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Director of National Intelligence
The Director of National Intelligence (DNI) is the United States government cabinet-level official – subject to the authority, direction, and control

View Wikipedia Article

Director of National Intelligence of the United States of America Seal of the Director of National Intelligence Incumbent
Dan Coats

since March 16, 2017 United States Intelligence Community Member of
  • Cabinet-level,
  • National Security Council
Reports to The President Seat Washington, D.C. Appointer The President
with Senate advice and consent Term length Appointed Precursor Director of Central Intelligence (CIA) Formation April 22, 2005; 12 years ago (2005-04-22) First holder John Negroponte Deputy Principal Deputy Director Website www.dni.gov

The Director of National Intelligence (DNI) is the United States government cabinet-level official – subject to the authority, direction, and control of the President – required by the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 to:

  • Serve as head of the sixteen-member United States Intelligence Community,
  • Direct and oversee the National Intelligence Program; and
  • Serve as an advisor, upon invitation, to the President and his executive offices of the National Security Council, and the Homeland Security Council about intelligence matters related to national security;

On July 30, 2008, President George W. Bush issued Executive Order 13470, amending Executive Order 12333 to strengthen the DNI's role. Further, by Presidential Policy Directive 19 signed by Barack Obama in October 2012, the DNI was given overall responsibility for Intelligence Community whistleblowing and source protection.

Under 50 U.S.C. § 403-3a, "under ordinary circumstances, it is desirable" that either the Director or the Principal Deputy Director of National Intelligence be an active-duty commissioned officer in the armed forces or have training or experience in military intelligence activities and requirements. Only one of the two positions can be held by a military officer at any given time. The statute does not specify what rank the commissioned officer will hold during his or her tenure in either position. On July 20, 2010, President Obama nominated retired Lt. (three-star) Gen. James R. Clapper for the position. Clapper was confirmed by the Senate on August 5, 2010, and replaced acting Director David C. Gompert. The prior DNI was retired Navy four-star admiral Dennis C. Blair, whose resignation became effective May 28, 2010.

Contents
  • 1 History
    • 1.1 Founding
    • 1.2 History (2005–2007)
  • 2 Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI)
    • 2.1 ODNI organization
      • 2.1.1 Core mission
      • 2.1.2 Mission enablers
      • 2.1.3 Oversight
  • 3 Directors
  • 4 Line of succession
  • 5 Subordinates
    • 5.1 Principal Deputy Directors of National Intelligence
    • 5.2 Director of the Intelligence Staff/Chief Management Officer
    • 5.3 Intelligence Community Inspector General
    • 5.4 Deputy Directors of National Intelligence
    • 5.5 Assistant Directors of National Intelligence
    • 5.6 Assistant Deputy Directors of National Intelligence
  • 6 Cultural references
  • 7 See also
  • 8 References
  • 9 External links

History Founding

Before the DNI was formally established, the head of the Intelligence Community was the Director of Central Intelligence (DCI), who concurrently served as the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA).

The 9/11 Commission recommended establishing the DNI position in its 9/11 Commission Report, not released until July 22, 2004, as it had identified major intelligence failures that called into question how well the intelligence community was able to protect U.S. interests against foreign terrorist attacks.

Senators Dianne Feinstein, Jay Rockefeller and Bob Graham introduced S. 2645 on June 19, 2002, to create the Director of National Intelligence position. Other similar legislation soon followed. After considerable debate on the scope of the DNI's powers and authorities, the United States Congress passed the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 by votes of 336–75 in the House of Representatives, and 89–2 in the Senate. President George W. Bush signed the bill into law on December 17, 2004. Among other things, the law established the DNI position as the designated leader of the United States Intelligence Community and prohibited the DNI from serving as the CIA Director or the head of any other Intelligence Community element at the same time. In addition, the law required the CIA Director to "report" his agency's activities to the DNI.

Critics say compromises during the bill's crafting led to the establishment of a DNI whose powers are too weak to adequately lead, manage and improve the performance of the US Intelligence Community. In particular, the law left the United States Department of Defense in charge of the National Security Agency (NSA), the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO), and the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). (The limited DNI role in leading the US Intelligence Community is discussed on the Intelligence Community page.)

