Brie Larson
Brie Larson
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Brie Larson
Sidonie Desaulniers (born October 1, 1989), known professionally as Brie Larson, is an American actress and filmmaker. Initially noticed as a teenager

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American actress, singer-songwriter and musician

Brie Larson Larson at the Women in Film Crystal + Lucy Awards in 2018Born Brianne Sidonie Desaulniers
(1989-10-01) October 1, 1989 (age 28)
Sacramento, California, U.S.Residence Los Angeles, California, U.S.Education American Conservatory TheaterOccupation
  • Actress
  • filmmaker
Years active 1998–presentWorks Full listPartner(s) Alex Greenwald (engaged)Awards Full list

Brianne Sidonie Desaulniers (born October 1, 1989), known professionally as Brie Larson, is an American actress and filmmaker. Initially noticed as a teenager for her supporting work in comedies, she has since expanded to leading roles in both independent dramas and film franchises, receiving such accolades as an Academy Award, a BAFTA Award, and a Golden Globe.

Born in Sacramento, California, Larson was homeschooled. At age six, she became the youngest student admitted to a training program at the American Conservatory Theater. She soon relocated to Los Angeles and began her acting career in 1998 with a comedy sketch in The Tonight Show with Jay Leno. She appeared as a regular in the 2001 sitcom Raising Dad and briefly dabbled with a music career, releasing the album Finally Out of P.E. in 2005. Larson subsequently played supporting roles in the comedy films Hoot (2006), Scott Pilgrim vs. the World (2010), and 21 Jump Street (2012), and appeared as a sardonic teenager in the television series United States of Tara (2009–2011). Her breakthrough came with a leading role in the acclaimed independent drama Short Term 12 (2013), and she continued to take on supporting parts in the romance The Spectacular Now (2013) and the comedy Trainwreck (2015). For playing a kidnapping victim in the drama Room (2015), Larson won the Academy Award for Best Actress. In 2017, she starred as a photojournalist in the adventure film Kong: Skull Island, which emerged as her highest-grossing release.

As a filmmaker, Larson has co-written and co-directed two short films, The Arm (2012), which received a special jury prize at the Sundance Film Festival, and Weighting (2013). She made her feature film directorial debut in 2017 with the independent comedy-drama Unicorn Store. Larson is also an advocate for sexual assault survivors and is vocal about social and political issues.

Contents
  • 1 Early life
  • 2 Career
    • 2.1 Comedies and music career (2001–2008)
    • 2.2 United States of Tara and film breakthrough (2009–2014)
    • 2.3 Room and beyond (2015–present)
      • 2.3.1 Upcoming projects
  • 3 Other work
  • 4 Personal life and media image
  • 5 Works and accolades
  • 6 References
  • 7 External links
Early life The American Conservatory Theater in San Francisco, where Larson was the youngest student admitted

Larson was born Brianne Sidonie Desaulniers on October 1, 1989, in Sacramento, California, to Heather and Sylvain Desaulniers.[1][2] Her parents were homeopathic chiropractors who ran a practice together, and they had another daughter, Milaine.[3][4] Her father came from French Canadian ancestry and in her childhood, Larson spoke French as her first language.[5] She was mostly homeschooled and believed that it allowed her to explore innovative and abstract experiences.[3][6][7] Describing her early life, Larson has said that she was "straight-laced and square"; she shared a close bond with her mother but was shy and suffered from social anxiety.[3][6][8] During the summer, she would write and direct her own home movies in which she cast her cousins and filmed them in her garage.[9] At age six, she expressed interest in becoming an actress, later remarking that the "creative arts was just something that was always in me".[3][10] The same year, she auditioned for a training program at the American Conservatory Theater in San Francisco, where she became the youngest student admitted.[4][11]

Larson experienced trauma when her parents divorced when she was seven.[11] She shared a dysfunctional relationship with her father; she has recalled, "As a kid I tried to understand him and understand the situation. But he didn't do himself any favors. I don't think he ever really wanted to be a parent."[11] Soon after their split, Heather relocated to Los Angeles with her two daughters to fulfill Larson's acting ambition. They had limited financial means and lived in a small apartment near Hollywood studio lots at Burbank.[11] Larson described her experience, "We had a crappy one-room apartment where the bed came out of the wall and we each had three articles of clothing."[3] Even so, Larson has recounted fond memories of that period and has credited her mother for doing the best she could for them.[12]

As her last name was difficult to pronounce, she adopted the stage name Larson from her Swedish great-grandmother and an American Girl doll named Kirsten Larson that she received as a child.[10][13][14] Her first job was performing a commercial parody for Barbie, named "Malibu Mudslide Barbie", in a 1998 episode of The Tonight Show with Jay Leno.[2][6][15] She subsequently took on guest roles in several television series, including Touched by an Angel and Popular.[4] In 2000, she was cast in the Fox sitcom Schimmel, which was canceled before airing when its star, Robert Schimmel, was diagnosed with cancer.[16][17][18]

