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United States Department of State
United States Department of State (DOS), often referred to as the State Department, is the United States federal executive department that advises the

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"Department of State" redirects here. For the term as used in Ireland, see Department of State (Ireland). United States Department of State Seal of the U.S. Department of State Flag of the U.S. Department of State Agency overview Formed July 27, 1789; 227 years ago (1789-07-27) Preceding agency
  • Department of Foreign Affairs
Headquarters Harry S Truman Building
2201 C Street
Northwest, Washington, D.C., U.S.
38°53′39″N 77°2′54″W / 38.89417°N 77.04833°W / 38.89417; -77.04833 Employees 13,000 Foreign Service employees
11,000 Civil Service employees
45,000 Foreign Service local employees Annual budget $47.4 billion (FY 2015; including $26.5 billion for State and $21.0 billion for international assistance) Agency executives
  • Rex Tillerson, Secretary
  • John Sullivan, Deputy Secretary & Deputy Secretary for Management and Resources
Website www.state.gov

The United States Department of State (DOS), often referred to as the State Department, is the United States federal executive department that advises the President and leads the country in foreign policy issues. Equivalent to the foreign ministry of other countries, the State Department is responsible for the international relations of the United States, negotiates treaties and agreements with foreign entities, and represents the United States at the United Nations. The Department was created in 1789 and was the first executive department established.

The Department is headquartered in the Harry S Truman Building located at 2201 C Street, NW, a few blocks away from the White House in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood of Washington, D.C. The Department operates the diplomatic missions of the United States abroad and is responsible for implementing the foreign policy of the United States and U.S. diplomacy efforts. The Department is also the depositary for more than 200 multilateral treaties.

The Department is led by the Secretary of State, who is nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate and is a member of the Cabinet. The current Secretary of State is Rex Tillerson, beginning 1 February 2017. The Secretary of State is the first Cabinet official in the order of precedence and in the presidential line of succession, after the President pro tempore of the Senate.

Contents
  • 1 History
  • 2 Duties and responsibilities
  • 3 Organization
    • 3.1 Mission statement
    • 3.2 Core activities
    • 3.3 Secretary of State
      • 3.3.1 Staff
      • 3.3.2 Other agencies
  • 4 Diplomats in Residence
  • 5 The Fulbright Program
  • 6 Jefferson Science Fellows Program
  • 7 Franklin Fellows Program
  • 8 Department of State Air Wing
  • 9 Expenditures
    • 9.1 Audit of expenditures
  • 10 Central Foreign Policy File
  • 11 Freedom of Information Act processing performance
  • 12 Other
  • 13 See also
  • 14 Notes and references
  • 15 External links

History Old State Department building in Washington, D.C., c. 1865

The U.S. Constitution, drafted in Philadelphia in September 1787 and ratified by the 13 states the following year, gave the President the responsibility for the conduct of the nation's foreign relations.

The House of Representatives and Senate approved legislation to establish a Department of Foreign Affairs on July 21, 1789, and President Washington signed it into law on July 27, making the Department of Foreign Affairs the first federal agency to be created under the new Constitution. This legislation remains the basic law of the Department of State. In September 1789, additional legislation changed the name of the agency to the Department of State and assigned to it a variety of domestic duties.

These responsibilities grew to include management of the United States Mint, keeper of the Great Seal of the United States, and the taking of the census. President George Washington signed the new legislation on September 15. Most of these domestic duties of the Department of State were eventually turned over to various new Federal departments and agencies that were established during the 19th century. However, the Secretary of State still retains a few domestic responsibilities, such as being the keeper of the Great Seal and being the officer to whom a President or Vice President of the United States wishing to resign must deliver an instrument in writing declaring the decision to resign.

On September 29, 1789, President Washington appointed Thomas Jefferson of Virginia, then Minister to France, to be the first United States Secretary of State. John Jay had been serving in as Secretary of Foreign Affairs as a holdover from the Confederation since before Washington had taken office and would continue in that capacity until Jefferson returned from Europe many months later.

