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United States Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
The United States Senate Select Committee on Intelligence (sometimes referred to as the Intelligence Committee or SSCI) is dedicated to overseeing the

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Senate Select Committee on Intelligence Select committee Active

United States Senate
115th Congress History Formed May 19, 1976 Succeeded Church Committee Leadership Chair Richard Burr (R)
Since January 3, 2015 Vice chair Mark Warner (D)
Since January 3, 2017 Structure Seats 15 members Political parties Majority (8)
  •      Republican (8)
Minority (7)
  •      Democratic (6)
  •      Independent (1)
Jurisdiction Purpose to “oversee and make continuing studies of the intelligence activities and programs of the United States Government” Oversight authority United States Intelligence Community House counterpart House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence Meeting place 211 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington, D.C. Website intelligence.senate.gov Rules
  • Rules of Procedure of the Select Committee on Intelligence
The US Senate Report on CIA Detention Interrogation Program that details the use of torture during CIA detention and interrogation.

The United States Senate Select Committee on Intelligence (sometimes referred to as the Intelligence Committee or SSCI) is dedicated to overseeing the United States Intelligence Community—the agencies and bureaus of the federal government of the United States who provide information and analysis for leaders of the executive and legislative branches. The Committee was established in 1976 by the 94th Congress. The Committee is "select" in that membership is temporary and rotated among members of the chamber. The committee comprises 15 members. Eight of those seats are reserved for one majority and one minority member of each of the following committees: Appropriations, Armed Services, Foreign Relations, and Judiciary. Of the remaining seven, four are members of the majority, and three are members of the minority. In addition, the Majority Leader and Minority Leader are non-voting ex officio members of the committee. Also, the Chairman and Ranking Member of the Committee on Armed Services (if not already a member of the select Committee) are ex officio members.

As part of its oversight responsibilities, the Committee performs an annual review of the intelligence budget submitted by the president and prepares legislation authorizing appropriations for the various civilian and military agencies and departments comprising the intelligence community. These entities include the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, Central Intelligence Agency, Defense Intelligence Agency, National Security Agency, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, National Reconnaissance Office, as well as the intelligence-related components of Department of State, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Department of the Treasury, and Department of Energy. The Committee makes recommendations to the Senate Armed Services Committee on authorizations for the intelligence-related components of the U.S. Army, U.S. Navy, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Marine Corps. The Committee also conducts periodic investigations, audits, and inspections of intelligence activities and programs.

Contents
  • 1 History
  • 2 Members, 115th Congress
  • 3 Chairs
  • 4 Staff directors
  • 5 See also
  • 6 References
  • 7 External links

History

The Select Committee on Intelligence was preceded by the Church Committee (1975). Senator Daniel K. Inouye (D-Hawaii) became the first chairman of the committee when it was established in 1975 until 1979.

Former Director of Central Intelligence George Tenet was staff director of the committee when David Boren of Oklahoma was its chairman. The committee was the center of much controversy and contention during the run-up to the war in Iraq in 2002 and 2003, when chairmanship of the committee changed hands following the November 2002 election. Among the committee staff members at that time were: Pete Dorn, Professional Staff Member; Jim Hensler, Deputy Staff Director; Vicki Divoll, General Counsel; Steven Cash, Professional Staff Member & Counsel; and Alfred Cumming, Minority Staff Director.

On July 9, 2004, the committee issued the Report of the Select Committee on Intelligence on the U.S. Intelligence Community's Prewar Intelligence Assessments on Iraq, and on June 5, 2008, it issued a long-delayed portion of its "phase two" investigative report, which compared the prewar public statements made by top Bush administration officials to justify the invasion with the intelligence information that was available to them at that time.

In a March 6, 2008, letter to the Senate leadership, 14 of the 15 then members of the Committee proposed the creation of a new Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Intelligence to prepare the annual intelligence budget. The proposed Subcommittee, on which members of the Intelligence Committee would be heavily represented, would increase the Committee’s influence and leverage over executive branch intelligence agencies, and require continuing disclosure of the annual budget for the National Intelligence Program. The proposal has been opposed by the leadership of the Senate Appropriations Committee, however.

