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Kleiner Perkins
37.421731°N 122.211275°W / 37.421731; -122.211275 Kleiner Perkins, formerly Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers (KPCB), is an American venture capital

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Coordinates: 37°25′18″N 122°12′41″W / 37.421731°N 122.211275°W / 37.421731; -122.211275

Kleiner Perkins Formerly Kleiner PerkinsType PrivateIndustry Private equityFounded 1972; 46 years ago (1972) in CaliforniaFounders Eugene Kleiner, Tom Perkins, Frank J. Caufield, Brook ByersHeadquarters Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California, United StatesNumber of locations Menlo Park, California, United States
San Francisco, California, United States.
ShanghaiProducts Investments
Venture capital fundsWebsite www.kleinerperkins.com

Kleiner Perkins, formerly Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers (KPCB), is an American venture capital firm headquartered on Sand Hill Road in Menlo Park in Silicon Valley.[1] Specializing in investments in incubation, early stage and growth companies, since its founding in 1972 the firm has backed entrepreneurs[2] in over 850 ventures,[3] including America Online,[4] Amazon.com,[5] Compaq,[6] Electronic Arts,[4] JD.com, Square,[7] Genentech,[6] Google, Netscape, Sun Microsystems, Nest, Snap, AppDynamics, and Twitter.[7] Kleiner Perkins focuses its global investments in practice areas including technology and life sciences.[7] The Wall Street Journal and other publications have called it one of the "largest and most established" venture capital firms[8] and Dealbook named it "one of Silicon Valley’s top venture capital providers."[9] In addition to its Menlo Park headquarters, the company has offices in San Francisco[1] and Shanghai, China.[10]

Contents
  • 1 History
  • 2 Investments
  • 3 Key partners
  • 4 See also
  • 5 References
  • 6 External links
History History of private equity
and venture capital Early history (origins of modern private equity) The 1980s (leveraged buyout boom) The 1990s (leveraged buyout and the venture capital bubble) The 2000s (dot-com bubble to the credit crunch)
  • v
  • t
  • e

The firm was formed in 1972 as Kleiner, Perkins, Caufield & Byers (KPCB)[11][12] on Sand Hill Road in Menlo Park, California,[13] with a focus on seed, early-stage, and growth investments.[11][12] The firm is named after its four founding partners: Eugene Kleiner, Tom Perkins, Frank J. Caufield, and Brook Byers.[13] Kleiner was a founder of Fairchild Semiconductor, and Perkins was an early Hewlett-Packard executive.[13][14] Byers joined in 1977.[15]

Located in Menlo Park, California, Kleiner Perkins had access to the growing technology industries in the area. By the early 1970s, there were many semiconductor companies based in the Santa Clara Valley as well as early computer firms using their devices and programming and service companies. Venture capital firms suffered a temporary downturn in 1974, when the stock market crashed and investors were naturally wary of this new kind of investment fund. Nevertheless, the firm was still active in this period.[citation needed] By 1996, Kleiner Perkins had handed out $880 million in funding to around 260 companies.[15] Beyond the original founders, notable members of the firm have included individuals such as[16] John Doerr,[17] Vinod Khosla,[18] and Bill Joy.[19] Colin Powell joined as a “strategic” partner in 2005,[20] while Al Gore joined as partner[9] in 2007[18][21] as part of a collaboration between Kleiner Perkins and Generation Investment Management.[22] Mary Meeker joined the firm in 2010,[16] and that year Kleiner Perkins expanded its practice to invest in growth stage companies.[23]

The New York Times has described Kleiner Perkins as “perhaps Silicon Valley’s most famous venture firm.”[20] The firm was described by Dealbook in 2009 as "one of Silicon Valley’s top venture capital providers,”[9] and The Wall Street Journal in 2010 called it one of the "largest and most established" venture capital firms.[8] By 2017 it had raised around $10 billion in 20 venture capital funds and four growth funds.[3]

In May 2012, Ellen Pao, an employee, sued the firm for gender discrimination in Pao v. Kleiner Perkins,[24] which the firm has vigorously denied.[25] On March 27, 2015, after a month-long trial, the jury found against Pao on all claims.[26] In June 2015, Pao filed an appeal.[27] In September 2015, Pao announced she would no longer appeal the jury verdict.[28]

