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List of Elizabeth Warren 2020 presidential campaign endorsements
who have voiced their endorsement of Elizabeth Warren's campaign for the Democratic Party's nomination for the 2020 U.S. presidential election. Ed Markey

View Wikipedia Article

This is a list of notable individuals and organizations who have voiced their endorsement of Elizabeth Warren's campaign for the Democratic Party's nomination for the 2020 U.S. presidential election.

List of Elizabeth Warren 2020 presidential campaign endorsementsCampaign2020 United States presidential election (Democratic Party primaries)CandidateElizabeth Warren
U.S. Senator from Massachusetts
(2013–present)AffiliationDemocratic PartyStatusAnnounced: February 9, 2019HeadquartersCharlestown, MassachusettsSloganDream Big, Fight Hard.Websiteelizabethwarren.com This article is part of a series about
Elizabeth Warren
  • Political positions
  • Electoral history

2020 presidential campaign

  • Primaries
  • Endorsements

U.S. Senator from Massachusetts

  • 2012 election
  • 2018 re-election

Early political involvement

  • Special Advisor for the CFPB
  • Chair of the Congressional Oversight Panel

  • v
  • t
  • e

This is a list of notable individuals and organizations who have voiced their endorsement of Elizabeth Warren's campaign for the Democratic Party's nomination for the 2020 U.S. presidential election.

Officials below the level of State Legislator and all other individuals and entities are listed only if they have a Wikipedia page or are otherwise clearly notable.

Contents
  • 1 Federal officials
    • 1.1 U.S. Senators
      • 1.1.1 Current
    • 1.2 U.S. Representatives
      • 1.2.1 Current
      • 1.2.2 Former
    • 1.3 U.S. Cabinet members and Cabinet-level officials
      • 1.3.1 Former
    • 1.4 Sub-Cabinet-level officials
      • 1.4.1 Former
    • 1.5 U.S. Ambassadors
      • 1.5.1 Former
  • 2 State officials
    • 2.1 Governors
      • 2.1.1 Former
    • 2.2 Statewide executive officials
      • 2.2.1 Current
      • 2.2.2 Former
    • 2.3 State legislators
      • 2.3.1 Current
      • 2.3.2 Former
  • 3 Local and municipal officials
    • 3.1 Mayors
      • 3.1.1 Current
    • 3.2 Municipal executive officials
      • 3.2.1 Current
      • 3.2.2 Former
    • 3.3 Municipal legislators
      • 3.3.1 Current
  • 4 Party officials
    • 4.1 DNC Members
  • 5 Notable individuals
    • 5.1 Athletes and sports figures
    • 5.2 Businesspeople
    • 5.3 Entertainers and artists
    • 5.4 Political activists
    • 5.5 Religious leaders
    • 5.6 Writers, experts, and commentators
  • 6 Organizations
    • 6.1 Labor unions
    • 6.2 Newspapers
    • 6.3 Political organizations
  • 7 References
  • 8 External links
Federal officials Ed Markey Deb Haaland Ayanna Pressley Katie Porter Julián Castro U.S. Senators Current
  • Ed Markey, U.S. Senator from Massachusetts (2013–present); U.S. Representative from MA-05 (1976–2013)[1]
U.S. Representatives Current
  • Raúl Grijalva, U.S. Representative from AZ-03 (2003–present)[2]
  • Katie Porter, U.S. Representative from CA-45 (2019–present)[3]
  • Jan Schakowsky, US Representative from IL-9 (1999–present)[4]
  • Jamie Raskin, U.S. Representative from MD-08 (2017–present)[5]
  • Jim McGovern, U.S. Representative from MA-02 (1997–present)[6]
  • Lori Trahan, U.S. Representative from MA-03 (2019–present)[1]
  • Joe Kennedy III, U.S. Representative from MA-04 (2013–present)[1]
  • Katherine Clark, U.S. Representative from MA-05 (2013–present)[2]
  • Ayanna Pressley, U.S. Representative from MA-07 (2019–present)[7]
  • Andy Levin, U.S. Representative from MI-09 (2019–present)[2]
  • Deb Haaland, U.S. Representative from NM-01 (2019–present)[8]
  • Joaquin Castro, U.S. Representative from TX-20 (2013–present) [9] (previously endorsed Julian Castro)[10]
Former
  • Berkley Bedell, former U.S. Representative from IA-06 (1975–1987) (deceased) [11]
  • David Bonior, former U.S. Representative from MI-12 (1977–1993) and from MI-10 (1993–2003); former House Democratic Chief Deputy Whip (1987–1991), former House Majority Whip (1991–1995) and former House Minority Whip (1995–2002)[12]
  • Sander Levin, former U.S. Representative from MI-09 (1983-2019); former Chair of the House Ways and Means Committee (2010-2011)[13]
  • Brad Miller, former U.S. Representative from NC-13 (2003-2013)[13]
U.S. Cabinet members and Cabinet-level officials Former