In 2013, and beyond, the SSCI received renewed attention in the wake of Edward Snowden's disclosures regarding the NSA surveillance of communications. Senator Dianne Feinstein and the SSCI made several statements on the matter, one of which was notably disputed: that the NSA tracked US citizens locations via cellphone. Later, the SSCI Staff Director, David Grannis, claimed that the NSA did not collect cellphone location, claiming the Senator was "speaking extemporaneously". The SSCI later came to prominence in relation to voting to publish in March 2014 and then publishing in December 2014 of a report on the policies of the CIA on torture.

Members, 115th Congress Majority Minority
  • Richard Burr, North Carolina, Chairman
  • Jim Risch, Idaho
  • Marco Rubio, Florida
  • Susan Collins, Maine
  • Roy Blunt, Missouri
  • James Lankford, Oklahoma
  • Tom Cotton, Arkansas
  • John Cornyn, Texas
  • Mark Warner, Virginia, Vice Chairman
  • Dianne Feinstein, California, Former Chairwoman
  • Ron Wyden, Oregon
  • Martin Heinrich, New Mexico
  • Angus King, Maine
  • Joe Manchin, West Virginia
  • Kamala Harris, California
Ex officio
  • John McCain, Arizona
  • Mitch McConnell, Kentucky
  • Jack Reed, Rhode Island
  • Chuck Schumer, New York

Source: Member List

Chairs Nº Chair Party State Term 1 Daniel Inouye   Democratic Hawaii 1975–1979 2 Birch Bayh   Democratic Indiana 1979–1981 3 Barry Goldwater   Republican Arizona 1981–1985 4 David Durenberger   Republican Minnesota 1985–1987 5 David Boren   Democratic Oklahoma 1987–1993 6 Dennis DeConcini   Democratic Arizona 1993–1995 7 Arlen Specter   Republican Pennsylvania 1995–1997 8 Richard Shelby   Republican Alabama 1997–2001 9 Bob Graham   Democratic Florida 2001 10 Richard Shelby   Republican Alabama 2001 11 Bob Graham   Democratic Florida 2001–2003 12 Pat Roberts   Republican Kansas 2003–2007 13 Jay Rockefeller   Democratic West Virginia 2007–2009 14 Dianne Feinstein   Democratic California 2009–2015 15 Richard Burr   Republican North Carolina 2015–present Staff directors
  • Christopher Joyner, 2015–present
  • David Grannis, 2009–2014
  • Andy Johnson, 2004–2008
  • Alfred Cumming, 2000–2003
  • George Tenet, 1989–1993
See also
  • Senate Intelligence Committee report on CIA torture
  • James R. Clapper § False testimony to Congress on NSA surveillance programs
References
  1. ^ Snider, L. Britt (2008). The Agency & The Hill: CIA's Relationship with Congress, 1946-2004, Chapter 2 (PDF). CIA Center for the Study of Intelligence. Retrieved June 19, 2008. 
  2. ^ Kaiser, Frederick (September 16, 2008). "Congressional Oversight of Intelligence: Current Structure and Alternatives". Congressional Research Service. Retrieved April 23, 2009. 
  3. ^ a b c "Committee on Intelligence" from Riddick's Senate Procedure
  4. ^ "Rules of Procedure" (PDF). U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. Retrieved 2017-03-30. 
  5. ^ "INOUYE, Daniel Ken - Biographical Information". United States Congress. Retrieved 19 February 2016. 
  6. ^ Mazzetti, Mark; Shane, Scott (June 6, 2008). "Bush Overstated Iraq Evidence, Senators Report". The New York Times. p. A1. Retrieved June 17, 2008. 
  7. ^ Senate Select Committee on Intelligence (March 6, 2008). "Letter to Senators Harry Reid and Mitch McConnell" (PDF). Retrieved April 14, 2008. 
  8. ^ Senate Appropriations Committee (April 5, 2008). "Letter to Senators Harry Reid and Mitch McConnell" (PDF). Retrieved April 14, 2008. 
  9. ^ Ali Watkins. "Senate intelligence committee director denies NSA collects data on Americans' cellphone locations". McClatchy Washington Bureau. 
  10. ^ "Statement on SSCI Vote for Declassification of Torture Report". OpenTheGovernment.org. 
  11. ^ "U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence". www.intelligence.senate.gov. Retrieved June 8, 2017. 
  12. ^ Angus King is an independent, but caucuses with the Democrats.
  13. ^ "115th Congress (2017-2018) | Intelligence Committee". www.intelligence.senate.gov. Retrieved 2017-01-05. 
External links
  • U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence Official Website
    • Committee Publications
    • Committee Hearing Schedule & Archive
    • Committee Press Releases
  • US GPO Congressional Directory includes information on past members
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The Senate Intelligence Committee Report on Torture: Committee Study of the Central Intelligence Agency's Detention and Interrogation Program
The Senate Intelligence Committee Report on Torture: Committee Study of the Central Intelligence Agency's Detention and Interrogation Program
“The most extensive review of U.S. intelligence-gathering tactics in generations.” —Los Angeles TimesMeticulously formatted, this is a highly readable edition of the Senate Intelligence Committee’s investigation of Central Intelligence Agency interrogation and detention programs launched in the wake of the 9/11 attacks.   Based on over six million internal CIA documents, the report details secret prisons -- like the one in Thailand run by Gina Haspel, currently nominated to be Donald Trump's Deputy Secretary of State -- prisoner deaths, interrogation practices, and cooperation with other foreign and domestic agencies. It also examines charges that the CIA deceived elected officials and governmental overseers about the extent and legality of its operations.   Over five years in the making, and withheld from public view since its declassification in April, 2014, this is the full summary report as finally released by the United States government on December 9th, 2014.