Investments

In March 2008 Kleiner Perkins announced the iFund, a $100 million venture capital investment initiative that funds concepts related to the iPhone, and doubled that investment a year later.[29] It was reported in April 2008 that Kleiner Perkins was raising funds for a $500 million growth-stage clean-technology fund.[12][30] In October 2010, the firm launched a $250 million fund called sFund to focus on social startups, with co-investors such as Facebook, Zynga and Amazon.com.[31] In early 2016, the firm raised $1.4 billion in KP XVII and DGF III.[32]

The firm has been an early investor in more than 850[3] technology and life sciences firms since its founding, including Amazon.com,[5] America Online,[4] Brio Technology,[33] Compaq,[6] Electronic Arts,[4] Flextronics,[33] Genentech,[6] Geron,[34] Google,[5] Intuit,[31] Lotus Development, LSI Logic, Macromedia,[33] Netscape,[15] Quantum, Segway, Sun Microsystems,[33] Synack,[35] Tandem Computers,[14] Nebula,[36] and The 3DO Company.[33] Some current private investments include Newsela,[37] Align Commerce,[38][39] AlienVault, Ionic Security, AirBnB, DJI, Armo, Spotify, Handshake, Ring, Clean Power Finance, Coursera,[7] Datameer,[40] Shape Security,[41] SimpliVity, Leanplum, and Uber.[7]

Kleiner Perkins paid $5 million in 1994 for around 25% of Netscape and profited from Netscape's IPO.[15] Its investment of $8 million in Cerent was worth around $2 billion[citation needed] when the optical equipment maker was sold to Cisco Systems[13] for $6.9 billion in August 1999.[42] In 1999, Kleiner Perkins[5] and Sequoia Capital paid $24 million for 20% of Google—as of February 2018 Google's market capitalization stood at about $700 billion.[citation needed] As initial investors in Amazon.com Kleiner Perkins scored returns[5] in excess of $1 billion[citation needed] on an $8 million investment.[5] Recent investments include AppDynamics, ArcSight, Autotrader.com, Foundation Medicine, Flexus, Lifelock, JD.com, MyFitnessPal, FireEye (Mandiant), Nest, Snap, Square, Tesoara, and Twitter.[7] Kleiner Perkins funds Proterra Inc., an automotive company. [43]

Key partners See also: Category:Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers people

The firm currently has nine general partners managing the company:[44]

