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United States presidential election, 2020
The United States presidential election of 2020, scheduled for Tuesday, November 3, 2020, will be the 59th quadrennial U.S. presidential election. Voters

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For related races, see United States elections, 2020.

59th election of President of the United States United States presidential election, 2020 ← 2016 November 3, 2020 2024 → 538 members of the Electoral College
270 electoral votes needed to win The electoral map for the 2020 election, based on populations from the 2010 Census Incumbent President

Donald Trump
Republican




2020 U.S. presidential election
  • Parties
Republican Party
  • Primaries
  • Candidates
  • Convention
Democratic Party
  • Primaries
  • Candidates
  • Convention
Third parties
  • Third party and independent candidates
  • Libertarian Party
    • primaries
Related races
  • House
  • Senate
  • Governors
  • 2016 ←
  • 2020
  • v
  • t
  • e

The United States presidential election of 2020, scheduled for Tuesday, November 3, 2020, will be the 59th quadrennial U.S. presidential election. Voters will select presidential electors who in turn will either elect a new president and vice president through the electoral college or reelect the incumbents. The series of presidential primary elections and caucuses are likely to be held during the first six months of 2020. This nominating process is also an indirect election, where voters cast ballots selecting a slate of delegates to a political party's nominating convention, who then in turn elect their party's presidential nominee.

President Donald Trump of the Republican Party, who was elected in 2016, is seeking reelection to a second term. The winner of the 2020 presidential election is scheduled to be inaugurated on January 20, 2021.

Contents
  • 1 Background
    • 1.1 Procedure
    • 1.2 Demographic trends
    • 1.3 Simultaneous elections
  • 2 General election polling
  • 3 Nominations
    • 3.1 Republican Party
      • 3.1.1 Declared major candidates
      • 3.1.2 Individuals who have publicly expressed interest
      • 3.1.3 Convention site
      • 3.1.4 Endorsements
    • 3.2 Democratic Party
      • 3.2.1 Declared major candidates
      • 3.2.2 Other declared candidates
      • 3.2.3 Individuals who have publicly expressed interest
      • 3.2.4 Potential convention sites
      • 3.2.5 Endorsements
    • 3.3 Libertarian Party
      • 3.3.1 Declared candidates
      • 3.3.2 Convention site
    • 3.4 Constitution Party
      • 3.4.1 Individuals who have publicly expressed interest
    • 3.5 Independent or unaffiliated
      • 3.5.1 Individuals who have publicly expressed interest
    • 3.6 Green Party
  • 4 Maps
  • 5 See also
  • 6 Notes
  • 7 References
Background Procedure Further information: United States presidential election

Article Two of the United States Constitution states that for a person to serve as President of the United States the individual must be a natural-born citizen of the United States, at least 35 years old and a United States resident for at least 14 years. Candidates for the presidency typically seek the nomination of one of the various political parties of the United States, in which case each party develops a method (such as a primary election) to choose the candidate the party deems best suited to run for the position. The primary elections are usually indirect elections where voters cast ballots for a slate of party delegates pledged to a particular candidate. The party's delegates then officially nominate a candidate to run on the party's behalf. The nominee then personally chooses a vice presidential running mate to form that party's presidential ticket (with the exception of the Libertarian Party, which nominates its vice presidential candidate by delegate vote regardless of the nominee's preference). The general election in November is also an indirect election, where voters cast ballots for a slate of members of the Electoral College; these electors then directly elect the President and Vice President.[1]

In August 2018, the Democratic National Committee voted to disallow superdelegates from voting on the first ballot of the nominating process, beginning with the 2020 election. This would require a candidate to win a majority of pledged delegates from the assorted primary elections in order to win the party's nomination. The last time this did not occur was the nomination of Adlai Stevenson II at the 1952 Democratic National Convention.[2]

The Twenty-second Amendment to the Constitution states that an individual can not be elected to the presidency more than twice. This prohibits former Presidents Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama from being elected president again. However, former presidents Jimmy Carter and George H. W. Bush (both nonagenarians), having each served a single term as president, are not constitutionally prohibited from being elected to another term in the 2020 election.

Demographic trends Further information: Demography of the United States

The age group of what will then be people in the 18 to 45-year-old bracket is expected to represent just under 40 percent of the United States' eligible voters in 2020. It is expected that more than 30 percent of eligible American voters will be nonwhite.[3]

A bipartisan report indicates that changes in voter demographics since the 2016 election could impact the results of the 2020 election. African Americans, Hispanics, Asians/others, and "whites with a college degree" are expected to all increase their percentage of national eligible voters by 2020, while "whites without a college degree" will decrease. This shift is potentially an advantage for the Democratic nominee, however due to geographical differences, this could still lead to President Trump (or a different Republican nominee) winning the Electoral College while still losing the popular vote, possibly by an even larger margin than in 2016.[4]

Additionally, Washington, D.C. may lower its voting age from 18 to 16. Legislation was introduced by City Councilman Charles Allen in April 2018, with a public hearing in June, and a vote by the end of the year. Unlike other cities with a voting age of 16 such as Berkeley, California, this would allow 16 and 17-year-olds to vote for President of the United States for the first time in 2020. Allen said that he was inspired by the high school students that participated in the March for Our Lives, which occurred at the capital in March.[5]

