Greg Holland
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Greg Holland
Rockies and St. Louis Cardinals. Holland is a three-time All-Star. After pitching for Western Carolina University, Holland made his MLB debut with the Royals

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For other uses, see Greg Holland (disambiguation). Greg Holland Holland with the Kansas City RoyalsWashington Nationals – No. 56 Relief pitcher Born: (1985-11-20) November 20, 1985 (age 32)
Marion, North Carolina Bats: Right Throws: Right MLB debut August 2, 2010, for the Kansas City RoyalsMLB statistics
(through September 6, 2018)Win–loss record 23–20Earned run average 2.86Strikeouts 536Saves 187 Teams
  • Kansas City Royals (2010–2015)
  • Colorado Rockies (2017)
  • St. Louis Cardinals (2018)
  • Washington Nationals (2018–present)
Career highlights and awards
  • 3× All-Star (2013, 2014, 2017)
  • World Series champion (2015)
  • AL Reliever of the Year (2014)
  • NL saves leader (2017)

Gregory Scott Holland (born November 20, 1985) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Washington Nationals of Major League Baseball (MLB). He previously played for the Kansas City Royals, Colorado Rockies and St. Louis Cardinals. Holland is a three-time All-Star.

After pitching for Western Carolina University, Holland made his MLB debut with the Royals in 2010. He became their closer and made the All-Star Game in 2013 and 2014, and won the Mariano Rivera Award in 2014. He missed the 2016 season while recovering from Tommy John surgery, and signed with the Colorado Rockies for the 2017 season. He led the National League in saves with the Rockies, and signed with the Cardinals for the 2018 season.

Contents
  • 1 Early career
  • 2 Professional career
    • 2.1 Kansas City Royals
      • 2.1.1 2010–2013
      • 2.1.2 2014–2016
    • 2.2 Colorado Rockies
    • 2.3 St. Louis Cardinals
    • 2.4 Washington Nationals
  • 3 Pitching repertoire
  • 4 Personal life
  • 5 References
  • 6 External links
Early career

Holland attended McDowell High School in Marion, North Carolina, and he played for the school's baseball team as a third baseman. He suffered a broken jaw when he was hit in the face by a ball, requiring his jaw to be wired shut. He lost weight, dropping to about 150 pounds (68 kg), and drew little interest from college baseball programs. He enrolled at Western Carolina University, and made the Catamounts' baseball team as a pitcher as a walk on.[1] While at Western Carolina, he had a 10-12 win-loss record with a 4.34 earned run average (ERA) from 2005 to 2007.

Professional career Kansas City Royals

The Kansas City Royals selected Holland in the 10th round of the 2007 Major League Baseball draft.[1] Holland began his professional career in 2007, making 22 relief appearances for the Idaho Falls Chukars of the Rookie-level Pioneer League, and going 6-1 with a 3.48 ERA, striking out 37 batters in 33​2⁄3 innings. In 2008, he pitched for the Wilmington Blue Rocks of the Class A-Advanced Carolina League, going 4-5 with a 3.42 ERA in 32 games (seven starts), fanning 96 batters in 84​1⁄3 innings. He split 2009 between the Northwest Arkansas Naturals of the Class AA Texas League and the Omaha Royals of the Class AAA Pacific Coast League, going a combined 4-3 with a 3.81 ERA in 35 relief appearances.

2010–2013

Holland began the 2010 season with the Omaha Royals, going 3-3 with a 3.81 ERA in 36 relief appearances for them overall. He was promoted to the majors on July 29, 2010 and made 15 relief appearances for the Kansas City Royals, going 0-1 with 23 strikeouts and a 6.75 ERA in 18​2⁄3 innings.[2]

Holland started the 2011 season in Omaha, but was called up again in May, earning his first major league win in a May 19 game against the Texas Rangers. He pitched in 46 games for the big league club that season, going 5-1 with a 1.80 ERA. He allowed only 37 hits and struck out 74 batters in 60 innings. At the minor league level, he was 2-0 with a 2.08 ERA in 13 relief appearances that season.[citation needed] In 2012, Holland went 7-4 with 16 saves, 91 strikeouts and a 2.96 ERA in 67 relief appearances. He assumed closing duties when Jonathan Broxton, who began the season as the team's closer, was traded to the Cincinnati Reds in July 31.[3] He also pitched in two games at the minor league level that year.

