Biography.com. A&E Networks. Retrieved November 5, 2010. 
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^
  5. ^
  6. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-10-24. Retrieved 2014-10-18. 
  7. ^ "Washington State Scout". Washington State Scout. 2002-07-09. Archived from the original on 2011-07-16. Retrieved 2010-11-30. 
  8. ^ Patriots Official Website. Archived 2007-09-27 at the Wayback Machine. . Retrieved August 26, 2007.
  9. ^ Patriots Official Website Archived September 27, 2007, at the Wayback Machine.. Retrieved August 20, 2007.
  10. ^ . September 27, 2007 https://web.archive.org/web/20070927012113/http://www.patriots.com/alumni/index.cfm?ac=alumnibiosdetail&bio=119.  Missing or empty |title= (help). Retrieved August 20, 2007.
  11. ^ NFL Network
  12. ^
  13. ^ Bledsoe Heads to Buffalo for 2003 Pick ESPN.com. Retrieved August 20, 2007.
  14. ^ https://www.bostonglobe.com/sports/2002/12/09/patriots-expose-drew-bledsoe-return-foxborough/Ss3KgqDfkKffci6pdjTplK/story
  15. ^ "Boston Sports Media Watch » Bledsoe Traded As stated here". Bostonsportsmedia.com. April 21, 2002. Retrieved 2010-11-30. 
  16. ^ Maiorana, Sal (2005-02-17). "Bills saying goodbye to Bledsoe". USA Today. Retrieved 2010-11-30. 
  17. ^ Bledsoe Rejoins Parcells and Plans to Start for Cowboys at The New York Times
  18. ^ USA Today: Bledsoe expecting long, prosperous stay in Dallas
  19. ^ JT-SW.com. Retrieved August 20, 2007.
  20. ^ "Bledsoe retires, ends 14-year career". ESPN. 2007-04-12. Retrieved 2010-11-30. 
  21. ^ "Bledsoe is 2011 Fans' Choice". The Hall at Patriot Place. Archived from the original on July 17, 2011. Retrieved July 27, 2011. 
  22. ^ "Top 100 Modern Quarterbacks: 40-21". Football Nation. July 26, 2012. Archived from the original on October 30, 2012. 
  23. ^
  24. ^
  25. ^
  26. ^ a b Collins, Louise Mooney; Speace, Geri J. (1995). Newsmakers, The People Behind Today's Headlines. New York: Gale Research Inc. pp. 32–35. ISBN 0-8103-5745-3. 
  27. ^ a b No sour grapes from retired Bledsoe Dallas Morning News. October 14, 2007. Retrieved October 12, 2008.
  28. ^ "Drew Bledsoe watches as WSU Cougars have an intense first padded practice of fall camp". The Seattle Times. 2017-08-04. Retrieved 2018-01-17. 
  29. ^ Boston Magazine (2015-05-15), On the Market: Curt Schilling’s House, retrieved 2018-01-16 
  30. ^ "The Story - Doubleback". Doubleback. Retrieved 2017-11-08. 
  31. ^ "Doubleback -". Doubleback. Retrieved 2017-11-08. 
  32. ^ Peter King (November 29, 2010). "Josh McDaniels tape; Cortland Finnegan-Andre Johnson fight; more Week 12". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved 2010-11-30. 
  33. ^ Catching up with former No. 1 pick Drew Bledsoe - Shutdown Corner - NFL Blog - Yahoo! Sports
  34. ^ Sports Legend, Wine Lover: Drew Bledsoe
  35. ^ NFL Network (2017-04-04), Drew Bledsoe's Advice to Tony Romo on Being Replaced | Passing Seasons | NFL 360, retrieved 2017-11-08 