Simultaneous elections Further information: United States Senate elections, 2020 and United States House of Representatives elections, 2020

The presidential election will occur at the same time as elections to the Senate and the House of Representatives. Several states will also hold state gubernatorial and state legislative elections. Following the election, the United States House will redistribute the seats among the 50 states based on the results of the 2020 United States Census, and the states will conduct a redistricting of Congressional and state legislative districts. In most states, the governor and the state legislature conduct the redistricting (although some states have redistricting commissions), and often a party that wins a presidential election experiences a coattail effect that also helps other candidates of that party win election.[6] Therefore, the party that wins the 2020 presidential election could also win a significant advantage in the drawing of new Congressional and state legislative districts that would stay in effect until the 2032 elections.[7]

General election polling National polling
Trump vs. Avenatti
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Michael
Avenatti
Undecided Politico/Morning Consult[8] 1,974 August 16–18, 2018 ± 2.0% 28% 20% 51%
Trump vs. Biden
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Joe
Biden
Other Undecided Politico/Morning Consult[8] 1,974 August 16–18, 2018 ± 2.0% 31% 43% – 26% Politico/Morning Consult[9] 1,993 July 26–30, 2018 ± 2.0% 37% 44% – 19% Public Policy Polling[10] 679 June 8–10, 2018 ± 3.8% 39% 53% – 8% Zogby Analytics[11] 881 May 10–12, 2018 ± 3.2% 38% 48% – 14% Public Policy Polling[12] 846 March 23–25, 2018 ± 3.4% 39% 56% – 6% Public Policy Polling[13] 687 February 9–11, 2018 ± 3.7% 42% 51% – 7% CNN/SSRS[14] 1,005 January 14–18, 2018 ± 3.7% 37% 59% 2% 1% Zogby Analytics[15] 847 January 12–15, 2018 ± 3.4% 38% 53% – 9% Public Policy Polling[16] 862 December 11–12, 2017 ± 3.3% 40% 54% – 6% Politico/Morning Consult[17] 1,993 November 9–11, 2017 ± 2.0% 35% 46% – 20% Public Policy Polling[18] 572 October 27–29, 2017 ± 4.1% 38% 56% – 6% Zogby Analytics[19] 1,514 October 19–25, 2017 ± 2.5% 41% 50% – 9% Emerson College[20] 820 October 12–14, 2017 ± 3.4% 42% 51% – 7% Public Policy Polling[21] 865 September 22–25, 2017 ± 3.3% 40% 53% – 6% Public Policy Polling[22] 887 August 18–21, 2017 ± 3.3% 39% 51% – 11% Public Policy Polling[23] 692 July 14–17, 2017 ± 3.7% 39% 54% – 7% Public Policy Polling[24] 692 June 9–11, 2017 ± 3.7% 41% 54% – 5% Public Policy Polling[25] 692 May 12–14, 2017 ± 3.7% 40% 54% – 6% Public Policy Polling[26] 648 April 17–18, 2017 ± 3.9% 40% 54% – 6% Public Policy Polling[27] 677 March 27–28, 2017 ± 3.8% 40% 54% – 6%
Trump vs. Blumenthal
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Richard
Blumenthal
Undecided Public Policy Polling[22] 887 August 18–21, 2017 ± 3.3% 39% 42% 19%
Trump vs. Booker
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Cory
Booker
Undecided Politico/Morning Consult[8] 1,974 August 16–18, 2018 ± 2.0% 29% 27% 44% Public Policy Polling[10] 679 June 8–10, 2018 ± 3.8% 39% 47% 15% Zogby Analytics[11] 881 May 10–12, 2018 ± 3.2% 38% 38% 24% Public Policy Polling[12] 846 March 23–25, 2018 ± 3.4% 39% 49% 12% Public Policy Polling[13] 687 February 9–11, 2018 ± 3.7% 42% 46% 11% Public Policy Polling[16] 862 December 11–12, 2017 ± 3.3% 40% 50% 10% Public Policy Polling[18] 572 October 27–29, 2017 ± 4.1% 38% 49% 13% Public Policy Polling[21] 865 September 22–25, 2017 ± 3.3% 40% 47% 13% Public Policy Polling[22] 887 August 18–21, 2017 ± 3.3% 39% 42% 19% Public Policy Polling[23] 692 July 14–17, 2017 ± 3.7% 40% 45% 15% Public Policy Polling[24] 692 June 9–11, 2017 ± 3.7% 41% 43% 17% Public Policy Polling[25] 692 May 12–14, 2017 ± 3.7% 39% 46% 15% Public Policy Polling[26] 648 April 17–18, 2017 ± 3.9% 42% 42% 17% Public Policy Polling[27] 677 March 27–28, 2017 ± 3.8% 42% 45% 13%
Trump vs. Bullock
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Steve
Bullock
Undecided Politico/Morning Consult[8] 1,974 August 16–18, 2018 ± 2.0% 28% 18% 54%
Trump vs. Clinton
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Hillary
Clinton
Undecided Public Policy Polling[21] 865 September 22–25, 2017 ± 3.3% 42% 47% 11%
Trump vs. Cuban
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Mark
Cuban
