Coco Gauff
Coco Gauff
 
Search
Coco Gauff
Custom Search
Coco Gauff
 
 
 
 
 
Go Back

Smartphone









Free the Animation VR / AR
Play to reveal 3D images and 3D models!
Demonstration A-Frame / Multiplayer
Android app on Google Play
 
vlrPhone / vlrFilter
Project of very low consumption, radiation and bitrate softphones, with the support of the spatial audio, of the frequency shifts and of the ultrasonic communications / Multifunction Audio Filter with Remote Control!



 

Vectors and 3D Models

City Images, Travel Images, Safe Images

Howto - How To - Illustrated Answers

 

Cori Gauff
Cori Gauff also known as Coco Gauff (born March 13, 2004) is an American tennis player. She is the youngest ever finalist in the girls' singles event at

View Wikipedia Article

American tennis player

Cori GauffCountry (sports) United StatesResidenceDelray Beach, Florida, United StatesBorn (2004-03-13) March 13, 2004 (age 15)
Atlanta, Georgia, United StatesHeight1.76 m (5 ft 9 1⁄2 in)PlaysRight-handedCoachCorey Gauff[1]Prize money$75,011SinglesCareer record22–14 (61.1%)Career titles0Highest ranking299 (June 10, 2019)Current ranking313 (July 1, 2019)Grand Slam Singles resultsAustralian OpenNAFrench OpenQ2 (2019)Wimbledon3R (2019)US OpenQ1 (2018)DoublesCareer record12–6Career titles1 ITFHighest ranking269 (June 24, 2019)Current ranking273 (July 1, 2019)Grand Slam Doubles resultsAustralian Open Junior1R (2018)French Open JuniorQF (2018)Wimbledon JuniorSF (2018)US Open JuniorW (2018)Last updated on: July 2, 2019.

Cori Gauff also known as Coco Gauff (born March 13, 2004) is an American tennis player. She is the youngest ever finalist in the girls' singles event at the US Open.[2] She won the Junior French Open in 2018, the second-youngest to do so. She is also the youngest female to qualify for a Grand Slam tournament main draw, and the youngest player overall to qualify for the main draw at Wimbledon.

Contents
  • 1 Personal life
  • 2 Professional career
    • 2.1 2019
  • 3 ITF finals
    • 3.1 Doubles: 1 (1–0)
  • 4 Singles performance timeline
  • 5 References
  • 6 External links
Personal life

Gauff started playing tennis at the age of seven.[3] She grew up in Atlanta, but moved to Delray Beach, Florida to have better opportunities to train in tennis.[4] Her father played basketball at Georgia State University and her mother was a track and field athlete at Florida State University.[5] She has two younger brothers.[4] Gauff is home-schooled by her mother, a former teacher.[5] Her father is her head coach.[6] She is nicknamed "Coco".[7]

Gauff has trained with Gerard Loglo at the New Generation Tennis Academy in Delray Beach, Florida. When she was 11, she was selected by Serena Williams's coach Patrick Mouratoglou as part of his Champ’Seed foundation and trained with him in Nice, France.[8][5]

In October 2018 Gauff signed her first multi-year sponsorship contract, with New Balance.[9] In March 2019 she announced a multi-year sponsorship agreement with Italian food company Barilla, which also sponsors Roger Federer.[9]

Professional career

Gauff made her ITF debut in May 2018 as a qualifier into the 25K event at Osprey, where she won her first professional match. Aged 14, she won her first Junior Grand Slam Title in June 2018 at the French Open.[10] In September 2018, she won the Girls' Doubles at the US Open with her partner Caty McNally.[10] Gauff finished 2018 strong by winning the Girls, 18 and under, division of the Orange Bowl International Tennis Championships.

2019

At Miami Open, Gauff recorded her first WTA match-win against Caty McNally.[11] In the second round she lost to Daria Kasatkina.

In June 2019, she won her third qualifying round at Wimbledon to reach the main draw, becoming the youngest person to qualify for Wimbledon in the Open Era.[12][13]

In her Grand Slam tournament debut on July 1, 2019, she defeated five-time champion Venus Williams in straight sets. It was only the second time since Williams' Wimbledon debut in 1997 that she had been beaten in the first round of the tournament. She then defeated Magdalena Rybarikova to reach the third round. [14][15]

