Curt Schilling
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Curt Schilling
2012. Three months later, Schilling laid off his entire staff amid severe financial troubles. As a radio-personality Schilling was signed by the Howie Carr

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Curt Schilling Schilling with the Red Sox in October 2007 Pitcher Born: (1966-11-14) November 14, 1966 (age 51)
Anchorage, Alaska Batted: Right Threw: Right MLB debut September 7, 1988, for the Baltimore OriolesLast MLB appearance September 25, 2007, for the Boston Red SoxMLB statisticsWin–loss record 216–146Earned run average 3.46Strikeouts 3,116 Teams
  • Baltimore Orioles (1988–1990)
  • Houston Astros (1991)
  • Philadelphia Phillies (1992–2000)
  • Arizona Diamondbacks (2000–2003)
  • Boston Red Sox (2004–2007)
Career highlights and awards
  • 6× All-Star (1997–1999, 2001, 2002, 2004)
  • 3× World Series champion (2001, 2004, 2007)
  • World Series MVP (2001)
  • NLCS MVP (1993)
  • Roberto Clemente Award (2001)
  • 2× MLB wins leader (2001, 2004)
  • 2× NL strikeout leader (1997, 1998)
  • Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame
  • Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame

Curtis Montague Schilling (born November 14, 1966) is an American former Major League Baseball right-handed pitcher, former video game developer, and former baseball color analyst. He helped lead the Philadelphia Phillies to the World Series in 1993, and won championships in 2001 with the Arizona Diamondbacks and in 2004 and 2007 with the Boston Red Sox. Schilling retired with a career postseason record of 11–2, and his .846 postseason winning percentage is a major-league record among pitchers with at least ten decisions.[1] He is a member of the 3,000-strikeout club and has the highest strikeout-to-walk ratio of any of its members. He is tied for third for the most 300-strikeout seasons.[2] Of post 19th century pitchers, Schilling has the second highest JAWS of any pitcher not in the Hall of Fame (behind only Roger Clemens).[3]

After retiring, he founded Green Monster Games, which was renamed 38 Studios. The company released Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning in February 2012. Three months later, Schilling laid off his entire staff amid severe financial troubles.

As a radio-personality Schilling was signed by the Howie Carr radio network to do a Saturday morning politics and sports show.[4] An outspoken conservative, Schilling joined the website Breitbart.com in 2016.[5]

Contents
  • 1 Junior college years
  • 2 Playing career
    • 2.1 Early MLB career (1988–1992)
    • 2.2 Phillies career (1992–2000)
    • 2.3 Diamondbacks career (2000–03)
    • 2.4 Red Sox career (2004–08)
    • 2.5 Retirement
    • 2.6 Scouting report
  • 3 Awards
  • 4 Personal life
    • 4.1 Cancer
    • 4.2 Political involvement
    • 4.3 Charity work
    • 4.4 Conflicts with players
    • 4.5 Conflicts with management
    • 4.6 Conflicts with media
    • 4.7 Gaming
    • 4.8 Internet
    • 4.9 Public speaking
    • 4.10 Broadcast analyst
  • 5 See also
  • 6 References
  • 7 External links
Junior college years

Schilling graduated from Shadow Mountain High School in Phoenix, Arizona, in 1985, before attending Yavapai College in Prescott, Arizona.[6]

Playing career Early MLB career (1988–1992)

Schilling began his professional career in the Boston Red Sox farm system as a second-round pick in what would be the final January draft in MLB. He began his professional career with the Elmira Pioneers, then a Red Sox affiliate. After two and a half years in the minor leagues, he and Brady Anderson were traded to the Baltimore Orioles in 1988 for Mike Boddicker. He debuted in the Major League with the Orioles (1988–1990), and then spent one year with the Houston Astros (1991).

Phillies career (1992–2000)

During the Phillies' pennant run in 1993, Schilling went 16–7 with a 4.02 ERA and 186 strikeouts. Schilling led the Phillies to an upset against the two-time defending National League champion Atlanta Braves in the National League Championship Series. Although he received no decisions during his two appearances in the six-game series, Schilling's 1.69 ERA and 19 strikeouts (including the first 5 Braves hitters of Game 1, an NLCS record) were enough to earn him the 1993 NLCS Most Valuable Player Award. The Phillies went on to face the defending world champion Toronto Blue Jays in the World Series. After losing Game 1, he pitched brilliantly in his next start. With the Phillies facing elimination the day after losing a bizarre 15–14 contest at home in Veterans Stadium, Schilling pitched a five-hit shutout that the Phillies won, 2–0.

Schilling was named to the NL All-Star team in 1997, 1998, and 1999 and started the 1999 game. In 1997, he finished 14th in NL MVP voting and fourth in NL Cy Young voting. Unhappy with the team's performance, he requested a trade to a contender in 2000 and was subsequently dealt to the Arizona Diamondbacks.[7] His 101 career victories ranks sixth all-time for Phillies pitchers, 20th in ERA (3.35), 23rd in games appeared in (242), sixth in games started (226), 34th in complete games (61), 13th in shutouts (14), fourth in strikeouts (1554), and eighth in innings pitched (1659.1).[8]

Diamondbacks career (2000–03)

Schilling was traded to the Diamondbacks on July 26, 2000, for first baseman Travis Lee and pitchers Vicente Padilla, Omar Daal, and Nelson Figueroa.[9] With Arizona, he went 22–6 with a 2.98 ERA in 2001, leading the majors in wins and innings pitched. He also went 4–0 with a 1.12 ERA in the playoffs. In the 2001 World Series, the Diamondbacks beat the New York Yankees in seven games. Schilling was 1-0 in that World Series with a 1.69 ERA and 26 strikeouts in 21 innings, though he also allowed a go-ahead home run in the 8th inning of Game Seven.[10] He shared the 2001 World Series MVP Award with teammate Randy Johnson (who relieved Schilling in Game Seven and got the win after the Diamondbacks' dramatic ninth-inning comeback). Schilling and Johnson also shared Sports Illustrated magazine's 2001 "Sportsmen of the Year" award. During the World Series Schilling received two other honors, as he was presented that year's Roberto Clemente and Branch Rickey Awards, the first Arizona Diamondback so honored for either award.

In 2002, he went 23–7 with a 3.23 ERA. He struck out 316 batters while walking 33 in 259.1 innings. On April 7, 2002, Schilling threw a one-hit shutout striking out 17 against the Milwaukee Brewers. Both years he finished second in the Cy Young Award voting to Johnson. Schilling finished the 2003 season with an 8–9 record and a 2.95 ERA in 168 innings while striking out 194 batters. In November 2003, the Diamondbacks traded Schilling to the Boston Red Sox in exchange for Jorge de la Rosa, Casey Fossum, Mike Goss, and Brandon Lyon.

Red Sox career (2004–08) Curt Schilling on the mound Pitchers Josh Beckett, Jon Lester, Éric Gagné, pitching coach John Farrell and Schilling prior to a Red Sox game at Safeco Field Curt Schilling hoisting the Commissioner's Trophy during the Red Sox 2007 World Series Parade.

The trade to Boston reunited Schilling with Terry Francona, his manager during his final four years with the Philadelphia Phillies.[11] On September 16, 2004, Schilling won his 20th game of 2004 for the Red Sox, becoming the fifth Boston pitcher to win 20 or more games in his first season with the team, and the first since Hall of Famer Dennis Eckersley in 1978. Schilling ended his regular season with a 21–6 record.

On October 19, 2004, Schilling won Game 6 of the 2004 American League Championship Series against the New York Yankees. Notably, he won this game playing on an injured ankle—the same injuries that contributed to his disastrous outing in Game 1 of the ALCS. These injuries were so acute that by the end of his Game 6 performance, blood visibly soaked part of his white sock, which is now referred to as "the bloody sock". The victory forced a Game 7, which the Red Sox would go on to win to capture the pennant and make their first World Series appearance since 1986. Schilling pitched (and won) Game 2 of the 2004 World Series for the Red Sox against the St. Louis Cardinals. In both series, he had to have the tendon in his right ankle stabilized repeatedly, in what has become known as the Schilling tendon procedure, after the tendon sheath was torn during his Game 1 ALDS appearance against the Anaheim Angels. As in Game 6 of the ALCS, Schilling's sock was soaked with blood from the sutures used in this medical procedure, but he still managed to pitch seven strong innings, giving up one run on four hits and striking out four. This second bloody sock was placed in the Baseball Hall of Fame after Boston's victory over St. Louis in the World Series. A four-game sweep of the World Series erased the Curse of the Bambino. On February 23, 2013, the first bloody sock was sold at a live auction at the Fletcher-Sinclair Mansion for $92,613 to an anonymous bidder.[12]

Schilling was once again runner-up in Cy Young voting in 2004, this time to Minnesota Twins hurler Johan Santana, who was a unanimous selection, receiving all 28 first-place votes. Schilling received 27 of the 28 second-place votes. Later, the entire Red Sox team was named Sports Illustrated's 2004 Sportsmen of the Year, making Schilling only the second person to have won or shared that award twice.

Schilling began 2005 on the disabled list due to recurrent ankle injuries. He returned in July as Boston's closer. He eventually returned to the starting rotation and continued to struggle. The Red Sox made it to the playoffs, but were swept by the Chicago White Sox in three games.