  • John Doerr (chairman)
  • Eric Feng
  • Ilya Fushman
  • Mamoon Hamid
  • Wen Hsieh
  • Noah Knauf
  • Mary Meeker
  • Mood Rowghani
  • Ted Schlein
  • Beth Seidenberg
See also
  • San Francisco Bay Area portal
  • List of venture capital firms
References
  1. ^ a b Kleiner Perkins Offices at KPCB.com Archived 22 July 2010 at the Wayback Machine.
  2. ^ "Capital Markets: Kleiner, Perkins, Caufield & Byers". Bloomberg Businessweek. Retrieved 27 July 2011. 
  3. ^ a b c Companies, Kleiner Perkins, 2017, retrieved July 22, 2017 
  4. ^ a b c d Clifford, Stephanie (April 28, 2008). "Venture Firm Hires Creative Chief at Electronic Arts". The New York Times. New York City, United States. Retrieved May 21, 2017. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f "How John Doerr, the old prospector, finally struck Google". CNET. 2004. Retrieved May 17, 2017. 
  6. ^ a b c d "Executive Joins Kleiner Perkins". The New York Times. 14 March 1984. Retrieved May 15, 2017. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f "KPCB Portfolio Companies". Archived from the original on 1 March 2014. Retrieved 28 March 2015. 
  8. ^ a b Austin, Scott (2010-01-22). "One Of These Venture Firms Is Not Like The Other". The Wall Street Journal. 
  9. ^ a b c "Gore's Dual Role in Spotlight: Advocate and Investor". The New York Times (Dealbook). 3 November 2009. 
  10. ^ Headquarters, KPCB China, retrieved May 2, 2017 
  11. ^ a b KPCB Information Technology Archived 3 June 2010 at the Wayback Machine.[dead link]
  12. ^ a b c Richtel, Matt (2008-05-01). "Kleiner Perkins Goes Late on Energy". The New York Times. 
  13. ^ a b c d Kleiner, Perkins, Caufield & Byers History, International Directory of Company Histories, Vol. 53. St. James Press, 2003, retrieved May 17, 2017 
  14. ^ a b Tandem Computers - International Directory of Company Histories Vol. 6, St. James Press, 1992 
  15. ^ a b c d Corcoran, Elizabeth (October 13, 1996). "Venture Capital Firm Kleiner Perkins Has Long Nurtured Internet Enterprises". ‘’Washington Post’’. Retrieved September 2, 2014. 
  16. ^ a b "Team". KPCB. Retrieved May 21, 2017. 
  17. ^ Kaplan, Jerry (1996) . Startup: A Silicon Valley Adventure. Bridgewater, NJ: Penguin Books. pp. 301–302. ISBN 0-7351-0141-8. ISBN 0-395-71133-9 (hc.); ISBN 0 14 025731 4 (pbk.). Retrieved June 13, 2010. 
  18. ^ a b "Greentech Initiative". Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. Archived from the original on 16 November 2007. Retrieved 2007-11-13. 
  19. ^ Primack, Dan (April 16, 2012). "Exclusive: Big changes coming to Kleiner Perkins". Fortune. Retrieved May 21, 2017. 
  20. ^ a b Rivlin, Gary (July 13, 2005). "Colin Powell Joins Venture Capital Firm". The New York Times. Retrieved May 21, 2017. 
  21. ^ Coile, Zachary (13 November 2007). "Gore joins Valley's Kleiner Perkins to push green business". San Francisco Chronicle . Retrieved 2007-11-13. 
  22. ^ "Generation Investment Management and Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers Create International Alliance to Accelerate Global Climate Solutions". Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, Generation Investment Management. 2007-11-12. Archived from the original on 14 November 2007. Retrieved 2007-11-13. 
  23. ^ McBride, Sarah (June 27, 2014). "Kleiner Perkins files to raise $1.2 billion in new venture funds". Reuters. Retrieved June 20, 2017. 
  24. ^ McBride, Sarah (22 May 2012). "Kleiner partner sues firm for discrimination". Reuters. Retrieved 15 June 2012. 
  25. ^ Roy, Jessica (May 22, 2012). "Kleiner Perkins 'Vigorously Denies' Ellen Pao's Gender Discrimination Claims". The Observer (Betabeat). Retrieved 15 June 2012. 
  26. ^ Elder, Jeff (28 March 2015). "Jury Backs Kleiner Perkins in Sex-Bias Case". The Wall Street Journal. 
  27. ^ Kocalitcheva, Kia (2015-08-11). "Ellen Pao appeals order to pay Kleiner Perkins trial costs". Fortune. Retrieved 2015-10-01. 
  28. ^ Elder, Jeff (September 10, 2015). "Ellen Pao Won't Appeal Trial Loss in Case Against Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers". Wall Street Journal. New York City. Retrieved May 2, 2017. 
  29. ^ KPCB doubles iFund investment to $200MM Archived 10 March 2008 at the Wayback Machine.
  30. ^ Haislip, Alexander; Dan Primack (24 April 2008). "Kleiner Perkins raising green growth fund". Private Equity Week. Archived from the original on 1 May 2008. Retrieved 2008-04-27. 
  31. ^ a b Arrington, Michael (October 21, 2010). "The Kleiner Perkins sFund: A $250 mn bet that social is just getting started". TechCrunch. Retrieved 22 October 2010. 
  32. ^ Levy, Ari (May 23, 2016). "Kleiner Perkins raising close to $1.3 billion for two funds: Sources". CNBC. Retrieved May 21, 2017. 
  33. ^ a b c d e "75 Power Players". Next Generation. Imagine Media (11): 66–67. November 1995. Kleiner, Perkins, Coffhil & Beyers [sic] were one of the initial investors in The 3DO Company, and as a result, they made a lot of money. 
  34. ^ "SEC Schedule 13G, filed Feb. 17, 1999". 
  35. ^ Lev-Ram, Michal (April 24, 2014). "For crowdsourced security startup, a carrot and a hack". Fortune. Retrieved April 30, 2017. 
  36. ^ Morgan, Timothy Prickett (July 27, 2011). "NASA's former CTO launches Nebula cloud controller". The Register. Retrieved 12 March 2013. 
  37. ^ "Newsela Profile". Built in NYC. Retrieved 15 March 2017. 
  38. ^ Chernova, Yuliya (17 November 2015). "Kleiner Perkins Makes First Bitcoin Related Deal With Aligh Commerce". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 18 November 2015. 
  39. ^ Shin, Laura (17 November 2015). "Kleiner Perkins Makes First Bitcon Startup Investment With B2B Payments Provider Align Commerce". Forbes. Retrieved 18 November 2015. 
  40. ^ Finley, Klint (September 25, 2012). "Analytics Company Datameer Raises $6 Million From Redpoint Ventures and Kleiner Perkins". TechCrunch. Retrieved May 17, 2017. 
  41. ^ Primack, Dan. "Deals of the day: Shape Security raises $40 million". Fortune. Fortune. Retrieved 14 May 2015. 
  42. ^ Cisco buys Cerent, Monterey Networks - CNET (August 1999)
  43. ^ "The electric bus company Proterra is worth up to $840 million after raising new money". Recode. Retrieved 2018-06-04. 
  44. ^ "Team". KPCB. Retrieved September 8, 2017. 
External links
  • www.kleinerperkins.com
  • v
  • t
  • e
Private equity and venture capitalBasic investment types
  • Buyout
  • Venture
  • Mezzanine
  • Growth
  • Secondaries
  • Equity co-investment
History
  • History of private equity and venture capital
  • Early history of private equity
  • Private equity in the 1980s
  • Private equity in the 1990s
  • Private equity in the 2000s
Terms and conceptsBuyout
  • Financial sponsor
  • Management buyout
  • Divisional buyout
  • Buy–sell agreement
  • Leveraged recapitalization
  • Dividend recapitalization
Venture
  • Angel investor
  • Business incubator
  • Post-money valuation
  • Pre-money valuation
  • Seed money
  • Startup company
  • Venture capital financing
  • Venture debt
  • Venture round
Structure
  • Private equity firms and funds
  • Limited partnership
  • Limited liability company
  • Carried interest
  • Management fee
  • Publicly traded private equity
    • Business Development Company
    • Venture capital trust
  • Private investment in public equity (PIPE)
  • Pledge fund
Investors
  • Corporations
  • Institutional investors
  • Pension funds
  • Insurance companies
  • Fund of funds
  • Endowments
  • Foundations
  • Investment banks
  • Merchant banks
  • Commercial banks
  • High-net-worth individuals
  • Family offices
  • Sovereign wealth funds
  • Crowdfunding
Related financial terms
  • AUM
  • Cap table
  • Capital call
  • Capital commitment
  • Capital structure
  • Distribution waterfall
  • EBITDA
  • Envy ratio
  • High-yield debt
  • IPO
  • IRR
  • Leverage
  • Liquidation preference
  • M&A
  • PME
  • Taxation of private equity and hedge funds
  • Undercapitalization
  • Vintage year
  • Private equity and venture capital investors
  • Private equity firms
  • Venture capital firms
  • Angel investors
  • Portfolio companies