History (2005–2007)

On February 17, 2005, President George W. Bush named US Ambassador to Iraq John Negroponte to the post, pending confirmation by the Senate. It was reported that President Bush's first choice for Director of National Intelligence was former Director of Central Intelligence Robert M. Gates, who was serving as president of Texas A&M University; however, Gates declined the offer. Negroponte was confirmed by a Senate vote of 98 to 2 in favor of his appointment on April 21, 2005, and he was sworn in by President Bush on that day.

On February 13, 2007, John Michael McConnell became the 2nd Director of National Intelligence, after Negroponte was appointed Deputy Secretary of State.

Donald M. Kerr was confirmed by the U.S. Senate to be Principal Deputy Director of National Intelligence on October 4, 2007 and sworn in on October 9, 2007. Kerr, from Virginia, was most recently the Director of the National Reconnaissance Office, and previously the Duty Director for Science and Technology at the US CIA and earlier in his career the Assistant Director of the Justice Department's FBI.

Declan McCullagh at News.com wrote on August 24, 2007, that the DNI site was configured to repel all search engines to index any page at DNI.gov. This effectively made the DNI website invisible to all search engines and in turn, any search queries. Ross Feinstein, Spokesman for the DNI, said that the cloaking was removed as of September 3, 2007. "We're not even sure how (the robots.txt file]) got there" – but it was again somehow hidden the next day. Another blog entry by McCullagh on September 7, states that the DNI site should now be open to search engines. This explanation is plausible because some software used for web development has been known to cause servers to automatically generate and re-generate robots.txt, and this behavior can be difficult to turn off. Therefore, if the web developers working for the DNI had tried to solve the issue by simply removing robots.txt, it would have looked like it worked at first, but then fail once the server had undergone a self-check for the robots.txt file. robots.txt has been configured to allow access to all directories for any agent.

In September 2007, the Office of the DNI released "Intelligence Community 100 Day & 500 Day Plans for Integration & Collaboration". These plans include a series of initiatives designed to build the foundation for increased cooperation and reform of the U.S. Intelligence Community.

Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI)

The Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 established the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) as an independent agency to assist the DNI. The ODNI's goal is to effectively integrate foreign, military and domestic intelligence in defense of the homeland and of United States interests abroad. The budget for the ODNI and the Intelligence Community for fiscal year 2013 was $52.6 billion and the base request for fiscal year 2014 was $48.2 billion. The Military Intelligence Program (MIP) base budget request for fiscal year 2014, excluding overseas contingency funds, is $14.6 billion, which together with the NIP, comprise an Intelligence Community budget request of $62.8 billion for fiscal year 2014. The ODNI has about 1,750 employees.

On March 23, 2007, DNI Mike McConnell announced organizational changes, which include:

  • Elevating acquisition to a new Deputy DNI position
  • Creating a new Deputy DNI for Policy, Plans, and Requirements (replacing the Deputy DNI for Requirements position)
  • Establishing an Executive Committee
  • Designating the Chief of Staff position as the new Director of the Intelligence Staff

The ODNI continued to evolve under succeeding directors, culminating in a new organization focused on intelligence integration across the community. The ODNI has six centers and 15 Offices that, together with the centers, support the Director of National Intelligence as the head of the Intelligence Community (IC) in overseeing and directing implementation of the NIP and acting as the principal advisor to the President, the National Security Council, and the Homeland Security Council for intelligence matters related to national security. The six ODNI centers include:

  • Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Agency (IARPA)
  • Information Sharing Environment (ISE)
  • National Counterproliferation Center (NCPC)
  • National Counterterrorism Center (NCTC)
  • National Intelligence Council (NIC)
  • Office of the National Counterintelligence Executive (ONCIX).
ODNI organization

The ODNI is divided into core, enabling, and oversight offices. The Principal Duty Director (PDDNI) to the DNI, in a role similar to that of a Chief Operating Officer, oversees operation of ODNI offices, manages Intelligence Community (IC) coordination and information sharing, reinforces the DNI's intelligence-integration initiatives, and focuses on IC resource challenges.