Undecided Emerson College[20] 820 October 12–14, 2017 ± 3.4% 43% 36% 22% Public Policy Polling[22] 887 August 18–21, 2017 ± 3.3% 38% 42% 20% Public Policy Polling[28] 941 February 21–22, 2017 ± 3.2% 41% 40% 19%
Trump vs. Cuomo
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Andrew
Cuomo
Undecided Politico/Morning Consult[8] 1,974 August 16–18, 2018 ± 2.0% 30% 25% 45%
Trump vs. Delaney
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
John
Delaney
Undecided Politico/Morning Consult[8] 1,974 August 16–18, 2018 ± 2.0% 28% 18% 53% Public Policy Polling[22] 887 August 18–21, 2017 ± 3.3% 38% 38% 24%
Trump vs. Franken
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Al
Franken
Undecided Public Policy Polling[25] 692 May 12–14, 2017 ± 3.7% 38% 46% 16% Public Policy Polling[26] 648 April 17–18, 2017 ± 3.9% 43% 43% 14% Public Policy Polling[27] 677 March 27–28, 2017 ± 3.8% 41% 46% 13%
Trump vs. Gillibrand
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Kirsten
Gillibrand
Undecided Politico/Morning Consult[8] 1,974 August 16–18, 2018 ± 2.0% 29% 24% 47% Public Policy Polling[10] 679 June 8–10, 2018 ± 3.8% 39% 45% 16% Public Policy Polling[12] 846 March 23–25, 2018 ± 3.4% 40% 42% 18% Public Policy Polling[13] 687 February 9–11, 2018 ± 3.7% 43% 42% 15% YouGov[29] 865 January 9, 2018 – 43% 41% 16% Public Policy Polling[16] 862 December 11–12, 2017 ± 3.3% 40% 47% 14% Public Policy Polling[18] 572 October 27–29, 2017 ± 4.1% 38% 48% 14% Public Policy Polling[21] 865 September 22–25, 2017 ± 3.3% 39% 42% 18%
Trump vs. Harris
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Kamala
Harris
Undecided Politico/Morning Consult[8] 1,974 August 16–18, 2018 ± 2.0% 29% 26% 45% Public Policy Polling[10] 679 June 8–10, 2018 ± 3.8% 40% 45% 15% Zogby Analytics[11] 881 May 10–12, 2018 ± 3.2% 39% 35% 26% Public Policy Polling[12] 846 March 23–25, 2018 ± 3.4% 39% 43% 18% Public Policy Polling[13] 687 February 9–11, 2018 ± 3.7% 43% 43% 15% Zogby Analytics[15] 847 January 12–15, 2018 ± 3.4% 41% 42% 16% Public Policy Polling[16] 862 December 11–12, 2017 ± 3.3% 40% 46% 13% Public Policy Polling[18] 572 October 27–29, 2017 ± 4.1% 39% 45% 16% Public Policy Polling[21] 865 September 22–25, 2017 ± 3.3% 40% 41% 19% Public Policy Polling[22] 887 August 18–21, 2017 ± 3.3% 39% 39% 22% Zogby Analytics[30] 1,300 August 4–7, 2017 – 38% 41% 21% Public Policy Polling[23] 692 July 14–17, 2017 ± 3.7% 40% 41% 19% Public Policy Polling[24] 692 June 9–11, 2017 ± 3.7% 41% 42% 18%
Trump vs. Holder
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Eric
Holder
Undecided Politico/Morning Consult[8] 1,974 August 16–18, 2018 ± 2.0% 30% 24% 46%
Trump vs. Johnson
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Dwayne
Johnson
Undecided Public Policy Polling[25] 692 May 12–14, 2017 ± 3.7% 37% 42% 21%
Trump vs. Kennedy
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Joe
Kennedy III
Undecided Public Policy Polling[13] 687 February 9–11, 2018 ± 3.7% 43% 46% 12%
Trump vs. Obama
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Michelle
Obama
Undecided Zogby Analytics[11] 881 May 10–12, 2018 ± 3.2% 39% 48% 13% Zogby Analytics[15] 847 January 12–15, 2018 ± 3.4% 42% 49% 9% Zogby Analytics[19] 1,514 October 19–25, 2017 ± 2.5% 44% 47% 9% Public Policy Polling[21] 865 September 22–25, 2017 ± 3.3% 41% 51% 9%
Trump vs. Sanders
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Bernie
Sanders
Other Undecided Politico/Morning Consult[8] 1,974 August 16–18, 2018 ± 2.0% 32% 44% – 24% Public Policy Polling[10] 679 June 8–10, 2018 ± 3.8% 40% 49% – 11% Zogby Analytics[11] 881 May 10–12, 2018 ± 3.2% 37% 48% – 14% Public Policy Polling[12] 846 March 23–25, 2018 ± 3.4% 39% 55% – 6% Public Policy Polling[13] 687 February 9–11, 2018 ± 3.7% 44% 48% – 8% CNN/SSRS[14] 1,005 January 14–18, 2018 ± 3.7% 39% 58% 3% 1% Zogby Analytics[15] 847 January 12–15, 2018 ± 3.4% 39% 52% – 10% YouGov[29] 856 January 9, 2018 – 43% 48% – 9% Public Policy Polling[16] 862 December 11–12, 2017 ± 3.3% 40% 53% – 6% Politico/Morning Consult[31] 2,586 November 16–19, 2017 ± 2.0% 36% 42% – 22% Public Policy Polling[18] 572 October 27–29, 2017 ± 4.1% 38% 53% – 9% Zogby Analytics[19] 1,514 October 19–25, 2017 ± 2.5% 40% 51% – 9% Public Policy Polling[21] 865 September 22–25, 2017 ± 3.3% 40% 51% – 9% Public Policy Polling[22] 887 August 18–21, 2017 ± 3.3% 38% 51% – 11% Public Policy Polling[23] 692 July 14–17, 2017 ± 3.7% 39% 52% – 9% Public Policy Polling[24] 692 June 9–11, 2017 ± 3.7% 41% 51% – 8% Public Policy Polling[25] 692 May 12–14, 2017 ± 3.7% 39% 52% – 9% Public Policy Polling[26] 648 April 17–18, 2017 ± 3.9% 41% 50% – 8% Public Policy Polling[27] 677 March 27–28, 2017 ± 3.8% 41% 52% – 7%
