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Dougherty County, Georgia
Dougherty County is a county located in the southwestern portion of the U.S. state of Georgia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 94,565. The county

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Dougherty County, GeorgiaDougherty County Government Center
Location in the U.S. state of Georgia
Georgia's location in the U.S.Founded1853Named forCharles DoughertySeatAlbanyLargest cityAlbanyArea • Total335 sq mi (868 km2) • Land329 sq mi (852 km2) • Water5.9 sq mi (15 km2), 1.8%Population (est.) • (2015)91,332 • Density288/sq mi (111/km2)Congressional district2ndTime zoneEastern: UTC−5/−4Websitewww.albany.ga.us/content/1800

Dougherty County is a county located in the southwestern portion of the U.S. state of Georgia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 94,565.[1] The county seat and sole incorporated city is Albany.[2]

Dougherty County is included in the Albany, GA Metropolitan Statistical Area. Historically dominated by cotton plantation agriculture in the nineteenth century, it was part of what has been called the Black Belt of the South. Its population continues to be majority African American.

Contents
  • 1 History
  • 2 Geography
    • 2.1 Major highways
    • 2.2 Adjacent counties
  • 3 Demographics
    • 3.1 2010 census
    • 3.2 2000 census
  • 4 Education
  • 5 Communities
    • 5.1 City
    • 5.2 Census-designated place
    • 5.3 Unincorporated communities
    • 5.4 Ghost town
  • 6 Politics
  • 7 See also
  • 8 References
  • 9 External links
History

The county was created by the Georgia General Assembly on December 15, 1853, from a part of Baker County.[3] It was named after Charles Dougherty,[4] a respected judge and lawyer from Athens, Georgia. In 1854 and 1856 small areas were added from Worth County.

As noted above, the county was developed by European Americans using enslaved African Americans as workers for the production of "King Cotton" as a commodity crop. Its county seat of Albany, Georgia is located on the Flint River, which was originally the chief means of transportation for shipped products. Albany was later served by seven railroad lines, adding to its significance as a market center. The city was a center of the Civil Rights Movement, particularly during the early 1960s.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 335 square miles (870 km2), of which 329 square miles (850 km2) is land and 5.9 square miles (15 km2) (1.8%) is water.[5]

The majority of Dougherty County is located in the Lower Flint River sub-basin of the ACF River Basin (Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin). The northeastern corner of the county, northeast of Albany, is located in the Middle Flint River sub-basin of the same ACF River basin. A very small portion of Dougherty County, north of Albany, is located in the Kinchafoonee-Muckalee sub-basin of the larger ACF River Basin. The remaining western portion of the county is located in the Ichawaynochaway Creek sub-basin of the same ACF River Basin.[6]

Major highways
  • U.S. Route 19

  • U.S. Route 19 Business
  • U.S. Route 82

  • U.S. Route 82 Business
  • State Route 3
  • State Route 62
  • State Route 91
  • State Route 133
  • State Route 234
  • State Route 300
  • State Route 520
  • State Route 520 Business
Adjacent counties
  • Lee County – north
  • Worth County – east
  • Mitchell County – south
  • Baker County – southwest
  • Calhoun County – west
  • Terrell County – northwest
Demographics Historical population Census Pop. %± 18608,295—187011,51738.8%188012,6229.6%189012,206−3.3%190013,67912.1%191016,03517.2%192020,06325.1%193022,30611.2%194028,56528.1%195043,61752.7%196075,68073.5%197089,63918.4%1980100,71812.4%199096,311−4.4%200096,065−0.3%201094,565−1.6%Est. 201789,502[7]−5.4%U.S. Decennial Census[8]
1790-1960[9] 1900-1990[10]
1990-2000[11] 2010-2013[1] 2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 94,565 people, 36,508 households, and 23,422 families residing in the county.[12] The population density was 287.7 inhabitants per square mile (111.1/km2). There were 40,801 housing units at an average density of 124.1 per square mile (47.9/km2).[13] The racial makeup of the county was 67.1% black or African American, 29.6% white, 0.8% Asian, 0.2% American Indian, 0.1% Pacific islander, 1.0% from other races, and 1.2% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 2.2% of the population.[12] In terms of ancestry, 6.1% were English, 6.0% were American, and 5.3% were Irish.[14]

