Charles Haley
Charles Haley
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Charles Haley
Charles Lewis Haley (born January 6, 1964) is a former American football linebacker and defensive end who played in the National Football League (NFL)

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For the mining engineer, see Charles Scott Haley. Charles Haley No. 94, 95 Position: Outside linebacker, defensive end Personal information Born: (1964-01-06) January 6, 1964 (age 54)
Gladys, Virginia Height: 6 ft 5 in (1.96 m) Weight: 255 lb (116 kg) Career information High school: Naruna (VA) William Campbell College: James Madison NFL Draft: 1986 / Round: 4 / Pick: 96 Career history
  • San Francisco 49ers (1986–1991)
  • Dallas Cowboys (1992–1996)
  • San Francisco 49ers (1998–1999)
Career highlights and awards
  • 5× Super Bowl champion (XXIII, XXIV, XXVII, XXVIII, XXX)
  • 5× Pro Bowl (1988, 1990, 1991, 1994, 1995)
  • 2× First-team All-Pro (1990, 1994)
  • 2× NFC Defensive Player of the Year (1990, 1994)
  • Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor
  • San Francisco 49ers Hall of Fame
  • Division I-AA All-American (1985)
Career NFL statistics Tackles: 500 Sacks: 100.5 Interceptions: 2 Forced fumbles: 26 Player stats at NFL.com Player stats at PFR Pro Football Hall of Fame College Football Hall of Fame

Charles Lewis Haley (born January 6, 1964) is a former American football linebacker and defensive end who played in the National Football League (NFL) for the San Francisco 49ers (1986–1991, 1998–1999) and the Dallas Cowboys (1992–1996).

A versatile defensive player, Haley began his career as a specialty outside linebacker, eventually progressing to pass-rusher and finally full-fledged defensive end. He is the first five-time Super Bowl champion, and is one of only two such players, the other being Tom Brady. He won two Super Bowls with the 49ers (XXIII, XXIV) and three with the Cowboys (XXVII, XXVIII, XXX); he was a starter in all five championship games. Haley was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2011 and was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2015.

Contents
  • 1 Early years
  • 2 Professional career
    • 2.1 San Francisco 49ers (first stint)
    • 2.2 Dallas Cowboys
    • 2.3 San Francisco 49ers (second stint)
    • 2.4 Career statistics
  • 3 Honors
  • 4 Personal life
  • 5 References
  • 6 External links

Early years

Haley was born in Gladys, Virginia. He attended William Campbell High School in Naruna, Virginia where he was a three-year starter for the football team, while playing linebacker and tight end. As a senior, he received defensive player of the year honors, All-Region III and All-Group AA accolades, while helping the team win the Seminole District championship. He also played basketball and was an All-district selection.

Haley was not highly recruited at the start of his senior season, so he accepted a scholarship from James Madison University, which at the time was the only Division I-A or I-AA school to make an offer. He was named a starter at defensive end / linebacker as a freshman, posting 85 tackles (second on the team), 5 sacks, 6 passes defensed and 4 forced fumbles.

The next year, Haley was moved to inside linebacker, making 143 tackles (led the team) and 4 sacks. As a junior, he tallied 147 tackles (led the team), 3 sacks and 2 interceptions. In his final year he was switched to outside linebacker for the last four games, registering 131 tackles (second on the team), 5 quarterback sacks, 3 blocked kicks and one interception.

Haley was a two-time Division I-AA All-American and finished his career with 506 tackles (school record), 17 sacks, and 3 interceptions. Haley is a member of the Xi Delta chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity at James Madison.

Professional career San Francisco 49ers (first stint)

Haley was selected by the San Francisco 49ers in the fourth round (96th overall) of the 1986 NFL Draft, after dropping because he initially was timed at 4.8 seconds in the 40-yard dash, although he was later clocked by a 49ers scout at 4.55 seconds. He played outside linebacker in a 3–4 defense, finished second behind Leslie O'Neal for rookies with 12 sacks and was voted to the NFL All-Rookie team by Pro Football Weekly and the United Press International. The following year, he played again in a designated pass rusher role, coming into the game in likely passing situations, while making 25 tackles and 6.5 sacks.

