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Doug Pederson
Douglas Irving Pederson (born January 31, 1968) is an American football coach who is currently the head coach of the Philadelphia Eagles of the National

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Not to be confused with Doug Peterson. Doug Pederson Pederson in 2016Philadelphia EaglesPosition: Head coachPersonal informationBorn: (1968-01-31) January 31, 1968 (age 50)
Bellingham, WashingtonHeight: 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)Weight: 221 lb (100 kg)Career informationHigh school: Ferndale (WA)College: Northeast LouisianaUndrafted: 1991Career history As player:
  • Miami Dolphins (1991)*
  • New York/New Jersey Knights (1992)
  • Miami Dolphins (1992–1994)
  • Carolina Panthers (1995)*
  • Rhein Fire (1995)
  • Miami Dolphins (1995)
  • Green Bay Packers (1995–1998)
  • Philadelphia Eagles (1999)
  • Cleveland Browns (2000)
  • Green Bay Packers (2001–2004)
 * Offseason and/or practice squad member onlyAs coach:
  • Calvary Baptist Academy (2005–2008)
    Head coach
  • Philadelphia Eagles (2009–2010)
    Offensive quality control coordinator
  • Philadelphia Eagles (2011–2012)
    Quarterbacks coach
  • Kansas City Chiefs (2013–2015)
    Offensive coordinator
  • Philadelphia Eagles (2016–present)
    Head coach
Career highlights and awards

As player

  • Super Bowl champion (XXXI)

As coach

  • Super Bowl champion (LII)
Career NFL statistics Pass attempts: 522Pass completions: 286Percentage: 54.7TD–INT: 12–19Passing yards: 2,762Passer rating: 62.3 Player stats at NFL.comHead coaching recordRegular season: 21–12 (.636)Postseason: 3–0 (1.000)Career: 24–12 (.667) Coaching stats at PFR

Douglas Irving Pederson (born January 31, 1968) is an American football coach who is currently the head coach of the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League (NFL). He served as the offensive coordinator of the Kansas City Chiefs from 2013–2015. He spent most of his playing career as a member of the Green Bay Packers, serving as a backup quarterback to Brett Favre and holder on placekicks, and winning Super Bowl XXXI with the team over the New England Patriots. He was also a backup to Dan Marino as a member of the Miami Dolphins, and a starting quarterback for the Eagles and Cleveland Browns.

In his second season as the Eagles' head coach, Pederson won Super Bowl LII (also against the Patriots), marking the first Super Bowl title in franchise history. He also became just the fourth person, after Mike Ditka, Tom Flores and Tony Dungy to win a Super Bowl as both a player and head coach.[1]

Contents
  • 1 Playing career
    • 1.1 Early years
    • 1.2 Professional
      • 1.2.1 Miami Dolphins
      • 1.2.2 First stint with Packers
      • 1.2.3 Philadelphia Eagles
      • 1.2.4 Cleveland Browns
      • 1.2.5 Green Bay Packers (second stint)
  • 2 Coaching career
    • 2.1 High School
      • 2.1.1 Calvary Baptist Academy
    • 2.2 NFL
      • 2.2.1 Philadelphia Eagles
      • 2.2.2 Kansas City Chiefs
      • 2.2.3 Return to Philadelphia
    • 2.3 Coaching tree
  • 3 Personal life
  • 4 Head coaching record
  • 5 References
  • 6 External links
Playing career Early years

Pederson was born in Bellingham, Washington, in 1968. He attended Ferndale High School in nearby Ferndale, Washington, and was an All-State selection in football, basketball, and baseball. After high school he graduated from Northeast Louisiana University, where he was quarterback from 1987 through 1990.[2] He still holds multiple passing records at the school.[3]

Professional Miami Dolphins

Pederson originally signed as a rookie free agent by the Miami Dolphins on May 1, 1991,[4] out of Northeast Louisiana University (now University of Louisiana at Monroe) in Monroe, Louisiana.[5] He was waived on August 17, 1991, before the start of the regular season.[6] After spending the 1991 season as a free agent, the New York/New Jersey Knights of the World League of American Football (WLAF) drafted him in the fifth round for the first pool of draft-eligible players on February 4, 1992. The second pool, which was drafted from on February 20, consisted of players allocated by NFL teams to the league.[7] He was the backup quarterback to Reggie Slack with the Knights from March to May 1992.[8]

After the WLAF season finished, he was re-signed by the Dolphins on June 2, 1992.[9] Pederson spent 1992 training camp with the Dolphins, before being released during final roster cuts again. He was subsequently re-signed to the team's practice squad, where he practiced on the scout team until he was waived on October 8, 1992.[10] He was re-signed by the Dolphins after the season on March 3, 1993.[11] After his third training camp with the Dolphins, he was waived again on August 31, 1993.[12] For the second consecutive season, Pederson was re-signed to the team's practice squad, on September 1, 1993.[13] Dan Marino, the Dolphins' starting quarterback since 1983, ruptured his Achilles' tendon in a week 6 game against the Cleveland Browns on October 10, 1993, forcing backup Scott Mitchell to replace him. Pederson replaced Marino on the active roster, and served as Mitchell's backup for the next four games. Pederson made his NFL debut on October 24, 1993, in a week 8 game against the Indianapolis Colts.[14] He helped head coach Don Shula win his NFL-record 325th victory as a coach when Mitchell suffered a separated shoulder in a week 11 game against the Philadelphia Eagles on November 14, 1993.[15] In that record breaking game for Coach Shula, Pederson entered in the 3rd quarter of the game and went 3 for 6 for 34 yards, and completed several crucial 3rd downs.[16][17] Pederson was able to steer the Dolphins to the win. Pederson also served as the backup to recently acquired Steve DeBerg for the three games Mitchell missed with injury. He briefly entered a week 14 game against the New York Giants while DeBerg was receiving stitches on his face.[18] Mitchell returned as the Dolphins' starter after week 15, and Pederson was released in favor of backup DeBerg and third-string quarterback Hugh Millen on December 16, 1993.[19] Pederson re-signed with the Dolphins on April 16, 1994, after the season ended.[20] He spent the entire 1994 season on the Dolphins' active roster as the third-string quarterback behind Marino and Bernie Kosar. On February 15, 1995, Pederson was selected by the Carolina Panthers in the twenty-second round of the NFL Expansion Draft,[21] after being placed on the Dolphins' available players list on January 19,[22] but was released on May 24, 1995.[23] He returned to the World League after his release, playing with Rhein Fire. Pederson re-signed with the Dolphins again in June 1995.[24] After competing with Dan McGwire throughout training camp, Pederson was waived on August 22, 1995.[25] Marino suffered a knee injury during a week 6 game,[26] so Pederson was re-signed on October 10 to serve as the third quarterback behind Kosar and McGwire for the next two games.[27] He was released again after Marino returned for week 9 on October 24.[28]