  • Julián Castro, former U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (2014–2017); former 2020 candidate for President; former Mayor of San Antonio, Texas (2009–2014)[14]
  • Robert Reich, former U.S. Secretary of Labor (1993–1997)[15] (co-endorsement with Bernie Sanders)
Sub-Cabinet-level officials Former
  • Hady Amr, former United States Deputy Special Envoy for Israeli-Palestinian Negotiations (2014–2017); Deputy Assistant Administrator for the Middle East, USAID (2010–2013)[16]
  • Richard Cordray, former Director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) (2012–2017)[17]
  • Nicholas A. Klinefeldt, former United States Attorney for the Southern District of Iowa (2009-2015)[18]
  • Mike Lux, former Special Assistant to the President for Public Liaison (1993-1995)[19]
  • Joseph Y. Yun, United States Special Representative for North Korea Policy (2016–2018) United States Ambassador to Malaysia (2013–2016)[20]
U.S. Ambassadors Former
  • Robert Stephen Ford, former United States Ambassador to Syria (2011–2014), former United States Ambassador to Algeria (2006–2008)[21]
State officials Michael Dukakis Maura Healey Andrés Cano Isela Blanc David Chiu Lorena Gonzalez Omar Aquino Beth Wessel-Kroeschell Liz Bennett Zach Wahls Joe Bolcom Nicole A. Williams Karen Spilka Sonya Chang-Diaz Megan Hunt Yuh-Line Niou Nathalia Fernandez Tina Kotek Governors Former
  • Michael Dukakis, former Governor of Massachusetts (1975–1979, 1983–1991) and Democratic nominee for president in 1988[22]
Statewide executive officials Current
  • Catherine Byrne, Nevada State Controller (2019–present)[23]
  • Michael Fitzgerald, Iowa State Treasurer (1983–present)[24]
  • Mike Frerichs, Treasurer of Illinois (2015–present)[25]
  • Maura Healey, Attorney General of Massachusetts (2015–present)[26]
  • Val Hoyle, Labor Commissioner of Oregon since 2019; Majority Leader of the Oregon House of Representatives (2013-2015) and Oregon State Representative (2009–2017)[27]
  • Kevin Lembo, Connecticut State Comptroller (2011–present)[28]
  • Denise Merrill, Secretary of the State of Connecticut (2011–present)[29]
Former
  • Elaine Baxter, Secretary of State of Iowa (1987–1995)[30]
  • Sally Pederson, Lieutenant Governor of Iowa (1999–2007)[30]
State legislators Current
  • Zack Fields, Alaska State Representative, from the 20th district (2019-present)[19]
  • Andrés Cano, Arizona State Representative from the 3rd district (2019–present)[31]
  • Isela Blanc, Arizona State Representative from the 26th district (2017–present)[31]
  • Raquel Terán, Arizona State Representative from the 30th district (2019–present)[31]
  • Scott Wiener, California State Senator from District 11 (2016–present) (previously endorsed Kamala Harris)[32]
  • David Chiu, California State Assemblyman from District 17 (2014–present) (previously endorsed Kamala Harris)[33]
  • Robert Rivas, California State Assemblyman from District 30 (2018–present)[31]
  • Lorena Gonzalez, California State Assemblywoman from District 80 (2013–present)[34]
  • Kerry Donovan, Colorado State Senator, District 5 (2015–present), Majority Whip[35]
  • Mike Foote, Colorado State Senator, from the 17th district (2019–present)[36]
  • Faith Winter, Colorado State Senator, from the 24th district (2019–present)[36]
  • Dominique Jackson, Colorado State Representative from the 42nd district (2017–present)[36]
  • Chris Kennedy, Colorado State Representative from the 23rd district (2017–present)[36]
  • Matt Lesser, Connecticut State Senator from the 9th district (2019–present)[37]
  • Mary Daugherty Abrams, Connecticut State Senator from the 13th district (2019–present)[38]
  • Edwin Vargas, Connecticut State Representative from the 6th district (2012–present)[39]
  • Josh Elliott, Connecticut State Representative from the 88th district (2017–present)[39]
  • Quentin Phipps, Connecticut State Representative from the 100th district (2019–present)[38]
  • Cindy Polo, Florida State Representative from the 103rd district (2018–present)[40]
  • Omar Aquino, Illinois State Senator from the 2nd district (2016–present)[31]
  • Cristina Castro, Illinois State Senator from the 22nd district (2017–present)[31]
  • Kelly Cassidy, Illinois State Representative from the 14th district (2011–present)[41]
  • Will Guzzardi, Illinois State Representative from the 39th district (2015–present[42]
