Rick Forzano
Rick Forzano
 
Search
Rick Forzano
Custom Search
Rick Forzano
 
 
 
 
 
Go Back

Smartphone









Free the Animation VR / AR
Play to reveal 3D images and 3D models!
Demonstration A-Frame / Multiplayer
Android app on Google Play
 
vlrPhone / vlrFilter
Project of very low consumption, radiation and bitrate softphones, with the support of the spatial audio, of the frequency shifts and of the ultrasonic communications / Multifunction Audio Filter with Remote Control!



 

Vectors and 3D Models

City Images, Travel Images, Safe Images

Howto - How To - Illustrated Answers

 

Rick Forzano
Richard Edward Forzano (November 20, 1928 – January 10, 2019) was an American football coach at the high school, collegiate and professional levels, most

View Wikipedia Article

Rick ForzanoBiographical detailsBorn(1928-11-20)November 20, 1928DiedJanuary 10, 2019(2019-01-10) (aged 90)
Orlando, FloridaAlma materKent StateCoaching career (HC unless noted)1951Kenmore HS (OH) (assistant)1952Hower HS (OH) (assistant)1953–1955Hower HS (OH)1956Wooster (assistant)1957–1958Kent State (assistant)1959–1963Navy (assistant)1964–1965Connecticut1966–1967St. Louis Cardinals (OB)1968Cincinnati Bengals (OB)1969–1972Navy1973Detroit Lions (assistant)1974–1976Detroit Lions Head coaching recordOverall17–43–1 (college)
15–17 (NFL)
10–14–1 (high school)

Richard Edward Forzano (November 20, 1928 – January 10, 2019)[1] was an American football coach at the high school, collegiate and professional levels, most prominently as head coach of the National Football League's Detroit Lions from 1974 to 1976.[2]

After seeing his football playing career ended by a high school eye injury, Forzano turned to coaching and earned his first two opportunities at two Akron, Ohio high schools. A 1951 stint at Kenmore High School was followed one year later by a season at Hower High School. In 1953, he was promoted to head coach at Hower, where he stayed three seasons and compiled a 10–14–1 record.

In 1956, he moved on for one year as an assistant at the College of Wooster before spending two seasons in the same capacity at Kent State University.[3] In 1959, he began a five-year stretch as an assistant with the United States Naval Academy, helping recruit quarterback Roger Staubach, who went on to win the Heisman Trophy in 1963.[4]

That success led to his first college head coaching position at the University of Connecticut,[5] where he was 7–10–1 in two years. In 1966, he moved up to become an NFL coach with the first of two seasons as the St. Louis Cardinals' offensive backfield coach.[6][7] Returning to Ohio in 1968, he served one year in that same role as a Cincinnati Bengals assistant under Paul Brown.[4][8] On January 15, 1969, he then took the head coaching position at the U.S. Naval Academy.[4]

After putting together a 10–33 record with three defeats against rival Army, Forzano resigned on February 1, 1973. The decision came when he accepted an offer to become an assistant coach with the Detroit Lions under Don McCafferty,[9] who had worked with him at Kent State in the late 1950s.[3] When McCafferty died suddenly of a heart attack on July 28, 1974, Forzano was named to replace him.[10]

Forzano was known as a strict disciplinarian.[11][12] However, Forzano was unable to lead the team to a winning record and resigned on October 4, 1976 after the team lost three of its first four games. Forzano finished his Lions' tenure with a 15–17 record[11] and never returned to coaching, focusing on his own company, Rick Forzano Associates. The company, based in Detroit, serves as a manufacturer's sales representative.[13] Forzano also served as a commentator for Big Ten Conference football games.