In 2013, Holland became the Royals full-time closer and converted 47 of 50 save opportunities. On September 26, 2013, Holland set the Royals single season saves record with his 46th save in a 3-2 win over the Chicago White Sox. He surpassed Dan Quisenberry and Jeff Montgomery who both had 45 save seasons.[4]

2014–2016

Holland had his second straight All-Star year in 2014, converting 46 of 48 save opportunities while compiling a 1.44 ERA. He appeared in eight games in the postseason leading up to the Royals World Series appearance, posting a 1.13 ERA over 8 innings and earning 6 saves. He tied a playoff series record by saving 4 games in the ALCS (matching Dennis Eckersley's record in the 1988 ALCS), the first since John Wetteland in the 1996 World Series. On October 22, Holland won the inaugural Mariano Rivera Award for his outstanding performance as a closer.[5] Two days later in Game 3 of the World Series he saved his record-tying seventh game of the postseason, sharing the record with Wetteland, Robb Nen, Troy Percival, Brad Lidge and Koji Uehara.[6]

After serving the bulk of the 2015 season as the Royals' closer, compiling 32 saves with a 3.83 ERA, doctors discovered in late September that Holland had a "significant tear" in his right ulnar collateral ligament. On September 22, the Royals announced that Holland's season was over, and that he would likely require Tommy John surgery. On September 29, the team confirmed that Holland was scheduled to undergo the surgery on October 2, and that he would likely miss most, if not all, of the 2016 season.[7] With the Royals finishing the season 95-67, the team won the 2015 World Series against the New York Mets, their first title in 30 years.

After the 2015 season, Holland had been released, making him a free agent for the first time of his career. Holland missed the entire 2016 season as he continued to recover from Tommy John surgery.[8]

Colorado Rockies

On January 26, 2017, Holland signed a one-year contract with the Colorado Rockies.[9] On April 3, he earned his first save since September 17, 2015, defeating the Milwaukee Brewers on his Rockies debut and Opening Day.[10] Holland won the National League Reliever of the Month Award for April.[11]

On Mother's Day, Holland broke the Rockies franchise record of converting 16 consecutive saves to start a season, formerly held by José Jiménez, which he had set in 2002. Holland won his second consecutive NL Reliever of the Month Award for the month of May, going for 20-for-20 in save opportunities, a 1.31 ERA and 0.82 WHIP through May.[11] He was selected to his third All-Star Game, played at Marlins Park in Miami. At that point, he saved an MLB-best 28 of 29 chances with a 1.62 ERA and opponents batted .162/.264/.259.[12] He slumped in August, allowing 14 earned runs in ​9 1⁄3 innings.[13] h At season's end, Holland had tied the Rockies franchise record for saves in one season while tying for the National League lead with Los Angeles Dodgers' Kenley Jansen. Holland's ERA was 3.61, and he qualified for enough incentives to increase his salary from the base $9 million to $15 million. Having a player option for 2018, he chose not to exercise it, making him a free agent.[14] He won the NL Comeback Player of the Year Award.[15]

St. Louis Cardinals

Holland signed a one-year, $14 million, contract with the St. Louis Cardinals on March 31, 2018.[16] The Cardinals assigned him to the Palm Beach Cardinals of the Class A-Advanced Florida State League to ensure his conditioning before promoting him to the major leagues.[13] In his major league debut with the club versus the Milwaukee Brewers on April 10, he appeared in the tenth inning and walked four batters, including walking a run to Orlando Arcia, which led to a 5−4 loss.[17] On May 26, 2018, after putting up a 9.45 ERA for the 2018 season, the Cardinals put Holland on the 10-day disabled list with a hip impingement. [18]