  36. ^ Mitch Stevens (September 30, 2016). "Drew Bledsoe coaching his sons on Oregon high school football team". Max Preps. Retrieved January 15, 2017. 
  37. ^ CHFF classic: The last word on Bledsoe ColdHardFootballFacts.com. Retrieved June 30, 2007.
  38. ^ "No Hall call for Bledsoe". SportsIllustrated.com. April 13, 2007. Archived from the original on April 16, 2007. Retrieved June 30, 2007. 
External links Wikimedia Commons has media related to Drew Bledsoe.
  • Career statistics and player information from NFL.com · ESPN · Yahoo! Sports · SI.com · Pro-Football-Reference · Rotoworld
  • Drew Bledsoe profile by the New England Patriots
  • Humanitarian Bio
  • Drew Bledsoe on IMDb
Drew Bledsoe—championships, awards, and honors
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Washington State Cougars starting quarterbacks
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  • Cousineau
  • B. Sims
  • Rogers
  • K. Sims
  • Elway
  • Fryar
  • Br. Smith
  • Jackson
  • Testaverde
  • Bruce
  • Aikman
  • George
  • Maryland
  • Emtman
  • Bledsoe
  • Wilkinson
  • Carter
  • Johnson
  • Pace
  • P. Manning
  • Couch
  • Brown
  • Vick
  • Carr
  • Palmer
  • E. Manning
  • A. Smith
  • Williams
  • Russell
  • Long
  • Stafford
  • Bradford
  • Newton
  • Luck
  • Fisher
  • Clowney
  • Winston
  • Goff
  • M. Garrett
  • Mayfield
  • v
  • t
  • e
1993 NFL draft first-round selections
  • Drew Bledsoe
  • Rick Mirer
  • Garrison Hearst
  • Marvin Jones
  • John Copeland
  • Eric Curry
  • Curtis Conway
  • Willie Roaf
  • Lincoln Kennedy
  • Jerome Bettis
  • Dan Williams
  • Patrick Bates
  • Brad Hopkins
  • Steve Everitt
  • Wayne Simmons
  • Sean Dawkins
  • Tom Carter
  • Ernest Dye
  • Lester Holmes
  • Irv Smith
  • Robert Smith
  • Darrien Gordon
  • Deon Figures
  • Leonard Renfro
  • O. J. McDuffie
  • Dana Stubblefield
  • Todd Kelly
  • Thomas Smith
  • George Teague
  • v
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New England Patriots 1993 NFL draft selections
  • Drew Bledsoe
  • Chris Slade
  • Todd Rucci
  • Vincent Brisby
  • Kevin Johnson
  • Corwin Brown
  • Scott Sisson
  • Rich Griffith
  • Lawrence Hatch
  • Troy Brown
  • v
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  • e
Boston / New England Patriots first-round draft picks
  • Schwedes
  • Mason
  • Collins
  • A. Graham
  • Concannon
  • Rush
  • Singer
  • Charles
  • Byrd
  • Sellers
  • Olsen
  • Plunkett
  • Hannah
  • Cunningham
  • Stingley
  • Francis
  • Haynes
  • Brock
  • Fox
  • Clayborn
  • Morgan
  • Cryder
  • Sanford
  • James
  • Ferguson
  • Holloway
  • Sims
  • Williams
  • Eason
  • Fryar
  • Matich
  • Dupard
  • Armstrong
  • Stephens
  • Dykes
  • Singleton
  • Agnew
  • Harlow
  • Russell
  • Chung
  • Bledsoe
  • McGinest
  • Law
  • Glenn
  • Canty
  • Edwards
  • T. Jones
  • Woody
  • Katzenmoyer
  • Seymour
  • D. Graham
  • Warren
  • Wilfork
  • Watson
  • Mankins
  • Maroney
  • Meriweather