For the 2006 season, Schilling was said to be healthy. He began the season 4–0 with a 1.61 ERA. He finished the year with a 15–7 record and 198 strikeouts, with a respectable 3.97 ERA. On May 27, he earned his 200th career win, the 104th major league pitcher to accomplish the feat.[13] On August 30, Schilling collected his 3,000th strikeout. Schilling has the highest ratio of strikeouts to walks of any pitcher with at least 3,000 strikeouts, and is one of four pitchers to reach the 3,000-K milestone before reaching 1,000 career walks. The other three who accomplished this feat are Fergie Jenkins, Greg Maddux, and former Boston Red Sox ace and teammate Pedro Martínez.[14]

In January 2007, Schilling announced on the Dennis and Callahan show that after talking with his family, he had changed his mind and did not want to retire at the conclusion of the 2007 season.[15] He sought to negotiate an extension to his current contract, but Red Sox executives announced that they would not negotiate with him until after the season citing Schilling's age and physical condition as factors in their decision.[16][17] Schilling went on to say he would become a free agent at the end of the season, for the first time in his career, and would not negotiate with the Red Sox during the 15 days after the end of the World Series when the team has exclusive negotiating rights with potential free agents.[18] On a June appearance on the Dennis and Callahan Show, Schilling stated he would accept a one-year extension to his contract at his current salary if the Red Sox offered it to him. Questioned on his statement, Schilling said, "I said I wouldn't negotiate a deal during the season, and I'm saying that now. But I would accept that offer."[19]

On June 7, 2007, Schilling came within one out of his first career no-hitter. Schilling gave up a two-out single to Oakland's Shannon Stewart, who lined a 95-mph fastball to right field for the A's only hit.[20] Schilling followed up his one-hitter with two poor starts and was sent back to Boston on June 20 for an MRI on his shoulder and was placed on the disabled list. He returned from the disabled list on August 6, pitching at least six innings in each of his nine starts following the All-Star break.

Schilling continued his career postseason success in 2007, throwing seven shutout innings in a 9–1 victory over the Angels in the ALDS, wrapping up a three-game sweep for Boston.[21] However, he did not fare as well pitching in Game 2 of the ALCS against Cleveland, surrendering nine hits—two of them home runs—and five earned runs in just 4​2⁄3 innings. He did start again in the sixth game of the series, pitching seven complete innings during which he recorded five strikeouts, surrendering no walks with only two earned runs to gain the victory and force a Game 7. He earned his third win of the 2007 playoffs in Game 2 of the 2007 World Series leaving after 5​1⁄3 innings, striking out four while allowing only four hits. With this win, he became only the second pitcher over the age of 40 to start and win a World Series game (Kenny Rogers became the first just one year prior). As Schilling departed in the 6th inning, fans at Fenway Park gave Schilling a standing ovation.

Schilling filed for free agency on October 30, 2007. He said he would seek a one-year deal, and according to ESPN First Take and his own blog page 38 Pitches. Schilling later signed a one-year deal with the Boston Red Sox for the 2008 season.[22] Schilling missed all of the 2008 season because of a shoulder injury. The injury was first revealed in February 2008 and the treatment options became a point of contention between Schilling and the Red Sox management.[23] On March 13, 2008, the Red Sox placed Schilling on the 60-day disabled list as he continued to rehabilitate his right shoulder.[24] On June 18, 2008, Curt Schilling left the team to be reevaluated after suffering pain when throwing off the mound.[25] On June 20, 2008 Schilling stated on WEEI's Dennis and Callahan show that he would undergo season-ending surgery and that he had possibly thrown the last pitch of his career.[26] On June 23, 2008, Schilling underwent biceps surgery, during which a small undersurface tear on the rotator cuff was discovered and stitched, and a separation of the labrum was repaired. According to his surgeon, he could begin throwing in four months.[27]

Retirement

On March 23, 2009, Schilling officially announced his retirement from professional baseball after 20 seasons. Schilling ended his career with a 216–146 record, 3.46 ERA and 3116 strikeouts, 15th-most in MLB history.[28][29] Having last pitched in 2007, Schilling became eligible for the 2013 Baseball Hall of Fame ballot, but he did not receive sufficient votes for election. He has subsequently appeared on the 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, and 2018 ballots, but has not received sufficient votes to be elected to the Hall. On August 2, 2013, Schilling was inducted into the Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame.[30]

Scouting report

During the prime of his career, Schilling was capable of reaching and sustaining speeds of 94–98 mph on his four-seam fastball. Throughout his career, he was characterized by a determination to go deep into ballgames, routinely pitching past the sixth and seventh innings. He combined his endurance with pinpoint control, especially on his fastball. Schilling's "out" pitch was a split-finger fastball, which he generally located beneath the strike zone (resulting in many swinging strikeouts). He also possessed an above-average changeup, a decent slider, and mixed in an occasional curveball, though he mainly alternated between his fastball and splitter. Though his velocity decreased in later years (to the 89–93 range on his fastball), his control remained excellent, and he is currently fifth in career strikeout to walk ratio.[31]

Awards
  • Babe Ruth Award (2001)
  • 2× Baseball Digest Pitcher of the Year (2001, 2004)
  • Branch Rickey Award (2001)
  • Hutch Award (2001)
  • Lou Gehrig Memorial Award (1995)
  • 6× MLB All-Star (1997, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2004)
  • 4× MLB Pitcher of the Month (May 1999, May 2001, May 2002, July 2002)
  • 3× MLB Player of the Week (May 27, 2001; August 5, 2001; August 17, 2003)
  • National League Championship Series Most Valuable Player Award (1993)
  • Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame inductee (2013)
  • Philadelphia Sports Hall of Fame inductee (2014)
  • 2× Players Choice Award for NL Outstanding Pitcher (2001, 2002)
  • Roberto Clemente Award (2001)
  • 2× Sporting News NL Pitcher of the Year (2001, 2002)
  • Sporting News Sportsman of the Year (2001)
  • 2× Sports Illustrated Sportsperson of the Year (2001, 2004)
  • 3× World Series champion (2001, 2004, 2007)
  • World Series Most Valuable Player Award (2001)
Accomplishments
  • 3× 300 strikeouts in one season (1996, 1997, 2002)
  • 3,000 strikeout club (2006)
  • 4× NL complete games leader (1996, 1998, 2000, 2001)
  • MLB hits per nine innings pitched leader (1992)
  • 3× NL games started leader (1997, 1998, 2001)
  • 2× NL innings pitched leader (1998, 2001)
  • 2× NL strikeout leader (1998, 2001)
  • 5× AL/NL strikeout-to-walk ratio leader (2001–04, 2006)
  • 2× AL/NL walks per nine innings pitched leader (2002, 2006)
  • 2× NL walks plus hits per inning pitched leader (1992, 2002)
  • 2× MLB wins leader (2001, 2004)
Personal life Curt Schilling (left) presenting an "Above and Beyond Award" in 2007.

Schilling considers his family's native Pittsburgh metro area to be home and is a fan of the Pittsburgh Steelers.[32][33] Until 2013, Schilling lived in Medfield, Massachusetts, in Drew Bledsoe's former home.[34] In late 2013, Schilling's 8,000 square foot home in Massachusetts was put on the market with a listing price of $3 million. Various personal belongings, including a golf cart, were also listed for sale.[35]

Schilling is one of just 11 players born in the state of Alaska to play Major League Baseball.[36] He is married to Shonda Schilling. They have four children: Gehrig (born 1995),[37] Gabriella (born 1997), Grant (born 1999), and Garrison (born 2002).

Schilling is a born-again Christian.[38]

Cancer

On February 5, 2014, Schilling revealed that he had been diagnosed with and was being treated for throat cancer. His statement: "I've always believed life is about embracing the gifts and rising up to meet the challenges. We've been presented with another challenge, as I've recently been diagnosed with cancer."[39] On June 25 of that year, Schilling announced via Twitter that the cancer was in remission.[40][41] On August 20, 2014 Schilling announced he was in remission from his battle with oral cancer. That same day, he mentioned his cancer was as a result of using smokeless tobacco for 30 years.[42] He also used his experiences to warn Madison Bumgarner, who is also a long-time smokeless tobacco user (a 'dipper').[43]

Political involvement

Schilling campaigned for President George W. Bush in 2004, while certain members of the ownership of the Red Sox campaigned for the challenger, Senator John F. Kerry (D). Schilling said he was encouraged to run for Kerry's seat in the U.S. Senate in 2008 as a Republican.[44] However, Schilling was quoted in The Boston Globe as saying that he intended to pitch in 2008, which would preclude a Senate run.[45]

He was called to Capitol Hill to testify about steroid use in March 2005, not as a suspected user but rather as a vocal opponent. He has said that Jose Canseco's statistics should be thrown out due to his admitted use of steroids, and has also said that unless he can refute allegations that he used performance-enhancing drugs, Roger Clemens should be stripped of the four Cy Young Awards he has won since 1997.[46]

On January 29, 2007, Schilling announced in an interview that he would support Sen. John McCain, who became the Republican nominee in the 2008 presidential election. In the same interview, he criticized then-presidential candidate and Senator Hillary Clinton (D) for her comments criticizing the war in Iraq.[47] Schilling also turned up on the campaign trail several times stumping for McCain.[48]

Schilling was mentioned as a possible candidate for U.S. Senate in the special election in Massachusetts for the seat left vacant by the deceased Senator Ted Kennedy.[49] However, he ruled out a run during his September 24, 2009, appearance on Dennis and Callahan, a popular Boston sports radio talk show.[50] In 2009, Schilling endorsed Scott Brown for the seat. During the campaign, Martha Coakley, the Democratic candidate, referred to Schilling as a Yankee fan.[51] Coakley was ridiculed for the comment; critics said it showed she was out of touch with the Boston community.[52] Schilling joked about the incident: "I've been called a lot of things... But never, and I mean never, could anyone ever make the mistake of calling me a Yankee fan. Well, check that, if you didn't know what the hell is going on in your own state, maybe you could."[53]

In a Fox News interview on January 18, 2010, Schilling was asked about his own political ambitions. He said that it was not time.[54]

Schilling opposes same-sex marriage, but believes that each state should decide the issue. Schilling supported Donald Trump during the 2016 presidential election.[55]

Schilling has announced that he will challenge Senator Elizabeth Warren in the 2018 US Senate election in Massachusetts.[56] Schilling has also expressed interest in running for President in 2024 if Donald Trump is re-elected in 2020.[57]

Charity work

Schilling is a supporter of care for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) sufferers. His organization, Curt's Pitch for ALS, allows fans and organizations to sponsor him, donating to the ALS Association for every strikeout he throws. He also donated to the charity his $25,000 winnings in a celebrity version of Jeopardy! that originally aired on November 9, 2006. In the 2004 playoffs, after the operation on his ankle, Schilling wrote "K ALS" (short for "strike out ALS") on his shoe, knowing that the cameras would be focusing on his foot numerous times while he was pitching. He also does a weekly radio show with WEEI-FM in Boston that raises over $100,000 each year for ALS patients and research.