First stint with Packers

Pederson worked out for the Green Bay Packers following week 10 in 1995, due to a season-ending injury suffered by backup Ty Detmer and a minor injury sustained by starter Brett Favre. Third-string quarterback T. J. Rubley was forced to play in week 10 and threw a game-ending interception after calling an audible, going against head coach Mike Holmgren's playcall. The Packers signed Bob Gagliano to serve as the third-stringer quarterback for weeks 11 and 12.[29] Pederson replaced Gagliano as the third-string quarterback when he signed with the Packers on November 22, 1995.[30] The Packers claimed Jim McMahon off waivers from the Browns to serve as Favre's backup ahead of Pederson and Rubley on November 29, 1995.[31] Rubley was waived on December 13, leaving McMahon and Pederson as Favre's backups.[32] Favre did not miss any games, so Pederson did not see any game action for the Packers in 1995. Pederson served as the third quarterback behind Favre and McMahon in 1996, playing in one game but recorded no statistics. He received a Super Bowl ring following the Packers' win over the Patriots in Super Bowl XXXI. He re-signed with the Packers with a two-year contract on February 20, 1997.[33] Pederson was again the third quarterback throughout 1997, backing up Favre and Steve Bono. Pederson beat out Rick Mirer for the backup job to Favre, as well as the primary placekick holder job, in 1998. In a week 5 loss to the Minnesota Vikings, Pederson replaced Favre in the last five minutes of a blowout game, and threw two touchdowns in his place. However, Pederson suffered a broken jaw that knocked him out for the team's next four games.[34][35]

Philadelphia Eagles

Pederson signed a three-year, $4.5 million contract with the Philadelphia Eagles on February 18, 1999, to become the team's starting quarterback under new head coach Andy Reid, who was Pederson's quarterbacks coach in Green Bay from 1997–1998.[36] The Eagles drafted Donovan McNabb with the second overall pick in the 1999 NFL Draft in April 1999, and Reid said Pederson would remain the starter until McNabb was ready to play.[37] In his nine starts for the Eagles, Pederson had a 2–7 record, a 51.6% completion rate, 1,168 passing yards, six touchdowns, and nine interceptions. In his first career start, a week 1 game against the Arizona Cardinals, Pederson threw two touchdowns in the first quarter to help give the Eagles a 21–0 lead. The Cardinals came back, however, and won the game on a field goal as time expired, 25–24. Pederson went 12-for-25 for 91 yards and two touchdowns in the game.[38] McNabb replaced Pederson, who suffered a bruised throwing shoulder, after one half in a week 2 loss to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, in which Pederson went 12-of-19 for 100 yards and an interception.[39] Pederson started a week 3 shutout loss (26–0) to the Buffalo Bills, going 14-of-26 for 137 yards and two lost fumbles, before being replaced by McNabb again in the fourth quarter.[40] In a week 4 loss to the New York Giants, Pederson went 6-for-15 for 75 yards and two interceptions before being replaced by McNabb after halftime.[41] Pederson's first NFL win came in week 5 in a game against the Dallas Cowboys. He played the entire game, going 11-of-29 for 145 yards, one touchdown, and one interception.[42] Pederson played the entirety of the next three games, posting a 1–2 record while throwing three touchdowns and three interceptions. In his final start as an Eagle, Pederson was benched at halftime of a week 9 game against the Carolina Panthers after going 3-of-9 for 28 yards and being down 23–0. He did not see game action at quarterback again until a week 14 game against the Cowboys in which McNabb suffered an injury in the fourth quarter. Pederson went 8-for-12 for 108 yards and a touchdown in the loss, and Koy Detmer received the start ahead of him in week 15 with McNabb still injured. After spending the next season's training camp with the team, the Eagles released Pederson on August 28, 2000.[43]

Cleveland Browns

Pederson considered retirement after being released by the Eagles, but instead signed a two-year contract with the Cleveland Browns on September 2, 2000.[44] The Browns' backup, Ty Detmer, suffered a season-ending injury, and the Browns needed a backup quarterback to starter Tim Couch. This was the second time in Pederson's career that he was signed to replace an injured Ty Detmer. Pederson started as the third quarterback behind Couch and Spergon Wynn, until Couch suffered a season-ending injury in week 7. Pederson started the next six games, posting a 1–5 record. In a week 13 game against the Baltimore Ravens, he was knocked out of the game with bruised ribs and replaced with Wynn. Wynn started the next week against the Jacksonville Jaguars, but he suffered a season-ending injury and Pederson replaced him.[45] Pederson returned for the final two games of the season, losing both, including a 35–24 loss to his former team, the Eagles, and a 24–0 shutout loss to the Tennessee Titans. Pederson was released after the season on February 22, 2001.[28]

Green Bay Packers (second stint)