Core mission

The core mission functions of the ODNI are organized under the Deputy DNI for Intelligence Integration (DDNI/II). The DDNI/II facilitates information sharing and collaboration through the integration of analysis and collection, and leads execution of core mission functions. These include:

  • Integration Management Council
  • National Intelligence Council
  • Mission Integration Division
  • National Counterterrorism Center
  • National Counterproliferation Center
  • Office of the National Counterintelligence Executive
Mission enablers

Mission enablers include policy, engagement, acquisition, resource, human capital, financial, and information offices.

Oversight

Oversight offices include the General Counsel, civil liberties, public affairs, Inspector General, Equal Employment Opportunity, and legislative affairs functions.

Directors See also: List of United States Directors of National Intelligence by time in office
Status
  Denotes an Acting Director of National Intelligence No. Director Term of Office President(s) served under Position succeeded the Director of Central Intelligence 1 John Negroponte April 21, 2005 – February 13, 2007 George W. Bush 2 Mike McConnell February 13, 2007 – January 27, 2009 3 Dennis C. Blair January 29, 2009 – May 28, 2010 Barack Obama – David Gompert
Acting May 28, 2010 – August 5, 2010 4 James R. Clapper August 5, 2010 – January 20, 2017 – Mike Dempsey
Acting January 20, 2017 – March 16, 2017 Donald Trump 5 Dan Coats March 16, 2017 – present Line of succession

The line of succession for the Director of National Intelligence is as follows:

  1. Principal Deputy Director of National Intelligence
  2. Deputy Director of National Intelligence for Intelligence Integration
  3. Director of the National Counterterrorism Center
  4. National Counterintelligence Executive
  5. Inspector General of the Intelligence Community
Subordinates Principal Deputy Directors of National Intelligence Name Term of Office President(s) served under Michael Hayden April 21, 2005 – May 26, 2006 George W. Bush Ronald L. Burgess, Jr. June 2006 – January 2007 George W. Bush Donald Kerr October 2007 – January 2009 George W. Bush Ronald L. Burgess, Jr.
Acting January 2009 – February 2009 Barack Obama David C. Gompert November 10, 2009 – August 2010 Barack Obama Stephanie O'Sullivan February 18, 2011 – January 20, 2017 Barack Obama Vacant Donald Trump Director of the Intelligence Staff/Chief Management Officer Name Term of Office President(s) served under Ronald L. Burgess, Jr. May 2007 – February 2009 George W. Bush, Barack Obama John F. Kimmons February 2009 – October 2010 Barack Obama Mark Ewing November 2010 – present Barack Obama, Donald Trump Intelligence Community Inspector General Name Term of Office President(s) served under Charles McCullough November 2011 – present Barack Obama, Donald Trump Deputy Directors of National Intelligence Name Office Term of Office President(s) served under Robert Cardillo Intelligence Integration (oversees collection and analysis) September 2010 – October 2014 Barack Obama Peter Lavoy Analysis December 2008 – ??? George W. Bush Vacant Collection April 2010 – ??? Barack Obama David Shedd Policy, Plans and Requirements May 2007 – ??? George W. Bush Dawn Meyerriecks Acquisition and Technology September 2009 – ??? Barack Obama Dawn Eilenberger April 2017 – present Donald Trump Assistant Directors of National Intelligence Assistant Deputy Directors of National Intelligence Name Office Term of Office President(s) served under Deborah Kircher ADNI for Human Capital October 2011 – present Barack Obama Al Tarasiuk Intelligence Community Chief Information Officer February 2011 – present Barack Obama Marilyn A. Vacca Chief Financial Officer April 2009 – present Barack Obama L. Roger Mason, Jr. ADNI for Systems and Resource Analyses May 2009 – present Barack Obama Dawn Meyerriecks ADNI for Acquisition, Technology and Facilities ??? – present Barack Obama Name Office Term of Office President(s) served under Dan Butler Assistant Deputy Director for Open Source April 2008 – ??? George W. Bush, Barack Obama Andrew Hallman Assistant Deputy Director for Intelligence Integration September 2010 – present Barack Obama, Donald Trump Cultural references
  • The Office of Naval Intelligence from the Halo video game series shares a similar acronym, the variation being ONI, as opposed to DNI
See also
  • Title 32 of the CFR
  • Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity
  • Information Sharing Environment
  • Intellipedia
  • Joint Worldwide Intelligence Communications System (JWICS)
  • National Intelligence Coordination Center           
  • The National Security Act of 1947
  • Open source intelligence
  • United States Joint Intelligence Community Council
  • US intelligence community A-Space
References
  1. ^ "Executive Order 13470". Federal Register. National Archives and Records Administration. July 30, 2008. Retrieved November 22, 2016. 
  2. ^ "Bush Orders Intelligence Overhaul". The New York Times. Associated Press. July 31, 2008. 
  3. ^ Miller, Greg (May 21, 2010). "Dennis C. Blair to resign as Director of National Intelligence". Washington Post. Retrieved June 3, 2010. 
  4. ^ Kaplan, Fred (7 December 2004). "You Call That a Reform Bill?". Slate. 
  5. ^ "Robert M. Gates profile". Washington Post. November 8, 2006. Retrieved November 22, 2016. 
  6. ^ McCullagh, Declan (2007-08-24). "Feds use robots.txt files to stay invisible online. Lame.". CNET. Retrieved 2014-02-14. 
  7. ^ McCullagh, Declan (2007-09-07). "National Intelligence Web site no longer invisible to search engines". CNET. Retrieved 2014-02-14. 
  8. ^ "Auto generated robots.txt file in WordPress". Codegrad. February 10, 2013. Retrieved 2013-08-12. 
  9. ^ "Director of National Intelligence Moves Forward with Intelligence Reform" (PDF). ODNI News Release No. 20-07. DNI.gov. September 13, 2007. 
  10. ^ a b "Public Affairs Office, ODNI". Office of the Director of National Intelligence. ODNI. Retrieved 14 April 2013. 
  11. ^ "National Intelligence Program" (PDF). Budget for Fiscal Year 2013. US Government Publishing Office. p. 85. Retrieved 14 Apr 2013. 
  12. ^ "National Intelligence Program" (PDF). The Budget for Fiscal Year 2014. US Government Publishing Office. p. 75. Retrieved 14 April 2013. 
  13. ^ "DoD Releases MIP Base Request for FY 2014". Department of Defense. Retrieved 14 April 2013. 
  14. ^ Clark, Charles (September 2012). "Lifting the Lid". Government Executive. Retrieved 14 April 2013. 
  15. ^ "Designation of Officers of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence To Act as Director of National Intelligence". Federal Register. 78 FR 59159. 2013-09-25. Retrieved 2016-10-30. 
External links
  • Official website
  • The National Counterproliferation Center at the Wayback Machine (archived April 28, 2015)
  • The National Counterterrorism Center
  • The National Counterintelligence Executive
  • Program Manager for the Information Sharing Environment
  • Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004