Conflicts with players

Schilling is known for being outspoken, and this has resulted in several conflicts with fellow players. Schilling was publicly criticized by Phillies teammates Mitch Williams, Larry Andersen, and Danny Jackson for his conduct during the 1993 World Series. Whenever Mitch Williams (a hard-throwing closer with a penchant for unpredictability and erratic control) was on the mound, CBS television cameras caught Schilling in the dugout hiding his face with a towel. Although Schilling said he was nervous in the heat of the World Series, his teammates criticized him for being disrespectful.[58]

Schilling has also directed comments toward Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez, once calling Rodríguez's swat of a tag in game six of the ALCS a "bush-league play" on The Jim Rome Show.[59]

During a radio show appearance on May 8, 2007, Schilling criticized Barry Bonds, stating: "He admitted to cheating on his wife, cheating on his taxes and cheating on the game." Soon after, Schilling issued an apology on his blog, stating "it was absolutely irresponsible and wrong to say what I did,"[60][61] without, however, indicating his opinion on the statements' veracity.

After the 2008 season, Schilling released a blog post blasting former-Red Sox teammate Manny Ramirez's conduct before Ramirez left the team.[62]

Conflicts with management

While with the Phillies, Schilling was a vocal critic of team management, stopping just short of calling the front office incompetent.

During a game as a Diamondback in 2003, he damaged a QuesTec camera with a bat. According to Schilling, the umpire behind the plate had said "I can't call that pitch a strike, the machine won't let me." This led to a fine and a public exchange of insults with Major League Baseball executive Sandy Alderson who accused Schilling of whining and wanting balls to be called strikes. In response Schilling said Alderson was "ignorant to the facts and ignorant about what I said."[63]

Conflicts with media

Schilling has a longstanding feud with ESPN and former Arizona Republic reporter Pedro Gomez, initially over an article he wrote concerning manager Buck Showalter. Gomez then published a column critical of Schilling, the same day Schilling was pitching in Game 7 of the 2001 World Series. In his column, Gomez stated, "During the past few days, the country ... has discovered Schilling's little secret, the one baseball insiders have known for years but has rarely surfaced into the mainstream. Schilling is something of a con man, someone more intent on polishing his personal image through whatever means possible." He is also quoted later as saying Schilling was "the consummate table for one." A year later he further incensed Schilling by stating that the friendship between Schilling and teammate Randy Johnson "was merely cosmetic."

In interviews in October 2004[64][65] and February 2006,[66][67] Schilling said about Gomez:

There are a lot of in that industry, Pedro Gomez, Joel Heyman, to name a few. People with so little skill in their profession that they need to speculate, make up, fabricate, to write something interesting enough to be printed. What makes them bad people? I am sure I cannot nail the exact reason, but I know some. Jealousy, bitterness, the need to be 'different,' I am sure there are others, but those are the ones I know off hand ... You just kind of have to realize that there are people that don't like you and, unfortunately, sometimes those people have a voice, disliking me probably matches my dislike for him (Gomez), but I have a problem with people who don't have integrity and principle, so that stuff happens. You just kind of just have to let it go.

In 2007, Schilling engaged in another war of words with a writer, this time with Boston Globe sports columnist Dan Shaughnessy. Shaughnessy in his column and during television appearances has criticized Schilling for the condition he showed up in for spring training, referred to him as "the Big Blowhard"[68] and mocked Schilling's blog and radio appearances.[69][70] Schilling has responded by using the Sons of Sam Horn forum[71] and his own blog[72] to point out errors in Shaughnessy's columns.

On April 27, 2007, broadcaster Gary Thorne said that he overheard Red Sox catcher Doug Mirabelli say that the blood on the sock used by Schilling in Game 6 of the 2004 ALCS was actually paint.[73] Mirabelli accused Thorne of lying and a day later, after talking to Mirabelli, Thorne backed off his statement saying he misinterpreted what was intended as a joke, "Having talked with him today, there's no doubt in my mind that's not what he said, that's not what he meant. He explained that it was in the context of the sarcasm and the jabbing that goes on in the clubhouse."

Schilling responded in his blog by saying the following:

So Gary Thorne says that Doug told him the blood was fake. Which even when he's called out he can't admit he lied. Doug never told Gary Thorne anything. Gary Thorne overheard something and then misreported what he overheard. Not only did he misreport it, he misinterpreted what he misreported.[74]

Gaming

Schilling plays the board wargame Advanced Squad Leader.

ASL has become his constant companion on road trips, and every National League city is now his playground for baseball at night and ASL in the day. (All of which has become a bonanza for ASL players of his acquaintance, who are sometimes Curt's guests at stadiums around the country.)[75]

Schilling's disappointment at not being able to attend the ASL Oktoberfest (an annual game convention) led him to create his own, The ASL Open, which debuted the weekend of January 15, 1993, in Houston, Texas. The Open was financed out of his own pocket. Schilling also started his own amateur publication entitled Fire for Effect, a bi-monthly featuring "some of the ASL hobby's best writers".[75]

When his favorite game was sold along with Avalon Hill to Hasbro, Schilling joined the small gaming company Multi-Man Publishing which maintained ASL and other Avalon Hill titles. MMP also started a new, professional publication entitled ASL Journal and contributed articles, editorials, and game scenarios.[76]

Schilling has played EverQuest and EverQuest II and has reviewed two of the game's many expansion packs for PC Gamer magazine. Schilling has played World of Warcraft[77] and became a regular guest on the World of Warcraft podcast The Instance.[78] In 2006 Schilling created Green Monster Games, which Schilling stated was not named after the Fenway left field wall.[79] In early 2007, the company's name changed to 38 Studios.[80]

In January 2008, Schilling announced that he would be focusing on an MMORPG project after his retirement. Comic book creator Todd McFarlane and fantasy author R.A. Salvatore were working with Schilling on the project.[81] The new game was developed under the code-name Copernicus. A single-player RPG set in the same setting, titled Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning, was released by his company 38 Studios in February 2012. Executives from 38 Studios introduced the game at the Comic-Con 2010 convention in San Diego.[82]

In July 2010, the Rhode Island Board of Economic Development approved a $75 million guaranteed loan to 38 Studios. 38 Studios promised to bring 450 jobs to the state by the end of 2012. In May 2012, 38 Studios defaulted on its loan from the state of Rhode Island and failed to meet payroll obligations to its employees. 38 Studios and its subsidiary, Big Huge Games, then laid off their staffs[83] with a mass email.[84] Some of the laid-off employees may have second mortgages because the company had not actually sold homes for them as part of a relocation package.[85] Some have accused Schilling of hypocrisy based on the conflict between his professed views on "big government" and the studio's relationship with "big government".[86] On November 1, 2012, Schilling was sued by the state in connection with the loan. Governor Lincoln Chafee said: "My message to Rhode Islanders is this: I know that you work hard for your paychecks, and for your tax dollars to be squandered is unacceptable. The Board's legal action was taken to rectify a grave injustice put upon the people of Rhode Island."[87]

In a July 2012 interview, Schilling discussed the downfall of 38 Studios, citing the Rhode Island governor and his own optimism as the primary reasons for the demise of the company.[88]

Internet

He has a custom avatar in EverQuest II, as the creators of the game have made Schilling a special online character. from June 5 to June 7, 2006, fans were able to battle a virtual Curt Schilling in the game. Every time the virtual Schilling was defeated, Sony Online Entertainment donated $5 towards ALS research.[89] Before the 2007 season, Schilling started a blog called 38pitches.com[90] in which he answered fan questions, documented his starts, and refuted press coverage about him or the team that he believed to be inaccurate. After retiring, he moved his blog to the WEEI sports radio website. After a disagreement with the station, Schilling removed it from that site. Schilling periodically contributes on the ESPN Boston website answering fan questions about the Red Sox or baseball in general.[91] Schilling can also be found on the popular micro-blogging website Twitter under the handle gehrig38.[92]

In November 2014, Schilling got into a day-long Twitter argument with baseball writer Keith Law over the creation-evolution controversy, where he argued for creationism against Law's defense of evolution, after which ESPN decided to suspend Law's Twitter account.[93] ESPN commented that "Keith's Twitter suspension had absolutely nothing to do with his opinions on the subject", but it remains unclear what other motivation is behind the act, since the conversation between Schilling and Law reportedly "never really turned hostile", with many reading the details feeling that his suspension was "ridiculous".[94] Schilling's account was not suspended, and he continued to tweet.[93] Returning to Twitter after the ban expired, Law's first tweet "Eppur si muove" ("And yet it moves") made clear that Schilling's complaints about his posts contradicting his argument were in fact the reason for the suspension.[95]

On February 25, 2015, Schilling posted a congratulatory tweet to his then-17-year-old daughter Gabby for her acceptance to college and the school's softball team. Some responses to his tweet made crude references to rape, fisting and anal sex, among other sexual references. Schilling posted to his blog screen captures of some offending tweets, along with the real identities of the Twitter handles, whose jobs, schools and relatives he claimed to have contacted.[96] At least two of the Twitter users were known to have been punished, with one losing his part-time job as a ticket seller for the Yankees, and still another being suspended from Brookdale Community College.[97] Schilling claimed at least seven others were also penalized by their jobs or athletic teams.[98]

Public speaking

Schilling was selected as the commencement speaker for Worcester Polytechnic Institute's 2010 commencement [99] and awarded a Doctorate of Science, honoris causa.[100]

Broadcast analyst

Schilling debuted on ESPN as a baseball color analyst on April 4, 2010, on the pre-game show for the 2010 season opener between the New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox. He has written for WEEI.com, 38pitches.com, and WordPress.com. In 2014, he was named as an analyst for ESPN's Sunday Night Baseball, although his subsequent cancer diagnosis prevented him from working the telecasts for most of the season. On September 14, 2014, Schilling returned to the Sunday Night Baseball booth as the Yankees played the Baltimore Orioles.