  • Mayo
  • McCourty
  • Solder
  • C. Jones
  • Hightower
  • Easley
  • Brown
  • Wynn
  • Michel
  • v
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  • e
Boston / New England Patriots starting quarterbacks
  • Butch Songin (1960–1961)
  • Tom Greene (1960)
  • Babe Parilli (1961–1967)
  • Tom Yewcic (1962)
  • Eddie Wilson (1965)
  • Don Trull (1967)
  • Mike Taliaferro (1968–1970)
  • Tom Sherman (1968)
  • Joe Kapp (1970)
  • Jim Plunkett (1971–1975)
  • Steve Grogan (1975–1990)
  • Neil Graff (1975)
  • Matt Cavanaugh (1980–1982)
  • Tom Owen (1981)
  • Tony Eason (1983–1989)
  • Tom Ramsey (1987–1988)
  • Bob Bleier (1987)
  • Doug Flutie (1987–1989)
  • Marc Wilson (1989–1990)
  • Tommy Hodson (1990–1992)
  • Hugh Millen (1991–1992)
  • Scott Zolak (1992, 1995, 1998)
  • Jeff Carlson (1992)
  • Drew Bledsoe (1993–2001)
  • Scott Secules (1993)
  • Tom Brady (2001–present)
  • Matt Cassel (2008)
  • Jimmy Garoppolo (2016)
  • Jacoby Brissett (2016)
  • v
  • t
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Buffalo Bills starting quarterbacks
  • Johnny Green (1960–1961)
  • Tommy O'Connell (1960–1961)
  • Richie Lucas (1960)
  • Bob Brodhead (1960)
  • Warren Rabb (1961–1962)
  • Mack Reynolds (1961)
  • Al Dorow (1962)
  • Jack Kemp (1962–1967, 1969)
  • Daryle Lamonica (1963–1965)
  • Tom Flores (1967–1968)
  • Dan Darragh (1968–1970)
  • Ed Rutkowski (1968)
  • Kay Stephenson (1968)
  • James Harris (1969, 1971)
  • Dennis Shaw (1970–1972)
  • Leo Hart (1972)
  • Joe Ferguson (1973–1984)
  • Gary Marangi (1976)
  • Joe Dufek (1984)
  • Vince Ferragamo (1985)
  • Bruce Mathison (1985)
  • Jim Kelly (1986–1996)
  • Brian McClure (1987)
  • Willie Totten (1987)
  • Dan Manucci (1987)
  • Frank Reich (1989–1991, 1994)
  • Todd Collins (1995–1997)
  • Alex Van Pelt (1997, 2001)
  • Doug Flutie (1998–2000)
  • Rob Johnson (1998–2001)
  • Drew Bledsoe (2002–2004)
  • J. P. Losman (2005–2008)
  • Kelly Holcomb (2005)
  • Trent Edwards (2007–2010)
  • Ryan Fitzpatrick (2009–2012)
  • Brian Brohm (2009–2010)
  • EJ Manuel (2013–2016)
  • Thad Lewis (2013)
  • Jeff Tuel (2013)
  • Kyle Orton (2014)
  • Matt Cassel (2015)
  • Tyrod Taylor (2015–2017)
  • Nathan Peterman (2017–present)
  • v
  • t
  • e
Dallas Cowboys starting quarterbacks
  • Eddie LeBaron (1960–1963)
  • Don Meredith (1960–1968)
  • Don Heinrich (1960)
  • John Roach (1964)
  • Jerry Rhome (1965–1966)
  • Craig Morton (1965, 1967–1972)
  • Roger Staubach (1969–1971, 1973–1979)
  • Clint Longley (1975)
  • Danny White (1978, 1980–1987)
  • Glenn Carano (1981)
  • Gary Hogeboom (1984–1985)
  • Steve Pelluer (1986–1988)
  • Reggie Collier (1986)
  • Kevin Sweeney (1987–1988)
  • Troy Aikman (1989–2000)
  • Steve Walsh (1989)
  • Babe Laufenberg (1990)
  • Steve Beuerlein (1991)
  • Bernie Kosar (1993)
  • Jason Garrett (1993–1994, 1998–1999)
  • Rodney Peete (1994)
  • Wade Wilson (1996)
  • Randall Cunningham (2000)
  • Anthony Wright (2000–2001)