Articles

  • U.S. News & World Report: First line of Defense: Inside the Efforts to Remake U.S. Intelligence
  • Fact Sheet: Real Progress in Reforming Intelligence
  • The Washington Post – December 29, 2006: DNI Awards $2 Million in Hush-Hush Money
  • The National Security Archive: From Director of Central Intelligence to Director of National Intelligence
  • U.S. National Intelligence: An Overview 2013
  • v
  • t
  • e
United States Intelligence Community Intelligence
Community Defense
  • Defense Intelligence Agency (Defense Clandestine Service • Defense Attaché System • National Intelligence University • Missile and Space Intelligence Center • National Center for Medical Intelligence • Joint Functional Component Command for Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance)
  • National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency
  • National Reconnaissance Office
  • National Security Agency (Central Security Service, Special Collection Service)
Armed Forces
  • Army Intelligence and Security Command
  • Marine Corps Intelligence
  • Office of Naval Intelligence
  • Twenty-Fifth Air Force
  • Coast Guard Intelligence (Homeland Security)
Civilian
  • Bureau of Intelligence and Research (State)
  • Central Intelligence Agency (Directorate of Operations • Special Activities Division • Open Source Center • Directorate of Science and Technology • CIA University)
  • Drug Enforcement Administration (Justice)
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation (Justice)
  • Office of Intelligence and Analysis (Homeland Security)
  • Office of Terrorism and Financial Intelligence (Treasury)
  • Office of Intelligence and Counterintelligence (Energy)
Director of
National
Intelligence
  • Director of National Intelligence
  • National Counterterrorism Center
  • National Counterproliferation Center
  • Office of the National Counterintelligence Executive
  • National Intelligence Council
  • Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity
  • Joint Intelligence Community Council
  • Chief Information Officer
Executive Office
of the President
  • National Security Advisor
  • National Security Council
  • President's Intelligence Advisory Board
  • Homeland Security Council
  • Homeland Security Advisor
  • President's Daily Brief
Other
  • Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence
  • Army Intelligence Support Activity
  • Joint Worldwide Intelligence Communications System
  • Intellipedia
Oversight
  • United States Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
  • United States House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence
  • United States Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court
Defunct
  • Contingency Fund for Foreign Intercourse
  • Counterintelligence Field Activity
  • Military Information Division
  • Military Intelligence Division
  • Military Intelligence Service
  • Office of Strategic Services
  • Office of Special Plans
  • Strategic Support Branch
  • v
  • t
  • e
United States Directors of National Intelligence
  • Negroponte
  • McConnell
  • Blair
  • Clapper
  • Coats
  • v
  • t
  • e
Defense Intelligence Agency Subordinate organizations
  • Defense Clandestine Service
  • Defense Attaché System
  • Defense Cover Office
  • Missile and Space Intelligence Center
  • National Center for Medical Intelligence
  • National Media Exploitation Center
  • Joint Intelligence Operations Center Europe Analytic Center/Joint Intelligence Center
  • National Intelligence University
  • Joint Functional Component Command for Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance
Projects, operations, and programs
  • Project Socrates
  • Stargate Project
  • Able Danger
  • Iraq Survey Group
  • Joint Worldwide Intelligence Communications System
  • Soviet Military Power
Oversight
  • United States Secretary of Defense
  • Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence
  • Military Intelligence Board
  • Director of National Intelligence
  • United States Intelligence Community
  • United States Department of Defense
  • SSCI
  • HPSCI
People
  • Robert McNamara
  • Directors
Facilities
  • Defense Intelligence Agency Headquarters
  • The Pentagon
  • DIA Memorial Wall
  • v
  • t
  • e
War on Terror
  • War in Afghanistan
  • Iraq War
  • War in North-West Pakistan
  • Symbolism of terrorism
Participants Operational
  • ISAF
  • Operation Enduring Freedom participants
  • Afghanistan
  • Northern Alliance
  • Iraq (Iraqi Armed Forces)
  • NATO
  • Pakistan
  • United Kingdom
  • United States
  • European Union
  • Philippines
  • Ethiopia
Targets
  • al-Qaeda
  • Osama bin Laden
  • al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula
  • Abu Sayyaf
  • Anwar al-Awlaki
  • Al-Shabaab
  • Harkat-ul-Jihad al-Islami
  • Hizbul Mujahideen
  • Islamic Courts Union
  • Jaish-e-Mohammed
  • Jemaah Islamiyah
  • Lashkar-e-Taiba
  • Taliban
  • Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan
Conflicts Operation
Enduring Freedom
  • War in Afghanistan
  • OEF – Philippines
  • Georgia Train and Equip Program
  • Georgia Sustainment and Stability
  • OEF – Horn of Africa
  • OEF – Trans Sahara
  • Drone strikes in Pakistan
Other
  • Operation Active Endeavour
  • Insurgency in the Maghreb (2002–present)
  • Insurgency in the North Caucasus
  • Moro conflict in the Philippines
  • Iraq War
  • Iraqi insurgency
  • Operation Linda Nchi
  • Terrorism in Saudi Arabia
  • War in North-West Pakistan
  • War in Somalia (2006–09)
  • 2007 Lebanon conflict
  • al-Qaeda insurgency in Yemen
See also
  • Abu Ghraib torture and prisoner abuse
  • Axis of evil
  • Black sites
  • Bush Doctrine
  • Clash of Civilizations
  • Cold War
  • Combatant Status Review Tribunal
  • Criticism of the War on Terror
  • Death of Osama bin Laden
  • Enhanced interrogation techniques
  • Torture Memos
  • Extrajudicial prisoners
  • Extraordinary rendition
  • Guantanamo Bay detention camp
  • Iranian Revolution
  • Islamism
  • Military Commissions Act of 2006
  • Terrorist Surveillance Program
  • Operation Noble Eagle
  • Operation Eagle Assist
  • Pakistan's role
  • President's Surveillance Program
  • Protect America Act of 2007
  • September 11 attacks
  • Targeted killing
  • Targeted Killing in International Law
  • Targeted Killings: Law and Morality in an Asymmetrical World
  • Unitary executive theory
  • Unlawful combatant
  • USA PATRIOT Act
  • Withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan
  • CAGE
  • Terrorism portal
  • War portal