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$13.09
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The Official Senate Report on CIA Torture: Committee Study of the Central Intelligence Agency’s Detention and Interrogation Program
The Official Senate Report on CIA Torture: Committee Study of the Central Intelligence Agency’s Detention and Interrogation Program
Now available to the public for the first time, the Senate's landmark torture report delivers a damning indictment on CIA interrogation practices.Finally declassified and released after five years in the making, the Senate Intelligence Committee’s report on the CIA’s torture program, which describes in excruciating detail what Obama has called “harsh methods . . . inconsistent with our values as a nation,” is now available to the American public—citizens who have a right to know the truth.Considered one of the most important government documents ever to be published, the torture report compiles the Senate committee’s findings of the CIA’s program to detain and interrogate terrorist threats in the aftermath of the September 11 attacks, from 2001 to 2006 during the Bush administration. Among other controversial conclusions, the report has found that the CIA’s “enhanced interrogation techniques” were not effective in acquiring intelligence to avert terrorist threats. The study also shows that the CIA misled the public, Congress, the Department of Justice, and even the White House on the effectiveness and the scope and severity of their interrogation techniques. The exhaustive and disturbing account also provides grisly accounts on horrific practices that occurred in CIA black sites: prisoners experienced sleep deprivation in stressful positions for up to 180 hours; being stripped and shackled, hooded and dragged down a long corridor while being punched; waterboarding; and “rectal feeding.”Based on six million CIA documents and requiring $40 million to complete, the entire 6,000-page report still remains classified. Only 525 pages of summary have been published, with 7 percent of its content redacted, and it is now at the disposal of American readers who have the opportunity to learn what occurred during this dark chapter in modern American history. The Senate report delivers a scathing, shocking, and controversial judgment, and gives us much to think about in terms of our longstanding position on freedom, democracy, dignity, and human rights.