Trump vs. Warren
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Elizabeth
Warren
Undecided Politico/Morning Consult[8] 1,974 August 16–18, 2018 ± 2.0% 30% 34% 36% Public Policy Polling[10] 679 June 8–10, 2018 ± 3.8% 40% 48% 12% Zogby Analytics[11] 881 May 10–12, 2018 ± 3.2% 37% 43% 20% Public Policy Polling[12] 846 March 23–25, 2018 ± 3.4% 40% 51% 9% Public Policy Polling[13] 687 February 9–11, 2018 ± 3.7% 44% 44% 12% Zogby Analytics[15] 847 January 12–15, 2018 ± 3.4% 40% 50% 10% Public Policy Polling[32]
(for a Warren-aligned PAC) 620 January 9–10, 2018 ± 3.9% 43% 49% 8% Public Policy Polling[16] 862 December 11–12, 2017 ± 3.3% 42% 51% 7% Public Policy Polling[18] 572 October 27–29, 2017 ± 4.1% 40% 50% 9% Zogby Analytics[19] 1,514 October 19–25, 2017 ± 2.5% 43% 45% 13% Emerson College[20] 820 October 12–14, 2017 ± 3.4% 44% 44% 12% Democracy Corps/Greenberg Research[33] 1,000 September 30 – October 6, 2017 – 42% 54% 4% Public Policy Polling[21] 865 September 22–25, 2017 ± 3.3% 41% 47% 12% Public Policy Polling[22] 887 August 18–21, 2017 ± 3.3% 40% 45% 15% Zogby Analytics[30] 1,300 August 4–7, 2017 – 37% 46% 17% Public Policy Polling[23] 692 July 14–17, 2017 ± 3.7% 42% 49% 9% Public Policy Polling[24] 692 June 9–11, 2017 ± 3.7% 43% 46% 11% Public Policy Polling[25] 692 May 12–14, 2017 ± 3.7% 39% 49% 12% Public Policy Polling[26] 648 April 17–18, 2017 ± 3.9% 42% 46% 13% Public Policy Polling[27] 677 March 27–28, 2017 ± 3.8% 43% 48% 9% Politico/Morning Consult[34] 1,791 February 9–10, 2017 ± 2.0% 42% 36% 22%
Trump vs. Wilson
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Frederica
Wilson
Undecided Public Policy Polling[18] 572 October 27–29, 2017 ± 4.1% 39% 42% 19%
Trump vs. Winfrey
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Oprah
Winfrey
Other Undecided Zogby Analytics[11] 881 May 10–12, 2018 ± 3.2% 47% 53% – – CNN/SSRS[14] 1,005 January 14–18, 2018 ± 3.7% 39% 54% 6% 2% Quinnipiac University[35] 1,212 January 12–16, 2018 ± 3.4% 39% 52% – 9% Zogby Analytics[15] 847 January 12–15, 2018 ± 3.4% 46% 54% – – Public Policy Polling[32]
(for a Warren-aligned PAC) 620 January 9–10, 2018 ± 3.9% 43% 44% – 13% NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist[36] 1,092 January 8–10, 2018 ± 3.0% 39% 50% – 11% YouGov[29] 856 January 9, 2018 – 43% 47% – 10% Rasmussen Reports[37] 1,000 January 8–9, 2018 ± 3.0% 38% 48% – 14% Zogby Analytics[38] 1,531 March 27–29, 2017 ±2.5% 36% 46% – 18% Public Policy Polling[39] 808 March 10–12, 2017 ± 3.4% 40% 47% – 12%
Trump vs. Zuckerberg
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Mark
Zuckerberg
Undecided Zogby Analytics[15] 847 January 12–15, 2018 ± 3.4% 40% 41% 19% Zogby Analytics[30] 1,300 August 4–7, 2017 – 40% 43% 16% Public Policy Polling[23] 836 July 14–17, 2017 ± 3.4% 40% 40% 20%
Trump vs. Zuckerberg vs. Scarborough
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Mark
Zuckerberg
Joe
Scarborough
Undecided Zogby Analytics[30] 1,300 August 4–7, 2017 – 36% 34% 18% 12%
Trump vs. generic Democrat
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Democratic
candidate
Other Undecided Politico/Morning Consult[9] 1,993 July 26–30, 2018 ± 2.0% 35% 48% – 17% Politico/Morning Consult[40] 1,990 May 17–19, 2018 ± 2.0% 36% 44% – 20% Politico/Morning Consult[41] 1,993 March 1–5, 2018 ± 2.0% 36% 44% – 19% NBC News/Wall Street Journal[42] 900 December 13–15, 2017 ± 3.6% 36% 52% 3% 9% Politico/Morning Consult[31] 2,586 November 16–19, 2017 ± 2.0% 35% 44% – 21% Politico/Morning Consult[17] 1,993 November 9–11, 2017 ± 2.0% 34% 48% – 18% Politico/Morning Consult[43] 1,990 October 26–30, 2017 ± 2.0% 36% 46% – 18% Opinion Savvy[44] 763 August 16–17, 2017 ± 3.5% 41% 52% – 8% Gravis Marketing[45] 1,917 July 21–31, 2017 ± 2.2% 39% 48% – 13% Politico/Morning Consult[34] 1,791 February 9–10, 2017 ± 2.0% 35% 43% – 23%
Pence vs. generic Democrat
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Mike
Pence
Democratic
candidate
Undecided Opinion Savvy[44] 762 August 16–17, 2017 ± 3.5% 40% 52% 8%
Generic Republican vs. generic Democrat[note 1]
Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Republican
candidate
Democratic
candidate
Undecided Politico/Morning Consult[40] 1,990 May 17–19, 2018 ± 2.0% 27% 40% 33% Politico/Morning Consult[41] 1,993 March 1–5, 2018 ± 2.0% 28% 42% 31% Statewide polling