In 1988, Haley was named the starter at left outside linebacker, registering 69 tackles, 11.5 sacks and would hold that spot through the 1991 season. The next year, he tallied 57 tackles and 10.5 sacks.

In 1990, Haley had 58 tackles, 9 passes defensed, was third in the league with 16 sacks, was voted the UPI NFC Defensive Player of the Year and was a consensus All-Pro.

In 1991, Haley's relationship with the organization began to deteriorate after safety Ronnie Lott was left unprotected—eligible to sign with any team under Plan B free agency. He still recorded 53 tackles, 6 passes defensed, 2 forced fumbles and 7 sacks, tying for the team lead with Larry Roberts. While with the 49ers from 1986 to 1991, he led the team in sacks every season, and played on the Super Bowl XXIII and Super Bowl XXIV championship teams.

On August 26, 1992, Haley's volatile temperament and clashes with head coach George Seifert prompted the team to trade him to the Dallas Cowboys in exchange for a 1993 second round selection (#56-Vincent Brisby) and a 1994 third round selection (#99-Alai Kalaniuvalu).

Dallas Cowboys

In 1992, Haley was moved to right defensive end in the Dallas Cowboys 4–3 defense, made 39 tackles, 6 sacks, and 42 quarterback pressures (led the team), and helped the team improve from 17th in total defense in 1991 to first. Haley received the UPI NFC Defensive Player of the Year Award and was a consensus All-Pro once again. He is often mentioned as the final piece that helped propel the Cowboys into a Super Bowl contender.

In 1993, Haley made headlines after smashing his helmet through a wall in the locker room following a home loss to the Buffalo Bills, showing his displeasure with the team's inability to sign holdout running back Emmitt Smith, which contributed to an 0–2 start and put the season in jeopardy. The Cowboys relented and reached an agreement with Smith the following week, getting them back on track and making them the first team to win a Super Bowl after starting a season 0–2. He registered 41 tackles, 4 sacks, 2 passes defensed, and 3 forced fumbles, but his recurring back problems began to require a series of surgeries.

In 1994, Haley recovered from off-season surgery (lumbar microdiscectomy) to post 68 tackles, 12.5 sacks, and 52 quarterback pressures. He immediately announced his retirement after losing 28–38 to the 49ers in the NFC Championship game, but decided to return after being offered a new contract.

In 1995, Haley posted 10.5 sacks, 33 quarterback pressures, and 35 tackles in the first 10 games, until suffering a ruptured disk against the Washington Redskins, which derailed his season. He started in Super Bowl XXX six weeks after having back surgery, making one sack, 3 quarterback pressures and 5 tackles. The next year, with the team trying to limit him to 30 plays per game, he appeared in the first three contests, in week 9 and 10, before being deactivated with a back injury. He retired after the season, because of his back injuries and his youngest daughter Brianna having been diagnosed with leukemia.

San Francisco 49ers (second stint)

On January 2, 1999, Haley was signed by the San Francisco 49ers after being out of football for almost two years, to provide depth for an injury depleted defensive line in the playoffs (2 games). He was re-signed for the 1999 season and tallied 3 sacks.

Career statistics

In his 12 NFL seasons, Haley recorded 100.5 quarterback sacks, two interceptions (nine return yards), and eight fumble recoveries, which he returned for nine yards and a touchdown. He was also selected to play in five Pro Bowls (1988, 1990, 1991, 1994, 1995) and was named NFL All-Pro in 1990 and 1994. In his first four seasons in Dallas, he was on three Super Bowl-winning teams: in 1992 (XXVII), 1993 (XXVIII), and 1995 (XXX). Haley and Tom Brady are the only players in NFL history to have won five Super Bowl rings.

Honors

Haley was inducted into the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame in 2006, the College Football Hall of Fame in 2011, and the Texas Black Sports Hall of Fame in 2012. He was enshrined into the Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor on November 6, 2011. In 2015, he was inducted into the San Francisco 49ers Hall of Fame. One of 15 finalists for election to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2010 and 2011, he was not selected. After being elected on January 31, 2015, Haley felt that his election may have been delayed by his image and behavior: "I thought that what you do on the field would govern whether you get in the Hall". On August 8, 2015, Haley was inducted at the Enshrinement Ceremony where his bust, sculpted by Scott Myers, was unveiled.