The Packers re-signed Pederson to a one-year contract on March 13, 2001, to replace backup Matt Hasselbeck, who was traded to the Seattle Seahawks.[46] Pederson was the primary backup to Favre for the entire 2001 season, and was the primary placekick holder in every game. He was re-signed to a one-year, $650,000 contract with the Packers on April 2, 2002. Pederson again was the backup quarterback and primary holder in all 16 games in 2002. In a week 7 game against the Washington Redskins, Favre suffered a sprained knee and Pederson took most of the snaps in the second half, going 9-for-15 for 78 yards to help win the game 30–9. Pederson also played in games against the Miami Dolphins, Detroit Lions, and New York Jets. He re-signed with the Packers to a one-year, $750,000 contract on April 29, 2003.[47] For the third consecutive season, Pederson backed up Favre in all 16 games and held placekicks. He completed both of his passes during the regular season for a total of 16 yards. The Packers re-signed Pederson to a one-year contract on April 28, 2004.[48] Tim Couch was signed to compete for the backup quarterback job, but lost out to Pederson and was released on September 5, 2004.[49] In a week 3 game against the Indianapolis Colts, Pederson replaced Favre in a blowout loss and went 4-of-6 for 34 yards and an interception. The next week, a week 4 game against the New York Giants, Favre sustained a concussion in the third quarter, and Pederson replaced him at quarterback. Pederson went 7-of-17 for 86 yards and an interception in the loss before he suffered a hit to his side in the third quarter that resulted in a cracked bone in his back, a torn muscle in his side, and a broken rib.[50] He stayed in the game up until the last snap, when he was replaced by third-string quarterback Craig Nall. Pederson was placed on injured reserve on October 7, ending his season.[51] He retired in March 2005 to become a head coach at Calvary Baptist Academy.[52]

Coaching career High School Calvary Baptist Academy

After his retirement, Pederson was hired as head football coach of Calvary Baptist Academy, a private Christian high school in Shreveport, Louisiana.[52] Calvary was going into its second year as a program when Pederson signed on in March 2005.

Pederson was the head coach at Calvary for four years, and held a 33–7 record in the regular season and an 8–3 record in the post-season. The Cavaliers were in the state playoffs all four years with Pederson as head coach. In his first season in 2005, the Cavaliers went 5–6 and lost in the first round of the state playoffs.[53] In 2007, he led the Cavaliers to the semi-finals and to their first district title.

NFL Philadelphia Eagles

On January 29, 2009, Pederson was hired as the offensive quality control coach for the Philadelphia Eagles, reuniting him with his former head coach, Andy Reid.[54] He was promoted to quarterbacks coach on February 8, 2011, replacing James Urban, who was promoted to assistant offensive coordinator.[55]

Kansas City Chiefs

On January 11, 2013, Pederson followed Andy Reid to the Kansas City Chiefs to serve as offensive coordinator.[56]

Return to Philadelphia

On January 18, 2016, Pederson was hired as head coach of the Eagles replacing Chip Kelly.[57] Despite having Sam Bradford on the roster as the starting quarterback, the Eagles drafted Carson Wentz with the second overall pick in 2016. Right before the 2016 season began, Bradford was traded to the Minnesota Vikings and Wentz was named the starting quarterback as a rookie. Pederson and Wentz won their first three NFL games together, but finished the season 7–9, missing the playoffs.

Pederson's second season was much more successful as he led the Eagles to a 13-3 record, winning them the NFC East division championship and allotting them home-field advantage throughout the playoffs. Wentz, who was having a career year and was considered a front runner for league MVP, tore his ACL in Week 14, leaving backup Nick Foles with the starting job for the remainder of the year. Despite becoming major playoff underdogs due to the loss of Wentz, Foles filled in admirably as the starter, allowing Philadelphia to make it to Super Bowl LII, their first Super Bowl appearance since the 2004 season. Eventual Super Bowl MVP Foles led the team in a 41-33 win over the New England Patriots, giving them their first Lombardi Trophy in franchise history and their first league championship since 1960.

On May 3, 2018, it was reported the Philadelphia Eagles picked up Pederson's 5th year option, allowing him to coach the team through 2020.

On August 5, 2018, it was reported the Philadelphia Eagles extended his contract to 2022. [58]

Coaching tree

NFL head coaches under whom Pederson has served:

  • Andy Reid, Philadelphia Eagles (2009–2012) Kansas City Chiefs (2013–2015)

Assistant coaches under Pederson who have become NFL head coaches:

  • Frank Reich, Indianapolis Colts (2018–present)[59]
Personal life

Pederson was born to Teri (née Boykin) and Gordon "Gordy" Pederson (1939–2016)[60] on January 31, 1968, in Bellingham, Washington. A devout Christian[61], Pederson and his wife Jeannie have three sons.[62] Pederson lives in Moorestown, New Jersey.[63][64]