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$8.95
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The Senate Intelligence Committee Report on Torture - Special Extensive Edition Including Additional Views, Minority Views & Additional Minority Views
The Senate Intelligence Committee Report on Torture - Special Extensive Edition Including Additional Views, Minority Views & Additional Minority Views
Long awaited: This is THE SPECIAL EXTENSIVE EDITION of the Official Report of the Senate Intelligence Committee's investigation of the Central Intelligence Agency Interrogation and Detention Program, including additional views, minority views & additional minority views. Completely new type set and quality formatted in all details, this special edition is an excellent choice for both serious private readers as well as libraries and archives. "A portrait of depravity that is hard to comprehend and even harder to stomach." - The New York Times "The Senate intelligence committee's report is a landmark in accountability ... It is one of the most shocking documents ever produced by any modern democracy about its own abuses of its own highest principles." - The Guardian "Releasing this report is an important step to restoring our values and showing the world that we are a just society."- Senate Intelligence Committee chair Senator Diane Feinstein "The most extensive review of U.S. intelligence-gathering tactics in generations." - The Los Angeles Times "I believe the American people have a right-indeed, a responsibility-to know what was done in their name; how these practices did or did not serve our interests; and how they comported with our most important values. I commend Chairman Feinstein and her staff for their diligence in seeking a truthful accounting of policies I hope we will never resort to again." - Senator John McCain

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The Torture Report: The U.S. Senate Report on the Central Intelligence Agency’s Detention and Interrogation Program
The Torture Report: The U.S. Senate Report on the Central Intelligence Agency’s Detention and Interrogation Program
The Senate Intelligence Committee has released the highly anticipated summary of its report on the CIA’s post-9/11 torture program. It provides a sobering glimpse into one of the darkest chapters in the U.S. government's history. After a grueling 5-year investigation, Senate investigators reveal torrid details of the systemic and individual failures by the agency personnel who ran the "enhanced interrogation program" -- the government's euphemism for systematic torture--during the George W. Bush administration. The program involved capturing terrorism suspects and shipping them to secret overseas prisons, where they were subjected to techniques such as waterboarding (and worse). This is the full, 526-page executive summary unclassified and released by the Senate.

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The Senate Intelligence Committee Report on Torture: Committee Study of the Central Intelligence Agencys Detention and Interrogation Program
The Senate Intelligence Committee Report on Torture: Committee Study of the Central Intelligence Agencys Detention and Interrogation Program
The Senate Intelligence Committee’s summary of its report on the CIA’s post-9/11 torture program provides a sobering glimpse into one of the darkest chapters in the U.S. government's history. After a grueling 5-year investigation, Senate investigators reveal torrid details of the systemic and individual failures by the agency personnel who ran the "enhanced interrogation program" -- the government's euphemism for systematic torture--during the George W. Bush administration. The program involved capturing terrorism suspects and shipping them to secret overseas prisons, where they were subjected to techniques such as waterboarding (and worse). This is the full, 526-page executive summary unclassified and released by the Senate.

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Minority Report: The U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee Study of the CIA's Detention and Interrogation Program -- The GOP Rebuttal to the Torture Report
Minority Report: The U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee Study of the CIA's Detention and Interrogation Program -- The GOP Rebuttal to the Torture Report
The most important book in what is called The Senate Torture Report. This is the third book in what is commonly called the “Senate Torture Report.” The full title is, the Senate Intelligence Committee's Study of the Central Intelligence Agency's Detention and Interrogation Program — Minority Views. It's the one where the minority, Republican members explain what was wrong with the first, main book, written exclusively by the majority, Democrat members. This is the book that tells you what the first book didn't tell you. I believe it may prove the most important book of the three. Know what all the arguments are. Whatever side you are on, if you're only going to read one report, make it this one. What they're saying: “I'm going to read the report, but I'm also going to read the minority report...”— David Ignatius, Washington Post columnist “I urge everyone to read the Minority Views which document many falsehoods propagated by the Study.”— U.S. Senator Richard Burr (R-NC) “There's a theory on the part of the Senate Democrats... that no significant information was obtained as a result of the use of those enhanced interrogation techniques. That is absolutely wrong, and you're going to be able to see from the report itself as well as from the minority views that we have put together... that information gleaned from these interrogations was in fact used to interrupt and disrupt terrorist plots, including some information that took down [Osama] bin Laden.”— U.S. Senator Saxby Chambliss (R-GA), Senate Intelligence Committee