Measure What Matters: How Google, Bono, and the Gates Foundation Rock the World with OKRs
Measure What Matters: How Google, Bono, and the Gates Foundation Rock the World with OKRs
#1 New York Times BestsellerLegendary venture capitalist John Doerr reveals how the goal-setting system of Objectives and Key Results (OKRs) has helped tech giants from Intel to Google achieve explosive growth—and how it can help any organization thrive. In the fall of 1999, John Doerr met with the founders of a start-up whom he'd just given $12.5 million, the biggest investment of his career. Larry Page and Sergey Brin had amazing technology, entrepreneurial energy, and sky-high ambitions, but no real business plan. For Google to change the world (or even to survive), Page and Brin had to learn how to make tough choices on priorities while keeping their team on track. They'd have to know when to pull the plug on losing propositions, to fail fast. And they needed timely, relevant data to track their progress—to measure what mattered.Doerr taught them about a proven approach to operating excellence: Objectives and Key Results. He had first discovered OKRs in the 1970s as an engineer at Intel, where the legendary Andy Grove ("the greatest manager of his or any era") drove the best-run company Doerr had ever seen. Later, as a venture capitalist, Doerr shared Grove's brainchild with more than fifty companies. Wherever the process was faithfully practiced, it worked.In this goal-setting system, objectives define what we seek to achieve; key results are how those top-priority goals will be attained with specific, measurable actions within a set time frame. Everyone's goals, from entry level to CEO, are transparent to the entire organization. The benefits are profound. OKRs surface an organization's most important work. They focus effort and foster coordination. They keep employees on track. They link objectives across silos to unify and strengthen the entire company. Along the way, OKRs enhance workplace satisfaction and boost retention.In Measure What Matters, Doerr shares a broad range of first-person, behind-the-scenes case studies, with narrators including Bono and Bill Gates, to demonstrate the focus, agility, and explosive growth that OKRs have spurred at so many great organizations. This book will help a new generation of leaders capture the same magic.