  • Quincy Carter (2001–2003)
  • Ryan Leaf (2001)
  • Clint Stoerner (2001)
  • Chad Hutchinson (2002)
  • Vinny Testaverde (2004)
  • Drew Henson (2004)
  • Drew Bledsoe (2005–2006)
  • Tony Romo (2006–2015)
  • Brad Johnson (2008)
  • Jon Kitna (2010)
  • Stephen McGee (2010)
  • Kyle Orton (2013)
  • Brandon Weeden (2014–2015)
  • Matt Cassel (2015)
  • Kellen Moore (2015)
  • Dak Prescott (2016–present)
  • v
  • t
  • e
NFL annual passing yards leaders
  • 1932: Herber
  • 1933: Newman
  • 1934: Herber
  • 1935: Danowski
  • 1936: Herber
  • 1937: Baugh
  • 1938: Parker
  • 1939: O'Brien
  • 1940: Baugh
  • 1941: Isbell
  • 1942: Isbell
  • 1943: Luckman
  • 1944: Comp
  • 1945: Luckman
  • 1946: Luckman
  • 1947: Baugh
  • 1948: Baugh
  • 1949: Lujack
  • 1950: Layne
  • 1951: Layne
  • 1952: Graham
  • 1953: Graham
  • 1954: Van Brocklin
  • 1955: Finks
  • 1956: Rote
  • 1957: Unitas
  • 1958: Wade
  • 1959: Unitas
  • 1960: Unitas
  • 1961: Jurgensen
  • 1962: Jurgensen
  • 1963: Unitas
  • 1964: Johnson
  • 1965: Brodie
  • 1966: Jurgensen
  • 1967: Jurgensen
  • 1968: Brodie
  • 1969: Jurgensen
  • 1970: Brodie
  • 1971: Hadl
  • 1972: Namath
  • 1973: Gabriel
  • 1974: Anderson
  • 1975: Anderson
  • 1976: Jones
  • 1977: Ferguson
  • 1978: Tarkenton
  • 1979: Fouts
  • 1980: Fouts
  • 1981: Fouts
  • 1982: Fouts
  • 1983: Dickey
  • 1984: Marino
  • 1985: Marino
  • 1986: Marino
  • 1987: Lomax
  • 1988: Marino
  • 1989: Majkowski
  • 1990: Moon
  • 1991: Moon
  • 1992: Marino
  • 1993: Elway
  • 1994: Bledsoe
  • 1995: Favre
  • 1996: Brunell
  • 1997: George
  • 1998: Favre
  • 1999: Beuerlein
  • 2000: Manning
  • 2001: Warner
  • 2002: Gannon
  • 2003: Manning
  • 2004: Culpepper
  • 2005: Brady
  • 2006: Brees
  • 2007: Brady
  • 2008: Brees
  • 2009: Schaub
  • 2010: Rivers
  • 2011: Brees
  • 2012: Brees
  • 2013: Manning
  • 2014: Brees & Roethlisberger
  • 2015: Brees
  • 2016: Brees
  • 2017: Brady
  • v
  • t
  • e
NFL quarterbacks with a perfect passer rating game
  • Ray Mallouf
  • Sammy Baugh
  • Len Dawson
  • Y. A. Tittle
  • Frank Ryan
  • Sonny Jurgensen
  • Joe Namath
  • Johnny Unitas
  • Don Meredith
  • Craig Morton (2)
  • Fran Tarkenton
  • Daryle Lamonica
  • Dick Shiner
  • Bob Lee
  • James Harris
  • Ken Anderson
  • Jim Hart
  • Dan Fouts
  • Scott Hunter
  • Terry Bradshaw
  • Steve Grogan
  • Brian Sipe
  • Bob Griese
  • Vince Evans
  • Dave Krieg (2)
  • Steve Bartkowski
  • Ken O'Brien (2)
  • Steve Young
  • Joe Montana
  • Rich Gannon
  • Bobby Hebert
  • Mick Buck
  • Drew Bledsoe
  • Craig Erickson
  • Chris Chandler
  • Jeff Blake
  • Kurt Warner (3)
  • Peyton Manning (4)
  • Doug Flutie
  • Kerry Collins
  • Chad Pennington
  • Trent Green
  • Ben Roethlisberger (3)
  • Donovan McNabb
  • Tom Brady (2)
  • Eli Manning
  • Drew Brees
  • Robert Griffin III
  • Nick Foles
  • Alex Smith
  • Geno Smith
  • Marcus Mariota
  • Ryan Tannehill
  • Kirk Cousins