  • Daniel Didech, Illinois State Representative from the 59th district (2019–present)[43]
  • Janet Petersen, Iowa State Senator from the 18th District (2013–present) and Minority Leader (Democratic) (2017–present)[44]
  • Claire Celsi, Iowa State Senator from the 21st District (2019–present)[45]
  • Eric Giddens, Iowa State Senator from the 30th District (2019–present)[45]
  • Zach Wahls, Iowa State Senator from the 37th District (2019–present)[46]
  • Joe Bolkcom, Iowa State Senator from the 29th District (1999–2003), the 39th District (2003–2012) and the 43rd District (2012–present)[45]
  • Heather Matson, Iowa State Representative from the 38th District (2019–present)[47] (previously endorsed Cory Booker)[48]
  • Jennifer Konfrst, Iowa State Representative from the 43rd District (2019–present)[47] (previously endorsed Cory Booker)[48]
  • Beth Wessel-Kroeschell, Iowa State Representative from the 45th District (2005-present)[18] (previously endorsed Cory Booker)[49]
  • Liz Bennett, Iowa State Representative from the 65th District (2015–present)[50]
  • Art Staed, Iowa State Representative from the 66th District (2013–present)[45]
  • Tracy Ehlert, Iowa State Representative from the 70th District (2019–present)[45]
  • Mary Mascher, Iowa State Representative from the 86th District (1995–present)[45]
  • Mary Wolfe, Iowa State Representative from the 98th District [30]
  • Lindsay James, Iowa State Representative from the 99th District (2019–present)[45]
  • Rui Xu, Kansas State Representative from District 25 since 2019[51]
  • Attica Scott, Kentucky State Representative from the 41st District (2017-present)[19]
  • Alfred C. Carr Jr., Maryland State Delegate from District 18 (2007–present)[52]
  • Arthur Ellis, Maryland State Senator from District 28 (2019–present)[52]
  • Mary L. Washington, Maryland State Senator from District 43 (2019–present)[52]
  • Jen Terrasa, Maryland State Delegate from District 24 (2019-present)[52]
  • Ariana Kelly, Maryland State Delegate from District 16 (2011–present)[52]
  • Lorig Charkoudian, Maryland State Delgate from District 20 (2019-present)[52]
  • Jheanelle Wilkins, Maryland State Delegate from District 20 (2017-present)[19]
  • Nicole A. Williams, Maryland State Delegate from District 22 (2019-present)[19]
  • Heather Bagnall, Maryland State Delgate from District 33 since 2019[52]
  • Lesley Lopez, Maryland State Delegate from District 39 (2019–present)[52]
  • Stephanie Smith, Maryland State Delegate from District 45 since 2019[52]
  • Eric Lesser, Massachusetts State Senator from the 1st Hampden & Hampshire District (2015–present)[53]
  • Karen Spilka, Massachusetts State Senator from Middlesex and Norfolk District 2 (2005–present); President of the Senate (2018–present); candidate for U.S. Representative from MA-05 in 2013[1]
  • Jo Comerford, Massachusetts State Senator from Hampshire, Franklin and Worcester District (2019–present)[41]
  • Julian Cyr, Massachusetts State Senator from Cape Cod and Islands district (2016-present)[54]
  • Sonia Chang-Díaz, Massachusetts State Senator from the 2nd Suffolk District (2009–present))[31]
  • Natalie Higgins, Massachusetts State Representative from the 4th Worcester district (2017–present)[41]
  • Jack Patrick Lewis, Massachusetts State Representative from the 7th Middlesex district (2017-present)[19]
  • Jose Tosado, Massachusetts State Representative from the 9th Hampden district (2015–present)[31]
  • Jon Santiago, Massachusetts State Representative from the 9th Suffolk district (2019–present)[31]
  • Andy Vargas, Massachusetts State Representative from the 3rd Essex District (2017–present)[31]
  • Rosemary Bayer, Michigan State Senator from District 12 (2019-present)[19]
  • Mallory McMorrow, Michigan State Senator from District 13 (2019–present)[55]
  • Laurie Pohutsky, Michigan State Representative from District 19 (2019–present)[56]
  • Jim Ellison, Michigan State Representative from District 26 (2017–present)[19]
  • William Sowerby, Michigan State Representative from District 31 (2017–present)[19]
  • Megan Hunt, Nebraska State Senator from District 8 (2019–present)[41]
  • Joyce Woodhouse, Nevada State Senator for Clark County 5 (Dual-member District) District 5 (2006–2010) and District 5 since 2010[57] (previously endorsed Kamala Harris)[58]
  • Howard Watts, Nevada State Assemblyman from District 15 (2018–present)[57]
  • Heidi Swank, Nevada State Assemblywoman from District 16 since 2013[57]