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Objectives and Key Results: Driving Focus, Alignment, and Engagement with OKRs (Wiley Corporate F&A)
Objectives and Key Results: Driving Focus, Alignment, and Engagement with OKRs (Wiley Corporate F&A)
Everything you need to implement Objectives and Key Results (OKRs) effectively Objectives and Key Results is the first full-fledged reference guide on Objectives and Key Results, a critical thinking framework designed to help organizations create value through focus, alignment, and better communication. Written by two leading OKRs consultants and researchers, this book provides a one-stop resource for organizations looking to quantify qualitative goals and ensure each team focuses their efforts to make measureable progress on their most important goals. You’ll learn how OKRs came to be and how leading companies use them every day to help teams and employees stretch their thinking about what’s possible, build their goal-setting muscles and achieve results that reflect their full potential. From the basic framework to a detailed dissection of best practices, this informative guide walks you through real-world implementations to help you get the most out of OKRs.OKRs help employees work together, focus effort, and drive the organization forward. Key results are used to define what it means to achieve broad, qualitative goals, and imperatives like “do it better” are transformed into clear, measureable markers. From the framework’s inception in the 1980s to its popularity in today’s hyper-competitive environment, OKRs make work more engaging and feature frequent feedback cycles that enable workers to see the progress they make at work each and every day. This book shows you everything you need to know to implement OKRs effectively.Understand the basics of OKRs and their day-to-day useLearn how to gain the executive support critical to a successful implementationMaintain an effective program with key assessment tipsTailor the OKRs framework to your organization’s needsObjectives and Key Results is your key resource for designing, planning, implementing, and maintaining your OKRs program for sustainable company-wide success.

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Summary of Measure What Matters by John Doerr: How Google, Bono, and the Gates Foundation Rock the World with OKRs - Finish Entire Book in 15 Minutes (SpeedyReads)
Summary of Measure What Matters by John Doerr: How Google, Bono, and the Gates Foundation Rock the World with OKRs - Finish Entire Book in 15 Minutes (SpeedyReads)
Wanna Read But Not Enough Time?Then, grab a SpeedyReads of Measure What Matters: How Google, Bono, and the Gates Foundation Rock the World with OKRs by John Doerr now!Here's a sample of what you'll see in this book:Summary of Measure What MattersObjectives and key results or OKRs refer to a process that assists in moving organizations ahead. OKRs offer visibility and enable pushing back while staying fruitful. OKRs have helped Google accomplish 10-times growth several times and made it possible for Google to arrange information all over the globe.  They have also made it possible for Google's workers to work accurately.*this is an unofficial summary of Measure What Matters: How Google, Bono, and the Gates Foundation Rock the World with OKRs by John Doerr. It is not endorsed, affiliated by Measure What Matters: How Google, Bono, and the Gates Foundation Rock the World with OKRs or John Doerr. It is not the full book.Download And Start Reading Now - Even if it's 3 AM!Hurry, Limited Quantities Available!*Bonus Section Included*100% Satisfaction Guaranteed or your money back!

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Step by Step Guide to OKRs
Step by Step Guide to OKRs
Most important aspect of running a successful business is setting the right goals and executing them well.This “Step by Step Guide to OKRs” is a practical guide to goal setting that offers concrete examples to help you start setting impactful and meaningful goals.This book teaches you how to manage a team better and create a feeling of success. It’s about Objectives and Key Results, better known for their acronym: OKR.This is a “How-to” guide to get started with OKRs and to help your team or a company implement the best goal setting system currently out there.