Head coaching record Team Year Regular season Postseason Won Lost Ties Win % Finish Won Lost Win % Result PHI 2016 7 9 0 .438 4th in NFC East — — — — PHI 2017 13 3 0 .813 1st in NFC East 3 0 1.000 Won Super Bowl LII PHI 2018 1 0 0 1.000 1st in NFC East — — — — Total 21 12 0 .636 3 0 1.000 References
  1. ^ Cahill, Dan (January 25, 2016). "Ron Rivera could become one of four to win Super Bowl as player and coach". chicago.suntimes.com. Retrieved February 19, 2018. 
  2. ^ McCallister, Laura (January 11, 2013). "Andy Reid fills out coaching staff, including coordinators". KCTV-TV website. Retrieved January 12, 2013. 
  3. ^ "ULM Football Records." 2008 ULM Warhawks Football Media Guide. Retrieved on September 7, 2008.
  4. ^ "Transactions". The Dispatch. 1991-05-01. Retrieved 2010-02-28. 
  5. ^ "Doug Pederson". Pro Football Reference. Retrieved 2010-02-28. 
  6. ^ Mayo, Michael (August 17, 1991). "Brown On Leave But Robbie Is, Too". Sun-Sentinel. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
  7. ^ Smith, Timothy W. (February 5, 1992). "Football; World League Kicks Off Its Talent Hunt for 1992". The New York Times. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
  8. ^ Smith, Timothy W. (May 17, 1992). "Football; Knights Do Their Part but Can't Gain Playoff Berth". The New York Times. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
  9. ^ "Transactions". The Dispatch. June 2, 1992. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
  10. ^ "Transactions". The New York Times. October 8, 1992. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
  11. ^ "Sports Today". The Buffalo News. March 3, 1993. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
  12. ^ "Transactions". The New York Times. August 31, 1993. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
  13. ^ "Transactions". The New York Times. September 1, 1993. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
  14. ^ "Doug Pederson". NFL.com. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
  15. ^ George, Thomas (November 15, 1993). "Pro Football; No. 325: Shula Rides the Shoulders". The New York Times. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
  16. ^ "Doug Pederson: Game Logs at NFL.com". www.nfl.com. Retrieved 21 February 2018. 
  17. ^ "FINS FLASHBACK: Coach Shula Wins 325". Retrieved 21 February 2018. 
  18. ^ Freeman, Mike (December 6, 1993). "Pro Football; Finally, Giants Get Some Respect". The New York Times. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
  19. ^ Cole, Jason (December 16, 1993). "Pederson, Humphrey Are Dolphins No More". Sun-Sentinel. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
  20. ^ "Transactions". The New York Times. April 16, 1994. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
  21. ^ "Expansion Draft". panthers.com. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
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  23. ^ "Capers makes first big roster cuts". Star-News. May 24, 1995. Retrieved 2010-02-28. 
  24. ^ Calkins, Geoff (June 7, 1995). "Kicker, Safety Contracts Extended". Sun-Sentinel. 
  25. ^ Calkins, Geoff (August 22, 1995). "It's McGwire: Pederson Loses No. 3 QB Spot". Sun-Sentinel. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
  26. ^ Cole, Jason (October 10, 1995). "Marino To Miss A Game Or 2". Sun-Sentinel. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
  27. ^ "Checkpoint Was Sore Spot to Chief Fans". The Los Angeles Times. October 11, 1995. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
  28. ^ a b "Transactions". The New York Times. February 23, 2001. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
  29. ^ Plaschke, Bill (November 11, 1995). "Any Old Joe Could Start For Packers This Week". The Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
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  31. ^ "McMahon Joins the Packers". The New York Times. November 29, 1995. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
  32. ^ "Rubley, Former Ram, Waived by Packers". The Los Angeles Times. December 13, 1995. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
  33. ^ "Thursday's Transactions". Laurel Leader. February 21, 1997. Retrieved 2017-08-06. (subscription required)
  34. ^ Pierson, Don (October 6, 1998). "Vikings 37, Packers 24". The Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
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  37. ^ "McNabb Signed but Not in Uniform". The New York Times. August 1, 1999. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
  38. ^ Kinney, David (September 12, 1999). "Jacke's 4th Field Goal Gives Cardinals 25–24 Win". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
  39. ^ Berger, Ken (September 19, 1999). "Bucaneers Pound Philadelphia in McNabb's Debut". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
  40. ^ Porter, Bill (September 26, 1999). "Bills Bury Punchless Eagles, 26–0". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
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  45. ^ "Big Fine Surprises Steeler". The New York Times. December 9, 2000. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
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  47. ^ "Packers Re-Sign QB Doug Pederson". packers.com. April 29, 2003. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
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  49. ^ "Packers cut former No. 1 pick Tim Couch". ESPN.com. September 5, 2004. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
  50. ^ Stapleton, Arnie (October 4, 2004). "Packers Suffer A Giant Loss". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
  51. ^ "Packers Re-sign Smith, Place Pederson On I.R, Sign Millhouse To Practice Squad". packers.com. October 7, 2004. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
  52. ^ a b Fedotin, Jeff (2006-08-25). "Using Lessons He Learned Backing Up Favre, Pederson Coaches High Schoolers". Green Bay Packers. Archived from the original on August 27, 2009. Retrieved 2010-02-28. 
  53. ^ "The History of Calvary Baptist Academy". cavsfootball.com. 2007. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
  54. ^ "Eagles bring back ex-QB Pederson". ESPN. Associated Press. 2009-01-30. Retrieved 2010-02-28. 
  55. ^ "2011 Coaching Staff Complete". Philadelphiaeagles.com. 2011-02-08. Retrieved 2011-02-08. 
  56. ^ "Chiefs hire Doug Pederson and Bob Sutton as Coordinators". nfl.com. 2013-01-11. Retrieved 2013-01-11. 
  57. ^ Sheridan, Phil (January 18, 2016). "Doug Pederson announced as Eagles coach". ESPN.com. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
  58. ^ "Eagles pick up Doug Pederson's contract option". NFL.com. Retrieved 2018-05-03. 
  59. ^ Wells, Mike (11 February 2018). "Eagles OC Frank Reich named new Colts coach". ESPN. Retrieved 11 February 2018. 
  60. ^ "Gordon "Gordy" Pederson". Legacy.com. September 29, 2016. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
  61. ^ "Eagles head coach Doug Pederson gives glory to God, says his faith keeps him grounded". 
  62. ^ McLane, Jeff (September 11, 2016). "Pederson goes on without his first mentor – his late father". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved 2017-08-06. 