  • Kevin Cavanaugh, New Hampshire State Senator from District 16 (2017–present)[59]
  • Lee Walker Oxenham, New Hampshire State Representative from the Sullivan District 1 (2014-present)[19] (previously endorsed Cory Booker)[60]
  • Jerry Knirk, New Hampshire State Representative from the Carroll District 3 (2016–present)[61]
  • Edward Butler, New Hampshire State Representative from Carroll District 7 (2006–2010, 2012–present)[62]
  • Sandy Swinburne, New Hampshire State Representative from Cheshire District 10 (2018–present)[62]
  • Craig Thompson, New Hampshire State Representative from Cheshire District 14 (2018–present)[62]
  • Larry Laflamme, New Hampshire State Representative from Coos District 3 (2016–present)[63]
  • Yvonne Thomas, New Hampshire State Representative from Coos District 3 (2006–present)[63]
  • Edith Tucker, New Hampshire State Representative from Coos District 5 (2016–present)[62]
  • Richard Abel, New Hampshire State Representative from Coos District 13 (2014–present)[62]
  • Susan M. Ford, New Hampshire State Representative from Grafton District 3 (2008–2010, 2012–2016, 2018–present)[63] (previously endorsed Kirsten Gillibrand)[64]
  • Suzanne Smith, New Hampshire State Representative from Grafton District 8 (2008–present)[62]
  • Joyce Weston, New Hampshire State Representative from Grafton District 8 (2014–present)[63]
  • Sharon Nordgren, New Hampshire State Representative from Grafton District 9 (1988–present)[63]
  • Timothy Josephson, New Hampshire State Representative from Grafton District 11 (2016–present)[63]
  • Mary Jane Mulligan, New Hampshire State Representative from Grafton District 12 (2016–present)[62]
  • Laurel Stavis, New Hampshire State Representative from Grafton District 13 (2018–present)[62]
  • George Sykes, New Hampshire State Representative from Grafton District 13 (2012–present)[62]
  • Elaine French, New Hampshire State Representative from Grafton District 14 (2018–present)[63]
  • Francesca Diggs, New Hampshire State Representative from Grafton District 16 (2018–present)[63]
  • Pat Long, New Hampshire State Representative from Hillsborough District 10 (2006–present)[62]
  • Nicole Klein Knight, New Hampshire State Representative from Hillsborough District 11 (2018–present)[63]
  • Kathryn Stack, New Hampshire State Representative from Hillsborough District 21 (2018–present)[62]
  • Wendy Thomas, New Hampshire State Representative from Hillsborough District 21 (2018–present)[62]
  • Suzanne Vail, New Hampshire State Representative from Hillsborough District 30 (2018–present)[62]
  • Michael Pedersen, New Hampshire State Representative from the Hillsborough District 32 (2018–present)[61](Switched endorsement to Amy Klobuchar)[65]
  • Deb Stevens, New Hampshire State Representative from Hillsborough District 34 (2018–present)[62]
  • Kat McGhee, New Hampshire State Representative from Merrimack District 40 (2018–present)[62]
  • Jacqueline Chretien, New Hampshire State Representative from Hillsborough District 42 (2018–present)[62]
  • Christopher Herbert, New Hampshire State Representative from Hillsborough District 42 (2014–present)[63]
  • Connie Van Houten, New Hampshire State Representative from Hillsborough District 45 (2016–present)[61]
  • Mary Jane Wallner, New Hampshire State Representative from the Merrimack District 10 (1980–present), Majority Leader of the New Hampshire House of Representatives (2007–2010, 2019–present)[61]
  • Connie Lane, New Hampshire State Representative from Merrimack District 12 (2018–present)[63]
  • Safiya Wazir, New Hampshire State Representative from Merrimack District 17 (2018–present)[63]
  • Kris Schultz, New Hampshire State Representative from Merrimack District 18[61]
  • David Doherty, New Hampshire State Representative from Merrimack District 20 since 2014[66]
  • Samantha Fox, New Hampshire State Representative from Merrimack District 23 (2018–present)[63]
  • Rebecca McWilliams, New Hampshire State Representative from Merrimack District 27 (2018–present)[62]
  • Liz McConnell, New Hampshire State Representative from Rockingham District 11 (2018–present)[62]
  • Lisa Bunker, New Hampshire State Representative from Rockingham District 18 (2018–present)[62]
  • Julie Gilman, New Hampshire State Representative from Rockingham District 18 (2012–present)[63]
  • Gaby Grossman, New Hampshire State Representative from Rockingham District 18 (2018–present)[63]