Of the 36,508 households, 34.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 33.7% were married couples living together, 25.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 35.8% were non-families, and 30.2% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 3.08. The median age was 33.2 years.[12]

The median income for a household in the county was $32,435 and the median income for a family was $39,951. Males had a median income of $34,444 versus $27,848 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,210. About 22.7% of families and 28.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 42.7% of those under age 18 and 15.5% of those age 65 or over.[15]

2000 census

As of the 2000 census[16] of 2000, there were 96,065 people, 35,552 households, and 24,282 families residing in the county. The population density was 292 people per square mile (113/km²). There were 39,656 housing units at an average density of 120 per square mile (46/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 60.13% Black or African American, 37.80% White, 0.23% Native American, 0.57% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.49% from other races, and 0.74% from two or more races. 1.34% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

The largest European ancestry groups in Dougherty County are English (6.6%), Irish (6.5%), "American" (mostly English and Scots-Irish)(5.6%), German (4.5%) and Scots-Irish (1.6%).[17]

There were 35,552 households out of which 32.90% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.90% were married couples living together, 23.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.70% were non-families. 26.80% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.13.

In the county, the population was spread out with 27.70% under the age of 18, 12.20% from 18 to 24, 27.60% from 25 to 44, 20.90% from 45 to 64, and 11.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females, there were 87.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $30,934, and the median income for a family was $36,655. Males had a median income of $30,742 versus $22,254 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,645. About 19.60% of families and 24.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 35.30% of those under age 18 and 17.20% of those age 65 or over.

Education Main article: Albany, Georgia § Education Communities City
  • Albany
Census-designated place
  • Putney
Unincorporated communities
  • Acree
  • Butler
  • Dosaga
  • Doublegate
  • Ducker
  • Five Points
  • Four Points
  • Gillionville
  • Hotalihuyana
  • Pecan City
  • Pretoria
  • Radium Springs
  • River Bend
  • Ruark
  • Turner City
  • Walker
  • Williamsburg
Ghost town
  • Ocmulgee
Politics Presidential elections results Previous presidential elections results[18] Year Republican Democratic Third parties 2016 30.0% 10,232 68.4% 23,311 1.6% 544 2012 30.2% 11,449 69.2% 26,295 0.6% 231 2008 32.3% 12,547 67.2% 26,135 0.5% 204 2004 40.7% 13,711 58.8% 19,805 0.5% 171 2000 42.1% 12,248 57.3% 16,650 0.6% 166 1996 40.0% 11,144 56.0% 15,600 4.1% 1128 1992 40.3% 12,455 49.3% 15,236 10.5% 3240 1988 50.9% 15,520 41.2% 12,579 7.9% 2,418 1984 56.7% 16,920 43.3% 12,904 1980 47.8% 12,726 50.5% 13,430 1.7% 459 1976 44.9% 9,337 55.1% 11,461 1972 78.0% 12,878 22.0% 3,625 1968 29.9% 5,611 20.4% 3834 49.7% 9,317 1964 70.9% 12,776 29.1% 5,248 1960 48.9% 4,323 51.1% 4,522 1956 44.1% 3,248 56.0% 4,126 1952 36.4% 2,535 63.6% 4,435 1948 19.6% 768 64.2% 2,517 16.2% 636 1944 9.6% 338 90.4% 3,199 1940 7.6% 180 92.3% 2,175 0.0% 1 1936 4.5% 122 95.4% 2,591 0.1% 3 1932 4.5% 95 95.0% 2,012 0.5% 10 1928 27.9% 379 72.2% 982 1924 12.7% 167 81.1% 1,065 6.2% 82 1920 14.5% 105 85.5% 621 1916 1.9% 17 93.9% 836 4.2% 37 1912 2.7% 18 94.1% 617 3.2% 21 See also
  • State of Georgia portal
  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Dougherty County, Georgia
  • W.E.B. Du Bois, The Souls of Black Folk (1903) contains two essays that are surveys of race relations in Dougherty County from Reconstruction to the end of the 19th century.
    • "Of the Black Belt"
    • "Of the Quest of the Golden Fleece"
References
  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 9, 2011. Retrieved June 22, 2014..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"\"""\"""'""'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. ^ Krakow, Kenneth K. (1975). Georgia Place-Names: Their History and Origins (PDF). Macon, GA: Winship Press. p. 63. ISBN 0-915430-00-2.
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 108.
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  6. ^ "Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission Interactive Mapping Experience". Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission. Retrieved 2015-11-27.
  7. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved June 22, 2014.
  9. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved June 22, 2014.
  10. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 22, 2014.
  11. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 22, 2014.
  12. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015-12-29.
  13. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015-12-29.
  14. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015-12-29.
  15. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015-12-29.
  16. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2011-05-14.
  17. ^ Bureau, U.S. Census. "American FactFinder - Results". factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2018-03-19.
  18. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-03-19.
External links
  • Dougherty County official website
  • Official Downtown Albany website
  • New Georgia Encyclopedia
  • Georgia Place Names
  • Dougherty County Courthouse history
  • Dougherty County historical marker
Places adjacent to Dougherty County, Georgia Terrell County Lee County Calhoun County Dougherty County, Georgia Worth County Baker County Mitchell County
  • v
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Municipalities and communities of Dougherty County, Georgia, United StatesCounty seat: AlbanyCity
  • Albany
CDP
  • Putney
Unincorporated
communities
  • Acree
  • Doublegate
  • Pretoria
  • Radium Springs
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Coordinates: 31°32′N 84°13′W / 31.54°N 84.22°W / 31.54; -84.22