From 1790 to 1800, the State Department had its headquarters in Philadelphia, the capital of the United States at the time. It occupied a building at Church and Fifth Streets (although, for a short period during which a yellow fever epidemic ravaged the city, it resided in the New Jersey State House in Trenton, New Jersey). In 1800, it moved from Philadelphia to Washington, D.C., where it first occupied the Treasury Building and then the Seven Buildings at 19th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue. It moved into the Six Buildings in September 1800, where it remained until May 1801. It moved into the War Office Building due west of the White House in May 1801. It occupied the Treasury Building from September 1819 to November 1866, except for the period from September 1814 to April 1816 (during which it occupied a structure at G and 18th streets NW while the Treasury Building was repaired). It then occupied the Washington City Orphan Home from November 1866 to July 1875. It moved to the State, War, and Navy Building in 1875. Since May 1947, it has occupied the Harry S. Truman Building in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood of Washington; the State Department is therefore sometimes metonymically referred to as "Foggy Bottom."

Madeleine Albright became the first woman to become the United States Secretary of State and the first foreign-born woman to serve in the Cabinet when she was appointed Secretary of State in 1997. Condoleezza Rice became the second female secretary of state in 2005. Hillary Rodham Clinton became the third female secretary of state when she was appointed in 2009.

In 2014, the State Department began expanding into the Navy Hill Complex across 23rd Street NW from the Truman Building. A joint venture consisting of the architectural firms of Goody, Clancy and the Louis Berger Group won a $2.5 million contract in January 2014 to begin planning the renovation of the buildings on the 11.8 acres (48,000 m2) Navy Hill campus, which housed the World War II headquarters of the Office of Strategic Services and was the first headquarters of the Central Intelligence Agency.

Duties and responsibilities

The Executive Branch and the U.S. Congress have constitutional responsibilities for U.S. foreign policy. Within the Executive Branch, the Department of State is the lead U.S. foreign affairs agency, and its head, the Secretary of State, is the President's principal foreign policy advisor, though other officials or individuals may have more influence on their foreign policy decisions. The Department advances U.S. objectives and interests in the world through its primary role in developing and implementing the President's foreign policy. The Department also supports the foreign affairs activities of other U.S. Government entities including the Department of Defense, the Department of Commerce, the Department of Homeland Security, the Central Intelligence Agency, and the U.S. Agency for International Development. It also provides an array of important services to U.S. citizens and to foreigners seeking to visiernational crime, foreign military training programs, the services the Department provides, and more—are paid for by the foreign affairs budget, which represents little more than 1% of the total federal budget. The total Department of State budget, together with 'Other International Programs' (see below), costs about 45 cents a day ($165.90 a year) for each resident of the United States. As stated by the Department of State, its purpose includes:

  • Protecting and assisting U.S. citizens living or traveling abroad;
  • Assisting U.S. businesses in the international marketplace;
  • Coordinating and providing support for international activities of other U.S. agencies (local, state, or federal government), official visits overseas and at home, and other diplomatic efforts.
  • Keeping the public informed about U.S. foreign policy and relations with other countries and providing feedback from the public to administration officials.
  • Providing automobile registration for non-diplomatic staff vehicles and the vehicles of diplomats of foreign countries having diplomatic immunity in the United States.

The Department of State conducts these activities with a civilian workforce, and normally uses the Foreign Service personnel system for positions that require service abroad. Employees may be assigned to diplomatic missions abroad to represent The United States, analyze and report on political, economic, and social trends; adjudicate visas; and respond to the needs of U.S. citizens abroad. The U.S. maintains diplomatic relations with about 180 countries and maintains relations with many international organizations, adding up to a total of more than 250 posts around the world. In the United States, about 5,000 professional, technical, and administrative employees work compiling and analyzing reports from overseas, providing logistical support to posts, communicating with the American public, formulating and overseeing the budget, issuing passports and travel warnings, and more. In carrying out these responsibilities, the Department of State works in close coordination with other federal agencies, including the Department of Defense, the Department of the Treasury, and the Department of Commerce. As required by the principle of checks and balances, the Department also consults with Congress about foreign policy initiatives and policies.