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SUMMARY: Measure What Matters by John Doerr: How Google, Bono, and the Gates Foundation Rock the World with OKRs
SUMMARY: Measure What Matters by John Doerr: How Google, Bono, and the Gates Foundation Rock the World with OKRs
The Best Summary Book of Measure What Matters by John Doerr! - A book about goal-setting.(EDITION 2018)WHY BUY THIS BOOK:Save time and money by reading this summaryGain more in-depth knowledgeDisclaimer: This is a summary, review of the book Measure What Matters and not the original book.You can find the original here:https://www.amazon.com/dp/0525536221ABOUT THE ORIGINAL BOOK:Author: John Doerr    L. John Doerr (born June 29, 1951) is an American Investor and venture capitalist at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers in Menlo Park, California.     He's passionate about encouraging leaders to reimagine the future, from transforming healthcare to advancing applications of machine learning. Outside of Kleiner Perkins, John works with social entrepreneurs for change in public education, the climate crisis, and global poverty. John serves on the board of the Obama Foundation and ONE.org.    As of July 2017, Forbes ranked Doerr as the 105th richest person in the United States and the 303rd richest person in the world, with a net worth of US$ 7.5 billion as of February 16, 2018.Book description:#1 New York Times BestsellerLegendary venture capitalist John Doerr reveals how the goal-setting system of Objectives and Key Results (OKRs) has helped tech giants from Intel to Google achieve explosive growth—and how it can help any organization thrive.     In Measure What Matters, John Doerr defines and makes a case for OKRs (objectives and key results) to direct a company toward success.     OKRs bring a sense of order to the goal-setting process of organizations.     The four superpowers of OKRs including focus and commit, align and connect, track and stretch drive companies toward a high-performance level.     The author uses the examples of Google, Intel, Bono, the Gates Foundation and many others to signify the usefulness of OKRs. The book makes it clear how any organization can benefit from OKRs to achieve greatness by aiming effectively.To get this book, Scroll Up Now and Click on the “Buy now with 1-Click” Button to Download your Copy Right Away!

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What Matters
What Matters
What happens when one small boy picks up one small piece of litter? He doesn't know it, but his tiny act has big consequences. From the miniscule to the universal, What Matters sensitively explores nature's connections and traces the ripple effects of one child’s good deed to show how we can all make a big difference.

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What Matters
What Matters
Within each of us are stories that have the power to inspire, challenge, motivate and guide generations of our families.The truth is, there is no such thing as an ordinary life. And the stories of our lives are the greatest legacy we can leave to our families and loved ones. Martin Forrestal is dying. From his hospital bed, he conceives a plan to share the stories from his life that will be his greatest legacy to his family. He wants them to know who he was, understand what he believed in, appreciate what he fought for, and see exactly how values shaped and guided his life. Martin takes up a pad of paper, and in large letters writes: What Matters? During a long night of reflection, eighty-two year old Martin identifies the values that matter most to him. His list begins with the value of Love. By the time the sun is rising outside his hospital window, he has identified fourteen values, from Responsibility to Family Unity. As family and friends come to say their good-byes, Martin records his stories. The action of the novel flows back and forth across more than a century, from an icy mountain cave where he was trapped by an avalanche with his Scout Troop, to a tiny coral island in the Pacific that saw some of WW II s bloodiest combat. From a pioneer cabin in old Montana on Christmas morning, to the sweeping plains of the Argentine pampas, Martin recounts how each of the values on his list were forged into his character. He is not financially wealthy. But he knows that by sharing What Matters with generations of his family, he is passing a far more important and enduring legacy than material wealth. What Matters brims with original stories, heartfelt emotions, and the eloquence of simple truths. Many of the chapters can be enjoyed as stand-alone stories.