ITF finals Doubles: 1 (1–0) Legend $100,000 tournaments $80,000 tournaments $60,000 tournaments $25,000 tournaments $15,000 tournaments Finals by surface Hard (1–0) Clay (0–0) Grass (0–0) Carpet (0–0) Result W–L    Date    Tournament Tier Surface Partner Opponents Score Win 1–0 Feb 2019 ITF Surprise, United States 25,000 Hard Paige Hourigan Usue Maitane Arconada
Emina Bektas 6–3, 4–6, Singles performance timeline Key W  F  SF QF #R RR Q# A P Z# PO G F-S SF-B NMS NH .mw-parser-output .refbegin{font-size:90%;margin-bottom:0.5em}.mw-parser-output .refbegin-hanging-indents>ul{list-style-type:none;margin-left:0}.mw-parser-output .refbegin-hanging-indents>ul>li,.mw-parser-output .refbegin-hanging-indents>dl>dd{margin-left:0;padding-left:3.2em;text-indent:-3.2em;list-style:none}.mw-parser-output .refbegin-100{font-size:100%}(W) Won; (F) finalist; (SF) semifinalist; (QF) quarterfinalist; (#R) rounds 4, 3, 2, 1; (RR) round-robin stage; (Q#) qualification round; (A) absent; (Z#) Davis/Fed Cup Zonal Group (with number indication) or (PO) play-off; (G) gold, (F-S) silver or (SF-B) bronze Olympic medal; a (NMS) downgraded Masters Series/1000 tournament; (NH) not held. SR=strike rate (events won/competed) To avoid confusion and double counting, these charts are updated at the conclusion of a tournament or when the player's participation has ended.

Current through the 2019 French Open.