On August 25, 2015, ESPN.com suspended Schilling's coverage of the ongoing Little League World Series and Sunday Night Baseball after he posted a Twitter meme that compared Muslim Jihadism and German Nazis, "the math is staggering when you get to the true s".[101][102] Schilling deleted and apologized for the controversial tweet the same day.[103] Schilling was also suspended from the next Sunday night game, in which Chicago Cubs pitcher Jake Arrieta threw a no-hitter. On September 3, 2015, ESPN announced his suspension would cover all remaining 2015 Sunday Night Baseball games as well as its 2015 MLB playoff coverage.[104]

On April 20, 2016, ESPN announced that they had fired Schilling after he shared a Facebook post that many viewed as being anti-transgender, saying, "ESPN is an inclusive company. Curt Schilling has been advised that his conduct was unacceptable and his employment with ESPN has been terminated."[105]

See also
  • Biography portal
  • Baseball portal
  • 100 Inning Game – annual event to raise funds for Curt's Pitch for ALS
  • 3,000 strikeout club
  • List of Major League Baseball career wins leaders
  • List of Major League Baseball annual strikeout leaders
  • List of Major League Baseball annual wins leaders
  • List of Major League Baseball career strikeout leaders
References
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  2. ^ "Clayton Kershaw first pitcher since 2002 with 300 strikeouts". CBS SPORTS. 
  3. ^ "Starting Pitcher JAWS Leaders". Baseball Reference. 
  4. ^ Goodell, Jared. "Curt Schilling Signs On To Host Weekend Radio Show | Howie Carr Show". howiecarrshow.com. Archived from the original on October 8, 2016. Retrieved February 19, 2017. 
  5. ^ Sherman, Gabriel. "Curt Schilling Joins Breitbart". Daily Intelligencer. Retrieved February 19, 2017. 
  6. ^ Metcalfe, Jeff (January 20, 2011). "Curt Schilling, Randall McDaniel, Ty Murray, Kerri Strug to enter Arizona Sports Hall of Fame". The Arizona Republic. Retrieved May 9, 2011. 
  7. ^ "D-Backs holding pair of aces with Schilling deal". ESPN. Associated Press. July 25, 2000. Retrieved March 6, 2009. 
  8. ^ "Major League Baseball Stats". Philadelphia.phillies.mlb.com. Retrieved June 20, 2012. 
  9. ^ "Curt Schilling Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 20, 2012. 
  10. ^ "2001 World Series Game 7, New York Yankees at Arizona Diamondbacks, November 4, 2001". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved November 23, 2017. 
  11. ^ Francona, Terry; Dan Shaughnessy, Dan (2013). Francona: The Red Sox Years. New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. p. 117. ISBN 978-0-547-92817-3. 
  12. ^ "SCHILLING'S BLOODY SOCK FROM WS GOES FOR $92,613". Associated Press. Retrieved February 24, 2013. 
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  35. ^ Moore, Galen (October 7, 2013). "Curt Schilling estate sale: Furniture, clothes, Hummer golf cart up for grabs at former Sox pitcher's Medfield home". Boston Business Journal. Retrieved October 12, 2013. 
  36. ^ "Players by birthplace : Alaska Baseball Stats and Info". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 20, 2012. 
  37. ^ Schilling named his son after Lou Gehrig and later that year received the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award. Lou Gehrig Memorial Award – Baseball Almanac. Retrieved August 22, 2009.
  38. ^ Brian C. Mooney, Globe Staff (October 29, 2004). "Schilling delivers for Bush on 'Good Morning America'". Boston.com. 
  39. ^ "Curt Schilling diagnosed with cancer". ESPN.com. February 5, 2014. Retrieved February 5, 2014. 
  40. ^ Curt Schilling (25 June 2014). "As of yesterday I am in remission. Start the 5 year clock!" (Tweet) – via Twitter. 
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  42. ^ "Schilling: Tobacco gave me cancer". ESPN.com. August 21, 2014. Retrieved August 21, 2014. 
  43. ^ "Schilling's warning to Bumgarner, other MLB dippers". espn.go.com. Retrieved November 23, 2017. 
  44. ^ Montopoli, Biran (September 2, 2009). "Curt Schilling for Kennedy's senate seat?". CBS. Retrieved September 4, 2015. 
  45. ^ Abraham, Peter (August 13, 2010). "Extra Bases – Red Sox blog". The Boston Globe. 
  46. ^ "One players take on the Mitchell Report, Canseco, Clemens, records, looking back or going forward..." 38pitches.com. December 19, 2007. Archived from the original on January 7, 2008. 
  47. ^ "Schilling says he backs McCain, criticizes Clinton's anti-Iraq statements". CNN.com. January 29, 2007. 
  48. ^ "Curt Schilling pitches for John McCain's presidential bid". Associated Press. December 4, 2007. Archived from the original on July 23, 2012. 
  49. ^ "Massachusetts Voters May Face Kennedy-Less Election". Fox News. August 27, 2009. Archived from the original on August 29, 2009. Retrieved August 27, 2009. 
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  51. ^ Coakley, Martha (January 15, 2010). "Martha Coakley radio interview: dismisses Schilling as a Yankee fan". youtube.com. Retrieved January 15, 2010. 
  52. ^ "In 8th Inning, Schilling, Coakley, throw hardballs". Fox News. January 18, 2010. Retrieved January 18, 2010. 
  53. ^ Koster, Kyle (January 18, 2010). "Curt Schilling blogs about being called a Yankee fan by Martha Coakley". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on January 21, 2010. Retrieved January 18, 2010. 
  54. ^ Kimberly Schwandt (January 18, 2010). "In 8th Inning, Coakley, Schilling Throw Hardballs". Fox News. Retrieved August 25, 2015. 
  55. ^ Neyer, Rob (February 1, 2013). "Curt Schilling comes out... with opinion about gay players". SB Nation. Retrieved September 4, 2015. 
  56. ^ "Ex-baseball star Schilling: 'I'm going to run' for Senate". TheHill. Retrieved November 23, 2017. 
  57. ^ "Curt Schilling says he's going to run for president in 2024". FOX Sports. Retrieved November 23, 2017. 
  58. ^ Gordon, Bob; Burgoyne, Tom (June 1, 2013). "Chapter 99: Wild Thing". More than Beards, Bellies and Biceps: The Story of the 1993 Phillies (And the Phillie Phanatic Too). Skyhorse Publishing, Inc. ISBN 1613214472. 
  59. ^ "The Providence Journal | Rhode Island breaking news, sports, politics, business, entertainment, weather and traffic – providencejournal.com". Projo.com. February 7, 2012. Retrieved June 20, 2012. 
  60. ^ "Public Apology". 38 Pitches. May 9, 2007. Archived from the original on May 12, 2007. Retrieved May 10, 2007. 
  61. ^ "Francona upset about players' comments on Bonds". ESPN. May 9, 2007. Retrieved May 9, 2007. 
  62. ^ "Schilling blasts Manny". Boston.com – The Boston Globe. September 17, 2008. Retrieved December 14, 2013. 
  63. ^ "Schilling meets with MLB exec Alderson". East Valley Tribune. May 29, 2003. Archived from the original on September 26, 2007. Retrieved April 25, 2007. 
  64. ^ "The Ten Most Hated Athletes". GQ Magazine. Archived from the original on November 11, 2006. Retrieved June 18, 2007. 
  65. ^ Curt Schilling and Boston Dirt Dogs (October 27, 2004). "Curt clears the air". Boston Globe. Retrieved June 18, 2007. 
  66. ^ "Boston's Schilling excited to pitch without injury woes". Associated Press. February 18, 2006. Archived from the original on October 17, 2007. Retrieved June 18, 2007. 
  67. ^ Larry Stone (May 1, 2005). "Around the horn: again, Schilling shows his true colors". Seattle Times. Retrieved June 18, 2007. 
  68. ^ Shaughnessy, Dan (February 23, 2007). "Ace's breaking pitch appears to be outside". Boston Globe. Retrieved April 25, 2007. 
  69. ^ Shaughnessy, Dan (February 2, 2007). "Curt answers given". Boston Globe. Retrieved May 10, 2007. 
  70. ^ Shaughnessy, Dan (March 25, 2007). "Famous guest blogs in: Given 'invite,' Schilling issues direct answers". Boston Globe. Retrieved April 25, 2007. 
  71. ^ "Curt Schilling Contract (no contract until after season 2/22/07)". Sons of Sam Horn. February 23, 2007. Retrieved April 25, 2007. 
  72. ^ "Q & A VIII, short one". 38Pitches. March 25, 2007. Archived from the original on July 4, 2007. Retrieved April 25, 2007. 
  73. ^ Gordon Edes (April 26, 2007). "Schilling's sock called into question". Boston Globe. Retrieved May 10, 2007. 
  74. ^ "Ignorance has its privileges". 38 Pitches. April 27, 2007. Archived from the original on April 29, 2007. Retrieved May 10, 2007. 
  75. ^ a b The General Magazine, Volume 27, No. 5
  76. ^ "Corrected MMP History by One of MMP's Owners". 
  77. ^ "Jace Hall, Ep 6: Curt Schilling, and Wiimbledon!!!". The Jace Hall Show. Season 1. Episode 6. July 9, 2008. 
  78. ^ "The Instance! World of Warcraft Podcast » The Instance #102 – "The Curt Schilling Episode"". Myextralife.com. July 26, 2005. Archived from the original on December 5, 2008. Retrieved June 20, 2012. 
  79. ^ "Fires of Heaven Guild Message Board: Green Monster Games (Curt Schilling)". Fohguild.org. Archived from the original on September 27, 2007. Retrieved June 20, 2012. 
  80. ^ "An Interview with Curt Schilling :: ZAM". Allakhazam.com. November 8, 2007. Archived from the original on February 13, 2009. Retrieved June 20, 2012. 
  81. ^ "Red Sox Pitcher to make MMORPG". Galbadia X. January 9, 2008. Archived from the original on July 8, 2008. Retrieved January 9, 2008. 
  82. ^ "Curt Schilling's video-game company gets $75-million loan to come to R.I." Providence Journal. July 27, 2010. Retrieved July 27, 2010. 
  83. ^ "38 38 Studios lays off entire staff". theverge.com. May 24, 2012. 
  84. ^ "Curt Schilling's 38 Studios Lays Off All Employees, Deems Move 'Absolutely Necessary'". 
  85. ^ "38 Studios passes second mortgages onto some former employees". 
  86. ^ Cohan, Peter. "Bloody Hypocrite: Schilling's 38 Studios Fires 413". Forbes. 
  87. ^ Niedowski, Erika (November 1, 2012). "RI SUES SCHILLING OVER 38 STUDIOS LOAN GUARANTEE". Associated Press. Retrieved November 1, 2012. 
  88. ^
    • Schwartz, Jason. "End Game: Inside the Destruction of Curt Schilling's 38 Studios". Boston Magazine. Retrieved July 25, 2012. 
    • http://audio.weei.com/a/58109860/curt-schilling-says-he-is-tapped-out-financially-and-lost-50-million-complete-interview.htm
  89. ^ "JeuxVideo Flash | Inside 38 Studios' Secret MMO | Tom's Games". tomsgames.com. Retrieved November 23, 2017. 
  90. ^ "38 Pitches". 38 Pitches. Archived from the original on March 9, 2007. Retrieved June 20, 2012. 
  91. ^ "Curt Schilling Archive – ESPN Boston". Espn.go.com. Retrieved June 20, 2012. 
  92. ^ "gehrig38 on Twitter". Twitter.com. March 15, 2012. Retrieved June 20, 2012. 
  93. ^ a b John Healy (November 21, 2014). "ESPN suspends Keith Law from Twitter after arguing about evolution with Curt Schilling: report". Daily News. Retrieved November 23, 2014. 
  94. ^ Joe Lucia (November 21, 2014). "ESPN reportedly suspends Keith law for Twitter argument with Curt Schilling (Update)". Awful Announcing. Retrieved November 23, 2014. 
  95. ^ "Reporter Suspended For Defending Evolution Comes Back, Gives Immediate Middle Finger To ESPN". 
  96. ^ "The world we live in...Man has it changed. ADDENDUM!". 38 pitches. March 1, 2015. Retrieved March 3, 2015. 
  97. ^ "Yankees fire employee over vulgar tweets about Curt Schilling's daughter". USA Today. For the Win. March 3, 2015. Retrieved March 3, 2015. 