Personal life

After football, Haley was diagnosed with bipolar disorder and began to undergo therapy and to take medication. Haley was an assistant defensive coach for the Detroit Lions from 2001 to 2002. He is a special advisor mentoring rookies for both the Dallas Cowboys and San Francisco 49ers. He also has dedicated his life to help fund several local initiatives with organizations such as Jubilee Centre and The Salvation Army.

References
  1. ^ Sordelett, Damien (August 8, 2015). "William Campbell football standout Charles Haley to be inducted into Pro Football Hall of Fame". The News & Advance. Lynchburg, Virginia. Retrieved February 19, 2016. 
  2. ^ Michael, Gary (August 4, 2015). "Charles Haley: JMU Standout to NFL Hall of Famer – Part 1". JMUSports.com. Retrieved February 19, 2016. 
  3. ^ Michael, Gary (August 5, 2015). "Charles Haley: JMU Standout to NFL Hall of Famer – Part 2". JMUSports.com. Retrieved February 19, 2016. 
  4. ^ Michael, Gary (August 6, 2015). "Charles Haley: JMU Standout to NFL Hall of Famer – Part 3". JMUSports.com. Retrieved February 19, 2016. 
  5. ^ "Former JMU All-American Haley Elected to College Football Hall of Fame". JMUSports.com. May 27, 2011. Retrieved February 19, 2016. 
  6. ^ Richards, Charles (August 27, 1992). "Haley traded to Cowboys". The Free Lance–Star. Fredericksburg, Virginia. Associated Press. Retrieved February 19, 2016. 
  7. ^ "Haley's return to be one of universal wonder". Boca Raton News. Boca Raton, Florida. Associated Press. January 13, 1993. Retrieved February 19, 2016. 
  8. ^ Archer, Todd (January 30, 2015). "2015 Hall of Fame finalist: Charles Haley". ESPN.com. Retrieved February 19, 2016. 
  9. ^ "Cowboys in chaos". Times-News. Hendersonville, North Carolina. Associated Press. September 14, 1993. Retrieved February 19, 2016. 
  10. ^ "Cowboys' Haley Sacks Plans To Retire". The Victoria Advocate. Victoria, Texas. Associated Press. March 8, 1995. Retrieved February 19, 2016. 
  11. ^ "Cowboys' Haley Retires Again". The Item. Sumter, South Carolina. Associated Press. December 5, 1995. Retrieved February 19, 2016. 
  12. ^ "Cowboys' Haley ready to return". Spartanburg Herald-Journal. Associated Press. January 24, 1996. Retrieved February 19, 2016. 
  13. ^ "Cowboys' Haley Faces Surgery Again". Star-Banner. Ocala, Florida. November 15, 1996. Retrieved February 19, 2016. 
  14. ^ "Dallas Loses Two Greats In Haley And Novacek". Reading Eagle. Reading, Pennsylvania. July 16, 1997. Retrieved February 19, 2016. 
  15. ^ "Charles Haley trying to find bone marrow donor for daughter". The Argus-Press. Owosso, Michigan. Associated Press. November 16, 1997. Retrieved February 19, 2016. 
  16. ^ "San Francisco Plans To Bring Charles Haley Back". Boca Raton News. Boca Raton, Florida. January 2, 1999. Retrieved February 19, 2016. 
  17. ^ "Haley sticks with Niners". The Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. July 22, 1999. Retrieved February 19, 2016. 
  18. ^ Watkins, Calvin (7 November 2011). "Drew Pearson, Charles Haley honored". ESPN. Retrieved 11 August 2014. 
  19. ^ Townsend, Brad (January 3, 2010). "With therapy, grit, ex-Cowboy Haley tackles bipolar disorder". Dallas News. Retrieved May 23, 2017. 
External links
  • Career statistics and player information from Pro-Football-Reference • Databasefootball.com
  • Charles Haley at the Pro Football Hall of Fame
  • Charles Haley at the College Football Hall of Fame
  • Charles Haley Cowboys Ring of Honor
  • Dallas Cowboys Top 50 players
Charles Haley—championships, awards, and honors
  • v
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San Francisco 49ers Super Bowl XXIII champions
  • 4 Max Runager
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  • 94 Charles Haley
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  • v
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San Francisco 49ers Super Bowl XXIV champions
  • 6 Mike Cofer
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  • 9 Barry Helton
  • 13 Steve Bono
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  • 21 Eric Wright