After compiling a 7.92 ERA and a 2.24 WHIP in 25 relief innings pitched, Holland was designated for assignment on July 27.[19] He was released on August 1, 2018.[20]

Washington Nationals

On August 7, 2018, he signed a contract with the Washington Nationals.[21]

Pitching repertoire

With an overhand delivery, Holland throws a four-seam fastball that regularly in 95-96 mph, topping out at 100 mph. He pairs his fastball with a slider around 86 mph, and a rare splitter around 85-89 mph.[22]

Personal life

He is the son of Scott and Kim Holland. He has a brother, Chase Holland and a sister, Ashley Holland Berryhill. He is married to Lacey. Their first child was born on October 1, 2014.[23] Their second child was born on July 27, 2017.

References
  1. ^ a b http://www.kansascity.com/sports/mlb/kansas-city-royals/article321960/Royals-closer-Greg-Holland’s-‘crazy-ride’-finds-him-among-baseball’s-best.html
  2. ^ Jared Burton (July 29, 2010). "Royals Promote Former Catamount RHP Greg Holland". Western Carolina University Media Relations. Retrieved November 17, 2017. 
  3. ^ "Cincinnati Reds acquire reliever Jonathan Broxton from Kansas City Royals". Espn.com. July 31, 2012. Retrieved April 1, 2018. 
  4. ^ "Reliever Greg Holland named 2013 Bruce Rice Royals Pitcher of the Year". MLB.com. January 20, 2016. Retrieved April 1, 2018. 
  5. ^ Snyder, Matt (October 22, 2014). "Greg Holland wins first Mariano Rivera Award". CBSSports.com. Retrieved August 7, 2018. 
  6. ^ Casella, Paul. "Game 3 Did you know: Greg Holland ties Postseason saves record". MLB.com. Retrieved August 7, 2018. 
  7. ^ Flanagan, Jeffrey (January 20, 2016). "Royals Greg Holland will undergo elbow surgery". MLB.com. Retrieved April 1, 2018. 
  8. ^ Harding, Thomas (January 20, 2016). "Rockies' Greg Holland recovers from Tommy John". MLB.com. Retrieved April 1, 2018. 
  9. ^ Thomas Harding (January 26, 2017). "Rox come to terms with former All-Star closer Holland". MLB.com. Retrieved November 17, 2017. 
  10. ^ Genaro Armas (April 3, 2017). "Rockies win in debuts of Black, Holland, beat Brewers 7−5". Associated Press. Retrieved November 17, 2017. 
  11. ^ a b Patrick Saunders (June 2, 2017). "Rockies' Charlie Blackmon, Greg Holland honored as National League's best in May". The Denver Post. Retrieved November 17, 2017. 
  12. ^ Matt Snyder (July 10, 2017). "2017 MLB All-Star Game: Greg Holland's long road back to being an All-Star: Even back in November, Holland was not throwing very well in his return from Tommy John surgery". CBSSports.com. Retrieved November 17, 2017. 
  13. ^ a b Eschman, Todd (March 13, 2018). "Holland assigned to Class A Palm Beach for conditioning as Cardinals make a trade, other roster moves". Belleville News-Democrat. Bnd.com. Retrieved April 1, 2018. 
  14. ^ Daniel Kramer (October 12, 2017). "Report: Rockies' Holland won't exercise option: All-Star closer returned from elbow surgery to tie for NL lead in saves". MLB.com. Retrieved November 17, 2017. 
  15. ^ Saunders, Patrick (December 1, 2017). "Rockies' Greg Holland honored as National League comeback player of the year". The Denver Post. Retrieved April 15, 2018. 
  16. ^ Trezza, Joe (March 31, 2018). "Greg Holland signs deal with Cardinals". MLB.com. Retrieved April 1, 2018. 
  17. ^ Hummel, Rick (April 10, 2018). "Holland implodes in Cardinals debut, walks four in decisive 10th inning". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Retrieved April 15, 2018. 