  98. ^ "Former Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling fires back after trolls' violent, sexual tweets about teen daughter". Daily News. March 2, 2015. Retrieved March 3, 2015. 
  99. ^ "Curt Schilling, Former Pitcher, Philanthropist, Entrepreneur, to Deliver 2010 Commencement Address – WPI". Wpi.edu. February 15, 2010. Retrieved June 20, 2012. 
  100. ^ "WPI to Award Four Honorary Degrees at 142nd Commencement on May 15 – WPI". Wpi.edu. Retrieved June 20, 2012. 
  101. ^ "ESPN pulls Curt Schilling from LLWS duty after 'unacceptable' tweet". ESPN.COM. August 25, 2015. Retrieved August 27, 2015. 
  102. ^ Boren, Cindy (August 26, 2015). "Curt Schilling stood down by ESPN after sharing Twitter meme comparing Muslim extremists to Nazis". The Age. Retrieved August 27, 2015. 
  103. ^ Curt Schilling (25 August 2015). "I understand and accept my suspension. 100% my fault. Bad choices have bad consequences and this was a bad decision in every way on my part" (Tweet) – via Twitter. 
  104. ^ ESPN suspends analyst Curt Schilling. Daily Mail. 4 September 2015. Retrieved on 2015-10-06.
  105. ^ ESPN fires analyst Curt Schilling over posting anti-transgender meme. CNN Money. 20 September 2016. Retrieved April 20, 2016.
External links Wikimedia Commons has media related to Curt Schilling.
  • Curt Schilling's Official Blog
  • Interview with GameSpy.com
  • Curt Schilling on IMDb
  • Curt Schilling – Official Red Sox Web Site
  • A Farewell Salute to Curt Schilling, the Ron Burgundy of Baseball, The New Republic
  • Philadelphia Inquirer Curt Schilling Photo Gallery
  • Chester County Sports Hall of Fame 2009 Inductee
  • Career statistics and player information from MLB, or ESPN, or Baseball-Reference, or Fangraphs, or The Baseball Cube, or Baseball-Reference (Minors)
  • Appearances on C-SPAN
Curt Schilling—awards, championships, and honors
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  • 1995: Devereaux
  • 1996: López
  • 1997: Hernández
  • 1998: Hitchcock
  • 1999: Pérez
  • 2000: Hampton
  • 2001: Counsell
  • 2002: Santiago
  • 2003: Rodríguez
  • 2004: Pujols
  • 2005: Oswalt
  • 2006: Suppan
  • 2007: Holliday
  • 2008: Hamels
  • 2009: Howard
  • 2010: Ross
  • 2011: Freese
  • 2012: Scutaro
  • 2013: Wacha
  • 2014: Bumgarner
  • 2015: Murphy
  • 2016: Báez & Lester
  • 2017: Taylor & Turner
  • v
  • t
  • e
Arizona Diamondbacks 2001 World Series champions
4 Craig Counsell (NLCS MVP)
5 Tony Womack
9 Matt Williams
12 Steve Finley
13 Midre Cummings
16 Reggie Sanders
17 Mark Grace
20 Luis Gonzalez
22 Greg Swindell
25 David Dellucci
26 Damian Miller
28 Greg Colbrunn
29 Danny Bautista
32 Albie Lopez
33 Jay Bell
34 Brian Anderson
36 Mike Morgan
37 Junior Spivey
38 Curt Schilling (World Series MVP)
40 Bobby Witt
43 Miguel Batista
44 Erubiel Durazo
48 Rod Barajas
49 Byung-hyun Kim
51 Randy Johnson (World Series MVP)
54 Troy Brohawn
61 Lyle Overbay
Manager
15 Bob Brenly
Coaches
Bench Coach 3 Bob Melvin
First Base Coach 14 Eddie Rodríguez
Hitting Coach 21 Dwayne Murphy
Pitching Coach 24 Bob Welch
Third Base Coach 35 Chris Speier
Bullpen Coach 53 Glenn Sherlock
Regular season
National League Division Series
National League Championship Series
  • v
  • t
  • e
Boston Red Sox 2004 World Series champions
3 Pokey Reese
7 Trot Nixon
11 Bill Mueller
12 Mark Bellhorn
13 Doug Mientkiewicz
15 Kevin Millar
18 Johnny Damon
19 Gabe Kapler
20 Kevin Youkilis
24 Manny Ramirez (World Series MVP)
26 Ramiro Mendoza
28 Doug Mirabelli
29 Keith Foulke
30 Curt Leskanic
31 Dave Roberts
32 Derek Lowe
33 Jason Varitek
34 David Ortiz (ALCS MVP)
36 Mike Myers
38 Curt Schilling
43 Alan Embree
44 Orlando Cabrera
45 Pedro Martínez
49 Tim Wakefield
50 Mike Timlin
61 Bronson Arroyo
Manager
47 Terry Francona
Coaches
Bench Coach 2 Brad Mills
Pitching Coach 17 Dave Wallace
Hitting Coach 22 Ron Jackson
First Base Coach 35 Lynn Jones
Third Base Coach 41 Dale Sveum
Interim First Base Coach 44 Bill Haselman
Bullpen Coach 54 Euclides Rojas
Bullpen Catcher 60 Dana LeVangie
Regular season
American League Division Series
American League Championship Series
  • v
  • t
  • e
Boston Red Sox 2007 World Series champions
7 J. D. Drew
10 Coco Crisp
12 Eric Hinske
13 Alex Cora
15 Dustin Pedroia
17 Manny Delcarmen
18 Daisuke Matsuzaka
19 Josh Beckett (ALCS MVP)
20 Kevin Youkilis
23 Julio Lugo
24 Manny Ramirez
25 Mike Lowell (World Series MVP)
28 Doug Mirabelli
31 Jon Lester
32 Bobby Kielty
33 Jason Varitek
34 David Ortiz
36 Kevin Cash
37 Hideki Okajima
38 Curt Schilling
39 Kyle Snyder
46 Jacoby Ellsbury
48 Javier López
49 Tim Wakefield
50 Mike Timlin
51 Julián Tavárez
58 Jonathan Papelbon
83 Éric Gagné
Manager
47 Terry Francona
Coaches
Bench Coach 2 Brad Mills
First Base Coach 16 Luis Alicea
Hitting Coach 29 Dave Magadan
Third Base Coach 35 DeMarlo Hale
Pitching Coach 52 John Farrell
Bullpen Coach 57 Gary Tuck
Bullpen Catcher 65 Ino Guerrero
Regular season
American League Division Series
American League Championship Series
  • v
  • t
  • e
World Series MVP Award
  • 1955: Podres
  • 1956: Larsen
  • 1957: Burdette
  • 1958: Turley
  • 1959: Sherry
  • 1960: Richardson
  • 1961: Ford
  • 1962: Terry
  • 1963: Koufax
  • 1964: Gibson
  • 1965: Koufax
  • 1966: F. Robinson
  • 1967: Gibson
  • 1968: Lolich
  • 1969: Clendenon
  • 1970: B. Robinson
  • 1971: Clemente
  • 1972: Tenace
  • 1973: Jackson
  • 1974: Fingers
  • 1975: Rose
  • 1976: Bench
  • 1977: Jackson
  • 1978: Dent
  • 1979: Stargell
  • 1980: Schmidt
  • 1981: Cey, Guerrero & Yeager
  • 1982: Porter
  • 1983: Dempsey
  • 1984: Trammell
  • 1985: Saberhagen
  • 1986: Knight
  • 1987: Viola
  • 1988: Hershiser
  • 1989: Stewart
  • 1990: Rijo
  • 1991: Morris
  • 1992: Borders
  • 1993: Molitor
  • 1994: No series
  • 1995: Glavine
  • 1996: Wetteland
  • 1997: Hernandez
  • 1998: Brosius
  • 1999: Rivera
  • 2000: Jeter
  • 2001: Johnson & Schilling
  • 2002: Glaus
  • 2003: Beckett
  • 2004: Ramirez
  • 2005: Dye
  • 2006: Eckstein
  • 2007: Lowell
  • 2008: Hamels
  • 2009: Matsui
  • 2010: Rentería
  • 2011: Freese
  • 2012: Sandoval
  • 2013: Ortiz
  • 2014: Bumgarner
  • 2015: Pérez
  • 2016: Zobrist
  • 2017: Springer
  • v
  • t
  • e
National League season wins leaders
  • 1876: Spalding
  • 1877: Bond
  • 1878: Bond
  • 1879: Ward
  • 1880: J. McCormick
  • 1881: Corcoran & Whitney
  • 1882: J. McCormick
  • 1883: Radbourn
  • 1884: Radbourn
  • 1885: Clarkson
  • 1886: Baldwin & Keefe
  • 1887: Clarkson
  • 1888: Keefe
  • 1889: Clarkson
  • 1890: Hutchinson
  • 1891: Hutchinson
  • 1892: Hutchinson & Young
  • 1893: Killen
  • 1894: Rusie
  • 1895: Young
  • 1896: Killen & Nichols
  • 1897: Nichols
  • 1898: Nichols
  • 1899: Hughes & McGinnity
  • 1900: McGinnity
  • 1901: Donovan
  • 1902: Chesbro
  • 1903: McGinnity
  • 1904: McGinnity
  • 1905: Mathewson
  • 1906: McGinnity
  • 1907: Mathewson
  • 1908: Mathewson
  • 1909: Brown
  • 1910: Mathewson
  • 1911: Alexander
  • 1912: Cheney & Marquard
  • 1913: Seaton
  • 1914: Alexander
  • 1915: Alexander
  • 1916: Alexander
  • 1917: Alexander
  • 1918: Vaughn
  • 1919: Barnes
  • 1920: Alexander
  • 1921: W. Cooper & Grimes
  • 1922: Rixey
  • 1923: Luque
  • 1924: Vance
  • 1925: Vance
  • 1926: Donohue, Kremer, Meadows & Rhem
  • 1927: Root
  • 1928: Benton & Grimes
  • 1929: Malone
  • 1930: Kremer & Malone
  • 1931: Elliott, Hallahan & Meine
  • 1932: Warneke
  • 1933: Hubbell
  • 1934: Dean
  • 1935: Dean
  • 1936: Hubbell
  • 1937: Hubbell
  • 1938: Lee
  • 1939: Walters
  • 1940: Walters
  • 1941: Higbe & Wyatt
  • 1942: M. Cooper
  • 1943: M. Cooper, Riddle & Sewell
  • 1944: Walters
  • 1945: Barrett
  • 1946: Pollet
  • 1947: Blackwell
  • 1948: Sain
  • 1949: Spahn
  • 1950: Spahn
  • 1951: Jansen & Maglie
  • 1952: Roberts
  • 1953: Roberts & Spahn
  • 1954: Roberts
  • 1955: Roberts
  • 1956: Newcombe
  • 1957: Spahn
  • 1958: Friend & Spahn
  • 1959: Burdette, S. Jones & Spahn
  • 1960: Broglio & Spahn
  • 1961: Jay & Spahn
  • 1962: Drysdale
  • 1963: Koufax & Marichal
  • 1964: L. Jackson
  • 1965: Koufax
  • 1966: Koufax
  • 1967: M. McCormick
  • 1968: Marichal
  • 1969: Seaver
  • 1970: Gibson & Perry
  • 1971: Jenkins
  • 1972: Carlton
  • 1973: Bryant
  • 1974: Messersmith & P. Niekro
  • 1975: Seaver
  • 1976: R. Jones
  • 1977: Carlton
  • 1978: Perry
  • 1979: J. Niekro & P. Niekro
  • 1980: Carlton
  • 1981: Seaver
  • 1982: Carlton
  • 1983: Denny
  • 1984: Andújar
  • 1985: Gooden
  • 1986: Valenzuela
  • 1987: Sutcliffe
  • 1988: Hershiser & D. Jackson
  • 1989: Scott
  • 1990: Drabek
  • 1991: Glavine & Smiley
  • 1992: Glavine & Maddux
  • 1993: Burkett & Glavine
  • 1994: Hill & Maddux
  • 1995: Maddux
  • 1996: Smoltz
  • 1997: Neagle
  • 1998: Glavine
  • 1999: Hampton
  • 2000: Glavine
  • 2001: Morris & Schilling
  • 2002: Johnson
  • 2003: Ortiz
  • 2004: Oswalt
  • 2005: Willis
  • 2006: Harang, Lowe, Penny, Smoltz, Webb & Zambrano
  • 2007: Peavy
  • 2008: Webb
  • 2009: Wainwright
  • 2010: Halladay
  • 2011: Kennedy & Kershaw
  • 2012: González
  • 2013: Wainwright & Zimmermann
  • 2014: Kershaw
  • 2015: Arrieta
  • 2016: Scherzer
  • 2017: Kershaw
  • v
  • t
  • e
American League season wins leaders
  • 1901: Young
  • 1902: Young
  • 1903: Young
  • 1904: Chesbro
  • 1905: Waddell
  • 1906: Orth
  • 1907: Joss & White
  • 1908: Walsh
  • 1909: Mullin
  • 1910: Coombs
  • 1911: Coombs
  • 1912: S. J. Wood
  • 1913: Johnson
  • 1914: Johnson
  • 1915: Johnson
  • 1916: Johnson
  • 1917: Cicotte
  • 1918: Johnson
  • 1919: Cicotte
  • 1920: Bagby
  • 1921: Mays & Shocker
  • 1922: Rommel
  • 1923: Uhle
  • 1924: Johnson
  • 1925: Lyons & Rommel
  • 1926: Uhle
  • 1927: W. Hoyt & Lyons
  • 1928: Grove & Pipgras
  • 1929: Earnshaw
  • 1930: Grove
  • 1931: Grove
  • 1932: Crowder
  • 1933: Crowder & Grove
  • 1934: Gomez
  • 1935: Ferrell
  • 1936: Bridges
  • 1937: Gomez
  • 1938: Ruffing
  • 1939: Feller
  • 1940: Feller
  • 1941: Feller
  • 1942: Hughson
  • 1943: Chandler & Trout
  • 1944: Newhouser
  • 1945: Newhouser
  • 1946: Feller & Newhouser
  • 1947: Feller
  • 1948: Newhouser
  • 1949: Parnell
  • 1950: Lemon
  • 1951: Feller
  • 1952: Shantz
  • 1953: Porterfield
  • 1954: Lemon & Wynn
  • 1955: Ford, Lemon & Sullivan
  • 1956: Lary
  • 1957: Bunning & Pierce
  • 1958: Turley
  • 1959: Wynn
  • 1960: Estrada & J. Perry
  • 1961: Ford
  • 1962: Terry
  • 1963: Ford
  • 1964: Chance & Peters
  • 1965: Grant
  • 1966: Kaat
  • 1967: Lonborg & Wilson
  • 1968: McLain
  • 1969: McLain
  • 1970: Cuellar, McNally & J. Perry
  • 1971: Lolich
  • 1972: G. Perry & W. Wood
  • 1973: W. Wood
  • 1974: Hunter & Jenkins
  • 1975: Hunter & Palmer
  • 1976: Palmer
  • 1977: Goltz, Leonard & Palmer
  • 1978: Guidry
  • 1979: Flanagan
  • 1980: Stone
  • 1981: D. Martínez, McCatty, Morris & Vuckovich
  • 1982: L. Hoyt
  • 1983: L. Hoyt
  • 1984: Boddicker
  • 1985: Guidry
  • 1986: Clemens
  • 1987: Clemens & Stewart
  • 1988: Viola
  • 1989: Saberhagen
  • 1990: Welch
  • 1991: Erickson & Gullickson
  • 1992: Brown & Morris
  • 1993: McDowell
  • 1994: Key
  • 1995: Mussina
  • 1996: Pettitte
  • 1997: Clemens
  • 1998: Clemens, Cone & Helling
  • 1999: P. Martínez
  • 2000: Hudson & Wells
  • 2001: Mulder
  • 2002: Zito