Names in bold are still active

  • v
  • t
  • e
New England Patriots Super Bowl XXXVI champions
  • 4 Adam Vinatieri
  • 11 Drew Bledsoe
  • 12 Tom Brady (MVP)
  • 13 Ken Walter
  • 14 Walter Williams
  • 15 Jimmy Farris
  • 16 Scott McCready
  • 19 Damon Huard
  • 21 J. R. Redmond
  • 22 Terrance Shaw
  • 23 Antwan Harris
  • 24 Ty Law
  • 25 Leonard Myers
  • 26 Matt Stevens
  • 27 Terrell Buckley
  • 28 Brock Williams
  • 29 Hakim Akbar
  • 30 Je'Rod Cherry
  • 31 Ben Kelly
  • 32 Antowain Smith
  • 33 Kevin Faulk
  • 34 Tebucky Jones
  • 35 Patrick Pass
  • 36 Lawyer Milloy
  • 38 Ray Hill
  • 44 Marc Edwards
  • 45 Otis Smith
  • 48 Arther Love
  • 49 Jabari Holloway
  • 50 Mike Vrabel
  • 51 Bryan Cox
  • 52 Ted Johnson
  • 53 Larry Izzo
  • 54 Tedy Bruschi
  • 55 Willie McGinest
  • 58 Matt Chatham
  • 59 Andy Katzenmoyer
  • 60 Drew Inzer
  • 61 Stephen Neal
  • 62 Setema Gali
  • 63 Joe Andruzzi
  • 64 Greg Randall
  • 65 Damien Woody
  • 66 Lonie Paxton
  • 67 Grey Ruegamer
  • 68 Tom Ashworth
  • 70 Adrian Klemm
  • 71 Chris Sullivan
  • 72 Matt Light
  • 74 Kenyatta Jones
  • 75 Maurice Anderson
  • 76 Grant Williams
  • 77 Mike Compton
  • 80 Troy Brown
  • 81 Charles Johnson
  • 82 Curtis Jackson
  • 83 Rod Rutledge
  • 84 Fred Coleman
  • 85 Jermaine Wiggins
  • 86 David Patten
  • 88 Terry Glenn
  • 90 Marty Moore
  • 91 Bobby Hamilton
  • 92 David Nugent
  • 93 Richard Seymour
  • 94 Jace Sayler
  • 95 Roman Phifer
  • 96 Brandon Mitchell
  • 97 Riddick Parker
  • 98 Anthony Pleasant
  • 99 Kole Ayi
  • Head coach: Bill Belichick
  • Coaches: Ned Burke
  • Romeo Crennel
  • Brian Daboll
  • Jeff Davidson
  • Ivan Fears
  • Pepper Johnson
  • Eric Mangini
  • Josh McDaniels
  • Randy Melvin
  • Markus Paul
  • Rob Ryan
  • Dante Scarnecchia
  • Brad Seely
  • Charlie Weis
  • Mike Woicik
  • v
  • t
  • e
New England Patriots Hall of Fame
  • 1991: John Hannah
  • 1992: Nick Buoniconti
  • 1992: Gino Cappelletti
  • 1993: Bob Dee
  • 1993: Jim Lee Hunt
  • 1993: Steve Nelson
  • 1993: Babe Parilli
  • 1994: Mike Haynes
  • 1995: Steve Grogan
  • 1999: Andre Tippett
  • 2001: Bruce Armstrong
  • 2007: Stanley Morgan
  • 2008: Ben Coates
  • 2009: Billy Sullivan
  • 2009: Jim Nance
  • 2010: Sam Cunningham
  • 2011: Jon Morris
  • 2011: Drew Bledsoe
  • 2012: Troy Brown
  • 2013: Tedy Bruschi
  • 2014: Ty Law
  • v
  • t
  • e
New England Patriots All-1990s Team
Offense
Bledsoe (QB)
Martin (RB)
Russell (RB)
Glenn (WR)
Jefferson (WR)
Coates (TE)
Armstrong (T)
Harlow (T)
Rucci (G)
Lane (G)
Wohlabaugh (C)
Defense
McGinest (DE)
Williams (DE)
Goad (NT)
Tippett (OLB)
Slade (OLB)
Brown (ILB)
Johnson (ILB)
Hurst (CB)
Law (CB)
Clay (S)
Milloy (S)
Special Teams
Meggett (Ret.)
Vinatieri (PK)
Tupa (P)
Whigham (ST)
Coach
Parcells
Authority control
  • WorldCat Identities
  • ISNI: 0000 0000 4669 6702
  • LCCN: n98040454
  • VIAF: 48540027