  18. ^ "Cardinals place Greg Holland on 10-day disabled list with hip impingement". Sports.yahoo.com. May 26, 2018. Retrieved August 7, 2018. 
  19. ^ RotoWire Staff (July 27, 2018). "Cardinals' Greg Holland: Designated for assignment". CBSSports.com. Retrieved August 7, 2018. 
  20. ^ Cole, Eric (August 2, 2018). "Complete MLB Transactions List 8/1: Braves send Kolby Allard back down". MLB Daily Dish. Retrieved August 7, 2018. 
  21. ^ Castillo, Jorge (August 7, 2018). "Nationals sign pitcher Greg Holland, option Jimmy Cordero". Washington Post. Retrieved August 7, 2018. 
  22. ^ "FanGraphs Greg Holland Pitch FX". Fangraphs.com. Retrieved November 17, 2017. 
  23. ^ Alyson Footer (October 9, 2014). "ALCS trio experiencing new joy of fatherhood". MLB.com. Retrieved November 17, 2017. 
External links Wikimedia Commons has media related to Greg Holland (baseball).
  • Baseball portal
  • Career statistics and player information from MLB, or ESPN, or Baseball-Reference, or Fangraphs, or The Baseball Cube, or Baseball-Reference (Minors)
  • v
  • t
  • e
National League season saves leaders
  • 1969: Gladding
  • 1970: Granger
  • 1971: Giusti
  • 1972: Carroll
  • 1973: Marshall
  • 1974: Marshall
  • 1975: Eastwick & Hrabosky
  • 1976: Eastwick
  • 1977: Fingers
  • 1978: Fingers
  • 1979: Sutter
  • 1980: Sutter
  • 1981: Sutter
  • 1982: Sutter
  • 1983: Smith
  • 1984: Sutter
  • 1985: Reardon
  • 1986: Worrell
  • 1987: Bedrosian
  • 1988: Franco
  • 1989: Davis
  • 1990: Franco
  • 1991: Smith
  • 1992: Smith
  • 1993: Myers
  • 1994: Franco
  • 1995: Myers
  • 1996: Brantley & Worrell
  • 1997: Shaw
  • 1998: Hoffman
  • 1999: Urbina
  • 2000: Alfonseca
  • 2001: Nen
  • 2002: Smoltz
  • 2003: Gagné
  • 2004: Benítez & Isringhausen
  • 2005: Cordero
  • 2006: Hoffman
  • 2007: Valverde
  • 2008: Valverde
  • 2009: Bell
  • 2010: Wilson
  • 2011: Axford & Kimbrel
  • 2012: Kimbrel & Motte
  • 2013: Kimbrel
  • 2014: Kimbrel
  • 2015: Melancon
  • 2016: Familia
  • 2017: Holland & Jansen
  • v
  • t
  • e
Major League Baseball Reliever of the Year AwardDelivery Man Award
(2005–2013)
  • 2005: Mariano Rivera
  • 2006: Mariano Rivera
  • 2007: Jonathan Papelbon
  • 2008: Brad Lidge
  • 2009: Mariano Rivera
  • 2010: Heath Bell
  • 2011: José Valverde
  • 2012: Fernando Rodney
  • 2013: Craig Kimbrel
Trevor Hoffman Award
(2014–present)
  • 2014: Craig Kimbrel
  • 2015: Mark Melancon
  • 2016: Kenley Jansen
  • 2017: Kenley Jansen
Mariano Rivera Award
(2014–present)
  • 2014: Greg Holland
  • 2015: Andrew Miller
  • 2016: Zach Britton
  • 2017: Craig Kimbrel
Monthly winners
(2005–2013)2005
  • April: José Mesa
  • May: Trevor Hoffman
  • June: Chad Cordero
  • July: Brad Lidge
  • August: Todd Jones
  • September: Ryan Dempster
2006
  • April: Jonathan Papelbon
  • May: Jason Isringhausen
  • June: Bobby Jenks
  • July: Joe Nathan
  • August: Francisco Rodríguez
  • September: Trevor Hoffman
2007
  • April: Francisco Cordero
  • May: Trevor Hoffman
  • June: J. J. Putz
  • July: Billy Wagner
  • August: Takashi Saito
  • September: Manny Corpas
2008
  • April: Mariano Rivera
  • May: B. J. Ryan
  • June: Francisco Rodríguez
  • July: Joe Nathan
  • August: José Valverde
  • September: Joakim Soria
2009
  • April: Heath Bell
  • May: Trevor Hoffman
  • June: Joe Nathan
  • July: Mariano Rivera
  • August: Ryan Franklin
  • September: Joakim Soria
2010
  • April: Matt Capps
  • May: Rafael Soriano