  • Debra Altschiller, New Hampshire State Representative from Rockingham District 19 (2016–present)[62]
  • Rebecca McBeath, New Hampshire State Representative from Rockingham District 26 (2014–present)[62]
  • Peter Somssich, New Hampshire State Representative from Rockingham District 27 (2016–present)[62]
  • David Meuse, New Hampshire State Representative from Rockingham District 29 (2018–present)[62]
  • Tamara Le, New Hampshire State Representative from Rockingham District 31 (2016–present)[62]
  • Matthew Towne, New Hampshire State Representative from Strafford District 4 (2018–present)[61]
  • Jeffrey Salloway, New Hampshire State Representative from Strafford District 5 (2016-present)[66] (previously endorsed Cory Booker)[60]
  • Chuck Grassie, New Hampshire State Representative from Strafford District 11 (2016–present)[63]
  • Casey Conley, New Hampshire State Representative from Strafford District 13[62]
  • Wendy Chase, New Hampshire State Representative from Strafford District 18 since 2018[66]
  • Peg Higgins, New Hampshire State Representative from Strafford District 22 (2018–present)[63]
  • Brian Sullivan, New Hampshire State Representative from Sullivan District 1[62]
  • Javier Martinez, New Mexico State Representative from the 11th district (2015–present)[31]
  • Gustavo Rivera, New York State Senator from the 33rd District (2011–present)[67]
  • Alessandra Biaggi, New York State Senator from the 34th District (2019–present)[67]
  • Rachel May, New York State Senator from the 53rd District (2019–present)[68]
  • Catalina Cruz, New York State Assemblymember from the 39th district (2019–present)[67]
  • Jo Anne Simon, New York State Assemblymember from the 52nd district (2015–present)[67]
  • Yuh-Line Niou, New York State Assemblymember from the 65th district (2017–present)[67]
  • Linda Rosenthal, New York State Assemblymember from the 67th district (2006–present)[67]
  • Carmen De La Rosa, New York State Assemblymember from the 72nd district (2017–present)[31]
  • Harvey Epstein, New York State Assemblymember from the 74th district (2018–present)[67]
  • Nathalia Fernandez, New York State Assemblymember from the 80th district (2018–present)[31]
  • Patrick B. Burke, New York State Assemblymember from 142th District (2013–Present)[45]
  • Susan C. Fisher, North Carolina State Representative from the 114th District (2004-present)[19]
  • Deb Butler, North Carolina State Representative from the 18th District (2017-present)[69]
  • Jeff Golden, Oregon State Senator from the 3rd District (2019-present)[27]
  • Sara Gelser, Oregon State Senator from the 8th District (2015-present)[27]
  • Michael Dembrow, Oregon State Senator from the 23rd District (2013-present)[27]
  • Shemia Fagan, Oregon State Senator from the 24th District (2019-present)[27]
  • Tina Kotek, Oregon State Representative from the 44th District (2007-present) and Speaker of the Oregon House of Representatives (2013-present)[27]
  • Julie Fahey, Oregon State Representative from the 14th District (2017-present)[27]
  • Andrea Salinas, Oregon State Representative from the 38th District (2017-present)[27]
  • Karin Power, Oregon State Representative from the 41st District (2017-present)[27]
  • Barbara Smith Warner, Oregon State Representative from the 45th District (2014-present)[27]
  • Alissa Keny-Guyer, Oregon State Representative from the 46th District since 2011[27]
  • Diego Hernandez, Oregon State Representative from the 47th District since 2017[27]
  • Carla Piluso, Oregon State Representative from the 50th District since 2015[27]
  • Katie Muth, Pennsylvania State Senator from the 44th district (2019–present)[70]
  • Danielle Friel Otten, Pennsylvania State Representative from the 155th district (2019–present)[70]
  • Leanne Krueger, Pennsylvania State Representative from the 161st district (2015–present)[70]
  • Edith Ajello, Rhode Island State Senator from the 1st district (2013-present)[19]
  • Gayle Goldin, Rhode Island State Senator from the 3rd district (2013-present)[19]
  • Moira Walsh,Rhode Island State Senator from the 3rd district (2017-present)[19]
  • Rebecca Kislak, Rhode Island State Representative from the 4th district (2018–present)[41]
  • Teresa Tanzi, Rhode Island State Senator from the 34th district (2011-present)[19]
  • Bridget Valverde, Rhode Island State Senator from the 35th district (2019-present)[19]
  • Liana Cassar, Rhode Island State Senator from the 66th district (2019-present)[19]