Career Comedies and music career (2001–2008) .mw-parser-output .quotebox{background-color:#F9F9F9;border:1px solid #aaa;box-sizing:border-box;padding:10px;font-size:88%}.mw-parser-output .quotebox.floatleft{margin:0.5em 1.4em 0.8em 0}.mw-parser-output .quotebox.floatright{margin:0.5em 0 0.8em 1.4em}.mw-parser-output .quotebox.centered{margin:0.5em auto 0.8em auto}.mw-parser-output .quotebox.floatleft p,.mw-parser-output .quotebox.floatright p{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output .quotebox-title{background-color:#F9F9F9;text-align:center;font-size:larger;font-weight:bold}.mw-parser-output .quotebox-quote.quoted:before{font-family:"Times New Roman",serif;font-weight:bold;font-size:large;color:gray;content:" “ ";vertical-align:-45%;line-height:0}.mw-parser-output .quotebox-quote.quoted:after{font-family:"Times New Roman",serif;font-weight:bold;font-size:large;color:gray;content:" ” ";line-height:0}.mw-parser-output .quotebox .left-aligned{text-align:left}.mw-parser-output .quotebox .right-aligned{text-align:right}.mw-parser-output .quotebox .center-aligned{text-align:center}.mw-parser-output .quotebox cite{display:block;font-style:normal}@media screen and (max-width:360px){.mw-parser-output .quotebox{min-width:100%;margin:0 0 0.8em!important;float:none!important}} "I was so insecure and so hard on myself back then. But there was a moment when I started doing the math. It took me two hours to get ready every day — hair and makeup, so many clothes, trying to make sure everything matched really well— and I had this intense epiphany. I realized how much time I was spending getting ready for life — I wasn't actually living it. It was the most terrified I've ever been in my life. So I went in the exact opposite way."

—Larson recalling her early career in 2015[19]

Larson's first major role came as Emily, the younger daughter of Bob Saget's character, in the WB sitcom Raising Dad, which aired for one season during the 2001–02 television schedule.[20] Hal Boedeker of Orlando Sentinel criticized the program and wrote that its cast members were "merrily joking through the show".[21] She was next hired for the ABC sitcom Hope & Faith, but she and some other cast members were dropped after the unaired pilot.[22] In 2003, she starred alongside Beverley Mitchell in the Disney Channel movie Right on Track, based on the junior drag race star sisters Erica and Courtney Enders, and played minor roles in the 2004 comedies Sleepover and 13 Going on 30.[23][24][25]

Larson developed an interest in music at age 11 when she learned to play the guitar. A music executive encouraged her to write her own songs, and she began self-recording and uploading tracks to her own website.[26][27] After failing to get cast as Wendy Darling in the 2003 film Peter Pan, a heartbroken Larson penned and recorded a song named "Invisible Girl", which received airplay on KIIS-FM.[12][15] She soon signed a recording deal with Tommy Mottola of Casablanca Records; Lindsay Lohan and she were the only artists signed by the label at that time.[12][28][29] In 2005, she released the album Finally Out of P.E., in which she also co-wrote songs with other songwriters, including Blair Daly, Pam Sheyne, Lindy Robbins, and Holly Brook.[28][30] She named it after a gym teacher she disliked and has said that the songs she wrote were mostly about failed job opportunities.[15][30] One of her singles, "She Said", was featured in the MTV series Total Request Live, was listed by Billboard in their weekly listings of the most-played videos in the channel, and peaked at number 31 on the Billboard Hot Single Sales.[31][32][33] Larson went on tour with Jesse McCartney for Teen People's "Rock in Shop" mall concerts, opened for him during his Beautiful Soul tour, and also performed in New York at the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade. Even so, the album was not a success, selling only 3,500 copies.[30][34][35] Larson later admitted to being disillusioned with her music career, saying, "I wanted to write all my own songs, and were afraid of that. I wanted to wear sneakers and play my guitar — they wanted heels and wind blown hair."[28]

In 2006, Larson was cast alongside Logan Lerman and Cody Linley in the comedy film Hoot, about young vigilantes trying to save a group of owls. It received poor reviews, but Ruthe Stein of San Francisco Chronicle was appreciative of Larson and Linley for bringing "a dash of Indiana Jones to their roles".[36][37] She had a small part, the following year, in the Amber Heard-starring drama Remember the Daze, and she launched her own arts and literature magazine, named Bunnies and Traps, for which she wrote her own opinion columns and accepted submissions from other artists and writers.[27][38] Larson has said that she frequently considered giving up acting at that time, as she found it difficult to find much work, blaming it on filmmaker's inability to typecast her.[4] She was particularly discouraged when she lost out on key roles in the films Thirteen (2003) and Juno (2007).[39] To support herself, Larson worked as a DJ.[40]

United States of Tara and film breakthrough (2009–2014) Larson at the London premiere of Scott Pilgrim vs. the World in 2010

In 2009, Larson began playing Kate Gregson, the sardonic teenage daughter of Toni Collette's character, coping with her mother's dissociative identity disorder, in the Showtime comedy-drama series United States of Tara. Portia Doubleday was initially cast in the role but was replaced with Larson after filming the pilot episode.[41] Reviewing the first season for The New York Times, Alessandra Stanley took note of how well she played a "real teenager" and Tim Goodman of San Francisco Chronicle credited her for finding nuance in her role.[42][43] Larson has said that her character's journey to find meaning in life mirrored that of her own, and she was upset when the show was canceled after three seasons in 2011.[44][45] Also in 2009, she starred alongside Rooney Mara in Tanner Hall, a coming-of-age film about four girls in boarding school. Despite disliking the film, Betsy Sharkey of Los Angeles Times commended Larson for providing "one of the film's funniest bits".[46] In her two other film releases that year, she played a scatterbrained cheerleader in House Broken and a popular high schooler in Just Peck.[47]

At the Williamstown Theatre Festival in 2010, Larson appeared in a stage production of Thornton Wilder's play Our Town.[48] Directed by Nicholas Martin, it featured her in the role of Emily Webb, a precocious young girl. Reviewing the play for The Boston Globe, Louise Kennedy thought that the production had glossed over the play's darker themes and bemoaned the lack of tragic arc in Larson's character.[49] In film, she featured in Noah Baumbach's comedy-drama Greenberg and Edgar Wright's comedy Scott Pilgrim vs. the World.[50][51] A journalist for Slate magazine opined that these films helped raised her profile, and Larson has said that the latter film, in which she played a rock star named Envy, marked a turning point in her career.[3][52] In it, Larson performed the song "Black Sheep" with the band Metric.[53] Although it did not do well commercially, Scott Pilgrim vs. the World has since developed a cult following.[54][55] She next played the troubled daughter of a corrupt cop (played by Woody Harrelson) in the drama Rampart (2011), an emotionally intense part she found herself unable to detach from.[56] A confrontation scene between Harrelson and her proved upsetting for her; the director was surprised by how well it turned out and tweaked the script to further explore the father-daughter relationship.[57][58]