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  • 23 Spencer Tillman
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Dallas Cowboys Super Bowl XXVII champions
  • 2 Lin Elliott
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  • 20 Ray Horton
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  • Head coach: Jimmy Johnson
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Dallas Cowboys Super Bowl XXVIII champions
  • 3 Eddie Murray
  • 8 Troy Aikman
  • 17 Jason Garrett
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  • 19 John Jett
  • 22 Emmitt Smith (MVP)
  • 23 Robert Williams
  • 24 Larry Brown
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  • 56 John Roper
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  • 89 Kelly Blackwell
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  • 98 Godfrey Myles
  • Head coach: Jimmy Johnson
  • Coaches: Hubbard Alexander
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  • John Blake
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  • Jim Eddy
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  • Norv Turner
  • v
  • t
  • e
Dallas Cowboys Super Bowl XXX champions
  • 8 Troy Aikman
  • 10 Jon Baker
  • 11 Wade Wilson
  • 17 Jason Garrett
  • 18 Chris Boniol
  • 19 John Jett
  • 20 Sherman Williams
  • 21 Deion Sanders
  • 22 Emmitt Smith
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  • 24 Larry Brown (MVP)
  • 25 Scott Case
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  • 27 Greg Tremble
  • 28 Darren Woodson
  • 29 Alundis Brice
  • 31 Brock Marion
  • 36 Dominique Ross
  • 38 David Lang
  • 40 Bill Bates
  • 42 Charlie Williams
  • 43 Greg Briggs
  • 47 Clayton Holmes
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  • 53 Ray Donaldson
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  • 60 Derek Kennard
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  • 78 Leon Lett
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  • 81 Ed Hervey
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  • 83 Kendell Watkins
  • 84 Jay Novacek
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  • 86 Eric Bjornson
  • 87 Billy Davis
  • 88 Michael Irvin
  • 90 Oscar Sturgis
  • 91 Darren Benson
  • 92 Tony Tolbert
  • 94 Charles Haley
  • 95 Chad Hennings
  • 96 Shante Carver
  • 98 Godfrey Myles
  • 99 Hurvin McCormack
  • Head coach: Barry Switzer
  • Coaches: Hubbard Alexander
  • Joe Avezzano
  • Craig Boller
  • Joe Brodsky
  • Dave Campo
  • Jim Eddy
  • Robert Ford
  • Steve Hoffman
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  • Mike Zimmer
  • v
  • t
  • e
San Francisco 49ers 1986 NFL draft selections
  • Larry Roberts
  • Tom Rathman
  • Tim McKyer
  • John Taylor
  • Charles Haley
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  • Patrick Miller
  • Don Griffin
  • Jim Popp
  • Tony Cherry
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  • Harold Hallman
  • v
  • t
  • e
1990 AP NFL All-Pro Team
  • Offense: QB Joe Montana
  • RB Thurman Thomas
  • RB Barry Sanders
  • WR Jerry Rice
  • WR Andre Rison
  • TE Keith Jackson

  • OT Jim Lachey
  • OT Anthony Muñoz
  • G Bruce Matthews
  • G Randall McDaniel
  • C Kent Hull
  • Defense: DE Bruce Smith
  • DE Reggie White
  • DT Michael Dean Perry
  • DT Jerome Brown
  • OLB Derrick Thomas
  • OLB Charles Haley
  • ILB Pepper Johnson
  • ILB John Offerdahl
  • CB Rod Woodson
  • CB Albert Lewis
  • S Joey Browner
  • S Ronnie Lott
  • Special teams: P Sean Landeta
  • PK Nick Lowery
  • KR Mel Gray
  • v
  • t
  • e
100 sacks club
  • Bruce Smith
  • Reggie White
  • Kevin Greene
  • Julius Peppers
  • Chris Doleman
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  • Jason Taylor
  • DeMarcus Ware
  • Richard Dent
  • John Randle
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  • Simeon Rice
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  • Pat Swilling
  • Trace Armstrong
  • Elvis Dumervil
  • Kevin Carter
  • Neil Smith
  • Jim Jeffcoat
  • William Fuller
  • Charles Haley
  • Andre Tippett