The Fairies of Sadieville: The Final Tufa Novel (Tufa Novels Book 6)
The Fairies of Sadieville: The Final Tufa Novel (Tufa Novels Book 6)
Charming and lyrical, The Fairies of Sadieville continues Alex Bledsoe's widely-praised contemporary fantasy series, about the song-wielding fairy descendants living in modern-day Appalachia.“This is real.” Three small words on a film canister found by graduate students Justin and Veronica, who discover a long-lost silent movie from more than a century ago. The startlingly realistic footage shows a young girl transforming into a winged being. Looking for proof behind this claim, they travel to the rural foothills of Tennessee to find Sadieville, where it had been filmed.Soon, their journey takes them to Needsville, whose residents are hesitant about their investigation, but Justin and Veronica are helped by Tucker Carding, who seems to have his own ulterior motives. When the two students unearth a secret long hidden, everyone in the Tufa community must answer the most important question of their entire lives — what would they be willing to sacrifice in order to return to their fabled homeland of Tír na nÓg?“Imagine a book somewhere between American Gods and Faulkner. Absolutely worth your time.” – Patrick Rothfuss, New York Times bestselling authorEnter the captivating world of the fae in Alex Bledsoe's Tufa novelsThe Hum and the ShiverWisp of a ThingLong Black CurlChapel of EaseGather Her RoundSadievilleAt the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

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Bledsoe PFS Plantar Fasciitis Strap - Size Small
Bledsoe PFS Plantar Fasciitis Strap - Size Small
The Bledsoe Plantar Fasciitis Support provides continuous elastic tension and pressure to reduce the pain associated with inflammation due to plantar fasciitis. Used in conjunction with Bledsoe's recommended exercise program, the PFS reduces pain, allowing the patient to strengthen the muscles of the foot, arch and lower leg, as well as stretch the Achilles tendon to provide relief and prevent future discomfort from plantar fasciitis. Unlike shoe inserts or non-elastic bands, the Bledsoe PFS maintains tension continuously during wear. This reduces painful inflammation and allows the patient to exercise the calf and foot muscles. Proper muscle tone will prevent future plantar fasciitis. Simple and inexpensive way to reduce inflammation. Anatomically designed for proper fit and control; two sizes adjust for any size foot. Provides tension and support, allowing the patient to exercise; exercise program included with brace. Fast, easy 15-second application. Breathable stiff foam, wickable fabric draws perspiration away from skin. Indications This device is indicated to help relieve pain from inflammation caused by mild to moderate plantar fasciitis by applying pressure and tension over the medial calcaneal tubercle and plantar fascia. Contraindications This device is contraindicated for patients with severe circulatory impairment or other medical conditions where the elastic band could further reduce circulation or cause problems related to excess elastic pressure. Goals Reduce plantar fascia irritation. Reduce arch inflammation. Decrease anti-inflammatory medications. Decrease foot pain symptoms. Improve ankle/foot function. Improve endurance.

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$39.63



Long Black Curl: A Novel of the Tufa (Tufa Novels Book 3)
Long Black Curl: A Novel of the Tufa (Tufa Novels Book 3)
Star-crossed lovers reunite in Long Black Curl, part of Alex Bledsoe's acclaimed contemporary fantasy series, where fairy magic is hidden in plain sight and age-old rivalries simmer just beneath the surface"Reading Long Black Curl makes me so happy that there are authors writing real North American-based mythic fiction: stories that incorporate the Americas where many of us live, infusing them with their own folklore and mythology-one that sits so well it feels like it's always been a part of us." —Charles de LintIn all the time the Tufa have existed, only two have ever been exiled: Bo-Kate Wisby and her lover, Jefferson Powell. They were cast out, stripped of their ability to make music, and cursed to never be able to find their way back to Needsville. Their crime? A love that crossed the boundary of the two Tufa tribes, resulting in the death of several people.Somehow, Bo-Kate has found her way back, and fueled by vengeful plans to change the town forever. The only one who can stop Bo-Kate is Jefferson, but even he isn't sure what will happen when they finally meet. Will he fall in love with her again? Will he join her in her quest to reign over the Tufa? Or will he have to sacrifice himself to save the people who once banished him?Enter the captivating world of the fae in Alex Bledsoe's Tufa novelsThe Hum and the ShiverWisp of a ThingLong Black CurlChapel of EaseGather Her RoundAt the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