In 2012, Larson expanded into filmmaking by co-writing and co-directing the short film The Arm with Jessie Ennis and Sarah Ramos. The film, about societal expectations in the near future, won a special jury prize at the Sundance Film Festival.[3][12][26] She featured as a seductive teenager in the critically panned drama The Trouble with Bliss,[59] after which she played Molly, a high school student, in a film adaptation of the 1980s police procedural television series 21 Jump Street, co-starring Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum. Larson found her acting style to be more rigid than Hill's approach and was challenged by scenes that required her to improvise with him.[60] Dana Stevens of Slate labeled Larson "a find of major proportions", adding that "she's not only beautiful but funny, with a scratchy contralto voice, and unlike the usual female in a buddy movie, she comes across as a real person".[61] With worldwide earnings of over $200 million, 21 Jump Street proved to be Larson's most widely seen film to that point.[62][63]

Larson at the premiere of Short Term 12 at the 2013 South by Southwest

Following an appearance in the sitcom Community,[64] Larson collaborated with Dustin Bowser to co-write and co-direct Weighting (2013), a short film about a strained relationship, which was screened at South by Southwest.[56][65] Larson's breakthrough came that year when she starred in Destin Daniel Cretton's critically acclaimed independent drama Short Term 12, which marked the first leading role of her career.[5][66] Set in a foster-care home for troubled teenagers, the film featured her as Grace, the emotionally distressed supervisor of the institution. To prepare, Larson interacted with staff in a children's home and watched online interviews of people with similar jobs.[67] The film had a production budget of under $1 million, and she was pleased with its intimate and collaborative work environment.[68][69] Larson's performance was acclaimed.[70][71][72] Manohla Dargis of The New York Times found her "terrific" and "completely persuasive", and Ian Freer felt that she "builds into a whirling dervish of a performance, making Grace strong but scarred, damaged but compassionate".[73][74] Jenny McCartney of The Daily Telegraph predicted that it "marks her out for a stellar career".[75] Larson received a nomination for the Independent Spirit Award for Best Female Lead; she later remarked that the film prompted directors to offer her a wide variety of parts, but she turned down roles of the unidimensional love interest.[39][76]

Also in 2013, Larson had supporting roles in two romantic dramas, Don Jon and The Spectacular Now. In the former, written and directed by Joseph Gordon-Levitt, she played the sister of the titular character (also played by Gordon-Levitt). Peter Travers of Rolling Stone praised the film's exploration of sexual themes and considered Larson to be "terrific" in it.[77] In The Spectacular Now, starring Miles Teller and Shailene Woodley, she was cast as Cassidy, the ex-girlfriend of Teller's character. Larson was drawn to the project due to the realism she found in its depiction of high school experiences.[68] Writing for New York magazine, David Edelstein called upon viewers to admire "the shading and intelligence she brings to Cassidy".[78] The 2014 crime drama The Gambler, based on the 1974 film of the same name, featured Larson as a literature student who has an affair with her professor (played by Mark Wahlberg), a gambling addict. The director Rupert Wyatt felt that the role was underwritten and cast Larson to lend heft to it.[79] Even so, Claudia Puig of USA Today wrote that the "talented Larson is given little to do, other than react".[80]

Room and beyond (2015–present)

Larson had three film releases in 2015. Her first appearance was in Digging for Fire, a largely improvised ensemble comedy-drama featuring Jake Johnson in the lead role. Filming took place without a script and Larson made several on-set decisions regarding her character's choices, including the removal of a planned romantic subplot involving her and Johnson.[81] She next played the sister of Amy Schumer's character in the comedy Trainwreck, which was loosely based on Schumer's own life. Larson modeled her role on Schumer's sister, who served as an associate producer on the film.[82][83] Tim Grierson of Screen International labeled the film "a deft blend of laughs, romance and poignancy" and found Larson to be "lively, slightly underused".[84] Trainwreck earned over $140 million against a $35 million budget.[85]

Larson at the Japan premiere of Kong: Skull Island in 2017

Larson next starred in Room, a film adapted from the novel of the same name by Emma Donoghue. It featured her as Ma, a young woman held in captivity, who bears a child of rape. The role was physically and emotionally taxing for her, and she modeled it on her mother's struggle as a single parent.[12] A large portion of the film was shot inside a 10 ft x 10 ft shed created in a studio, and Larson prepared herself by spending a month isolated in her apartment.[26] She interacted with specialists on sexual abuse and researched the lack of nutrition that a person in captivity would suffer.[26] To achieve the look, she stayed away from sunlight, modified her diet, and exercised extensively to lose weight.[6] Larson collaborated closely with Jacob Tremblay, who played her son, and spent time performing activities that mirrored those of their characters.[86] Room received acclaim, particularly for Larson and Tremblay's work.[87] Los Angeles Times's Kenneth Turan called her performance "astonishing", adding that the "reality and preternatural commitment she brings to Ma is piercingly honest from start to finish, as scaldingly emotional a performance as anyone could wish for".[88] She won several awards, including the Academy Award for Best Actress, as well as a Golden Globe and BAFTA in the same category.[89]