  • Wendy Brawley, South Carolina State Representative from District 70 since 2017[71]
  • Kambrell Garvin, South Carolina State Representative from District 77 since 2018[71]
  • Gloria Johnson, Tennessee State Representative from the 13th district (2019–present)[67][72]
  • José R. Rodríguez, Texas State Senator from the 29th district (2011–present)[73] (previously endorsed Julian Castro))[74]
  • Joe Moody, Texas State Representative from the 78th district (2009–2011,2013–present) and Speaker Pro Tempore (2019–present) (Previously endorsed Julian Castro)[75]
  • Erin Zwiener, Texas State Representative from the 45th district (2019–present)[76]
  • Sheryl Cole, Texas State Representative from the 46th district (2019–present)[77]
  • Mary González, Texas State Representative from the 75th district (2013–present)[78] (Previously endorsed Julian Castro)[74]
  • Art Fierro, Texas State Representative from the 79th district (2019–present)[73] (Previously endorsed Julian Castro)[74]
  • Shawn Thierry, Texas State Representative from the 146th district (2017–present)[79]
  • Ghazala Hashmi, Virginia State Senator from the 10th district (2020–present)[80]
  • Sam Rasoul, Virginia State Delegate from the 11th district (2014–present)[80]
  • Chris Larson, Wisconsin State Senator from the 7th district (2011-present)[19]
  • Jonathan Brostoff, Wisconsin Assemblymember from the 19th district (2015–present)[81]
  • Jimmy P. Anderson, Wisconsin Assemblymember from the 47th district (2017–present)[19]
  • Greta Neubauer, Wisconsin Assemblymember from the 62nd district (2018–present) [82]
Former
  • Daniel Biss, former Illinois State Senator from the 9th district (2013–2019)[83]
  • Steve Sovern, former Iowa State Senator from District 15 (1975–1976)[45]
  • Mark Kuhn, former Iowa State Senator from District 29(1999–2003) and the 14th District (2003–2011)[45]
  • Charles Bruner, former Iowa State Senator from District 37 (1983-1990) and former Iowa State Representative from District 41 (1979–1982)[45]
  • Robert Dvorsky, former Iowa State Senator for District 37 (2003–2019) and from District 25 (1995–2003); former Iowa State Representative from District 49 (1993–1995) and for District 54 (1987–1993)[84](previously endorsed Kamala Harris)[84]
  • James Riordan, former Iowa State Senator from District 45 (1986–1992) and the 39th District (1993–1994)[45]
  • Dave Osterberg, former Iowa State Senator from District 43 (1983–1992) and District 50 (1993–1994)[45]
  • Kurt Swaim, former Iowa State Representative from District 94 (2003–2013)[45]
  • Victor R. Ramirez, former Maryland State Senator for District 47 (2011-2019); former Maryland State Delegate for District 47 (2003-2011)[52]
  • Maricé Morales, Maryland State Delgate from District 19 (2015-2019[52]
  • Lucy Flores, Nevada State Assemblywoman from District 28 (2011–2015)[85]
  • Chris Giunchigliani, former Nevada State Assemblyman from District 9 (1991–2006)[57]
  • Sheila Leslie, former Nevada State Senator from Washoe County District 1 (later District 13) (2010–2012), former Nevada State Assemblywoman from District 27 (1998–2010)[57]
  • Joe Neal, former Nevada State Senator from Clark County District 4 (1972–2004)[86]
  • Terie Norelli, former New Hampshire State Representative from Rockingham 16 (1996-2014) and former Speaker of the New Hampshire House of Representatives (2012-2014)[87]
  • Phil P. Leventis, former South Carolina Senator from Lexington County District 35 (1980–2012)[88]
Local and municipal officials Jim Kenney Larry Krasner Michelle Wu Maria Hadden Mayors Current
  • Jim Kenney, Mayor of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (2016–present)[89]
  • Regina Romero, Mayor of Tucson, Arizona (2019-present)[90]
  • Christopher Taylor, Mayor of Ann Arbor, Michigan (2014-present)[13]
Municipal executive officials Current
  • Larry Krasner, District Attorney of Philadelphia (2018–present)[91]
  • Scott Stringer, New York City Comptroller (2014–present)[92]
  • Rachael Rollins, District Attorney of Suffolk County (2019–present)[93]
  • Lina Hidalgo, Harris County, Texas judge (2019-Present)[94]
Former
  • Mark J. Green, former New York City Public Advocate (1994–2001)[67]
Municipal legislators Current
  • Lydia Edwards,Boston, MA City Councilor, District 1 (2017-Present)[95]
  • Ann Kitchen, Austin City Council Member, District 5 (2015–present)[96]