Italics denotes active player

Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor
  • 1975: Bob Lilly
  • 1976: Don Meredith
  • 1976: Don Perkins
  • 1977: Chuck Howley
  • 1981: Mel Renfro
  • 1983: Roger Staubach
  • 1989: Lee Roy Jordan
  • 1993: Tom Landry
  • 1994: Tony Dorsett
  • 1994: Randy White
  • 2001: Bob Hayes
  • 2003: Tex Schramm
  • 2004: Cliff Harris
  • 2004: Rayfield Wright
  • 2005: Troy Aikman
  • 2005: Emmitt Smith
  • 2005: Michael Irvin
  • 2011: Drew Pearson
  • 2011: Charles Haley
  • 2011: Larry Allen
  • 2015: Darren Woodson
  • v
  • t
  • e
Pro Football Hall of Fame Class of 2015
  • Jerome Bettis
  • Tim Brown
  • Charles Haley
  • Bill Polian
  • Junior Seau
  • Will Shields
  • Mick Tingelhoff
  • Ron Wolf
  • v
  • t
  • e
Members of the Pro Football Hall of Fame Quarterbacks Pre-modern era
  • Baugh
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  • Luckman
  • A. Parker
Modern era
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Running backs Pre-modern era
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Modern era
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  • Tomlinson
  • Trippi
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Wide receivers /
ends Pre-modern era
  • Badgro
  • Chamberlin
  • Flaherty
  • Halas
  • Hewitt
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Modern era
  • Alworth
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  • Hayes
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  • Irvin
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  • Largent
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  • Stallworth
  • Swann
  • C. Taylor
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Tight ends
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  • Winslow
Offensive
linemen
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  • Mix
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  • Muñoz
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  • Otto
  • Pace
  • J. Parker
  • Ringo
  • Roaf
  • Shaw
  • Shell
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Pre-modern era
two-way players
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Defensive
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Linebackers
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Defensive backs
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Placekickers &
punters
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Coaches
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Authority control
  • WorldCat Identities
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  • SNAC: w67z0h70


Fear No Evil: Tackling Quarterbacks and Demons on My Way to the Hall of Fame
Fear No Evil: Tackling Quarterbacks and Demons on My Way to the Hall of Fame
An elite pass rusher who was in the prime of his career, Charles Haley was traded from the San Francisco 49ers to an NFC rival, the Dallas Cowboys. Why would they make such a trade? The 49ers did so because Haley had become so difficult for teammates and coaches alike. It turns out that he acted this way because he had bipolar disorder. Haley, a Hall of Famer and the only NFL player who earned five Super Bowl rings, documents what it was like suffering from that condition and how he overcame it. He details what it was like to play for two championship organizations and the fights, transgression, and squabbles that marked his career.

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$18.82
-$8.13(-30%)



All the Rage: The Life of an NFL Renegade
All the Rage: The Life of an NFL Renegade
The defensive end for the Dallas Cowboys--the only player to win five Super Bowl rings--discusses the NFL, the teams he has played on, and his fellow players.

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Charles Goodnight: Cowman and Plainsman
Charles Goodnight: Cowman and Plainsman
An exciting story of a Texas Ranger, adventurer, and immigration officer who became a symbol of his age while gambling with death in the wild frontier regions of Texas, Arizona, and Old and New Mexico. Charles Goodnight knew the West of Jim Bridger, Kit Carson, Dick Wooton, St. Vrain, and Lucien Maxwell. He ranged a country as vast as Bridger ranged. He rode with the boldness of Fremont, guided by the craft of Carson. His vigorous zest for life enabled him to live intensely and amply, and in this book by J. Evetts Haley, himself no stranger to the West, provides a fully readable and important western biography, vividly told, thrilling, witty, and completely authentic.