  63. ^ Cuellar, Dann. "Doug Pedersons' neighbors ready to welcome him back home", WPVI-TV, January 19, 2016. Accessed November 29, 2017. "New Philadelphia Eagles head coach Doug Pederson and his family are excited about moving back to the area.... Before moving to Kansas City in 2011, the Pederson family lived on a cul-de-sac in the unit block of Hamilton Court in Moorestown, New Jersey."
  64. ^ "NFL Cribs: Where Do the Highest-Flying Philadelphia Eagles Choose to Nest?". Retrieved 22 May 2018. 
External links
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  • 59 Wayne Simmons
  • 62 Marco Rivera
  • 63 Adam Timmerman
  • 64 Bruce Wilkerson
  • 65 Lindsay Knapp
  • 67 Jeff Dellenbach
  • 68 Gary Brown
  • 71 Santana Dotson
  • 72 Earl Dotson
  • 73 Aaron Taylor
  • 75 Ken Ruettgers
  • 77 John Michels
  • 80 Derrick Mayes
  • 81 Desmond Howard (MVP)
  • 82 Don Beebe
  • 83 Jeff Thomason
  • 84 Andre Rison
  • 85 Terry Mickens
  • 86 Antonio Freeman
  • 87 Robert Brooks
  • 88 Keith Jackson
  • 89 Mark Chmura
  • 90 Darius Holland
  • 91 Shannon Clavelle
  • 92 Reggie White
  • 93 Gilbert Brown
  • 94 Bob Kuberski
  • 95 Keith McKenzie
  • 96 Sean Jones
  • 98 Gabe Wilkins
  • Head coach: Mike Holmgren
  • Coaches: Larry Brooks
  • Nolan Cromwell
  • Gil Haskell
  • Johnny Holland
  • Sherman Lewis
  • Jim Lind
  • Tom Lovat
  • Marty Mornhinweg
  • Andy Reid
  • Gary Reynolds
  • Fritz Shurmur
  • Harry Sydney
  • Bob Valesente
  • v
  • t
  • e
Philadelphia Eagles Super Bowl LII champions
  • 4 Jake Elliott
  • 6 Caleb Sturgis
  • 7 Nate Sudfeld
  • 8 Donnie Jones
  • 9 Nick Foles (MVP)
  • 10 Mack Hollins
  • 11 Carson Wentz
  • 13 Nelson Agholor
  • 14 Marcus Johnson
  • 16 Bryce Treggs
  • 17 Alshon Jeffery
  • 18 Shelton Gibson
  • 19 Rashard Davis
  • 21 Patrick Robinson
  • 22 Sidney Jones
  • 23 Rodney McLeod
  • 24 Corey Graham
  • 26 Jaylen Watkins
  • 27 Malcolm Jenkins
  • 28 Wendell Smallwood
  • 29 LeGarrette Blount
  • 30 Corey Clement
  • 31 Jalen Mills
  • 32 Rasul Douglas
  • 33 De'Vante Bausby
  • 34 Donnel Pumphrey
  • 35 D. J. Killings
  • 36 Jay Ajayi
  • 37 Randall Goforth
  • 38 Kenjon Barner
  • 39 Harold Jones-Quartey
  • 41 Ronald Darby
  • 42 Chris Maragos
  • 43 Darren Sproles
  • 45 Rick Lovato
  • 47 Nathan Gerry
  • 49 Tre Sullivan
  • 50 Bryan Braman
  • 51 Steven Means
  • 52 Najee Goode
  • 53 Nigel Bradham
  • 54 Kamu Grugier-Hill
  • 55 Brandon Graham
  • 56 Chris Long
  • 57 Dannell Ellerbe
  • 58 Jordan Hicks
  • 59 Joe Walker
  • 61 Stefen Wisniewski
  • 62 Jason Kelce
  • 65 Lane Johnson
  • 66 Will Beatty
  • 67 Chance Warmack
  • 68 Josh Andrews
  • 71 Jason Peters
  • 72 Halapoulivaati Vaitai
  • 73 Isaac Seumalo
  • 75 Vinny Curry
  • 78 Darrell Greene
  • 79 Brandon Brooks
  • 82 Torrey Smith
  • 84 Dom Williams
  • 85 Billy Brown
  • 86 Zach Ertz
  • 87 Brent Celek
  • 88 Trey Burton
  • 89 Greg Ward Jr.
  • 90 Aziz Shittu
  • 91 Fletcher Cox
  • 93 Timmy Jernigan
  • 94 Beau Allen
  • 95 Mychal Kendricks
  • 96 Derek Barnett
  • 97 Destiny Vaeao
  • 98 Elijah Qualls
  • Head coach: Doug Pederson
  • Coaches:
  • Eugene Chung
  • Phillip Daniels
  • John DeFilippo
  • Dave Fipp
  • Ken Flajole
  • Keith Gray
  • Mike Groh
  • Matthew Harper
  • Tim Hauck
  • Josh Hingst
  • Shaun Huls
  • Trent Miles
  • Ryan Paganetti
  • T. J. Paganetti
  • Justin Peelle
  • Spencer Phillips
  • Frank Reich
  • Jim Schwartz
  • Duce Staley
  • Jeff Stoutland
  • Press Taylor
  • Cory Undlin
  • Dino Vasso
  • Chris Wilson
  • v
  • t
  • e
Philadelphia Eagles starting quarterbacks
  • Red Kirkman (1933–1935)
  • Jim Leonard (1934, 1936)
  • Stumpy Thomason (1935)
  • Irv Kupcinet (1935)
  • Glenn Frey (1936–1937)
  • Jess Dow (1938–1939)
  • Davey O'Brien (1939–1940)
  • Len Barnum (1941)
  • Tommy Thompson (1941–1942, 1946–1950)
  • Foster Watkins (1941)
  • Roy Zimmerman (1943–1946)
  • Allie Sherman (1945)
  • Bill Mackrides (1948)
  • Jack Myers (1948)
  • Adrian Burk (1951–1956)
  • Bobby Thomason (1952–1957)
  • Sonny Jurgensen (1957, 1961–1963)
  • Norm Van Brocklin (1958–1960)
  • King Hill (1962–1966, 1968)
  • Norm Snead (1964–1970)
  • Jack Concannon (1964, 1966)
  • John Huarte (1968)
  • George Mira (1969)
  • Rick Arrington (1970–1971)
  • Pete Liske (1971–1972)
  • John Reaves (1972)
  • Roman Gabriel (1973–1976)
  • Mike Boryla (1974–1976)
  • Ron Jaworski (1977–1986)
  • Joe Pisarcik (1984)
  • Randall Cunningham (1985–1995)
  • Matt Cavanaugh (1986)
  • Scott Tinsley (1987)
  • Guido Merkens (1987)
  • Jim McMahon (1991–1992)
  • Jeff Kemp (1991)
  • Brad Goebel (1991)
  • Bubby Brister (1993–1994)
  • Ken O'Brien (1993)
  • Rodney Peete (1995–1998)
  • Ty Detmer (1996–1997)
  • Bobby Hoying (1997–1998)
  • Koy Detmer (1998–1999, 2002, 2004)
  • Doug Pederson (1999)
  • Donovan McNabb (1999–2009)
  • A. J. Feeley (2002, 2007)
  • Mike McMahon (2005)
  • Jeff Garcia (2006)
  • Kevin Kolb (2009–2010)
  • Michael Vick (2010–2013)
  • Vince Young (2011)
  • Nick Foles (2012–2014, 2017–present)
  • Mark Sanchez (2014–2015)
  • Sam Bradford (2015)
  • Carson Wentz (2016–2017)
  • v
  • t
  • e
Cleveland Browns starting quarterbacks
  • Cliff Lewis (1946–1947, 1949)
  • Otto Graham (1946–1955)
  • George Ratterman (1953–1956)
  • Babe Parilli (1956)
  • Tommy O'Connell (1956–1957)
  • Milt Plum (1957–1961)
  • Len Dawson (1961)
  • Jim Ninowski (1962–1963, 1965)
  • Frank Ryan (1962–1968)
  • Gary Lane (1967)
  • Bill Nelsen (1968–1972)
  • Mike Phipps (1970–1976)
  • Don Gault (1970)
  • Brian Sipe (1974–1983)
  • Will Cureton (1975)
  • Dave Mays (1977)
  • Terry Luck (1977)
  • Paul McDonald (1982–1984)
  • Gary Danielson (1985–1988)
  • Bernie Kosar (1985–1993)
  • Jeff Christensen (1987)
  • Mike Pagel (1988, 1990)
  • Don Strock (1988)
  • Mike Tomczak (1992)
  • Todd Philcox (1992–1993)
  • Vinny Testaverde (1993–1995)
  • Mark Rypien (1994)
  • Eric Zeier (1995)
  • Ty Detmer (1999)
  • Tim Couch (1999–2003)
  • Doug Pederson (2000)
  • Spergon Wynn (2000)
  • Kelly Holcomb (2002–2004)
  • Jeff Garcia (2004)
  • Luke McCown (2004)
  • Trent Dilfer (2005)
  • Charlie Frye (2005–2007)
  • Derek Anderson (2006–2009)
  • Brady Quinn (2008–2009)
  • Ken Dorsey (2008)
  • Bruce Gradkowski (2008)
  • Jake Delhomme (2010)
  • Seneca Wallace (2010–2011)
  • Colt McCoy (2010–2011)
  • Brandon Weeden (2012–2013)
  • Thad Lewis (2012)
  • Brian Hoyer (2013–2014)
  • Jason Campbell (2013)
  • Johnny Manziel (2014–2015)
  • Connor Shaw (2014)
  • Josh McCown (2015–2016)
  • Austin Davis (2015)
  • Robert Griffin III (2016)
  • Cody Kessler (2016)
  • DeShone Kizer (2017)
  • Kevin Hogan (2017)
  • Tyrod Taylor (2018–present)
  • v
  • t
  • e
Philadelphia Eagles head coaches
  • Lud Wray (1933–1935)
  • Bert Bell (1936–1940)
  • Greasy Neale (1941–1950)
  • Bo McMillin (1951)
  • Wayne Millner # (1951)
  • Jim Trimble (1952–1955)
  • Hugh Devore (1956–1957)
  • Buck Shaw (1958–1960)
  • Nick Skorich (1961–1963)
  • Joe Kuharich (1964–1968)
  • Jerry Williams (1969–1971)
  • Ed Khayat (1971–1972)
  • Mike McCormack (1973–1975)
  • Dick Vermeil (1976–1982)
  • Marion Campbell (1983–1985)
  • Fred Bruney # (1985)
  • Buddy Ryan (1986–1990)
  • Rich Kotite (1991–1994)
  • Ray Rhodes (1995–1998)
  • Andy Reid (1999–2012)
  • Chip Kelly (2013–2015)
  • Pat Shurmur # (2015)
  • Doug Pederson (2016– )