  • June: Bobby Jenks
  • July: Rafael Soriano
  • August: Rafael Soriano
  • September: Carlos Mármol
2011
  • April: Huston Street
  • May: J. J. Putz
  • June: Joel Hanrahan
  • July: John Axford
  • August: Craig Kimbrel
  • September: J. J. Putz
2012
  • April: Jonathan Papelbon
  • May: Jim Johnson
  • June: Tyler Clippard
  • July: Aroldis Chapman
  • August: Aroldis Chapman
  • September: Craig Kimbrel
2013
  • April: Jason Grilli
  • May: Jason Grilli
  • June: Joe Nathan
  • July: Greg Holland
  • August: Craig Kimbrel
  • September: Greg Holland
  • v
  • t
  • e
National League Comeback Player of the Year Award
  • 2005: Griffey, Jr.
  • 2006: Garciaparra
  • 2007: Young
  • 2008: Lidge
  • 2009: Carpenter
  • 2010: Hudson
  • 2011: Berkman
  • 2012: Posey
  • 2013: Liriano
  • 2014: McGehee
  • 2015: Harvey
  • 2016: Rendon
  • 2017: Holland
  • v
  • t
  • e
Sporting News National League Comeback Player of the Year Award
  • 1965: Law
  • 1966: Regan
  • 1967: McCormick
  • 1968: A. Johnson
  • 1969: Agee
  • 1970: Hickman
  • 1971: Downing
  • 1972: Tolan
  • 1973: D. Johnson
  • 1974: Wynn
  • 1975: Jones
  • 1976: John
  • 1977: McCovey
  • 1978: Stargell
  • 1979: Brock
  • 1980: Reuss
  • 1981: Knepper
  • 1982: Morgan
  • 1983: Denny
  • 1984: Andújar
  • 1985: Reuschel
  • 1986: Knight
  • 1987: Sutcliffe
  • 1988: Leary
  • 1989: Smith
  • 1990: Tudor
  • 1991: Pendleton
  • 1992: Sheffield
  • 1993: Galarraga
  • 1994: Wallach
  • 1995: Gant
  • 1996: Davis
  • 1997: Daulton
  • 1998: Vaughn
  • 1999: Henderson
  • 2000: Galarraga
  • 2001: Morris
  • 2002: Lieberthal
  • 2003: López
  • 2004: Carpenter
  • 2005: Griffey, Jr.
  • 2006: Garciaparra
  • 2007: Young
  • 2008: Tatis
  • 2009: Carpenter
  • 2010: Hudson
  • 2011: Berkman
  • 2012: Posey
  • 2013: Liriano
  • 2014: McGehee
  • 2015: Harvey
  • 2016: Fernández
  • 2017: Holland
  • v
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  • e
GIBBY/This Year in Baseball Closer of the Year Award
  • 2002: Smoltz
  • 2003: Gagné
  • 2004: Rivera
  • 2005: Rivera
  • 2006: Rivera
  • 2007: Papelbon
  • 2008: Lidge
  • 2009: Rivera
  • 2010: Wilson
  • 2011: Valverde
  • 2012: Rodney
  • 2013: Kimbrel
  • 2014: Holland
  • v
  • t
  • e
Washington Nationals current rosterActive roster
  • 1 Wilmer Difo
  • 2 Adam Eaton
  • 3 Michael A. Taylor
  • 5 Adrián Sánchez
  • 6 Anthony Rendon
  • 7 Trea Turner
  • 11 Ryan Zimmerman
  • 14 Mark Reynolds
  • 16 Víctor Robles
  • 22 Juan Soto
  • 23 Erick Fedde
  • 29 Pedro Severino
  • 30 Koda Glover
  • 31 Max Scherzer
  • 32 Matt Wieters
  • 33 Matt Grace
  • 34 Bryce Harper
  • 36 Sammy Solís
  • 37 Stephen Strasburg
  • 41 Joe Ross
  • 45 Andrew Stevenson
  • 50 Austin Voth
  • 51 Wander Suero
  • 52 Jimmy Cordero
  • 53 Austen Williams
  • 55 Tim Collins
  • 56 Greg Holland
  • 57 Tanner Roark
  • 60 Justin Miller
  • 61 Kyle McGowin
  • 62 Sean Doolittle
  • 64 Spencer Kieboom
  • 68 Jefry Rodríguez
Inactive roster
  • 19 Matt Reynolds
  • 26 Trevor Gott
  • 65 Raudy Read
  • 70 Austin L. Adams
Disabled list
  • 12 Howie Kendrick
  • 40 Kelvin Herrera
  • 53 Joaquín Benoit
  • 58 Jeremy Hellickson
  • 66 Jhonatan Solano
Coaching staff
  • Manager 4 Dave Martinez
  • Bench 10 Chip Hale
  • First base 24 Tim Bogar
  • Third base 13 Bob Henley
  • Hitting 54 Kevin Long
  • Assistant Hitting 25 Joe Dillon
  • Pitching 38 Derek Lilliquist
  • Bullpen 35 Henry Blanco