  • 2003: Halladay
  • 2004: Schilling
  • 2005: Colón
  • 2006: Santana & Wang
  • 2007: Beckett
  • 2008: Lee
  • 2009: Hernández, Sabathia & Verlander
  • 2010: Sabathia
  • 2011: Verlander
  • 2012: Price & Weaver
  • 2013: Scherzer
  • 2014: Kluber, Scherzer & Weaver
  • 2015: Keuchel
  • 2016: Porcello
  • 2017: Carrasco, Kluber & Vargas
  • v
  • t
  • e
National League season strikeout leaders
  • 1876: Devlin
  • 1877: Bond
  • 1878: Bond
  • 1879: Ward
  • 1880: Corcoran
  • 1881: Derby
  • 1882: Radbourn
  • 1883: Whitney
  • 1884: Radbourn
  • 1885: Clarkson
  • 1886: Baldwin
  • 1887: Clarkson
  • 1888: Keefe
  • 1889: Clarkson
  • 1890: Rusie
  • 1891: Rusie
  • 1892: Hutchinson
  • 1893: Rusie
  • 1894: Rusie
  • 1895: Rusie
  • 1896: Young
  • 1897: McJames & Seymour
  • 1898: Seymour
  • 1899: Hahn
  • 1900: Hahn
  • 1901: Hahn
  • 1902: Willis
  • 1903: Mathewson
  • 1904: Mathewson
  • 1905: Mathewson
  • 1906: Beebe
  • 1907: Mathewson
  • 1908: Mathewson
  • 1909: Overall
  • 1910: Moore
  • 1911: Marquard
  • 1912: Alexander
  • 1913: Seaton
  • 1914: Alexander
  • 1915: Alexander
  • 1916: Alexander
  • 1917: Alexander
  • 1918: Vaughn
  • 1919: Vaughn
  • 1920: Alexander
  • 1921: Grimes
  • 1922: Vance
  • 1923: Vance
  • 1924: Vance
  • 1925: Vance
  • 1926: Vance
  • 1927: Vance
  • 1928: Vance
  • 1929: Malone
  • 1930: Hallahan
  • 1931: Hallahan
  • 1932: Dean
  • 1933: Dean
  • 1934: Dean
  • 1935: Dean
  • 1936: Mungo
  • 1937: Hubbell
  • 1938: Bryant
  • 1939: Passeau & Walters
  • 1940: Higbe
  • 1941: Vander Meer
  • 1942: Vander Meer
  • 1943: Vander Meer
  • 1944: Voiselle
  • 1945: Roe
  • 1946: Schmitz
  • 1947: Blackwell
  • 1948: Brecheen
  • 1949: Spahn
  • 1950: Spahn
  • 1951: Newcombe & Spahn
  • 1952: Spahn
  • 1953: Roberts
  • 1954: Roberts
  • 1955: Jones
  • 1956: Jones
  • 1957: Sanford
  • 1958: Jones
  • 1959: Drysdale
  • 1960: Drysdale
  • 1961: Koufax
  • 1962: Drysdale
  • 1963: Koufax
  • 1964: Veale
  • 1965: Koufax
  • 1966: Koufax
  • 1967: Bunning
  • 1968: Gibson
  • 1969: Jenkins
  • 1970: Seaver
  • 1971: Seaver
  • 1972: Carlton
  • 1973: Seaver
  • 1974: Carlton
  • 1975: Seaver
  • 1976: Seaver
  • 1977: Niekro
  • 1978: Richard
  • 1979: Richard
  • 1980: Carlton
  • 1981: Valenzuela
  • 1982: Carlton
  • 1983: Carlton
  • 1984: Gooden
  • 1985: Gooden
  • 1986: Scott
  • 1987: Ryan
  • 1988: Ryan
  • 1989: DeLeón
  • 1990: Cone
  • 1991: Cone
  • 1992: Smoltz
  • 1993: Rijo
  • 1994: Benes
  • 1995: Nomo
  • 1996: Smoltz
  • 1997: Schilling
  • 1998: Schilling
  • 1999: Johnson
  • 2000: Johnson
  • 2001: Johnson
  • 2002: Johnson
  • 2003: Wood
  • 2004: Johnson
  • 2005: Peavy
  • 2006: Harang
  • 2007: Peavy
  • 2008: Lincecum
  • 2009: Lincecum
  • 2010: Lincecum
  • 2011: Kershaw
  • 2012: Dickey
  • 2013: Kershaw
  • 2014: Cueto & Strasburg
  • 2015: Kershaw
  • 2016: Scherzer
  • 2017: Scherzer
  • v
  • t
  • e
3,000 strikeout club
  • Nolan Ryan
  • Randy Johnson
  • Roger Clemens
  • Steve Carlton
  • Bert Blyleven
  • Tom Seaver
  • Don Sutton
  • Gaylord Perry
  • Walter Johnson
  • Greg Maddux
  • Phil Niekro
  • Ferguson Jenkins
  • Pedro Martínez
  • Bob Gibson
  • Curt Schilling
  • John Smoltz
Book:3,000 strikeout club
  • v
  • t
  • e
Philadelphia Phillies
  • Established in 1883
  • Formerly the Philadelphia Quakers
  • Based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Franchise
  • History
  • Seasons
  • Records
  • Players
  • Owners and executives
  • Managers
  • Broadcasters
  • Opening Day starting pitchers
  • First-round picks
  • No-hitters
  • Award winners and league leaders
Ballparks
  • Recreation Park
  • Baker Bowl
  • Shibe Park
  • Veterans Stadium
  • Citizens Bank Park
Spring training
Fogel Field
Coffee Pot Park
Rickwood Field
Cooke Field
City Park/Ninth Street Park
Wilmington Park
Flamingo Field
Clearwater Athletic Field
Jack Russell Memorial Stadium
Carpenter Complex/Spectrum Field
Culture
  • Ashburn Alley
  • Baseball Wall of Fame
  • By Saam
  • Curse of Billy Penn
  • Dan Baker
  • Franchise awards
  • Harry Kalas
  • "High Hopes"
  • Hot Pants Patrol
  • Maje McDonnell
  • Paul Richardson
  • Philadelphia Phillies (NFL)
  • Phillie Phanatic
  • Phillies Turn Back the Clock
  • Richie Ashburn
  • Sports Hall of Fame
  • Summer Catch
  • "The Sound of Philadelphia"
  • Tony Lucadello
  • "Whoomp! (There It Is)"
  • "The World Series Defense" (It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia episode)
Lore
  • 1993 World Series Game 6
  • 2018 MLB Little League Classic
  • Black Friday
  • Black Saturday
  • The Cardiac Kids
  • The Four Aces
  • Macho Row
  • Perfect games
    • Jim Bunning
    • Roy Halladay
  • The Phold
  • Whiz Kids
  • Wheeze Kids
Rivalries
  • New York Mets
  • Pittsburgh Pirates
  • Philadelphia Athletics (City Series)
Important figuresWall of Fame
members
  • Grover Cleveland Alexander
  • Dick Allen
  • Richie Ashburn
  • Bob Boone
  • Larry Bowa
  • Jim Bunning
  • Pat Burrell
  • Johnny Callison
  • Steve Carlton
  • Gavvy Cravath
  • Darren Daulton
  • Ed Delahanty
  • Del Ennis
  • Dallas Green
  • Billy Hamilton
  • Granny Hamner
  • Willie Jones
  • Harry Kalas
  • Chuck Klein
  • John Kruk
  • Mike Lieberthal
  • Greg Luzinski
  • Garry Maddox
  • Sherry Magee
  • Charlie Manuel
  • Tug McGraw
  • Paul Owens
  • Robin Roberts
  • Juan Samuel
  • Curt Schilling
  • Mike Schmidt
  • Chris Short
  • Curt Simmons
  • Tony Taylor
  • Jim Thome
  • Sam Thompson
  • John Vukovich
  • Cy Williams
Franchise
record holders
  • John Coleman
  • Bill Duggleby
  • Lenny Dykstra
  • Kid Gleason
  • Ryan Howard
  • George McQuillan
  • José Mesa
  • Lefty O'Doul
  • Jimmy Rollins
  • Curt Schilling
  • Kent Tekulve
  • Chase Utley
Retired numbers
  • 1
  • 14
  • 20
  • 32
  • 36
  • 42
  • P
  • P
Key personnel
  • Owner: Limited partnership (John S. Middleton, Jim & Pete Buck, David Montgomery, & Pat Gillick)
  • President: Andy MacPhail
  • General Manager: Matt Klentak
  • Manager: Gabe Kapler
World Series
championships (2)
  • 1980
  • 2008
NL pennants (7)
  • 1915
  • 1950
  • 1980
  • 1983
  • 1993
  • 2008
  • 2009
Division
championships (11)
  • 1976
  • 1977
  • 1978
  • 1980
  • 1983
  • 1993
  • 2007
  • 2008
  • 2009
  • 2010
  • 2011
Minor league
affiliates
AAA
Lehigh Valley IronPigs
AA
Reading Fightin Phils
A Adv.
Clearwater Threshers
A
Lakewood BlueClaws
Short A
Williamsport Crosscutters
Rookie
GCL Phillies East
GCL Phillies West
DSL Phillies Red
DSL Phillies White
Rosters
Minor league rosters
BroadcastingTelevision
  • NBC Sports Philadelphia
  • WCAU
Radio
  • 94 WIP (English flagship station)
  • El Pasaporte (Spanish flagship station)
  • Phillies radio network affiliates
Broadcasters
  • Tom McCarthy
  • John Kruk
  • Ben Davis
  • Mike Schmidt
  • Scott Franzke
  • Larry Andersen
Seasons (136)1880s
  • 1880 · 1881 · 1882 · 1883
  • 1884
  • 1885
  • 1886
  • 1887
  • 1888
  • 1889
1890s
  • 1890
  • 1891
  • 1892
  • 1893
  • 1894
  • 1895
  • 1896
  • 1897
  • 1898
  • 1899
1900s
  • 1900
  • 1901
  • 1902
  • 1903
  • 1904
  • 1905
  • 1906
  • 1907
  • 1908
  • 1909
1910s
  • 1910
  • 1911
  • 1912
  • 1913
  • 1914
  • 1915
  • 1916
  • 1917
  • 1918
  • 1919
1920s
  • 1920
  • 1921
  • 1922
  • 1923
  • 1924
  • 1925
  • 1926
  • 1927
  • 1928
  • 1929
1930s
  • 1930
  • 1931
  • 1932
  • 1933
  • 1934
  • 1935
  • 1936
  • 1937
  • 1938
  • 1939
1940s
  • 1940
  • 1941
  • 1942
  • 1943
  • 1944
  • 1945
  • 1946
  • 1947
  • 1948
  • 1949
1950s
  • 1950
  • 1951
  • 1952
  • 1953
  • 1954
  • 1955
  • 1956
  • 1957
  • 1958
  • 1959
1960s
  • 1960
  • 1961
  • 1962
  • 1963
  • 1964
  • 1965
  • 1966
  • 1967
  • 1968
  • 1969
1970s
  • 1970
  • 1971
  • 1972
  • 1973
  • 1974
  • 1975
  • 1976
  • 1977
  • 1978
  • 1979
1980s
  • 1980
  • 1981
  • 1982
  • 1983
  • 1984
  • 1985
  • 1986
  • 1987
  • 1988
  • 1989
1990s
  • 1990
  • 1991
  • 1992
  • 1993
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  • 1999
2000s
  • 2000
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2010s
  • 2010
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Category Portal
  • v
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Members of the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of FameInducted as
Phillies
  • Roberts
  • Ashburn
  • Klein
  • Alexander
  • Ennis
  • Bunning
  • Delahanty
  • Williams
  • Hamner
  • Owens
  • Carlton
  • Schmidt
  • Bowa
  • Short
  • Simmons
  • Allen
  • Jones
  • Thompson
  • Callison
  • Luzinski
  • McGraw
  • Cravath
  • Maddox
  • Taylor
  • Magee
  • Hamilton
  • Boone
  • Green
  • Vukovich
  • Samuel
  • Kalas
  • Daulton
  • Kruk
  • Lieberthal
  • Schilling
  • Manuel
  • Burrell
  • Thome
  • Gillick
  • Halladay
Inducted as
Athletics
  • Mack
  • Foxx
  • Grove
  • Simmons
  • Cochrane
  • Dykes
  • Plank
  • Waddell
  • Collins
  • Moses
  • Johnson
  • Valo
  • Bender
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  • Baker
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  • Rommel
  • Fain
  • Miller
  • Chapman
  • Earnshaw
  • Zernial
  • Walberg
  • Oldring
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Members of the Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame
  • Eddie Collins
  • Jimmy Collins
  • Tony Conigliaro
  • Joe Cronin
  • Dom DiMaggio
  • Bobby Doerr
  • Rick Ferrell
  • Jimmie Foxx
  • Harry Hooper
  • Frank Malzone
  • Herb Pennock
  • Johnny Pesky
  • Jim Rice
  • Red Ruffing
  • Babe Ruth
  • Tris Speaker
  • Ted Williams
  • Smoky Joe Wood
  • Carl Yastrzemski
  • Jean R. Yawkey
  • Tom Yawkey
  • Cy Young
  • Carlton Fisk
  • Dick O'Connell
  • Mel Parnell
  • Rico Petrocelli
  • Dick Radatz
  • Luis Tiant
  • Ken Coleman
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Sports Illustrated Sportsperson of the Year
  • 1954: Roger Bannister
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  • 1956: Bobby Morrow
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  • 1960: Arnold Palmer
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  • v
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Sporting News Sportsman/Pro Athlete of the Year
  • 1968: Denny McLain
  • 1969: Tom Seaver
  • 1970: John Wooden
  • 1971: Lee Trevino
  • 1972: Charlie Finley
  • 1973: O. J. Simpson
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  • 1987: None
  • 1988: Jackie Joyner-Kersee
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  • 1990: Nolan Ryan
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  • 1994: Emmitt Smith
  • 1995: Cal Ripken Jr.
  • 1996: Joe Torre
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  • 1998: Mark McGwire & Sammy Sosa
  • 1999: New York Yankees
  • 2000: Marshall Faulk & Kurt Warner
  • 2001: Curt Schilling
  • 2002: Tyrone Willingham
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  • 2004: Tom Brady
  • 2005: Matt Leinart
  • 2006: Dwyane Wade
  • 2007: Tom Brady
  • 2008: Eli Manning
  • 2009: Mariano Rivera
  • 2010: Roy Halladay
  • 2011: Aaron Rodgers
  • 2012: LeBron James
Authority control
  • WorldCat Identities
  • ISNI: 0000 0000 3839 1423
  • LCCN: n2003106116
  • VIAF: 41222718