Following the success of Room, Larson played a leading role in Free Fire (2016), an action-comedy about a shootout in a warehouse. She agreed to the project to bring attention to gun violence.[90] Eric Kohn of IndieWire remarked on how different Larson's role was from that of Room and added that her "businesslike demeanor once again proves her ability to command a scene with a single glare".[91] Commercially, the film failed to recoup its $7 million investment.[92][93] She had filmed a part in Todd Solondz's comedy Wiener-Dog, but it was cut out when Solondz found her character inessential to the story.[94] The following year, Larson starred in the second installment of the MonsterVerse franchise, entitled Kong: Skull Island, co-starring Samuel L. Jackson and Tom Hiddleston. Set in Vietnam during the 1970s, the film featured her as a photojournalist.[95] It marked her first big-budget project, and though she was glad to play a role not defined by her looks, she bemoaned the lack of female co-stars.[2][11] Ann Hornaday of The Washington Post praised the film's visual effects and thought that "Larson manages to hold her own with very little to do".[96] Kong: Skull Island earned over $566 million to emerge as her highest-grossing release.[62][97]

Later in 2017, Larson portrayed Jeannette Walls in The Glass Castle, an adaptation of Walls' memoir, which reunited her with Destin Daniel Cretton. It tells the story of a successful young woman who was raised by dysfunctional and nonconformist parents (played by Woody Harrelson and Naomi Watts).[98] Larson was attracted to the complex depiction of a parent-child relationship and identified with its theme of forgiveness. She collaborated closely with Walls and her siblings and observed their mannerisms.[99] Peter Bradshaw of The Guardian disliked the film's sentimentality but noted that "it is saved, just a little, by the robustness of Brie Larson's presence".[100] Larson made her feature film directorial debut with the comedy-drama Unicorn Store, in which she also starred.[101] She played a disillusioned art student who becomes fascinated with unicorns. Larson had unsuccessfully auditioned in 2012 to star in the film when Miguel Arteta was attached to direct. After the production was stalled, Larson was offered to direct and star in it.[102] She was drawn towards the fanciful narrative and found a connection between her character's journey and her experience as a director.[103] Peter Debruge of Variety labeled it a "creative misfire" and found her "directing style entirely incompatible with whimsy".[104] Larson's final appearance that year was in the India-set musical romance Basmati Blues, a project she had filmed back in 2013, which received criticism on social media for its white savior narrative.[105][106]

Upcoming projects

In 2019, Larson will star as Carol Danvers / Captain Marvel in superhero films set in the Marvel Cinematic Universe; the character will debut in the origin film Captain Marvel and subsequently be featured in the Untitled Avengers film.[107][108] She was initially skeptical to take on such a high-profile role but agreed after viewing it as a platform to empower young women.[2] In preparation, she underwent nine months of physical training and interacted with servicemen at the Nellis Air Force Base.[109][110] Larson will team with Destin Daniel Cretton for the third time in Just Mercy, an adaptation of Bryan Stevenson's memoir of the same name, co-starring Michael B. Jordan.[111] She is also attached to serve as the producer and star as Victoria Woodhull, the first female presidential candidate in American history, in an eponymous biopic produced by Amazon Studios.[112]

Other work Larson at the 2016 Toronto International Film Festival

Larson is an advocate for sexual assault survivors, and uses her celebrity to speak on political and social issues, saying, "I'd put it all on the line and be an activist for the rest of my life because it doesn't feel right to me to be quiet".[113][114][115] Following a performance by Lady Gaga at the 88th Academy Awards, in which several victims of sexual abuse appeared with the singer, Larson hugged all of them as they exited the stage.[116] At the following year's ceremony, Larson presented Casey Affleck with the Best Actor Award, but in light of his past sexual harassment allegations, she did not clap for him during a standing ovation from the audience; she later stated that her action spoke for itself.[114] In 2018, she collaborated with 300 women in Hollywood to set up the Time's Up initiative to protect women from harassment and discrimination.[117]

In 2014, Larson teamed with Alia Penner to launch Women of Cinefamily, a monthly program to bring attention to films directed by and starring women, for the non-profit cinematheque Cinefamily, in which Larson served as an advisory board member.[6][118] Following allegations of sexual assault against two of the company's male executives, she issued a statement in support of the victims and asked for action to be taken against the men.[119][120] Larson became a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in 2016, and was later among the finalists for the organization's board of governors.[121][122] In 2017, she was one of several celebrities to raise funds for the Motion Picture & Television Fund, a charity that offers assistance to elderly members of the industry, and co-hosted an event for the Women in film organization, during which she urged filmmakers to be vocal against the presidency of Donald Trump.[123][124] She took part in the Women's March on Washington and criticized Trump's policies on transgender rights.[125][126] At the Crystal + Lucy Awards in 2018, where she was honored, Larson bemoaned the lack of diversity among film reporters and called for better representation of minority voices in film criticism.[127] She announced a 20 percent quota for underrepresented journalists at the Sundance and Toronto International Film Festival.[128]

Personal life and media image Larson at the 2016 San Diego Comic-Con

Larson is reticent to discuss her personal life and declines to answer questions in interviews that make her uncomfortable.[4][6] When asked about her desire to be private, she has said that she fears being judged for her flaws and has added that the privacy allows her to play a wide variety of parts without being typecast.[19][90] Larson is in a relationship with Alex Greenwald, a musician and lead singer of the band Phantom Planet, with whom she became engaged in May 2016.[19][129][130] They cohabit in Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles.[2] She has credited Greenwald for creating a safe space for her and for empowering her to take risks in her work.[131] Larson maintains an active social media presence and uses it as a platform to share opinions and uplifting posts written by herself.[2][113]

Describing Larson's off-screen persona, Holly Millea of Elle wrote in 2016 that she "carries herself like an athlete, lean and solid, surefooted yet her energy is warm and familial, literally embracing".[11] Anne Helen Petersen of BuzzFeed considers her to be "incredibly warm" and adds that she is "a serious nerd, with the endlessly tunneling knowledge of a homeschooler".[19] Jennifer Dickison of Porter writes that Larson's "fully formed" personality makes it difficult to categorize her into a conventional slot.[132]