California

Trump vs. Biden

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Joe
Biden
Undecided SurveyUSA[46] 882 March 22–25, 2018 ± 3.8% 33% 56% 11%

Trump vs. Booker

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Cory
Booker
Undecided SurveyUSA[46] 882 March 22–25, 2018 ± 3.8% 35% 39% 26%

Trump vs. J. Brown

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Jerry
Brown
Undecided SurveyUSA[46] 882 March 22–25, 2018 ± 3.8% 35% 54% 11%

Trump vs. S. Brown

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Sherrod
Brown
Undecided SurveyUSA[46] 882 March 22–25, 2018 ± 3.8% 35% 36% 29%

Trump vs. Garcetti

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Eric
Garcetti
Undecided SurveyUSA[46] 882 March 22–25, 2018 ± 3.8% 34% 49% 17% SurveyUSA[47] 909 January 7–9, 2018 ± 3.3% 32% 46% 21%

Trump vs. Gillibrand

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Kirsten
Gillibrand
Undecided SurveyUSA[46] 882 March 22–25, 2018 ± 3.8% 33% 47% 19% SurveyUSA[47] 909 January 7–9, 2018 ± 3.3% 32% 46% 22%

Trump vs. Hanks

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Tom
Hanks
Undecided SurveyUSA[46] 882 March 22–25, 2018 ± 3.8% 34% 51% 15% SurveyUSA[47] 909 January 7–9, 2018 ± 3.3% 31% 56% 14%

Trump vs. Harris

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Kamala
Harris
Undecided SurveyUSA[46] 882 March 22–25, 2018 ± 3.8% 35% 54% 12% SurveyUSA[47] 909 January 7–9, 2018 ± 3.3% 33% 53% 13%

Trump vs. Holder

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Eric
Holder
Undecided SurveyUSA[46] 882 March 22–25, 2018 ± 3.8% 35% 38% 26%

Trump vs. Landrieu

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Mitch
Landrieu
Undecided SurveyUSA[46] 882 March 22–25, 2018 ± 3.8% 35% 36% 29%

Trump vs. Obama

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Michelle
Obama
Undecided SurveyUSA[46] 882 March 22–25, 2018 ± 3.8% 36% 57% 8%

Trump vs. Patrick

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Deval
Patrick
Undecided SurveyUSA[46] 882 March 22–25, 2018 ± 3.8% 34% 34% 32%

Trump vs. Warren

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Elizabeth
Warren
Undecided SurveyUSA[47] 909 January 7–9, 2018 ± 3.3% 32% 53% 14%

Trump vs. Winfrey

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Oprah
Winfrey
Undecided SurveyUSA[46] 882 March 22–25, 2018 ± 3.8% 35% 52% 13% SurveyUSA[47] 909 January 7–9, 2018 ± 3.3% 32% 56% 12%