Calhoun County (Images of America)
Calhoun County (Images of America)
View the history of small-town, rural Iowa through the eyes of those who lived it. Images of America: Calhoun County showcases this unique heritage through remarkable glimpses into the past and intriguing stories that bring these images to life. Discover the region's pioneer heritage, the birth of the railroad and prairie towns, and the growth of some of most productive farms in the world. Calhoun County claims two nationally acclaimed authors as native sons, welcomed Babe Ruth in 1940 (but not on the baseball field), and was the target of a bank robbery by Bonnie and Clyde in the 1930s. Calhoun County offers a well-researched pictorial journey designed for native Iowans, transplanted Iowans, and those curious about the evolution of small towns and farms in the Midwest.

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Map: 1885 View of the city of Albany, Ga. (the Artesian City) county-seat of Dougherty-County. 1885|Albany|Albany Ga|Georgia|
Map: 1885 View of the city of Albany, Ga. (the Artesian City) county-seat of Dougherty-County. 1885|Albany|Albany Ga|Georgia|
1885 map View of the city of Albany, Ga. (the Artesian City) county-seat of Dougherty-County. 1885.

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Dougherty County, Georgia GA ZIP Code Map Not Laminated
Dougherty County, Georgia GA ZIP Code Map Not Laminated
Current Unlaminated ZIP Code map Dougherty County, Georgia GA. Map shows state boundaries, county boundaries, water bodies, incorporated place boundaries, major landmarks, and roads.

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ALBANY GA Dougherty County Georgia TORNADO Cyclone Disaster 1940 Old Newspaper THE NEW YORK TIMES, February 11, 1940
ALBANY GA Dougherty County Georgia TORNADO Cyclone Disaster 1940 Old Newspaper THE NEW YORK TIMES, February 11, 1940
THE NEW YORK TIMES, February 11, 1940 * Albany, Georgia tornado disaster The front page has one column headings: "23 KILLED, 500 HURT BY GALE IN GEORGIA" and "Homes and Business Buildings Leveled in Dawn Storm--Loss at 5 to 10 Millions" Reporting continues on page 19 with a photo of the town's destruction. (see) 1st report coverage on the tornado disaster in Albany, Georgia in which the business section was destroyed. Other news, sports and advertisements of the day with much on World War II. Complete 1st section only with pages 1-52, this is the "rag edition", printed on very high quality newsprint for libraries & other institutions, nice condition.