Tournament 2018 2019 SR W–L Win % Grand Slam tournaments Australian Open A A 0 / 0 0–0  –  French Open A Q2 0 / 0 0–0  –  Wimbledon A 0 / 0 0–0  –  US Open Q1 0 / 0 0–0  –  WTA Premier Mandatory tournaments Indian Wells Open A A 0 / 0 0–0  –  Miami Open A 2R 0 / 0 1–1 50% Madrid Open A A 0 / 0 0–0  –  China Open A 0 / 0 0–0  –  WTA Premier 5 tournaments Dubai / Qatar Open A A 0 / 0 0–0  –  Italian Open A A 0 / 0 0–0  –  Canadian Open A 0 / 0 0–0  –  Cincinnati Open A 0 / 0 0–0  –  Wuhan Open A 0 / 0 0–0  –  Win–Loss 0–0 0–0 0 / 0 1–1 50% References
  1. ^ Persak, Mike. "Delray's Coco Gauff, 14, stays grounded with family after winning French Open Women's title". Sun-Sentinel.com..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output .citation q{quotes:"\"""\"""'""'"}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg/12px-Wikisource-logo.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{display:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  2. ^ "The Latest: Gauff, 13, can be youngest US Open girls' champ". wtop. Archived from the original on June 13, 2018. Retrieved September 11, 2017.
  3. ^ "American teen Gauff impresses in junior Slam debut". US Open. Retrieved September 11, 2017.
  4. ^ a b "Cori Gauff, 13, Has Great Potential And A Greater Goal: Be The Goat". Tennis.com. Retrieved September 24, 2017.
  5. ^ a b c "Why 12-year-old Cori Gauff hopes she'll be the greatest of all time". ESPN. Retrieved September 11, 2017.
  6. ^ "Interview with Coach Corey Gauff". blacktennismagazine.com. Retrieved July 1, 2019.
  7. ^ "Wimbledon 2019: Cori 'Coco' Gauff described as a 'champion in the making'". July 1, 2019 – via www.bbc.co.uk.
  8. ^ "Cori Gauff, the revelation of Champ'Seed". champseedfoundation.com. Retrieved July 1, 2019.
  9. ^ a b "Tennis prodigy, 14, signs multi-year sponsor deal". CNN. Retrieved November 1, 2018.
  10. ^ a b "Five Things to Know About Wimbledon Qualifier Cori Gauff". baseline.tennis.com. June 29, 2019. Retrieved July 1, 2019.
  11. ^ "2019 Miami Open: Gauff 'controls the controllables,' marvels in first WTA win". WTA Tennis. March 21, 2019. Retrieved July 2, 2019.
  12. ^ "15-year-old makes Wimbledon history by earning main-draw spot". The42. June 27, 2019. Retrieved January 28, 2019.
  13. ^ "Wimbledon qualifying: Cori Gauff makes history in qualifying aged 15". BBC Sport. June 27, 2019.
  14. ^ "Wimbledon 2019: Qualifier Cori Gauff, 15, beats Venus Williams in huge upset". BBC Sport. July 1, 2019. Retrieved July 1, 2019.
  15. ^ "Wimbledon 2019: Cori Gauff, 15, to 'just wing it', Kyle Edmund on Centre Court". July 2, 2019 – via www.bbc.co.uk.
External links
  • Cori Gauff at the Women's Tennis Association
  • Cori Gauff at the International Tennis Federation
  • Cori Gauff at the International Tennis Federation – Junior profile
  • v
  • t
  • e
French Open girls' singles championsPre Open Era
  • 1953 Christine Brunon
  • 1954 Beatrice de Chambure
  • 1955 Maria-Teresa Reidl
  • 1956 Eliane Launay
  • 1957 Ilse Buding
  • 1958 Francesca Gordigani
  • 1959 Joan Cross
  • 1960 Françoise Dürr
  • 1961 Robyn Ebbern
  • 1962 Kaye Dening
  • 1963 Monique Salfati
  • 1964 Nicole Seghers
  • 1965 Esme Emanel
  • 1966 Odile de Roubin
  • 1967 Corinne Molesworth
Open Era
  • 1968 Lesley Hunt
  • 1969 Kazuko Sawamatsu
  • 1970 Veronica Burton
  • 1971 Elena Granatourova
  • 1972 Renáta Tomanová
  • 1973 Mima Jaušovec
  • 1974 Mariana Simionescu
  • 1975 Regina Maršíková
  • 1976 Michelle Tyler
  • 1977 Anne Smith
  • 1978 Hana Mandlíková
  • 1979 Lena Sandin
  • 1980 Kathleen Horvath
  • 1981 Bonnie Gadusek
  • 1982 Manuela Maleeva
  • 1983 Pascale Paradis
  • 1984 Gabriela Sabatini
  • 1985 Laura Garrone
  • 1986 Patricia Tarabini
  • 1987 Natalia Zvereva
  • 1988 Julie Halard
  • 1989 Jennifer Capriati
  • 1990 Magdalena Maleeva
  • 1991 Anna Smashnova
  • 1992 Rossana de los Ríos
  • 1993 Martina Hingis
  • 1994 Martina Hingis
  • 1995 Amélie Cocheteux
  • 1996 Amélie Mauresmo
  • 1997 Justine Henin
  • 1998 Nadia Petrova
  • 1999 Lourdes Domínguez
  • 2000 Virginie Razzano
  • 2001 Kaia Kanepi
  • 2002 Angelique Widjaja
  • 2003 Anna-Lena Grönefeld
  • 2004 Sesil Karatantcheva
  • 2005 Ágnes Szávay
  • 2006 Agnieszka Radwańska
  • 2007 Alizé Cornet
  • 2008 Simona Halep
  • 2009 Kristina Mladenovic
  • 2010 Elina Svitolina
  • 2011 Ons Jabeur
  • 2012 Annika Beck
  • 2013 Belinda Bencic
  • 2014 Daria Kasatkina
  • 2015 Paula Badosa Gibert
  • 2016 Rebeka Masarova
  • 2017 Whitney Osuigwe
  • 2018 Cori Gauff
  • 2019 Leylah Annie Fernandez
  • v
  • t
  • e
US Open girls' doubles champions
  • 1982 Penny Barg / Beth Herr
  • 1983 Ann Hulbert / Bernadette Randall
  • 1984 Mercedes Paz / Gabriela Sabatini
  • 1985 Andrea Holíková / Radka Zrubáková
  • 1986 Jana Novotná / Radka Zrubáková
  • 1987 Meredith McGrath / Kimberly Po
  • 1988 Meredith McGrath / Kimberly Po
  • 1989 Jennifer Capriati / Meredith McGrath
  • 1990 Kristin Godridge / Nicole Pratt
  • 1991 Kristin Godridge / Kirrily Sharpe
  • 1992 Lindsay Davenport / Nicole London
  • 1993 Nicole London / Julie Steven
  • 1994 Surina de Beer / Chantal Reuter
  • 1995 Corina Morariu / Ludmila Varmužová
  • 1996 Surina de Beer / Jessica Steck
  • 1997 Marissa Irvin / Alexandra Stevenson
  • 1998 Kim Clijsters / Eva Dyrberg
  • 1999 Dája Bedáňová / Iroda Tulyaganova
  • 2000 Gisela Dulko / María Emilia Salerni
  • 2001 Galina Fokina / Svetlana Kuznetsova
  • 2002 Elke Clijsters / Kirsten Flipkens
  • 2004 Marina Erakovic / Michaëlla Krajicek
  • 2005 Nikola Fraňková / Alisa Kleybanova
  • 2006 Raluca Olaru / Mihaela Buzărnescu
  • 2007 Urszula Radwańska / Ksenia Milevskaya
  • 2008 Noppawan Lertcheewakarn / Sandra Roma
  • 2009 Valeriya Solovyeva / Maryna Zanevska
  • 2010 Tímea Babos / Sloane Stephens
  • 2011 Demi Schuurs / Irina Khromacheva
  • 2012 Gabrielle Andrews / Taylor Townsend
  • 2013 Barbora Krejčíková / Kateřina Siniaková
  • 2014 İpek Soylu / Jil Teichmann
  • 2015 Viktória Kužmová / Aleksandra Pospelova
  • 2016 Jada Hart / Ena Shibahara
  • 2017 Olga Danilović / Marta Kostyuk
  • 2018 Cori Gauff / Caty McNally


Twitter
 
Facebook
 
LinkedIn
 
 

 
 

WhmSoft Moblog
Copyright (C) 2006-2020 WhmSoft
All Rights Reserved