  • Michelle Wu, Boston, Massachusetts City Councilor, at-large (2014–present)[1]
  • Maria Hadden, Chicago City Council Alderman from the 49th ward (2019–present)[97]
  • Matt Martin, Chicago City Council Alderman from the 47th ward (2019–present)[97]
  • Costa Constantinides, New York City Councilman from District 22 (2014–present)[98]
  • Ben Kallos, New York City Councilman from District 5 (2014–present)[99]
  • Brad Lander, New York City Councilman from District 39 (2010–present)[100]
  • Antonio Reynoso, New York City Councilman from District 34 (2014–present)[101]
  • Jimmy Van Bramer, New York City Councilman from the 26th District (2010–present)[102]
  • Jamie Gauthier, Philadelphia City Councilmember from the 3rd District (2020–present)[70]
  • Chloe Eudaly, Portland, Oregon City Councilmember (2016–present)[103]
  • Tameika Isaac Devine, Columbia, South Carolina City Council Member At-Large (2002-present)[104]
Party officials DNC Members
  • Mark Brewer, former Chair of the Michigan Democratic Party (1995-2013)[19]
  • Kate Donaghue, DNC member from Massachusetts [105]
  • Alex Goff, DNC member from Nevada [106]
  • Allison Stephens, DNC member from Nevada [106]
  • Kathleen Sullivan, DNC member from New Hampshire; former New Hampshire Democratic Party Chair (1997–2007)[107]
  • Celine Vasquez, DNC member from Texas [105]
Notable individuals Megan Rapinoe John Legend Jonathan Van Ness Constance Wu Ashley Judd Ady Barkan Ashlee Marie Preston Athletes and sports figures
  • Layshia Clarendon, American basketball player for the Connecticut Sun and activist [41]
  • Megan Rapinoe, American professional soccer player[108]
  • Adam Rippon, American Olympic figure skater[109]
Businesspeople
  • Ellen Pao, investor and activist[20]
  • Franklin Leonard, film executive[110]
Entertainers and artists
  • Cristela Alonzo, comedian, actress, writer and producer[111]
  • Elizabeth Banks, actress, director, writer, and producer[110]
  • Ike Barinholtz, comedian, actor, writer, director, producer and screenwriter[110]
  • Bobby Berk, interior designer and television personality[112]
  • Iram Parveen Bilal, filmmaker and entrepreneur[20]
  • Ashley Nicole Black, actress and writer[113]
  • Yvette Nicole Brown, actress[114]
  • Karen Chee, comedian, essayist, comedy writer[20]
  • Shea Couleé, drag queen and reality TV personality[115]
  • Denise Crosby, actress[116]
  • Ramona Diaz, filmmaker[20]
  • Melissa Etheridge, singer-songwriter, guitarist, and activist[41]
  • Ben Feldman, actor[110]
  • Sally Field, actress and author[117]
  • Travon Free, comedian, actor, and writer[110]
  • Scarlett Johansson, actress[118]
  • Ashley Judd, actress and activist[119]
  • Michael Kang, film director[20]
  • John Legend, singer[120]
  • Rosie O'Donnell, comedian and television personality[121]
  • Annabel Park, filmmaker[20]
  • Piper Perabo, actress[122]
  • Busy Philipps, actress and writer[110]
  • PJ Raval, cinematographer and filmmaker[20]
  • Angela Robinson, actress and singer[110]
  • Amy Schumer, actress and activist[123]
  • Adam Scott, actor, comedian, producer, and podcaster[110]
  • Martin Sheen, actor[124]
  • Jill Soloway, television creator, showrunner, director and writer [41]
  • Amber Tamblyn, actress, writer and director[125]
  • Chrissy Teigen, model, television personality, and author[126]
  • Renee Tajima-Peña, filmmaker[20]
  • Jonathan Van Ness, hairdresser, podcaster, and television personality[127]
  • Constance Wu, actress[20]
  • Jenny Yang, comedian and writer[20]
  • Patricia Arquette, actress[128]
Political activists
  • Ady Barkan, healthcare activist and attorney[129]
  • Tracy Chou, activist and software engineer[20]
  • Lori Kido Lopez, media activist and Professor of Media and Cultural Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison[20]
  • Torie Osborn, former CEO of the Los Angeles LGBT Center & the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force [41]
  • Ashlee Marie Preston, transgender rights activist, journalist, former California State Assembly candidate.[130]
  • Urvashi Vaid, author, attorney, and LGBTQ rights activist [41]
  • Rhiana Gunn-Wright, one of the key policy architects of the Green New Deal[131]
Religious leaders
  • Bruce Reyes-Chow, American Teaching Elder (minister) of the Presbyterian Church[20]
Writers, experts, and commentators
  • Gina Apostol, writer[20]
  • Dean Baker, macroeconomist and co-founder of the Center for Economic and Policy Research[19]