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Bitter Blood: A True Story of Southern Family Pride, Madness, and Multiple Murder
Bitter Blood: A True Story of Southern Family Pride, Madness, and Multiple Murder
The terrifying #1 New York Times bestseller about the unbreakable ties of bloodThe first bodies found were those of a feisty millionaire widow and her daughter in their posh Louisville, Kentucky, home. Months later, another wealthy widow and her prominent son and daughter-in-law were found savagely slain in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Mystified police first suspected a professional in the bizarre gangland-style killings that shattered the quiet tranquility of two well-to-do southern communities. But soon a suspicion grew that turned their focus to family. The Sharps. The Newsoms. The Lynches. The only link between the three families was a beautiful and aristocratic young mother named Susie Sharp Newsom Lynch. Could this former child “princess” and fraternity sweetheart have committed such barbarous crimes? And what about her gun-loving first cousin and lover, Fritz Klenner, son of a nationally renowned doctor?In this powerful and riveting tale of three families connected by marriage and murder … of obsessive love and bitter custody battles, Jerry Bledsoe recounts the shocking events that ultimately took nine lives, building to a truly horrifying climax that will leave you stunned. “Recreates one of the most shocking crimes of recent years!”—Publishers Weekly“Riveting…chilling…engrossing!”—Kirkus Reviews“Absorbing suspense…Bledsoe leaves no pebble unturned in his reporting.”—Chicago Tribune“An astonishing, shocking and riveting account, brilliantly chronicled.”—Detroit News-Free Press“An engrossing southern gothic sure to delight fans of the true-crime genre. Bledsoe maintains the suspense with a sure hand.”—Charlotte Observer

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Bledsoe J Walker Walking BootMediumMidCalf with Pneumatic Ankle Support
Bledsoe J Walker Walking BootMediumMidCalf with Pneumatic Ankle Support
Bledsoe J Walker Walking Boot Bledsoe J Walker Walking Boot utilizes a computer-designed rocker-bottom from heel strike to toe-off offers the smoothest walking boot in the industry. The low heel height mimics a normal shoe for a balanced gate and reduces pressure on the knee and back. The aluminum arms are malleable to accommodate swelling and large dressings.The Bledsoe J Walker Walking Boot provides superior quality at an affordable price. Low profile rocker bottom helps eliminate pelvic tilt. Our most economical boot. Full bootie foam liner. Optional pneumatic ankle support. Indications Bledsoe J Walker Walking Boot is indicated for Sprains, strains and fractures of the foot and ankle. Goals Ankle/Foot immobilization. Post surgery protection. Decrease anti-inflammatory medications. Decrease pain symptoms. Improve ROM function. Ease of use.

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$49.80



Bledsoe Wraptor Ankle Stabilizer with Speed Laces (Medium)
Bledsoe Wraptor Ankle Stabilizer with Speed Laces (Medium)
Bledsoe Wraptor Ankle Brace Bledsoe Wraptor Ankle Brace is a Lace-up ankle brace that has been proven to reduce the incidents of acute ankle injuries in athletes both with and without a previous ankle injury. The Bledsoe Wraptor Ankle Brace combines function and comfort the key to compliance is to keep your athletes in the game! Several new materials make the Bledsoe Wraptor Ankle Brace more comfortable: Sharkskin material at the base of the foot reduces brace slippage, breathable spacer mesh lining wicks moisture away, and elastic forefoot material reduces fabric bunching. Designed to prevent inversion and eversion, the Bledsoe Wraptor Ankle Stabilizer offers staunch protection to an injured ankle. Non-stretch nylon figure eight straps lock the calcaneous in neutral position. Figure 8 design mimics taping saving time, money, and resources. Durable nylon and reinforced stitching design withstand extreme stress and wear. 6 month extended warranty for teams. Cooler Materials - mesh material wicks moisture away from the skin keeping athletes cool and comfortable. Speed laces - laces quickly adjust and secure for athletes with little time to apply a full lace-up. Achilles relief - padding above the heel provides relief and padding for the Achilles tendon. Controls abnormal eversion and inversion. Universal design fits right or left ankle. Prevent eversion or inversion by supporting the ankle in a biomechanically neutral position. Effective protecting the ankle proactively or in the rehabilitation of acute ankle sprains. The Wraptor keeps players in the game!. Eversion and inversion straps provide figure-8 support in a quick fit. High ankle strap provides additional support and secures medial and lateral stirrup straps. New materials including Spacer Mesh lining to wick moisture away. Sharkskin material to decrease brace slippage.