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Signature Announcements Dougherty County Drop Back in Academy (Albany, GA) Graduation Announcements, Presidential Elite Pack 25 with Gold & Blue Metallic Foil seal
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Dougherty County Drop Back in Academy “Print Your Own” Graduation Announcements, Presidential Style, Elite Package. Signature Announcements’ Presidential Tri-Panel Announcement actually opens both Up: Top panel with your Logo/Mascot; & Down: Bottom panel with your school name. When the top panel is raised, you will see a beautifully sculpted embossing of a sheild of knowledge. They are made of linen textured 92lb card stock and are Foil Stamped using sculpted dies by skilled artisans. They are the perfect size for a 3x5 graduation photo insert. Students across the country agree with you - Your Once-in-a-Lifetime event demands the highest quality, most professional announcement available! This is why our Presidential Announcements are Rated #1! You just spent four years achieving a great accomplishment. Show your friends and family how proud you are and how far you have come. Choose Signature Announcements quality to present your new image. Elite Package: Graduation Announcements (25) “Print your own”; Foil-lined inner Envelopes (25); Foil-lined outer envelopes(25); Premium Return Address Labels (25); Premium Envelope Seals (25); Premium Thank you cards with envelopes (25); Announcement Tissue (25); Certificates of Appreciation with Black Matte and Leatherette cover (2); a Souvenir Tassel; Announcement Keepsake (2).

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GreatCitees Dougherty Texas TX, Floyd County MAP Unisex Souvenir T Shirt
GreatCitees Dougherty Texas TX, Floyd County MAP Unisex Souvenir T Shirt
Show off your love for Dougherty Texas TX, while looking cool and stylish with this souvenir t-shirt. This casual and loose fitting tee is guaranteed to become your favorite in no time. We use direct-to-garment printing technology, so the ink is embedded in the fabric for your ultimate comfort. Our unisex t-shirts are 100% cotton (grey 90/10), preshrunk heavyweight 5.5 oz. with double needle sleeves and bottom hem.

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Dallas County (Images of America)
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No Iowa county has influenced American history more than Dallas County. It propelled Harry Truman to an unlikely victory in the 1948 presidential campaign, following a fiery speech he delivered to 100,000 farmers on a sweltering September day at the National Plowing Match near Dexter. Just 15 years earlier, a shoot-out near Dexfield Park marked the beginning of the end for infamous outlaws Bonnie and Clyde and the notorious Barrow Gang. Dallas County, located just west of Des Moines, has produced several major-league baseball players (among them Bob Feller and Hal Manders), a US congressman (David Young), and Nile Kinnick, the 1939 Heisman Trophy winner and University of Iowa football legend whose grandfather George Clarke, of Adel, served as Iowa's governor from 1913 to 1917. Today, Dallas County is one of the fastest-growing counties in America and remains a region of opportunity with a rich heritage of small-town living, farming, coal mining, and the immigrant experience.

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Ted's Vintage Art Albany Georgia 1885 Vintage Map Print | Historic Dougherty County, GA Art | Digitally Restored On Museum Quality Matte Paper 24" x 36"
Ted's Vintage Art Albany Georgia 1885 Vintage Map Print | Historic Dougherty County, GA Art | Digitally Restored On Museum Quality Matte Paper 24" x 36"
Vintage Art Albany Georgia 1885 Wall Art Print Product Content:High-quality vintage map of Albany, GA 1885.Printed in ultra-high resolution on museum-quality, highly durable paper. Available sizes: This item is available in four sizes 8 x 10 Inch - 12 x 18 Inch - 18 x 24 Inch - 24 x 36 Inch Description: This is a high-quality, digitally restored fine art print of Albany, Georgia from 1885. The Ted's Vintage Maps team has worked hard to restore this print to as close to its original condition as possible - removing any tears, stains, creases and other markings. This beautiful Albany, GA art print is incredibly high-detailed and is printed on durable, museum-quality, matte finish paper with archival quality ink. This ensures your vintage Albany map art will last forever. Whether you love the history of Albany, Georgia or you are looking for the perfect gift for a Albany history lover, this amazing print is sure to please.

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