Organization Mission statement

To: "Advance freedom for the benefit of the American people and the international community by helping to build and sustain a more democratic, secure, and prosperous world composed of well-governed states that respond to the needs of their people, reduce widespread poverty, and act responsibly within the international system."

Core activities

The DOS promotes and protects the interests of American citizens by (1) 'Promoting peace and stability in regions of vital interest'; (2) 'Creating jobs at home by opening markets abroad'; (3) 'Helping developing nations establish investment and export opportunities'; and (4) 'Bringing nations together and forging partnerships to address global problems, such as terrorism, the spread of communicable diseases, cross-border pollution, humanitarian crises, nuclear smuggling, and narcotics trafficking.'

BioPrepWatch reported that, on May 30, 2013, the State Department submitted the Country Reports on Terrorism 2012 to Congress. Most terrorist attacks have been decentralized and target the Middle East countries. There have been no other reports that have previously talked about this topic, but the biggest shifts in terrorism in 2012 included an increase in state-sponsored terrorism in Iran. The State Department states the best way to counter international terrorist attacks is to work with international partners to cut funding, strengthen law-enforcing institutions and eliminate terrorist safe havens.

Secretary of State

The Secretary of State is the chief executive officer of the Department of State and a member of the Cabinet that answers directly to, and advises, the President of the United States. The secretary organizes and supervises the entire department and its staff.

Staff
  • United States Deputy Secretary of State: The Deputy Secretary (with the Chief of Staff, Executive Secretariat, and the Under Secretary for Management) assists the Secretary in the overall management of the department. Reporting to the Deputy Secretary are the six Under Secretaries and the counselor, along with several staff offices:
    • Chief of Staff Organizational chart of the U.S. Department of State
    • Executive Secretariat
    • Office of Global Intergovernmental Affairs
    • National Foreign Affairs Training Center (which houses the Foreign Service Institute)
    • Office of the Legal Adviser
    • Office of the Inspector General
    • Office of Management Policy
    • Office of Protocol
    • Office of the Science and Technology Adviser
    • Office of the Senior Advisor for Civil Society and Emerging Democracies
    • Office of Global Women's Issues
    • Bureau of Intelligence and Research
    • Bureau of Legislative Affairs
    • Bureau of Budget and Planning
    • Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs: The fourth-ranking State Department official. Becomes Acting Secretary in the absence of the Secretary of State and the two Deputy Secretaries of State. This position is responsible for bureaus, headed by Assistant Secretaries, coordinating American diplomacy around the world:
      • Bureau of African Affairs
      • Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs
      • Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs
      • Bureau of International Organization Affairs
      • Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs
      • Bureau of South and Central Asian Affairs
      • Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs
    • Under Secretary of State for Management: The principal adviser to the Secretary and Deputy Secretary on matters relating to the allocation and use of Department's budget, physical property, and personnel. This position is responsible for bureaus, headed by Assistant Secretaries, planning the day-to-day administration of the Department and proposing institutional reform and modernization:
      • Bureau of Administration Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is greeted by Department employees during her arrival on her first day.
      • Bureau of Consular Affairs
        • Office of Children's Issues
      • Bureau of Diplomatic Security (DS)
        • U.S. Diplomatic Security Service (DSS)
        • Office of Foreign Missions
      • Bureau of Human Resources
      • Bureau of Information Resource Management
      • Bureau of Overseas Buildings Operations
      • Director of Diplomatic Reception Rooms
      • Foreign Service Institute
      • Office of Management Policy, Rightsizing, and Innovation
      • Office of Medical Services
      • Office of White House Liaison
    • Under Secretary of State for Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment: The senior economic advisor for the Secretary and Deputy Secretary on international economic policy. This position is responsible for bureaus, headed by Assistant Secretaries, dealing with trade, agriculture, aviation, and bilateral trade relations with America's economic partners:
      • Bureau of Economic and Business Affairs
      • Bureau of Energy Resources
      • Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs
      • Office of the Science and Technology Adviser
      • Office of the Chief Economist
    • Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs: This Under Secretary leads functions that were formerly assigned to the United States Information Agency but were integrated into the State Department by the 1999 reorganization. This position manages units that handle the department's public communications and seek to burnish the image of the United States around the world:
      • Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs
        • Internet Access and Training Program
      • Bureau of Public Affairs
        • Spokesperson for the United States Department of State
        • Office of the Historian
        • United States Diplomacy Center
      • Bureau of International Information Programs
      • Office of Policy, Planning, and Resources for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs
    • Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security Affairs: This Under Secretary coordinates the Department's role in U.S. military assistance. Since the 1996 reorganization, this Under Secretary also oversees the functions of the formerly independent Arms Control and Disarmament Agency.
      • Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation
      • Bureau of Political-Military Affairs
      • Bureau of Arms Control, Verification, and Compliance
    • Under Secretary of State for Civilian Security, Democracy, and Human Rights: This Under Secretary leads the Department's efforts to prevent and counter threats to civilian security and advises the Secretary of State on matters related to governance, democracy, and human rights.
      • Bureau of Conflict and Stabilization Operations
        • Office of the Coordinator for Reconstruction and Stabilization
      • Bureau of Counterterrorism
      • Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor
      • Bureau for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
      • Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration
      • Office of Global Criminal Justice
      • Office of Global Youth Issues
      • Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons
      • Global Engagement Center
    • Counselor: Ranking with the Under Secretaries, the Counselor is the Secretary's and Deputy Secretary's special advisor and consultant on major problems of foreign policy. The Counselor provides guidance to the appropriate bureaus with respect to such matters, conducts special international negotiations and consultations, and undertakes special assignments from time to time as directed by the Secretary.
  • Office of the Global AIDS Coordinator: President's main task force to combat global AIDS. The Global AIDS Coordinator reports directly to the Secretary of State.
Other agencies