  • Rabia Chaudry, writer, attorney, podcast host[20]
  • Esther Choo, emergency physician and associate professor at the Oregon Health & Science University[20]
  • Arthur Chu, columnist, Jeopardy champion[20]
  • Nicole Chung, writer and editor[20]
  • Robert Creamer, political consultant, community organizer, and author[19]
  • Art Cullen, editor of the Storm Lake Times[132]
  • Anil Dash, blogger and entrepreneur[20]
  • Gaby Dunn, writer, actress, journalist, comedian, LGBTQ activist, and podcaster [41]
  • Annie Fox, writer[133]
  • Jeff Faux, founder of the Economic Policy Institute[19]
  • Roxane Gay, writer, professor, editor, and commentator[134]
  • Marshall Ganz, professor of community organizing and grassroots organizing at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University[19]
  • Gayatri Gopinath, associate professor of Social and Cultural Analysis and director of the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality at New York University[20]
  • Rhiana Gunn-Wright, social and environmental policy expert and one of the architects of the Green New Deal[135]
  • Jenny Han, writer[20]
  • Gish Jen, writer[20]
  • Sarah Kendzior, journalist and author[136]
  • Stephen King, writer[137]
  • Sally Kohn, journalist, political commentator, CEO of Movement Vision Lab[19]
  • R. O. Kwon, writer[20]
  • Thanhha Lai, writer[20]
  • R. Zamora Linmark, writer[20]
  • J. Kenji López-Alt, writer[20]
  • Jeffrey Marsh, writer, actor, artist, non-binary rights activist[138]
  • Heather McGhee, political commentator and former president of Demos[19]
  • Courtney Milan, writer[20]
  • Lawrence Mishel, distinguished fellow at the Economic Policy Institute[19]
  • Kevin Nadal, author, activist, comedian, and professor of psychology at John Jay College of Criminal Justice and The Graduate Center of the City University of New York[20]
  • Celeste Ng, writer[20]
  • Christopher Noxon, writer and journalist[110]
  • Marti Noxon, writer, director, and producer[110]
  • Robyn Ochs, activist and editor of Bi Women Quarterly [41]
  • Dan Santat, writer and illustrator[20]
  • David Simon, author, journalist and writer[139]
  • Rebecca Solnit, writer[140][141]
  • Monique Truong, writer[20]
  • Esmé Weijun Wang, writer[20]
  • Chuck Wendig, author, comic book writer, screenwriter, and blogger[142]
  • Jeff Yang, writer and journalist[20]
Organizations Working Families Party Labor unions
  • AFT - American Federation of Teachers (Massachusetts), representing 23,000[143] (co-endorsement with Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden)
  • National Union of Healthcare Workers, representing 15,000[144] (co-endorsement with Bernie Sanders)
Newspapers
  • ‘’The New York Times‘’, ‘’(co-endorsement with Amy Klobuchar)’’[145]
  • ‘’The Storm Lake Times‘’ [146]
  • ‘’The Des Moines Register‘’ [147]
  • ‘’The Austin Chronicle‘’ [148]
Political organizations
  • Black to the Future Action Fund[149]
  • Lambda Independent Democrats of Brooklyn[150]
  • Progressive Change Campaign Committee[151]
  • Stonewall Democratic Club of New York[152]
  • Working Families Party[153]
References
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  145. ^ Lerer, Lisa (January 19, 2020). "New York Times Editorial Board Endorses Amy Klobuchar and Elizabeth Warren". The New York Times.
  146. ^ Cullen, Art (December 11, 2019). "Warren the best choice from a great field". The Storm Lake Times.
  147. ^ "Elizabeth Warren will push an unequal America in the right direction". The Des Moines Register. January 25, 2020.
  148. ^ "Chronicle Endorsements for the March 3 Primary Election". The Austin Chronicle. February 14, 2020.
  149. ^ McCammond, Alexi (February 20, 2020). "Black activist group gives its first presidential endorsement to Elizabeth Warren". Axios. Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  150. ^ http://www.gaycitynews.nyc/warrentopschoiceofnewyorkdemcraticclubs
  151. ^ "Our Candidates". boldprogressives.org. Retrieved January 18, 2020.
  152. ^ Tracey, Matt (January 23, 2020). "Stonewall Backs Elizabeth Warren for President". gaycitynews.com. Retrieved January 25, 2020.
  153. ^ Herndon, Astead (September 16, 2019). "Working Families Party Endorses Elizabeth Warren". The New York Times. Archived from the original on September 16, 2019. Retrieved November 11, 2019.
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