# denotes interim head coach



Fearless: How an Underdog Becomes a Champion
Fearless: How an Underdog Becomes a Champion
NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLERHow does an underdog become a champion? One of the most innovative, gutsy, and dynamic head coaches in the NFL reveals the strategies behind building the Eagles team that shocked the world by winning the Super Bowl. Doug Pederson is the very definition of an underdog. He was an undrafted rookie free agent who would go on to play fourteen years in the NFL as a backup quarterback. He was cut five times, yet kept getting back up and into the fray. He would win one Super Bowl, with the Green Bay Packers. When he retired, he decided to coach, but not at the pro level. Instead, he was head coach of Calvary Baptist Academy in Shreveport, Louisiana. After a successful four-year stint there, he returned to the NFL as an assistant coach under Andy Reid with the Eagles and the Kansas City Chiefs, where he was instrumental in the development of quarterback Alex Smith and his string of 3,000-plus-yard seasons of passing. When he was offered the job as head coach of the Eagles, he jumped at it, though few thought he would succeed. In the first season, a year of rebuilding, they finished 7-9. Some doubted his abilities, and before the 2017 season, one "expert" called Pederson the least qualified coach in thirty years. Plagued by the sidelining of seasoned players and devastated by quarterback Carson Wentz's season-ending knee injury, the Eagles managed a 13-3 record and home-field advantage in the playoffs. Yet they were still the underdogs in every single game, including the Super Bowl, against the New England Patriots, one of the greatest dynasties in the history of the NFL. It wasn't until they stunned the Patriots that people finally believed in Pederson and his team. In Fearless, Pederson reveals the principles that guided him through the ups and downs and tough times of his career, and what it took to become a champion. Through it all, Pederson sustained himself with his faith and the support of his family. He shares the defining stories of his life and career, growing up with his disciplinarian Air Force dad and his tender-hearted mom, developing friendships with Dan Marino and Brett Favre, and learning from mentors, such as Don Shula, Mike Holmgren, and Andy Reid, who helped mold him into the man and coach he is today. Fearless captures Pederson's coaching and leadership philosophies and reveals the brilliant mind and indomitable spirit of a man who has entered the pantheon of great coaches.