Trump vs. Zuckerberg

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Mark
Zuckerberg
Undecided SurveyUSA[46] 882 March 22–25, 2018 ± 3.8% 36% 42% 22% SurveyUSA[47] 909 January 7–9, 2018 ± 3.3% 31% 50% 19%

Florida

Trump vs. Warren

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Elizabeth
Warren
Undecided Zogby Analytics[48] 828 August 17–23, 2017 ± 3.4% 39% 48% 14%

Indiana

Trump vs. Warren

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Elizabeth
Warren
Undecided Zogby Analytics[48] 603 August 17–23, 2017 ± 4.0% 45% 39% 17%

Kentucky

Trump vs. Warren

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Elizabeth
Warren
Undecided Zogby Analytics[48] 402 August 17–23, 2017 ± 4.9% 47% 41% 13%

Michigan

Trump vs. Biden

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Joe
Biden
Undecided Epic-MRA[49] 600 April 28–30, 2018 ± 4.0% 39% 52% 9% Zogby Analytics[50] – September 2017 – 35% 52% 13%

Trump vs. Sanders

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Bernie
Sanders
Undecided Zogby Analytics[50] – September 2017 – 36% 54% 10%

Trump vs. Warren

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Elizabeth
Warren
Undecided Zogby Analytics[50] – September 2017 – 37% 46% 17% Zogby Analytics[48] 803 August 17–23, 2017 ± 3.5% 35% 51% 14%

Missouri

Trump vs. Warren

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Elizabeth
Warren
Undecided Zogby Analytics[48] 604 August 17–23, 2017 ± 4.0% 40% 46% 14%

Montana

Trump vs. Warren

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Elizabeth
Warren
Undecided Zogby Analytics[48] 403 August 17–23, 2017 ± 4.9% 45% 39% 17%

New Hampshire

Trump vs. Biden

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Joe
Biden
Undecided American Research Group[51] 1,365 March 21–27, 2018 ± 3.0% 39% 53% 8%

Trump vs. Sanders

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Bernie
Sanders
Undecided American Research Group[51] 1,365 March 21–27, 2018 ± 3.0% 49% 45% 5%

Trump vs. Warren

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Elizabeth
Warren
Undecided American Research Group[51] 1,365 March 21–27, 2018 ± 3.0% 50% 42% 9%

Kasich vs. Biden

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error John
Kasich
Joe
Biden
Undecided American Research Group[51] 1,365 March 21–27, 2018 ± 3.0% 45% 46% 8%

Kasich vs. Warren

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error John
Kasich
Elizabeth
Warren
Undecided American Research Group[51] 1,365 March 21–27, 2018 ± 3.0% 52% 37% 11%

North Carolina

Trump vs. Biden

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Joe
Biden
Other Undecided Meredith College[52] 618 January 21–25, 2018 ± 4.0% 45% 46% 8% 1%

Trump vs. Cooper

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Roy
Cooper
Other Undecided Meredith College[52] 618 January 21–25, 2018 ± 4.0% 45% 43% 11% 1%

Trump vs. Gillibrand

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Kirsten
Gillibrand
Other Undecided Meredith College[52][note 2] 618 January 21–25, 2018 ± 4.0% 46% 36% 18% 1%

Trump vs. Warren

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Elizabeth
Warren
Other Undecided Meredith College[52] 618 January 21–25, 2018 ± 4.0% 48% 40% 12% 1%

Trump vs. Winfrey

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Oprah
Winfrey
Other Undecided Meredith College[52] 618 January 21–25, 2018 ± 4.0% 48% 38% 12% 2%

North Dakota

Trump vs. Warren

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Elizabeth
Warren
Undecided Zogby Analytics[48] 403 August 17–23, 2017 ± 4.9% 47% 36% 17%

Ohio

Trump vs. Warren

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Elizabeth
Warren
Undecided Zogby Analytics[48] 805 August 17–23, 2017 ± 3.5% 40% 44% 16%

Pennsylvania

Trump vs. Warren

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Elizabeth
Warren
Undecided Zogby Analytics[48] 813 August 17–23, 2017 ± 3.4% 38% 46% 16%

Texas

Trump vs. Cuban

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Mark
Cuban
Undecided Public Policy Polling[53] – December 28, 2017 – 44% 47% 9%

West Virginia

Trump vs. Warren

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Elizabeth
Warren
Undecided Zogby Analytics[48] 401 August 17–23, 2017 ± 4.9% 43% 40% 17%

Wisconsin

Trump vs. Warren

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Donald
Trump
Elizabeth
Warren
Undecided Zogby Analytics[48] 603 August 17–23, 2017 ± 4.0% 37% 48% 15% Nominations Republican Party Further information: Republican Party presidential primaries, 2020

Donald Trump is eligible to run for reelection and intends to do so.[54] His reelection campaign has been ongoing since his victory in 2016, leading pundits to describe his tactic of holding rallies continuously throughout his presidency as a "never-ending campaign".[55] On January 20, 2017, at 5:11 PM, he submitted a letter as a substitute of FEC Form 2, for which he had reached the legal threshold for filing, in compliance with the Federal Election Campaign Act.[56]