Exception to the Rule
Exception to the Rule
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2018 Topps Big League #325 Corey Knebel/Kenley Jansen/Greg Holland Milwaukee Brewers/Los Angeles Dodgers/Colorado Rockies Baseball Card - GOTBASEBALLCARDS
2018 Topps Big League #325 Corey Knebel/Kenley Jansen/Greg Holland Milwaukee Brewers/Los Angeles Dodgers/Colorado Rockies Baseball Card - GOTBASEBALLCARDS
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Last Fast Ride - The Life, Love and Death of a Punk Goddess
Last Fast Ride - The Life, Love and Death of a Punk Goddess
She was smart, beautiful and talented, and as lead singer of THE INSAINTS, would-be rock star Marian Anderson reigns as one of the Bay Area's most provocative and controversial lead singers of the '90s punk scene. The fetish model and dominatrix quickly became known for her wild and lewd live sex acts during performances. Narrated by pop-culture icon Henry Rollins, Last Fast Ride - The Life, Love and Death of a Punk Goddess, is the cautionary tale of the youth, tormented adolescence and tragic untimely demise of this legendary performer. Featured Interviews with: Tim Armstrong - Rancid, Operation Ivy, co-Founder of Hellcat Records Dexter Holland - The Offspring Becky Wreck - Lunachicks Daniel deLeon - Insaints, Rezurex Greg Langston - No Alternative, Sea Hags Texas Terri - Texas Terri and the Stiff Ones Also includes in-depth interviews with Marian's sister, Lolly Holloway, and girlfriend of six years, Danielle Santos Bernal.

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High On the Mountain
High On the Mountain
High On the Mountain by Greg Alan HollandWhen sold by Amazon.com, this product is manufactured on demand using CD-R recordable media. Amazon.com's standard return policy will apply.

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See You At the Stage Door [Explicit]
See You At the Stage Door [Explicit]
See You At the Stage Door [Explicit] by Greg Alan HollandWhen sold by Amazon.com, this product is manufactured on demand using CD-R recordable media. Amazon.com's standard return policy will apply.

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When I Come Back
When I Come Back
When I Come Back (I Wanna Be My Dog) / Oh To Be The One

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