Autographed/Signed Curt Schilling Boston Grey Baseball Jersey JSA COA
Autographed/Signed Curt Schilling Boston Grey Baseball Jersey JSA COA
This is a custom jersey and was not manufactured by or in any manner associated with any professional sports league or manufacturer. This custom jersey carries no professional sports league designation. The item is intended to be an autographed collectible. Reference of team in the title is to allow the purchaser a point of association. The custom jersey displays the name, number and authenticated signature of the player. This item in no way is affiliated with or connected to any professional sports organization. The autograph, as always is guaranteed to be authentic and has been certified as authentic by a third-party, trusted authenticator. Size is XL unless otherwise noted.

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The Best Kind of Different: Our Family's Journey with Asperger's Syndrome
The Best Kind of Different: Our Family's Journey with Asperger's Syndrome
In The Best Kind of Different, Shonda Schilling, the wife of Major League Baseball All Star, former Boston Red Sox, and World Series championship pitcher Curt Schilling, shares the story of their son’s Asperger’s Syndrome, how it changed their lives, and what other parents can learn about this increasingly common diagnosis. Candid and compelling, The Best Kind of Different traces their family’s struggle with Asperger’s, following Curt and Shonda as they come to understand their son’s differences and in the process relearn everything they thought they knew about parenting.