Contents
  • 1 Head coaching record
    • 1.1 College
  • 2 References
  • 3 External links
Head coaching record College Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs Connecticut Huskies (Yankee Conference) (1964–1965) 1964 Connecticut 4–4–1 3–1–1 3rd 1965 Connecticut 3–6 2–2 T–3rd Connecticut: 7–10–1 4–3–1 Navy Midshipmen (NCAA University Division independent) (1969–1972) 1969 Navy 1–9 1970 Navy 2–9 1971 Navy 3–8 1972 Navy 4–7 Navy: 10–33 Total: 17–43–1 References
  1. ^ "Rick Forzano". Pro Football Reference. Retrieved 2011-04-15..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"\"""\"""'""'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  2. ^ https://bleacherreport.com/articles/2815136-former-detroit-lions-head-coach-rick-forzano-dies-at-90
  3. ^ a b "Navy Coach Resigns To Join Lions". The News and Courier. Associated Press. 1973-02-02. Retrieved 2011-04-15.
  4. ^ a b c "Ex-Navy Aide Forzano Returns As Coach". St. Petersburg Times. Associated Press. 1969-01-16. Retrieved 2011-04-15.
  5. ^ "Rick Forzano to Install Navy Offense at UConn". The Day. Associated Press. 1964-01-04. Retrieved 2011-04-15.
  6. ^ "UConn Shopping For Grid Coach". Meriden Journal. Associated Press. 1966-03-05. Retrieved 2011-04-15.
  7. ^ "Navy Selects Rick Forzano". Herald-Journal. Associated Press. 1969-01-13. Retrieved 2011-04-15.
  8. ^ Franke, Russ (1969-10-08). "Coach DePasqua Had Choice: Sink At Navy Or Swim At Pitt". The Pittsburgh Press. Retrieved 2011-04-15.
  9. ^ "Forzano Leaves Navy For Job With Lions". Lakeland Ledger. Associated Press. 1973-02-01. Retrieved 2011-04-15.
  10. ^ "Rick Forzano Named To Guide Detroit Lions". Daytona Beach Morning Journal. Associated Press. 1974-07-30. Retrieved 2011-04-15.
  11. ^ a b Shook, Richard L. (1976-10-05). "Rick Forzano out as Lions' coach". Beaver County Times. United Press International. Retrieved 2011-04-15.
  12. ^ "Forzano Not 'Easy Rider'". Ocala Star-Banner. Associated Press. 1974-07-30. Retrieved 2011-04-15.
  13. ^ "History". Rick Forzano Associates, Inc. Retrieved October 27, 2014.
External links
  • Biography portal
  • Rick Forzano Associates, Inc. website
  • v
  • t
  • e
Connecticut Huskies head football coaches
  • No coach (1896–1897)
  • E. S. Mansfield (1898)
  • Thomas D. Knowles (1899–1901)
  • Edwin O. Smith (1902–1905)
  • George H. Lamson (1906–1907)
  • William F. Madden (1908)
  • S. Frank G. McLean (1909)
  • M. F. Claffey (1910)
  • Leo Hafford (1911)
  • Abraham J. Sharadin (1912)
  • P. T. Brady (1913)
  • Dave Warner (1914)
  • John F. Donahue (1915–1916)
  • No team (1917–1918)
  • Roy J. Guyer (1919)
  • Ross Swartz (1920)
  • J. Wilder Tasker (1921–1922)
  • Sumner Dole (1923–1933)
  • J. Orlean Christian (1934–1942)
  • No team (1943)
  • J. Orlean Christian (1944–1949)
  • Arthur Valpey (1950–1951)
  • Robert Ingalls (1952–1963)
  • Rick Forzano (1964–1965)
  • John Toner (1966–1970)
  • Robert Casciola (1971–1972)
  • Larry Naviaux (1973–1976)
  • Walt Nadzak (1977–1982)
  • Tom Jackson (1983–1993)
  • Skip Holtz (1994–1998)
  • Randy Edsall (1999–2010)
  • Paul Pasqualoni (2011–2013)
  • T. J. Weist # (2013)
  • Bob Diaco (2014–2016)
  • Randy Edsall (2017– )