Larson has said that she is interested in films that illustrate the "human condition" and which "make people feel more connected to themselves the rest of the world".[113] She is drawn to parts that differ from her own personality and which involve themes of social activism.[90][133] The journalist Fan Zhong of W has identified a theme of "sex appeal, inner torment, and a quick, playful wit" in her characters.[134] Her Room director Lenny Abrahamson believes that her craft has "none of that showy intensity that sometimes gets all the attention" and has said that her "awareness of tougher lives" empowers her performances.[11] Destin Daniel Cretton, who directed her in Short Term 12 and The Glass Castle, has praised her ability to improvise, saying, "I never know what's going to happen, and often she doesn't know what's going to happen."[11] In 2016, Larson was featured by Forbes in their 30 Under 30 list and was included by People magazine in their annual beauty list.[135][136] In 2018, she was named amongst the best American actors under 30 by IndieWire.[137]

Works and accolades Main articles: List of Brie Larson performances and awards and nominations

According to the review aggregator site Rotten Tomatoes and the box-office site Box Office Mojo, Larson's most critically acclaimed and commercially successful films are Scott Pilgrim vs. the World (2010), 21 Jump Street (2012), Short Term 12 (2013), Don Jon (2013), The Spectacular Now (2013), Trainwreck (2015), Room (2015), and Kong: Skull Island (2017).[62][138] She has received an Academy Award, a Golden Globe Award, a Screen Actors Guild Award, and a British Academy Film Award, among other accolades, for her performance in Room.[139]