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$18.94
-$6.01(-24%)



1995 Upper Deck Football Card #60 Charles Haley Near Mint/Mint
1995 Upper Deck Football Card #60 Charles Haley Near Mint/Mint
1995 Upper Deck Co. trading card in near mint/mint condition, authenticated by Seller

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Charles Goodnight: Cowman and Plainsman
Charles Goodnight: Cowman and Plainsman
When the author of this book, J. Evetts Haley, was a boy just learning the cattle business on a Texas Panhandle ranch, the stories he heard about Charles Goodnight were as much a part of the lands as the trails the Goodnight herds had cut through its scanty grass. Fifteen years later, Mr Haley crossed the Goodnight ranch-house yard to face the flow of tobacco juice and profanity - the beginning of a decade of interviews, travel, and research which resulted in this book.

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Whale Hunt: The Narrative of a Voyage by Nelson Cole Haley, Harpooner in the Ship Charles W. Morgan 1849-1853 (Maritime)
Whale Hunt: The Narrative of a Voyage by Nelson Cole Haley, Harpooner in the Ship Charles W. Morgan 1849-1853 (Maritime)
"This classic true story of a voyage on the CHARLES W. MORGAN is both a wonderful read and an excellent source of information about American whaling in the 19th century." -Nathaniel Philbrick, author of IN THE HEART OF THE SEA

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$24.95



Football NFL 2016 Classics Legends #130 Charles Haley NM-MT Cowboys
Football NFL 2016 Classics Legends #130 Charles Haley NM-MT Cowboys
2016 Classics #130 Charles Haley

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From Du Bois to Obama: African American Intellectuals in the Public Forum
From Du Bois to Obama: African American Intellectuals in the Public Forum
In his groundbreaking new book Charles Pete Banner-Haley explores the history of African American intellectualism and reveals the efforts of black intellectuals in the ongoing struggle against racism, showing how they have responded to Jim Crow segregation, violence against black Americans, and the more subtle racism of the postintegration age. Banner-Haley asserts that African American intellectuals--including academicians, social critics, activists, and writers--serve to generate debate, policy, and change, acting as a moral force to persuade Americans to acknowledge their history of slavery and racism, become more inclusive and accepting of humanity, and take responsibility for social justice. Other topics addressed in this insightful study include the disconnection over time between black intellectuals and the masses for which they speak; the ways African American intellectuals identify themselves in relation to the larger black community, America as a whole, and the rest of the world; how black intellectuals have gained legitimacy in American society and have accrued moral capital, especially in the area of civil rights; and how that moral capital has been expended. Among the influential figures covered in the book are W. E. B. Du Bois, Ralph Ellison, Richard Wright, James Weldon Johnson, E. Franklin Frazier, Ralph Bunche, Oliver C. Cox, George S. Schuyler, Zora Neale Hurston, Martin Luther King, Jr., Jesse Jackson, Cornel West, Toni Morrison, bell hooks, Charles Johnson, and Barack Obama. African American intellectuals, as Banner-Haley makes clear, run the political gamut from liberal to conservative. He discusses the emergence of black conservatism, with its accompanying questions about affirmative action, government intervention on behalf of African Americans, and the notion of a color-blind society. He also looks at how popular music--particularly rap and hip-hop--television, movies, cartoons, and other media have functioned as arenas for investigating questions of identity, exploring whether African American intellectuals can also be authentically black. A concluding discussion of the so-called browning of America, and the subsequent rise in visibility and influence of black intellectuals culminates with the historic election of President Barack Obama, an African American intellectual who has made significant contributions to American society through his books, articles, and speeches. Banner-Haley ponders what Obama's election will mean for the future of race relations and black intellectualism in America.

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$25.20



Introduction to Financial Management (MCGRAW HILL SERIES IN FINANCE)
Introduction to Financial Management (MCGRAW HILL SERIES IN FINANCE)
Perfect Condition.

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$46.88
-$64.62(-58%)


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