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$16.48
-$11.52(-41%)



Believe It: My Journey of Success, Failure, and Overcoming the Odds
Believe It: My Journey of Success, Failure, and Overcoming the Odds
*New York Times Bestseller*Get ready to defy the odds when everyone’s counting you out.When the Philadelphia Eagles’ starting quarterback went down with a torn ACL in week 14 of the 2017 NFL season, many fans―and commentators―assumed the Eagles’ season was over.Instead, Nick Foles came off the bench and, against all odds, led the Eagles to their first Super Bowl victory in history.How did Nick get it done―winning MVP honors, silencing the critics, and shocking the world? How did the man who was on the verge of retiring just two seasons earlier stay optimistic and rally the team to an astounding win? How did he stay ready despite numerous trades and discouraging injuries, able to step up in the moment and perform at the top of his game?Believe It offers a behind-the-scenes look at Nick’s unlikely path to the Super Bowl, the obstacles that threatened to hold him back, his rediscovery of his love for the game, and the faith that grounded him through it all. Learn from the way Nick handled the trials and tribulations that made him into the man he is today―and discover a path to your own success.

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$18.40
-$8.59(-32%)



Philly Special: The Inside Story of How the Philadelphia Eagles Won Their First Super Bowl Championship
Philly Special: The Inside Story of How the Philadelphia Eagles Won Their First Super Bowl Championship
Sal Paolantonio of ESPN takes readers inside the improbable 2017 championship season of the Philadelphia Eagles—from training camp to the first Super Bowl title in franchise history. This is the inside story you will get nowhere else—from the team’s storybook start to the nail-biting victory over the New England Patriots in Minneapolis, featuring the “Philly Special,” perhaps the most memorable play in Super Bowl history. Through exclusive interviews, readers will learn how the Eagles overcame Carson Wentz’s season-ending injury, how the team defied the odds and the critics and how they beat the greatest dynasty in modern pro football. With exclusive inside access, Paolantonio reveals a rare look into the dynamic between head coach Doug Pederson, back-up quarterback and eventual Super Bowl LII MVP Nick Foles, and the many individuals who stepped up and answered the call at the right times. Paolantonio captures the mood of the team week by week, every step of the way, profiling numerous key players, coaches, and much, much more.

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$19.36
-$6.59(-25%)



A Team Makes a Miracle: Doug Pederson and the Philadelphia Eagles' Journey to the Super Bowl
A Team Makes a Miracle: Doug Pederson and the Philadelphia Eagles' Journey to the Super Bowl
Doug Pederson led the unlikeliest NFL team to their first Super Bowl ever. It takes a special team to fight through all of the adversity the 2017 Philadelphia Eagles faced in their Super Bowl winning season. Most teams couldn't withstand the loss of key players such as quarterback Carson Wentz, running back Darren Sproles, middle linebacker Jordan Hicks, and left tackle Jason Peters, but this Eagles team is unique. They managed to rally together when no one thought they would win. Led by head coach Doug Pederson, the Eagles embraced 'the underdog' mantra and used it as a rallying cry during their run to Philadelphia's first Super Bowl win ever.A Team Makes a Miracle takes you into the locker room for an up close and personal look at some of the best stories that fueled the Eagles as they did the unthinkable.  

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$17.38
-$0.61(-3%)



Fearless AUTOGRAPHED by Doug Pederson (SIGNED EDITION) Limited Quantity Available
Fearless AUTOGRAPHED by Doug Pederson (SIGNED EDITION) Limited Quantity Available
Hand Signed by Doug Pederson. First Print - First Edition Hardcover, 272 Pages. Autographed Sticker may or may not appear on dust jacket. How does an underdog become a champion? One of the most innovative, gutsy, and dynamic head coaches in the NFL reveals the strategies behind building the Eagles team that shocked the world by winning the Super Bowl. Doug Pederson is the very definition of an underdog. He was an undrafted rookie free agent who would go on to play fourteen years in the NFL as a backup quarterback. He was cut five times, yet kept getting back up and into the fray. He would win one Super Bowl, with the Green Bay Packers. When he retired, he decided to coach, but not at the pro level. Instead, he was head coach of Calvary Baptist Academy in Shreveport, Louisiana. After a successful four-year stint there, he returned to the NFL as an assistant coach under Andy Reid with the Eagles and the Kansas City Chiefs, where he was instrumental in the development of quarterback Alex Smith and his string of 3,000-plus-yard seasons of passing. When he was offered the job as head coach of the Eagles, he jumped at it, though few thought he would succeed. In the first season, a year of rebuilding, they finished 7-9. Some doubted his abilities, and before the 2017 season, one expert called Pederson the least qualified coach in thirty years. Plagued by the sidelining of seasoned players and devastated by quarterback Carson Wentz's season-ending knee injury, the Eagles managed a 13-3 record and home-field advantage in the playoffs. Yet they were still the underdogs in every single game, including the Super Bowl, against the New England Patriots, one of the greatest dynasties in the history of the NFL. It wasn't until they stunned the Patriots that people finally believed in Pederson and his team.

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$39.95



Fly Eagles Fly! The Philadelphia Eagles Official Super Bowl Commemorative Book
Fly Eagles Fly! The Philadelphia Eagles Official Super Bowl Commemorative Book
The one and only official Super Bowl championship book created by the Eagles and licensed by the NFL.Everyone thought they couldn't...but Philly believed the Eagles could. And they did! Philly fans are known for being passionate, loyal, energized. At long last, the devotion paid off, as the Eagles delivered to Philadelphia the prize it coveted most.This is the one and only official commemorative book created by the Eagles for Eagles fans. Go behind the scenes with pictures by Eagles team photographers, pictures not available in any other book. Featuring exclusive, original essays by head coach Doug Pederson, owner Jeffrey Lurie, and longtime broadcaster Merrill Reese, and written by Eagles Insider Dave Spadaro, this one-of-a-kind keepsake shows and tells the whole story, from training camp through every regular season game, the playoffs, the thrilling Super Bowl victory over the Patriots, and the epic victory parade. The only book officially licensed by the NFL, this hardcover, superior quality coffee table book is captures all of the moments and memories that Eagles fans will cherish forever. True Philly fans deserve to get and to gift the very best and most beautiful official Eagles Super Bowl LII championship commemorative book...and this is it!