References
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  8. ^ Wayland, Sara (March 23, 2010). "Brie Larson Interview: United States of Tara and Scott Pligrim vs. the World". Collider. Archived from the original on July 23, 2018. Retrieved July 23, 2018. 
  9. ^ Erbland, Kate (September 11, 2017). "Brie Larson Hopes Her Whimsical Directorial Debut 'Unicorn Store' Will Inspire Other Artists, Even If They Hate It". IndieWire. Archived from the original on June 18, 2018. Retrieved August 1, 2018. 
  10. ^ a b Radloff, Jessica (January 14, 2014). "Meet Brie Larson, the Rising Star You Need to Know About in 2014". Glamour. Archived from the original on January 14, 2018. Retrieved July 21, 2018. 
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h Millea, Holly (February 26, 2016). "Brie Larson's World Is About to Change. Just Don't Tell Her That". Elle. Archived from the original on May 3, 2018. Retrieved May 22, 2018. 
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External links Wikimedia Commons has media related to Brie Larson.
  • Brie Larson at Encyclopædia Britannica
  • Brie Larson on IMDb
  • Brie Larson at AllMovie
Awards for Brie Larson
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Academy Award for Best Actress1928–1950
  • Janet Gaynor (1928)
  • Mary Pickford (1929)
  • Norma Shearer (1930)
  • Marie Dressler (1931)
  • Helen Hayes (1932)
  • Katharine Hepburn (1933)
  • Claudette Colbert (1934)
  • Bette Davis (1935)
  • Luise Rainer (1936)
  • Luise Rainer (1937)
  • Bette Davis (1938)
  • Vivien Leigh (1939)
  • Ginger Rogers (1940)
  • Joan Fontaine (1941)
  • Greer Garson (1942)
  • Jennifer Jones (1943)
  • Ingrid Bergman (1944)
  • Joan Crawford (1945)
  • Olivia de Havilland (1946)
  • Loretta Young (1947)
  • Jane Wyman (1948)
  • Olivia de Havilland (1949)
  • Judy Holliday (1950)
1951–1975
  • Vivien Leigh (1951)
  • Shirley Booth (1952)
  • Audrey Hepburn (1953)
  • Grace Kelly (1954)
  • Anna Magnani (1955)
  • Ingrid Bergman (1956)
  • Joanne Woodward (1957)
  • Susan Hayward (1958)
  • Simone Signoret (1959)
  • Elizabeth Taylor (1960)
  • Sophia Loren (1961)
  • Anne Bancroft (1962)
  • Patricia Neal (1963)
  • Julie Andrews (1964)
  • Julie Christie (1965)
  • Elizabeth Taylor (1966)
  • Katharine Hepburn (1967)
  • Katharine Hepburn / Barbra Streisand (1968)
  • Maggie Smith (1969)
  • Glenda Jackson (1970)
  • Jane Fonda (1971)
  • Liza Minnelli (1972)
  • Glenda Jackson (1973)
  • Ellen Burstyn (1974)
  • Louise Fletcher (1975)
1976–2000
  • Faye Dunaway (1976)
  • Diane Keaton (1977)
  • Jane Fonda (1978)
  • Sally Field (1979)
  • Sissy Spacek (1980)
  • Katharine Hepburn (1981)
  • Meryl Streep (1982)
  • Shirley MacLaine (1983)
  • Sally Field (1984)
  • Geraldine Page (1985)
  • Marlee Matlin (1986)
  • Cher (1987)
  • Jodie Foster (1988)
  • Jessica Tandy (1989)
  • Kathy Bates (1990)
  • Jodie Foster (1991)
  • Emma Thompson (1992)
  • Holly Hunter (1993)
  • Jessica Lange (1994)
  • Susan Sarandon (1995)
  • Frances McDormand (1996)
  • Helen Hunt (1997)
  • Gwyneth Paltrow (1998)
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  • Julia Roberts (2000)
2001–present
  • Halle Berry (2001)
  • Nicole Kidman (2002)
  • Charlize Theron (2003)
  • Hilary Swank (2004)
  • Reese Witherspoon (2005)
  • Helen Mirren (2006)
  • Marion Cotillard (2007)
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  • Sandra Bullock (2009)
  • Natalie Portman (2010)
  • Meryl Streep (2011)
  • Jennifer Lawrence (2012)
  • Cate Blanchett (2013)
  • Julianne Moore (2014)
  • Brie Larson (2015)
  • Emma Stone (2016)
  • Frances McDormand (2017)
  • v
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  • e
BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role1952–1967British
  • Vivien Leigh (1952)
  • Audrey Hepburn (1953)
  • Yvonne Mitchell (1954)
  • Katie Johnson (1955)
  • Virginia McKenna (1956)
  • Heather Sears (1957)
  • Irene Worth (1958)
  • Audrey Hepburn (1959)
  • Rachel Roberts (1960)
  • Dora Bryan (1961)
  • Leslie Caron (1962)
  • Rachel Roberts (1963)
  • Audrey Hepburn (1964)
  • Julie Christie (1965)
  • Elizabeth Taylor (1966)
  • Edith Evans (1967)
Foreign
  • Simone Signoret (1952)
  • Leslie Caron (1953)
  • Cornell Borchers (1954)
  • Betsy Blair (1955)
  • Anna Magnani (1956)
  • Simone Signoret (1957)
  • Simone Signoret (1958)
  • Shirley MacLaine (1959)
  • Shirley MacLaine (1960)
  • Sophia Loren (1961)
  • Anne Bancroft (1962)
  • Patricia Neal (1963)
  • Anne Bancroft (1964)
  • Patricia Neal (1965)
  • Jeanne Moreau (1966)
  • Anouk Aimée (1967)
1968–present
  • Katharine Hepburn (1968)
  • Maggie Smith (1969)
  • Katharine Ross (1970)
  • Glenda Jackson (1971)
  • Liza Minnelli (1972)
  • Stéphane Audran (1973)
  • Joanne Woodward (1974)
  • Ellen Burstyn (1975)
  • Louise Fletcher (1976)
  • Diane Keaton (1977)
  • Jane Fonda (1978)
  • Jane Fonda (1979)
  • Judy Davis (1980)
  • Meryl Streep (1981)
  • Katharine Hepburn (1982)
  • Julie Walters (1983)
  • Maggie Smith (1984)
  • Peggy Ashcroft (1985)
  • Maggie Smith (1986)
  • Anne Bancroft (1987)
  • Maggie Smith (1988)
  • Pauline Collins (1989)
  • Jessica Tandy (1990)
  • Jodie Foster (1991)
  • Emma Thompson (1992)
  • Holly Hunter (1993)
  • Susan Sarandon (1994)
  • Emma Thompson (1995)
  • Brenda Blethyn (1996)
  • Judi Dench (1997)
  • Cate Blanchett (1998)
