Patriot's Day
Patriot's Day
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Patriots' Day
Patriots' Day (so punctuated in several U.S. states, but Patriot's Day in Maine) is an annual event, formalized as several state holidays, commemorating

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Civic holiday in the USA This article is about the American civic holiday. For the Quebec holiday, see National Patriots' Day. For the anniversary of September 11, 2001, see Patriot Day. For the 2016 motion picture about the Boston Marathon bombing, see Patriots Day (film).

Patriots' DayStatue of the Lexington Minuteman on the Lexington Green in Lexington, MassachusettsObserved by
  • Massachusetts
  • Maine
  • Wisconsin
  • Connecticut (since 2018)[1]
  • encouraged in Florida
TypeHistoricalCelebrationsBoston MarathonObservancesBattles of Lexington and ConcordDateThird Monday in April2018 dateApril 16  (2018-04-16)2019 dateApril 15  (2019-04-15)2020 dateApril 20  (2020-04-20)2021 dateApril 19  (2021-04-19)Frequencyannual Patriots' Grave in the Old Burying Ground, Arlington, Massachusetts

Patriots' Day (so punctuated in several U.S. states, but Patriot's Day in Maine)[2] is an annual event, formalized as several state holidays, commemorating the Battles of Lexington and Concord, the first battles of the American Revolutionary War.

Contents
  • 1 Description
  • 2 History
  • 3 Sporting events
  • 4 See also
  • 5 References
  • 6 External links
Description

The holiday was originally celebrated on April 19, the actual anniversary of the battles (fought in 1775). Since 1969, it has been observed on the third Monday in April in Massachusetts[3] and in Maine[4] (which until the Missouri Compromise of 1820 was part of Massachusetts). The Monday holiday creates a three-day long weekend. It is also the first day of a vacation week for public schools in both states and a school holiday for many local colleges and universities, both public and private.[citation needed]

The day is a public school observance day in Wisconsin.[5] Florida law also encourages people to celebrate it, though it is not treated as a public holiday.[6] Connecticut began observance in 2018.[1]

Acton Minutemen and citizens marching from Acton to Concord on Patriots' Day 2012

Observances and re-enactments of the battles occur annually at Lexington Green in Lexington, Massachusetts (around 6:00 am) and the Old North Bridge in Concord, Massachusetts (around 9:00 am). In the morning, mounted re-enactors with state police escorts retrace the Midnight Rides of Paul Revere and William Dawes, calling out warnings the whole way.[citation needed]

The most significant celebration of Patriots' Day is the Boston Marathon, which has been run every Patriots' Day since April 19, 1897 to mark the then-recently established holiday, with the race linking the Athenian and American struggles for liberty.[7]

History

In 1894 the Lexington Historical Society petitioned the Massachusetts State Legislature to proclaim April 19 as "Lexington Day." Concord countered with "Concord Day." Governor Frederic T. Greenhalge opted for a compromise: Patriots' Day. Patriots' Day was first proclaimed in Massachusetts in 1894 by Gov. Greenhalge replacing Fast Day as a public holiday.[2] The idea was introduced to the Governor by the statesman from Lowell, Isaac Henry Paige. It was established on April 19, commemorating the date of the Battles of Lexington and Concord in 1775, and consolidating the longstanding municipal observances of Lexington Day and Concord Day. It also marked the first bloodshed of the American Civil War in the Baltimore riot of 1861, during which four members of the Massachusetts militia were slain and 36 injured. The dual commemoration, Greenhalge explained, celebrated "the anniversary of the birth of liberty and union." In 1938, with the generation that had fought in the Civil War largely off the voter rolls, the Massachusetts legislature passed a bill establishing the holiday "in commemoration of the opening events of the War of the Revolution."[7]

Maine followed Massachusetts in 1907 and replaced its Fast Day with Patriot's Day.[2] On June 10, 2017, Governor Dannel Malloy signed a bill establishing Patriots' Day as a statewide unpaid holiday in Connecticut.[1] On April 16, 2018 Connecticut became the 4th state to recognize the holiday.[8][9]

Sporting events

The Boston Marathon is run on Patriots' Day every year, since its inception in 1897, even during the World War years.[7] Therefore, sometimes the holiday is referred to as "Marathon Monday".[10]

The Boston Red Sox have been scheduled to play at home in Fenway Park on Patriots' Day every year since 1959. The game was postponed due to weather in 1959, 1961, 1965, 1967, 1984, and 2018, and was canceled in 1995 because of the baseball strike.[11] The game was played in 2013 despite the Boston Marathon bombing because it had finished before the bombs went off.[12] From 1968 to 2006 the games started early, in the morning, around 11:00 am. The early start to these games usually resulted in the game ending just as the marathon is heading through Kenmore Square. However, since 2007 the marathon has started between 9:30 am and 10:00 am, resulting in the racers going through Kenmore towards the middle of the Red Sox game.[13]

See also
  • Bunker Hill Day
  • Evacuation Day (Massachusetts)
  • Minor American Revolution holidays
  • Holidays of the United States
References
  1. ^ a b c Sampson, Rob (July 13, 2017). "Patriots' Day Becomes Official Statewide Holiday!". State Representative Rob Sampson. Wolcott, Southington, Connecticut. Retrieved November 27, 2017..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output .citation q{quotes:"\"""\"""'""'"}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg/12px-Wikisource-logo.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{display:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  2. ^ a b c McMillan, Susan (April 20, 2014). "Patriot's Day or Patriots' Day? Punctuation confusion continues". Kennebec Journal. Retrieved April 21, 2014.
  3. ^ "Massachusetts Legal Holidays". Citizen Information Service. Secretary of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Retrieved April 11, 2007.
  4. ^ "Holidays". Human Resources Policy and Practices Manual. Maine Bureau of Human Resources. Retrieved April 11, 2007.
  5. ^ "Wisconsin Public School Observance Days". Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. Archived from the original on February 4, 2012. Retrieved April 10, 2007.
  6. ^ §683.14, Fla. Stat. (2013) http://www.leg.state.fl.us/statutes/index.cfm?App_mode=Display_Statute&URL=0600-0699/0683/0683.html
  7. ^ a b c "The History of the Boston Marathon: A Perfect Way to Celebrate Patriot's Day". The Atlantic. Retrieved April 23, 2013.
  8. ^ Patrick, Mike (July 3, 2017). "Patriots Day Coming to Connecticut". Waterbury Republican-American. Retrieved July 4, 2017.
  9. ^ Kinney, Jim (15 April 2018). "Patriots' Day 2018: What's open, what's closed, details on extended tax deadline, Boston Marathon, MBTA service and more". MassLive. Advance Local. Retrieved 25 April 2018.
  10. ^ "Who To Watch on Marathon Monday". April 17, 2015.
  11. ^ "1995. Boston Red Sox Box Scores". Baseball-reference.com. Retrieved October 14, 2012.
  12. ^ "MLB Scores, Standings, Box Scores for Monday, April 15, 2013". Baseball-Reference.com.
  13. ^ "Patriots' Day game may start earlier". Boston Red Sox. June 19, 2012. Archived from the original on October 8, 2012. Retrieved October 14, 2012.
External links Wikimedia Commons has media related to Patriots' Day.
  • Patriots' Day information, via noblenet.org
  • Information about Battle Reenactments, via battleroad.org
  • Massachusetts General Laws ch. 6, § 12
  • The Wisconsin Statutes & Annotations General School Operations, Special observance day
  • Maine Statutes Rev. 9-B, § 145
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