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$29.95
-$10.05(-25%)



Birds of Pray: The Story of the Philadelphia Eagles’ Faith, Brotherhood, and Super Bowl Victory
Birds of Pray: The Story of the Philadelphia Eagles’ Faith, Brotherhood, and Super Bowl Victory
High Stakes, Deep Faith, and Unbreakable BrotherhoodThey were the first No. 1 seed in NFL history to enter the playoffs as an underdog. Their star quarterback was out with a season-ending knee injury. Five-time Super Bowl champions the New England Patriots towered over them. But public opinion didn't matter to the Philadelphia Eagles. They believed in each other. The band of Christian brothers on the team believed in the God of the impossible, and they played for an audience of One.The most extensive book to explore the Christian faith shared by many of the team's players, Birds of Pray details the incredible inside story behind the Eagles' capture of the biggest prize in professional sports: the Vince Lombardi Trophy. Through exclusive interviews with the players, never-before-seen photos, and insider accounts of the miracle season's most memorable moments, Philly native and Associated Press sportswriter Rob Maaddi reveals a side of the team the world has yet to fully witness.From an impromptu baptism in the team's cold tub to weekly Bible studies and pre-game prayers, to the unique friendship between star quarterback Carson Wentz and back-up-then-MVP Nick Foles - the Eagles excel in the unexpected. Birds of Pray follows the deep faith shared among players, the high stakes they faced together, and their relentless reliance on Christ who gives all strength in moments of crisis and celebration alike. The result is a boldly inspiring, entertaining read that will challenge readers to go deeper in their faith, dream bigger, and live with renewed courage for whatever odds life stacks against them.

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$12.50
-$12.49(-50%)



20,859 Days: An Underdog Story
20,859 Days: An Underdog Story
The city of Philadelphia waited 57 years for their football team to once again reside at the top of the sport. The 2017 Philadelphia Eagles were a story of overcoming stacked odds and a team becoming a family to achieve the ultimate goal. After losing multiple players to injury, including their MVP-caliber quarterback, the Eagles were underdogs in all three of their postseason games despite having the best regular season record in football. Being an underdog was nothing new to the city of Philadelphia or the players that made up the roster. 20,859 Days: An Underdog Story looks at some of the Eagles players and executives who had been underdogs during their football careers.

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$7.49



Great Coaches in Philadelphia Eagles Football: Begins with Lud Wray, first Eagles coach, and goes to the Doug Pederson era.
Great Coaches in Philadelphia Eagles Football: Begins with Lud Wray, first Eagles coach, and goes to the Doug Pederson era.
Begins with Lud Wray, first Eagles coach, and goes to the Doug Pederson era.This book is written for those of us who love Philadelphia Eagles Football. Those who hate the Eagles will also want this book, so they can try to get a leg up on the facts about coaches missing from the bookshelves of those Eagles fans who do not have this book.The book first tells the story about the Eagles as a new team in 1933, but there are a lot of other old-time stories told such as the time the Eagles and Pittsburgh swapped teams and when the Steagles, a combined team of Eagles and Steelers competed in the NFL as a single unit.It seems like pro football has always been here but for those pros, players and coaches, trying to create a league out of nothing, there would have been nothing without their great work. And of course, this great book about the Eagles eventually gets a deep look at the great and soon-to-be-immortal-Eagles’ coaches including #2, Dick Vermeil, #3 Andy Reid, #4 Buddy Ryan, #3 Greasy Neale, #6, Buck Shaw, and all the way to the current potential immortal with lots of years left, #1 Doug Pederson, who tops the list of many pundits in just his second year at the helm.This book captures the great moments in Eagles Football even before the Eagles were the Eagles and when for one season during the war they were the Steagles. This Eagles-first book takes the reader through stories about the Eagles 22 coaches to great stories about the 85 seasons worth of great games (1231 games) with 590 great wins. When reviewing the record of particular coaches, the book often stops in time and talks about a particular great player such as Norm Van Brocklin, Tommy McDonald Wilbur Montgomery, Reggie White, Chuck Bednarik, Brian Dawkins, David Akers, and of course Carson Wentz, and Super Bowl MVP, Nick Foles. These stops will add substantially to your reading enjoyment. I dare you to pick up this book for, if you are an Eagles fan, you will never put it down again. You cannot ever get enough of Eagles’ greatness, but we do provide as many stories together in one spot as we can in this can’t miss book.

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Fearless AUTOGRAPHED/SIGNED by Doug Pederson Philadelpia Eagles COA 7118
Fearless AUTOGRAPHED/SIGNED by Doug Pederson Philadelpia Eagles COA 7118
Hand Signed by Doug Pederson. First Print - First Edition Hardcover, 272 Pages. Autographed Sticker may or may not appear on dust jacket. How does an underdog become a champion? One of the most innovative, gutsy, and dynamic head coaches in the NFL reveals the strategies behind building the Eagles team that shocked the world by winning the Super Bowl. Doug Pederson is the very definition of an underdog. He was an undrafted rookie free agent who would go on to play fourteen years in the NFL as a backup quarterback. He was cut five times, yet kept getting back up and into the fray. He would win one Super Bowl, with the Green Bay Packers. When he retired, he decided to coach, but not at the pro level. Instead, he was head coach of Calvary Baptist Academy in Shreveport, Louisiana. After a successful four-year stint there, he returned to the NFL as an assistant coach under Andy Reid with the Eagles and the Kansas City Chiefs, where he was instrumental in the development of quarterback Alex Smith and his string of 3,000-plus-yard seasons of passing. When he was offered the job as head coach of the Eagles, he jumped at it, though few thought he would succeed. In the first season, a year of rebuilding, they finished 7-9. Some doubted his abilities, and before the 2017 season, one expert called Pederson the least qualified coach in thirty years. Plagued by the sidelining of seasoned players and devastated by quarterback Carson Wentz's season-ending knee injury, the Eagles managed a 13-3 record and home-field advantage in the playoffs. Yet they were still the underdogs in every single game, including the Super Bowl, against the New England Patriots, one of the greatest dynasties in the history of the NFL. It wasn't until they stunned the Patriots that people finally believed in Pederson and his team.

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