  • Annette Bening (1999)
  • Julia Roberts (2000)
  • Judi Dench (2001)
  • Nicole Kidman (2002)
  • Scarlett Johansson (2003)
  • Imelda Staunton (2004)
  • Reese Witherspoon (2005)
  • Helen Mirren (2006)
  • Marion Cotillard (2007)
  • Kate Winslet (2008)
  • Carey Mulligan (2009)
  • Natalie Portman (2010)
  • Meryl Streep (2011)
  • Emmanuelle Riva (2012)
  • Cate Blanchett (2013)
  • Julianne Moore (2014)
  • Brie Larson (2015)
  • Emma Stone (2016)
  • Frances McDormand (2017)
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Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television award winners for Best ActressCanadian Film Award
1968–1978
  • Geneviève Bujold (1968)
  • Jackie Burroughs (1969)
  • Geneviève Bujold (1970)
  • Ann Knox (1971)
  • Micheline Lanctôt (1972)
  • Geneviève Bujold (1973)
  • no award (1974)
  • Margot Kidder (1975)
  • Marilyn Lightstone (1976)
  • Monique Mercure (1977)
  • Helen Shaver (1978)
Genie Award
1980–2011
  • Kate Lynch (1980)
  • Marie Tifo (1981)
  • Margot Kidder (1982)
  • Rae Dawn Chong (1983)
  • Martha Henry (1984)
  • Louise Marleau (1985)
  • Margaret Langrick (1986)
  • Martha Henry (1987)
  • Sheila McCarthy (1988)
  • Jackie Burroughs (1989)
  • Rebecca Jenkins (1990)
  • Pascale Montpetit (1991)
  • Janet Wright (1992)
  • Sheila McCarthy (1993)
  • Sandra Oh (1994)
  • Helena Bonham Carter (1995)
  • Martha Henry (1996)
  • Molly Parker (1997)
  • Sandra Oh (1998)
  • Sylvie Moreau (1999)
  • Marie-Josée Croze (2000)
  • Élise Guilbault (2001)
  • Arsinée Khanjian (2002)
  • Sarah Polley (2003)
  • Pascale Bussières (2004)
  • Seema Biswas (2005)
  • Julie Le Breton (2006)
  • Julie Christie (2007)
  • Ellen Burstyn (2008)
  • Karine Vanasse (2009)
  • Lubna Azabal (2010)
  • Vanessa Paradis (2011)
Canadian Screen Award
2012–present
  • Rachel Mwanza (2012)
  • Gabrielle Marion-Rivard (2013)
  • Anne Dorval (2014)
  • Brie Larson (2015)
  • Tatiana Maslany (2016)
  • Sally Hawkins (2017)
  • v
  • t
  • e
Critics' Choice Movie Award for Best Actress
  • Nicole Kidman (1995)
  • Frances McDormand (1996)
  • Helena Bonham Carter (1997)
  • Cate Blanchett (1998)
  • Hilary Swank (1999)
  • Julia Roberts (2000)
  • Sissy Spacek (2001)
  • Julianne Moore (2002)
  • Charlize Theron (2003)
  • Hilary Swank (2004)
  • Reese Witherspoon (2005)
  • Helen Mirren (2006)
  • Julie Christie (2007)
  • Anne Hathaway / Meryl Streep (2008)
  • Sandra Bullock / Meryl Streep (2009)
  • Natalie Portman (2010)
  • Viola Davis (2011)
  • Jessica Chastain (2012)
  • Cate Blanchett (2013)
  • Julianne Moore (2014)
  • Brie Larson (2015)
  • Natalie Portman (2016)
  • Frances McDormand (2017)
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Golden Globe Award for Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama
  • Jennifer Jones (1943)
  • Ingrid Bergman (1944)
  • Ingrid Bergman (1945)
  • Rosalind Russell (1946)
  • Rosalind Russell (1947)
  • Jane Wyman (1948)
  • Olivia de Havilland (1949)
  • Gloria Swanson (1950)
  • Jane Wyman (1951)
  • Shirley Booth (1952)
  • Audrey Hepburn (1953)
  • Grace Kelly (1954)
  • Anna Magnani (1955)
  • Ingrid Bergman (1956)
  • Joanne Woodward (1957)
  • Susan Hayward (1958)
  • Elizabeth Taylor (1959)
  • Greer Garson (1960)
  • Geraldine Page (1961)
  • Geraldine Page (1962)
  • Leslie Caron (1963)
  • Anne Bancroft (1964)
  • Samantha Eggar (1965)
  • Anouk Aimée (1966)
  • Edith Evans (1967)
  • Joanne Woodward (1968)
  • Geneviève Bujold (1969)
  • Ali MacGraw (1970)
  • Jane Fonda (1971)
  • Liv Ullmann (1972)
  • Marsha Mason (1973)
  • Gena Rowlands (1974)
  • Louise Fletcher (1975)
  • Faye Dunaway (1976)
  • Jane Fonda (1977)
  • Jane Fonda (1978)
  • Sally Field (1979)
  • Mary Tyler Moore (1980)
  • Meryl Streep (1981)
  • Meryl Streep (1982)
  • Shirley MacLaine (1983)
  • Sally Field (1984)
  • Whoopi Goldberg (1985)
  • Marlee Matlin (1986)
  • Sally Kirkland (1987)
  • Jodie Foster / Shirley MacLaine / Sigourney Weaver (1988)
  • Michelle Pfeiffer (1989)
  • Kathy Bates (1990)
  • Jodie Foster (1991)
  • Emma Thompson (1992)
  • Holly Hunter (1993)
  • Jessica Lange (1994)
  • Sharon Stone (1995)
  • Brenda Blethyn (1996)
  • Judi Dench (1997)
  • Cate Blanchett (1998)
  • Hilary Swank (1999)
  • Julia Roberts (2000)
  • Sissy Spacek (2001)
  • Nicole Kidman (2002)
  • Charlize Theron (2003)
  • Hilary Swank (2004)
  • Felicity Huffman (2005)
  • Helen Mirren (2006)
  • Julie Christie (2007)
  • Kate Winslet (2008)
  • Sandra Bullock (2009)
  • Natalie Portman (2010)
  • Meryl Streep (2011)
  • Jessica Chastain (2012)
  • Cate Blanchett (2013)
  • Julianne Moore (2014)
  • Brie Larson (2015)
  • Isabelle Huppert (2016)
  • Frances McDormand (2017)
  • v
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  • e
Independent Spirit Award for Best Female Lead
  • Geraldine Page (1985)
  • Isabella Rossellini (1986)
  • Sally Kirkland (1987)
  • Jodie Foster (1988)
  • Andie MacDowell (1989)
  • Anjelica Huston (1990)
  • Judy Davis (1991)
  • Fairuza Balk (1992)
  • Ashley Judd (1993)
  • Linda Fiorentino (1994)
  • Elisabeth Shue (1995)
  • Frances McDormand (1996)
  • Julie Christie (1997)
  • Ally Sheedy (1998)
  • Hilary Swank (1999)
  • Ellen Burstyn (2000)
  • Sissy Spacek (2001)
  • Julianne Moore (2002)
  • Charlize Theron (2003)
  • Catalina Sandino Moreno (2004)
  • Felicity Huffman (2005)