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What Matters: The World's Preeminent Photojournalists and Thinkers Depict Essential Issues of Our Time
What Matters: The World's Preeminent Photojournalists and Thinkers Depict Essential Issues of Our Time
For more than a century, photography has revealed truths, exposed lies, advanced the public discourse, and inspired people to demand change. Socially conscious pioneers with cameras transformed the world—and that legacy lives on in this eye-opening, thought-provoking, and (we hope) action-inducing book. Like Jacob Riis’s How the Other Half Lives, Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, and Jonathan Schell’s The Fate of the Earth before it, we believe that What Matters will fundamentally alter the way we see and understand the human race and our planet.What Matters asks: What are the essential issues of our time? What are the pictures that will spark public outrage and spur reform? The answer appears in 18 powerful, page-turning stories by the foremost photojournalists of our age, edited by The New York Times best-selling author/editor David Elliot Cohen (A Day in the Life and America 24/7 series), and featuring trenchant commentary from well-recognized experts and thinkers in appropriate fields. Photographer Gary Braasch and climate-change guru Bill McKibben provide “A Global Warming Travelogue” that takes us from ice caves in Antarctica to smoke-spewing coal plants in Beijing. Brent Stirton and Peter A. Glick examine a “Thirsty World,” chronicling the daily search for clean water in non-developed countries. James Nachtwey and bestselling poverty expert Jeffrey D. Sachs look at the causes of, and cures for, global poverty in “The Bottom Billion.” Stephanie Sinclair and Judith Bruce present the preteen brides of Afghanistan, Nepal, and Ethiopia.Sometimes the juxtaposition of photographs can be startling: “Shop ‘til We Drop,” Lauren Greenfield’s images of upscale consumer culture, starkly contrast with Shehzad Noorani’s “Children of the Black Dust”—child laborers in Bangladesh, their faces blackened with carbon dust from recycled batteries.The combination of compelling photographs and insightful writing make this a highly relevant, widely discussed book bound to appeal to anyone concerned about the crucial issues shaping our world. What Matters is, in effect, a 336-page illustrated letter to the next American president about the issues that count. It will inspire readers to do their part—however small—to make a difference: to help, the volume includes extensive “What You Can Do” sections with a menu of web links and effective actions readers can take now. This year give What Matters.

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The Ultimate Guide to OKRs: How Objectives and Key-Results can help your company build a culture of excellence and achievement.
The Ultimate Guide to OKRs: How Objectives and Key-Results can help your company build a culture of excellence and achievement.
What Intel, Google, Zynga, Linkedin, and Sears have in common? OKRs. OKRs translate a company's vision and strategy into a coherent set of performance measures. The three layers of organization: Dreams, OKRs, and To dos, offer a balance between long-term goals and short-term planning, between outcomes that are desired by the organization and actual performance KPIs that drive these outcomes, between harder and softer performance measures. Francisco Mello, founder of Qulture.Rocks, the leading performance management software company, takes you through the history of using goals for management, from MBOs to OKRs, and presents OKRs with a constant focus on its key differences from older frameworks such as MBOs.

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Summary of Measure What Matters: How Google, Bono, and the Gates Foundation Rock the World with OKRs: Conversation Starters
Summary of Measure What Matters: How Google, Bono, and the Gates Foundation Rock the World with OKRs: Conversation Starters
Measure What Matters: How Google, Bono, and the Gates Foundation Rock the World with OKRs by John Doerr and Larry Page: Conversation Starters Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers investor and venture capitalist John Doerr writes an indispensable book for leaders, Measure What Matters. In this instant New York Times bestselling book, Doerr reveals Objectives and Key Results (OKRs) goal-setting system. This has helped the tech giants like Amazon, Intel and Google get to where they are now. Doerr has seen the potential of these companies and invested in them. He saw first-hand how OKRs activate focus, agility, and explosive growth in many great organizations.Cisco executive chairman calls Measure What Matters a gift to leaders who want to start “big, bold bets that can transform an organization.” Good to Great author Jim Collins says that Measure What Matters is needed “by every person responsible for performance, in any walk of life.”A Brief Look Inside: EVERY GOOD BOOK CONTAINS A WORLD FAR DEEPERthan the surface of its pages. The characters and their world come alive, and the characters and its world still live on. Conversation Starters is peppered with questions designed tobring us beneath the surface of the pageand invite us into the world that lives on. These questions can be used to create hours of conversation: • Foster a deeper understanding of the book• Promote an atmosphere of discussion for groups• Assist in the study of the book, either individually or corporately• Explore unseen realms of the book as never seen before Disclaimer: This book you are about to enjoy is an independent resource to supplement the original book, enhancing your experience. If you have not yet purchased a copy of the original book, please do before purchasing this unofficial Conversation Starters. © Copyright 2018 Download your copy now on saleRead it on your PC, Mac, iOS or Android smartphone, tablet devices.

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