Beginning in August 2017, reports arose that members of the Republican Party were preparing a "shadow campaign" against Trump, particularly from the moderate or establishment wings of the party.[57] A poor showing for the GOP in the 2018 midterm elections may lead to an influx of ambitious politicians vying to reclaim the nomination from Trump, as Arizona Senator John McCain said that " see weakness in this president." Maine Senator Susan Collins, Kentucky Senator Rand Paul, and former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie have all expressed doubts that Trump will be the 2020 nominee, with Collins stating "it's too difficult to say."[58][59] Meanwhile, Senator Jeff Flake has claimed that Trump is "inviting" a primary challenger by the way he is governing.[60] Longtime political strategist Roger Stone, however, predicts that Trump may not seek a second term if he succeeds in keeping all of his campaign promises and " America great again", à la James K. Polk.[61]

Declared major candidates

The candidates in this section have held public office or been included in a minimum of five independent national polls.

Name Born Current or previous positions State Announced Ref
Donald Trump June 14, 1946
(age 7004264490000000000♠72)
New York City, New York President of the United States since 2017
Candidate for President in 2000
New York August 19, 2016

(Campaign • Website)
FEC Filing [62] Individuals who have publicly expressed interest This section is transcluded from Republican Party presidential primaries, 2020. (edit | history)

Individuals in this section have expressed an interest in running for president within the last six months.

  • Jeff Flake, U.S. Senator from Arizona since 2013; U.S. Representative 2001–2013[63][64][65]
  • Larry Hogan, Governor of Maryland since 2015[66]
  • John Kasich, Governor of Ohio since 2011; U.S. Representative 1983–2001; candidate for President in 2000 and in 2016[67][68]
  • Bill Kristol, Chief of Staff to the Vice President 1989–1993[69]
Convention site Further information: 2020 Republican National Convention

On July 20, 2018, the Republican National Convention chose Charlotte, North Carolina as the site for their 2020 national convention.[70] The convention will be held from August 24 until August 27, 2020.[71]

Endorsements This section is transcluded from Republican Party presidential primaries, 2020. (edit | history)
Donald Trump
Main article: List of Donald Trump presidential campaign endorsements, 2020 Democratic Party Main article: Democratic Party presidential primaries, 2020

After Hillary Clinton's loss in the previous election, the Democratic Party was seen largely as leaderless[72] and fractured between the centrist Clinton wing and the more progressive Sanders wing of the party, echoing the rift brought up in the 2016 primary election.[73][74]

This establishment/progressive divide was reflected in several elections leading up to the 2020 primaries. Most notably in 2017 with the election for DNC Chair between Tom Perez and Sanders-backed progressive Keith Ellison.[75] Perez was elected Chairman, but Ellison was appointed as the Deputy Chair, a largely ceremonial role. In 2018, several U.S. House districts that Democrats are hoping to gain from the Republican majority had contentious primary elections. These clashes were described by Politico's Elena Schneider as a "Democratic civil war."[76] Meanwhile there has been a general shift to the left in regards to college tuition, healthcare, and immigration among Democrats in the Senate, likely to build up credentials for the upcoming primary election.[77][78]

Perez has commented that the 2020 primary field will likely go into double-digits, rivaling the size of the 2016 GOP primary, which consisted of 17 major candidates.[79] In the wake of the Me Too movement, several female candidates are expected to enter the race, increasing the likelihood of the Democrats nominating a woman for the second time in a row.[80] Speculation also mounted that Democrats' best bet to defeat President Trump would be to nominate their own celebrity or businessperson with no government experience, most notably Oprah Winfrey after her memorable speech at the 75th Golden Globe Awards.[81]

The topic of age has been brought up among the most likely front-runners: former Vice President Joe Biden, Massachusetts senator Elizabeth Warren, and senator Sanders; who will be 78, 71, and 79 respectively on inauguration day. Former Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (who will be aged 81 on inauguration day) described the trio as "an old folks' home", expressing a need for fresh faces to step up and lead the party.[82]

Declared major candidates

The candidates in this section have held public office or been included in a minimum of five independent national polls.

Name Born Current or previous positions State Announced Ref
John Delaney April 16, 1963
(age 7004202990000000000♠55)
Wood-Ridge, New Jersey U.S. Representative from Maryland since 2013
Maryland July 28, 2017

(Campaign • Website)
FEC Filing [83]
Richard Ojeda October 25, 1970
(age 7004175500000000000♠48)
Rochester, Minnesota West Virginia State Senate Member since 2016
Democratic nominee for U.S. Representative from West Virginia in 2018
West Virginia November 11, 2018

(Website)
FEC Filing [84] Other declared candidates

These candidates have established campaign websites.