  • Shareeka Epps (2006)
  • Ellen Page (2007)
  • Melissa Leo (2008)
  • Gabourey Sidibe (2009)
  • Natalie Portman (2010)
  • Michelle Williams (2011)
  • Jennifer Lawrence (2012)
  • Cate Blanchett (2013)
  • Julianne Moore (2014)
  • Brie Larson (2015)
  • Isabelle Huppert (2016)
  • Frances McDormand (2017)
  • v
  • t
  • e
Locarno Film Festival Best Actress Award2000s–2010s
  • Sabine Timoteo (2000)
  • Ho-jung Kim (2001)
  • Taraneh Alidoosti (2002)
  • Holly Hunter / Diana Dumbrava / Kiron Kher (2003)
  • Maria Kwiatkowsky/ Pinar Erincin (2004)
  • Robin Wright / Sissy Spacek/Holly Hunter / LisaGay Hamilton / Glenn Close / Elpidia Carrillo / Amy Brenneman / Kathy Baker (2005)
  • Amber Tamblyn (2006)
  • Marian Álvarez (2007)
  • Ilaria Occhini (2008)
  • Lotte Verbeek (2009)
  • WiAna Ularu (2010)
  • María Canale (2011)
  • Nai An (2012)
  • Brie Larson (2013)
  • Ariane Labed (2014)
  • Sachie Tanaka / Hazuki Kikuchi / Maiko Mihara / Rira Kawamura (2015)
  • Irena Ivanova (2016)
  • Isabelle Huppert (2017)
  • v
  • t
  • e
National Board of Review Award for Best Actress
  • Joan Crawford (1945)
  • Anna Magnani (1946)
  • Celia Johnson (1947)
  • Olivia de Havilland (1948)
  • Gloria Swanson (1950)
  • Jan Sterling (1951)
  • Shirley Booth (1952)
  • Jean Simmons (1953)
  • Grace Kelly (1954)
  • Anna Magnani (1955)
  • Dorothy McGuire (1956)
  • Joanne Woodward (1957)
  • Ingrid Bergman (1958)
  • Simone Signoret (1959)
  • Greer Garson (1960)
  • Geraldine Page (1961)
  • Anne Bancroft (1962)
  • Patricia Neal (1963)
  • Kim Stanley (1964)
  • Julie Christie (1965)
  • Elizabeth Taylor (1966)
  • Edith Evans (1967)
  • Liv Ullmann (1968)
  • Geraldine Page (1969)
  • Glenda Jackson (1970)
  • Irene Papas (1971)
  • Cicely Tyson (1972)
  • Liv Ullmann (1973)
  • Gena Rowlands (1974)
  • Isabelle Adjani (1975)
  • Liv Ullmann (1976)
  • Anne Bancroft (1977)
  • Ingrid Bergman (1978)
  • Sally Field (1979)
  • Sissy Spacek (1980)
  • Glenda Jackson (1981)
  • Meryl Streep (1982)
  • Shirley MacLaine (1983)
  • Peggy Ashcroft (1984)
  • Whoopi Goldberg (1985)
  • Kathleen Turner (1986)
  • Lillian Gish / Holly Hunter (1987)
  • Jodie Foster (1988)
  • Michelle Pfeiffer (1989)
  • Mia Farrow (1990)
  • Geena Davis / Susan Sarandon (1991)
  • Emma Thompson (1992)
  • Holly Hunter (1993)
  • Miranda Richardson (1994)
  • Emma Thompson (1995)
  • Frances McDormand (1996)
  • Helena Bonham Carter (1997)
  • Fernanda Montenegro (1998)
  • Janet McTeer (1999)
  • Julia Roberts (2000)
  • Halle Berry (2001)
  • Julianne Moore (2002)
  • Diane Keaton (2003)
  • Annette Bening (2004)
  • Felicity Huffman (2005)
  • Helen Mirren (2006)
  • Julie Christie (2007)
  • Anne Hathaway (2008)
  • Carey Mulligan (2009)
  • Lesley Manville (2010)
  • Tilda Swinton (2011)
  • Jessica Chastain (2012)
  • Emma Thompson (2013)
  • Julianne Moore (2014)
  • Brie Larson (2015)
  • Amy Adams (2016)
  • Meryl Streep (2017)
  • v
  • t
  • e
San Diego Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress1990s
  • Frances McDormand (1996)
  • Pam Grier / Bai Ling (1997)
  • Susan Sarandon (1998)
  • Annette Bening (1999)
2000s
  • Laura Linney / Julia Roberts (2000)
  • Thora Birch (2001)
  • Julianne Moore (2002)
  • Naomi Watts (2003)
  • Imelda Staunton (2004)
  • Joan Allen (2005)
  • Helen Mirren (2006)
  • Julie Christie (2007)
  • Kate Winslet (2008)
  • Michelle Monaghan (2009)
2010s
  • Jennifer Lawrence (2010)
  • Brit Marling (2011)
  • Michelle Williams (2012)
  • Cate Blanchett (2013)
  • Marion Cotillard (2014)
  • Brie Larson (2015)
  • Sônia Braga (2016)
  • Sally Hawkins (2017)
  • v
  • t
  • e
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role
  • Jodie Foster (1994)
  • Susan Sarandon (1995)
  • Frances McDormand (1996)
  • Helen Hunt (1997)
  • Gwyneth Paltrow (1998)
  • Annette Bening (1999)
  • Julia Roberts (2000)
  • Halle Berry (2001)
  • Renée Zellweger (2002)
  • Charlize Theron (2003)
  • Hilary Swank (2004)
  • Reese Witherspoon (2005)
  • Helen Mirren (2006)
  • Julie Christie (2007)
  • Meryl Streep (2008)
  • Sandra Bullock (2009)
  • Natalie Portman (2010)
  • Viola Davis (2011)
  • Jennifer Lawrence (2012)
  • Cate Blanchett (2013)
  • Julianne Moore (2014)
  • Brie Larson (2015)
  • Emma Stone (2016)
  • Frances McDormand (2017)
  • v
  • t
  • e
Vancouver Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress
  • Laura Linney (2000)
  • Sissy Spacek (2001)
  • Julianne Moore (2002)
  • Charlize Theron (2003)
  • Imelda Staunton (2004)
  • Felicity Huffman (2005)
  • Helen Mirren (2006)
  • Marion Cotillard (2007)
  • Kate Winslet (2008)
  • Carey Mulligan (2009)
  • Jennifer Lawrence (2010)
  • Elizabeth Olsen (2011)
  • Jessica Chastain (2012)
  • Cate Blanchett (2013)
  • Tilda Swinton (2014)
  • Brie Larson (2015)
  • Isabelle Huppert (2016)
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Kong: Skull Island (BD) [Blu-ray]
Kong: Skull Island (BD) [Blu-ray]
Kong: Skull Island (Blu-ray)When a scientific expedition to an uncharted island awakens titanic forces of nature, a mission of discovery becomes an explosive war between monster and man. Tom Hiddleston, Samuel L. Jackson, Brie Larson, John Goodman and John C. Reilly star in a thrilling and original new adventure that reveals the untold story of how Kong became King.]]>

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