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$6.00
-$8.99(-60%)



Red Sox Curt Schilling Signed Authentic OML Baseball Autographed STEINER
Red Sox Curt Schilling Signed Authentic OML Baseball Autographed STEINER
This is a Signed Authentic OML Baseball that has been Personally Signed & Autographed by Curt Schilling of the Boston Red Sox. This item is 100% Authentic to include a Certificate of Authenticity (COA) / hologram by STEINER.This is a stock item. We have several of these available. The one you will receive will be of equal quality to the one pictured. Press Pass Collectibles offers a 100% Lifetime Guarantee on all Autographed & Signed Curt Schilling memorabilia.

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McFarlane Toys MLB Boston Red Sox Sports Picks Series 22 Curt Schilling Action Figure [Patch Variant]
McFarlane Toys MLB Boston Red Sox Sports Picks Series 22 Curt Schilling Action Figure [Patch Variant]
Full Name: Curtis Montague SchillingBorn: 11/14/1966Birthplace: Anchorage, AKHeight: 6'5" Weight: 235College: Yavapai JC, AZMLB Debut: 09/07/1988The Red Sox gave up Brandon Lyon and a bag of Snickers bars to acquire Schilling from the Diamondbacks, and three years, two championships and one bloody sock later they couldn't be more pleased. Schilling enters what's expected to be his final season with his legacy firmly stamped in the hearts of Red Sox fans everywhere.

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$21.90



CURT SCHILLING STEINER And MLB COA Hand Signed Major League Autograph Baseball
CURT SCHILLING STEINER And MLB COA Hand Signed Major League Autograph Baseball
NICE CERTIFIED BASEBALL SIGNATURE FROM THE INTERNETS #1 SOURCE OF QUALITY COLLECTIBLES FOR THE PAST 30 YEARS

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On the Mound with ... Curt Schilling (Athlete Biographies)
On the Mound with ... Curt Schilling (Athlete Biographies)
A biography of Curt Schilling, star pitcher with the Arizona Diamondbacks.

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$8.99



Curt Schilling baseball card (Philadelphia Phillies All Star) 1999 Topps #447 Strikeout Kings
Curt Schilling baseball card (Philadelphia Phillies All Star) 1999 Topps #447 Strikeout Kings
Curt Schilling baseball card (Philadelphia Phillies All Star) 1999 Topps #447 Strikeout Kings

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McFarlane Sportspicks: MLB Series 3 Curt Schilling (Chase Variant) Action Figure
McFarlane Sportspicks: MLB Series 3 Curt Schilling (Chase Variant) Action Figure
Add this unique McFarlane® Toys Arizona Diamondbacks Curt Schilling Series 3 figure to your collection. This meticulously designed life like sports figure arrives wearing his official team uniform and posing with fully detailed equipment on a custom base.

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$4.99



Bloody Sock Curt Schilling baseball card (2004 Boston Red Sox) 2010 Topps #TOG21
Bloody Sock Curt Schilling baseball card (2004 Boston Red Sox) 2010 Topps #TOG21
Bloody Sock Curt Schilling baseball card (2004 Boston Red Sox) 2010 Topps #TOG21

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Mcfarlane MLB Series 5 Curt Schilling Philadelphia Phillies Chase by Unknown
Mcfarlane MLB Series 5 Curt Schilling Philadelphia Phillies Chase by Unknown
Mcfarlane MLB Series 5 Curt Schilling in Phillies uniform. Some bubble damage to the front corner of bubble.

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$11.30


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