Name Born Current or previous positions State Announced
Ken Nwadike December 29, 1981
(age 7004134670000000000♠36)
San Diego, California Peace activist, inspirational speaker, video journalist
California October 18, 2017
(Website)
FEC Filing
Robby Wells April 10, 1968
(age 7004184780000000000♠50)
Bartow, Georgia Former college football coach
Natural Law nominee for U.S. Representative from California in 1996
Candidate for President in 2012 and 2016
Georgia May 24, 2017
(Website)
FEC Filing
Andrew Yang January 13, 1975
(age 7004160090000000000♠43)
Schenectady, New York Entrepreneur and lawyer who is the founder of Venture for America
New York November 6, 2017

(Website)
FEC Filing Individuals who have publicly expressed interest This section is transcluded from Democratic Party presidential primaries, 2020. (edit | history)

Individuals in this section have expressed an interest in running for president within the last six months.

  • Michael Avenatti, attorney and entrepreneur from California[85][86][87]
  • Joe Biden, Vice President of the United States 2009–2017; U.S. Senator from Delaware 1973–2009; candidate for President in 1988 and in 2008[88][89][90]
  • Michael Bloomberg, former Mayor of New York City 2002–2013[91][92][93][94]
  • Cory Booker, U.S. Senator from New Jersey since 2013; Mayor of Newark 2006–2013[95][96][97][98]
  • Sherrod Brown, Senator from Ohio[99]
  • Julian Castro, U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development 2014–2017; Mayor of San Antonio, Texas 2009–2014[100][101]
  • Hillary Clinton, 2016 Democratic nominee; U.S. Secretary of State from 2009–2013; U.S. Senator from New York from 2001–2009[102]
  • Oscar De La Hoya, boxing champion from California[103]
  • Tulsi Gabbard, U.S. Representative from Hawaii since 2013[104]
  • Eric Garcetti, Mayor of Los Angeles, California since 2013[105][106]
  • Kirsten Gillibrand, U.S. Senator from New York since 2009; U.S. Representative from 2007–2009[107][108][109][110]
  • Kamala Harris, U.S. Senator from California since 2017[111][112][113]
  • John Hickenlooper, Governor of Colorado since 2011; Mayor of Denver 2003–2011[114]
  • Eric Holder, U.S. Attorney General 2009–2015; Acting U.S. Attorney General in 2001[115]
  • Jay Inslee, Governor of Washington since 2013[116]
  • John Kerry, U.S. Senator from Massachusetts; 2004 Democratic nominee; Secretary of State from 2013 to 2017[117]
  • Terry McAuliffe, Governor of Virginia 2014–2018[118][119]
  • Jeff Merkley, U.S. Senator from Oregon since 2009[120]
  • Martin O'Malley, former Governor of Maryland from 2007-2015, former Mayor of Baltimore 1999-2007, candidate for President in 2016[121][122]
  • Tim Ryan, U.S. Representative from Ohio since 2003[123]
  • Bernie Sanders,[a] U.S. Senator from Vermont since 2007; U.S. Representative 1991–2007; candidate for President in 2016[124][125]
  • Howard Schultz, businessman from New York[126][127]
  • Tom Steyer, billionaire hedge fund manager, philanthropist, environmentalist, liberal activist, and fundraiser from California[128]
  • Eric Swalwell, U.S. Representative from California since 2013[129]
  • Elizabeth Warren, U.S. Senator from Massachusetts since 2013[130][131][125]
  • Marianne Williamson[a], spiritual teacher, author, and lecturer from California; candidate for U.S. Representative in 2014[132][133][134][135]
Potential convention sites Further information: 2020 Democratic National Convention

Bids for the National Convention were solicited in the fall of 2017, with finalists being announced in June 2018. The winning bid was supposed to be revealed in the summer of 2018.

  • Houston, Texas[136]
  • Miami Beach, Florida[136]
  • Milwaukee, Wisconsin[137]
Endorsements This section is transcluded from Democratic Party presidential primaries, 2020. (edit | history) John Delaney
Individuals
  • David Trone, businessman, candidate for MD-8 in 2016 and MD-6 in 2018[138]
Andrew Yang
Individuals
  • Antonio García Martínez, New York Times Best Selling author, tech entrepreneur[139]
  • David S. Rose, serial entrepreneur and angel investor[140]
  • Ari Meisel, author and entrepeneur[141]
  • Fabrice Grinda, entrepeneur and angel investor[142]
Libertarian Party Further information: Libertarian Party presidential primaries, 2020 Declared candidates

These candidates have established campaign websites.

Name Born Current or previous positions State Announced Ref
Adam Kokesh February 1, 1982
(age 7004134330000000000♠36)
San Francisco, California Libertarian and anti-war political activist
Candidate for U.S. Senate in 2018
Candidate for U.S. Representative from New Mexico in 2010
Arizona July 18, 2013
(Campaign • Website)
FEC Filing [143]
Vermin Supreme June 1961
(age 57)
Rockport, Massachusetts Performance artist and activist
Candidate for President in 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012, and 2016
Candidate for Mayor of Detroit, Michigan in 1989
Candidate for Mayor of Baltimore, Maryland in 1987
Kansas May 28, 2018

(Website) [144]
Arvin Vohra May 9, 1979
(age 7004144320000000000♠39)
Silver Spring, Maryland Vice Chair of the LNC 2014–2018
Libertarian nominee for U.S. Senate from Maryland in 2018
Libertarian nominee for U.S.