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2017 U.S. Intelligence Community Worldwide Threat Assessment - Coats Testimony: Cyber Attacks, Islamic State, ISIS, ISIL, Counterintelligence, Syria, Nuclear ... Missiles, Russia, Iran, North Korea, China
2017 U.S. Intelligence Community Worldwide Threat Assessment - Coats Testimony: Cyber Attacks, Islamic State, ISIS, ISIL, Counterintelligence, Syria, Nuclear ... Missiles, Russia, Iran, North Korea, China
Director of National Intelligence Daniel R. Coats presented the 2017 annual U.S. intelligence community worldwide threat assessment in Congressional testimony on May 11, 2017. In the published report, Coats provides a thorough review of the status of possible threats from a wide variety of nations and terror groups. In addition to the 2017 assessment, this compilation includes the 2016 assessment for comparison and historical reference, plus important additional material, including the Report of the Select Committee on Intelligence, United States Senate, Covering the Period January 6, 2015 to January 2, 2017.Topics covered include:GLOBAL THREATS - Cyber Threat * Emerging and Disruptive Technologies * Terrorism * Weapons of Mass Destruction and Proliferation * Space and Counterspace * Counterintelligence * Transnational Organized Crime * Economics and Natural Resources * Human SecurityREGIONAL THREATS - East Asia * China * North Korea Southeast Asia * Russia and Eurasia * Russia * Ukraine, Moldova, and Belarus * The Caucasus and Central Asia * Europe * Key Partners * Turkey * Middle East and North Africa * Syria * Iraq * Iran * Yemen * South Asia * Afghanistan * Pakistan * India-Pakistan * Sub-Saharan Africa * South Sudan * Sudan * Nigeria * Sahel * Somalia * Ethiopia * Democratic Republic of the Congo * Western Hemisphere * Mexico * Central America * Colombia * Cuba * VenezuelaCoats reported: Our adversaries are becoming more adept at using cyberspace to threaten our interests and advance their own, and despite improving cyber defenses, nearly all information, communication networks, and systems will be at risk for years. Cyber threats are already challenging public trust and confidence in global institutions, governance, and norms, while imposing costs on the US and global economies. Cyber threats also pose an increasing risk to public health, safety, and prosperity as cyber technologies are integrated with critical infrastructure in key sectors. These threats are amplified by our ongoing delegation of decisionmaking, sensing, and authentication roles to potentially vulnerable automated systems. This delegation increases the likely physical, economic, and psychological consequences of cyber attack and exploitation events when they do occur. Many countries view cyber capabilities as a viable tool for projecting their influence and will continue developing cyber capabilities. Some adversaries also remain undeterred from conducting reconnaissance, espionage, influence, and even attacks in cyberspace.

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