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Rebuttal: The CIA Responds to the Senate Intelligence Committee's Study of Its Detention and Interrogation Program
Rebuttal: The CIA Responds to the Senate Intelligence Committee's Study of Its Detention and Interrogation Program
In December 2014, the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence (SSCI) released a 500+ page executive summary of a 6,000 page study of the CIA's detention and interrogation of al Qa'ida terrorists. In early 2015 publishers released the study in book form and called it "the report" on "torture." Rebuttal presents the "rest of the story." In addition to reprinting the official responses from the SSCI minority and CIA, this publication also includes eight essays from senior former CIA officials who all are deeply knowledgeable about the program - and yet none of whom were interviewed by the SSCI staff during the more than four years the report was in preparation. These authors of the eight essays are George Tenet, Porter Goss, Gen. Michael V. Hayden, USAF (Ret.), John McLaughlin, Michael Morell, J. Philip Mudd, John Rizzo, and Jose A. Rodriguez, Jr.

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Report on the CIA Detention and Interrogation Program: The Senate CIA Torture Report
Report on the CIA Detention and Interrogation Program: The Senate CIA Torture Report
This is the full text of the unclassified US Senate report on the CIA's detention and interrogation program. This controversial document, also referred to as the CIA Torture Report, will resonate for decades as Americans debate the after-effects of the September 11, 2001 attacks and the ensuing War on Terror. On December 9, 2014, the US Senate Intelligence Committee released the unclassified executive summary of the committee’s five-year review of the CIA’s detention and interrogation program. The release included redacted versions of the committee’s executive summary and findings and conclusions, as well as additional and minority views authored by members of the committee. The committee voted to initiate the review on March 5, 2009, with a bipartisan 14-1 vote. Over the following three and a half years, committee staff reviewed more than 6.3 million pages of CIA records, a painstaking process that culminated in the committee’s 9-6 bipartisan vote to approve the study on December 13, 2012. Months of meetings with the CIA and work to update the study followed, and on April 3, 2014, the committee voted 11-3 to declassify and release the committee’s report. The committee has worked with the Executive Branch over the past eight months to prepare a redacted version designed to protection national security while allowing for the public release of this information. Key findings The study’s 20 findings and conclusions can be grouped into four central themes, each of which is supported extensively in the Executive Summary: 1. The CIA’s “enhanced interrogation techniques” were not effective. 2. The CIA provided extensive inaccurate information about the operation of the program and its effectiveness to policymakers and the public. 3. The CIA’s management of the program was inadequate and deeply flawed. 4. The CIA program was far more brutal than the CIA represented to policymakers and the American public.

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Joint Inquiry Into Intelligence Community Activities Before and After the Terrorist Attacks of September 11, 2001 (Volume One)
Joint Inquiry Into Intelligence Community Activities Before and After the Terrorist Attacks of September 11, 2001 (Volume One)
In February 2002, the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence and the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence agreed to conduct a Joint Inquiry into the activities of the U.S. Intelligence Community in connection with the terrorist attacks perpetrated against our nation on September 11, 2001. This report consists of 832 pages that presents the joint inquiry's findings and conclusions, plus an accompanying narrative, and a series of recommendations. This is the declassified version of the Final Report of the Joint Inquiry that was held by the U. S. Congress into the attacks of September 11, 2001. For reasons of printing production it has been produced in two volumes but is otherwise identical to the one volume report initially released by the Congress to the media. The entire narrative report is included in the first volume, and the appendices and supplementary information are included in the second volume.

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$20.99



Senate Select Committee on Intelligence: Testimony of James Comey (Russiagate Transcripts Series Book 20170608)
Senate Select Committee on Intelligence: Testimony of James Comey (Russiagate Transcripts Series Book 20170608)
On June 8, 2017, former Director of the FBI James Comey testified before the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence regarding his interactions with President Trump up to the time of his termination. This is the transcript of the hearing, formatted for readability as an ebook.Also includes:• Hyperlinks to each Senator's questions for easy navigation• Mr. Comey's prepared statement in its unmodified form as an appendix

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