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$45.50



Wisp of a Thing: A Novel of the Tufa (Tufa Novels Book 2)
Wisp of a Thing: A Novel of the Tufa (Tufa Novels Book 2)
Alex Bledsoe's The Hum and the Shiver was named one of the Best Fiction Books of 2011 by Kirkus Reviews. Now with Wisp of a Thing Bledsoe returns to the isolated ridges and hollows of the Smoky Mountains to spin an equally enchanting tale of music and magic older than the hills….Touched by a very public tragedy, musician Rob Quillen comes to Cloud County, Tennessee, in search of a song that might ease his aching heart. All he knows of the mysterious and reclusive Tufa is what he has read on the internet: they are an enigmatic clan of swarthy, black-haired mountain people whose historical roots are lost in myth and controversy. Some people say that when the first white settlers came to the Appalachians centuries ago, they found the Tufa already there. Others hint that Tufa blood brings special gifts.Rob finds both music and mystery in the mountains. Close-lipped locals guard their secrets, even as Rob gets caught up in a subtle power struggle he can't begin to comprehend. A vacationing wife goes missing, raising suspicions of foul play, and a strange feral girl runs wild in the woods, howling in the night like a lost spirit.Change is coming to Cloud County, and only the night wind knows what part Rob will play when the last leaf falls from the Widow's Tree…and a timeless curse must be broken at last.

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Gather Her Round: A Novel of the Tufa (Tufa Novels Book 5)
Gather Her Round: A Novel of the Tufa (Tufa Novels Book 5)
In Cloud County, where music and Tufa, the otherworldly fae community, intermix, a monster roams the forest, while another kind of evil lurks in the hearts of men.“Beautifully written, surprisingly moving, and unexpected in the best of ways.” —Seanan McGuire, New York Times bestselling authorYoung Tufa woman Kera Rogers disappears while hiking in the woods by Needsville. Soon, her half-eaten remains are found, and hunters discover the culprits: a horde of wild hogs led by a massive boar with seemingly supernatural strength. Kera’s boyfriend Duncan Gowen mourns her death, until he finds evidence she cheated on him with his best friend Adam Procure. When Adam’s body is the next one found, who is to blame: Duncan or the monstrous swine?As winter descends and determined hunters pursue beasts across the Appalachians, other Tufa seek the truth behind Adam and Kera’s deaths. What answers will unfold come spring?Enter the captivating world of the fae in Alex Bledsoe's Tufa novelsThe Hum and the ShiverWisp of a ThingLong Black CurlChapel of EaseGather Her RoundAt the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

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Funko POP! NFL: Legends - Drew Bledsoe
Funko POP! NFL: Legends - Drew Bledsoe
Get ready for football season! Create your own fantasy league team with only the best of the best in Pop! Vinyl Figure form. This NFL Legends Drew Bledsoe Pop! Vinyl Figure #115 measures approximately 3 3/4-inches tall and comes packaged in a window display box. Ages 3 and up.

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$9.99
-$2.00(-17%)



Chapel of Ease: A Novel of the Tufa (Tufa Novels Book 4)
Chapel of Ease: A Novel of the Tufa (Tufa Novels Book 4)
The latest installment in Alex Bledsoe's critically-acclaimed Tufa series about musically-talented fae in rural Tennessee, a series Kirkus Reviews calls "powerful, character-driven drama...a sheer delight." (starred review)“Beautifully written, surprisingly moving, and unexpected in the best of ways.” —Seanan McGuire, New York Times bestselling authorWhen Matt Johansson, a young New York actor, auditions for "Chapel of Ease," an off-Broadway musical, he is instantly charmed by Ray Parrish, the show's writer and composer. They soon become friends; Matt learns that Ray's people call themselves the Tufa and that the musical is based on the history of his isolated home town. But there is one question in the show's script that Ray refuses to answer: what is buried in the ruins of the chapel of ease?As opening night approaches, strange things begin to happen. A dreadlocked girl follows Ray and spies on him. At the press preview, a strange Tufa woman warns him to stop the show. Then, as the rave reviews arrive, Ray dies in his sleep.Matt and the cast are distraught, but there's no question of shutting down: the run quickly sells out. They postpone opening night for a week and Matt volunteers to take Ray's ashes back to Needsville. He also hopes, while he's there, to find out more of the real story behind the play and discover the secret that Ray took to his grave.Matt's journey into the haunting Appalachian mountains of Cloud County sets him on a dangerous path, where some secrets deserve to stay buried.Enter the captivating world of the fae in Alex Bledsoe's Tufa novelsThe Hum and the ShiverWisp of a ThingLong Black CurlChapel of EaseGather Her RoundAt the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

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