# denotes interim head coach.

  • v
  • t
  • e
Navy Midshipmen head football coaches
  • No coach (1879)
  • No team (1880–1881)
  • Vaulx Carter (1882)
  • No coach (1883–1891)
  • Ben Crosby (1892)
  • John A. Hartwell (1893)
  • William Wurtenburg (1894)
  • Matthew McClung (1895)
  • Johnny Poe (1896)
  • Bill Armstrong (1897–1899)
  • Garrett Cochran (1900)
  • Art Hillebrand (1901–1902)
  • Burr Chamberlain (1903)
  • Paul Dashiell (1904–1906)
  • Joseph M. Reeves (1907)
  • Frank Berrien (1908–1910)
  • Douglas Legate Howard (1911–1914)
  • Jonas H. Ingram (1915–1916)
  • Gil Dobie (1917–1919)
  • Bob Folwell (1920–1924)
  • Jack Owsley (1925)
  • Bill Ingram (1926–1930)
  • Edgar Miller (1931–1933)
  • Tom Hamilton (1934–1936)
  • Hank Hardwick (1937–1938)
  • Swede Larson (1939–1941)
  • John Whelchel (1942–1943)
  • Oscar Hagberg (1944–1945)
  • Tom Hamilton (1946–1947)
  • George Sauer (1948–1949)
  • Eddie Erdelatz (1950–1958)
  • Wayne Hardin (1959–1964)
  • Bill Elias (1965–1968)
  • Rick Forzano (1969–1972)
  • George Welsh (1973–1981)
  • Gary Tranquill (1982–1986)
  • Elliot Uzelac (1987–1989)
  • George Chaump (1990–1994)
  • Charlie Weatherbie (1995–2001)
  • Rick Lantz # (2001)
  • Paul Johnson (2002–2007)
  • Ken Niumatalolo (2007– )

# denotes interim head coach

  • v
  • t
  • e
Portsmouth Spartans / Detroit Lions head coaches
  • Hal Griffen (1930)
  • George Clark (1931–1936)
  • Dutch Clark (1937–1938)
  • Gus Henderson (1939)
  • George Clark (1940)
  • Bill Edwards (1941–1942)
  • John Karcis (1942)
  • Gus Dorais (1943–1947)
  • Bo McMillin (1948–1950)
  • Buddy Parker (1951–1956)
  • George Wilson (1957–1964)
  • Harry Gilmer (1965–1966)
  • Joe Schmidt (1967–1972)
  • Don McCafferty (1973)
  • Rick Forzano (1974–1976)
  • Tommy Hudspeth (1976–1977)
  • Monte Clark (1978–1984)
  • Darryl Rogers (1985–1988)
  • Wayne Fontes (1988–1996)
  • Bobby Ross (1997–2000)
  • Gary Moeller (2000)
  • Marty Mornhinweg (2001–2002)
  • Steve Mariucci (2003–2005)
  • Dick Jauron # (2005)
  • Rod Marinelli (2006–2008)
  • Jim Schwartz (2009–2013)
  • Jim Caldwell (2014–2017)
  • Matt Patricia (2018– )

# denotes interim head coach



Navy Football: Return to Glory (Sports)
Navy Football: Return to Glory (Sports)
Navy football holds a unique place in college athletics as one of the oldest and most prestigious programs the game has ever known. During the 1950s and 1960s, the Midshipmen were nationally recognized by the major bowl games they played and Heisman Trophy-winning players Joe Bellino and Roger Staubach. Although the program struggled mightily to maintain relevancy in subsequent years, Athletic Director Chet Gladchuk kick-started the renaissance of Navy football by hiring Coach Paul Johnson in 2001. The team's current coach, Ken Niumatalolo, once fired by the academy in the dining room of a McDonald's in 1998, returned to become the winningest coach in school history. Author T.C. Cameron charts the story of Navy football and steers readers through the reemergence of an iconic program representing our nation's finest.

Click Here to view in augmented reality

$14.57
-$7.42(-34%)


Twitter
 
Facebook
 
LinkedIn
 
 

 
 

WhmSoft Moblog
Copyright (C) 2006-2019 WhmSoft
All Rights Reserved