Since the 1996 reorganization, the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), while leading an independent agency, has also reported to the Secretary of State, as does the United States Ambassador to the United Nations.

Diplomats in Residence Map showing the 16 regions represented by Diplomats in Residence

Diplomats in Residence are career Foreign Service Officers and Specialists located throughout the U.S. who provide guidance and advice on careers, internships, and fellowships to students and professionals in the communities they serve. Diplomats in Residence represent 16 population-based regions that encompass the United States.

The Fulbright Program

The Fulbright Program, including the Fulbright–Hays Program, is a program of competitive, merit-based grants for international educational exchange for students, scholars, teachers, professionals, scientists and artists, founded by United States Senator J. William Fulbright in 1946. Under the Fulbright Program, competitively selected U.S. citizens may become eligible for scholarships to study, conduct research, or exercise their talents abroad; and citizens of other countries may qualify to do the same in the United States. The program was established to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and other countries through the exchange of persons, knowledge, and skills.

The Fulbright Program provides 8,000 grants annually to undertake graduate study, advanced research, university lecturing, and classroom teaching. In the 2015–16 cycle, 17% and 24% of American applicants were successful in securing research and English Teaching Assistance grants, respectively. However, selectivity and application numbers vary substantially by country and by type of grant. For example, grants were awarded to 30% of Americans applying to teach English in Laos and 50% of applicants to do research in Laos. In contrast, 6% of applicants applying to teach English in Belgium were successful compared to 16% of applicants to do research in Belgium.

The U.S. Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs sponsors the Fulbright Program from an annual appropriation from the U.S. Congress. Additional direct and in-kind support comes from partner governments, foundations, corporations, and host institutions both in and outside the U.S. The Fulbright Program is administered by cooperating organizations like the Institute of International Education. It operates in over 160 countries around the world. In each of 49 countries, a bi-national Fulbright Commission administers and oversees the Fulbright Program. In countries without a Fulbright Commission but that have an active program, the Public Affairs Section of the U.S. Embassy oversees the Fulbright Program. More than 360,000 persons have participated in the program since it began. Fifty-four Fulbright alumni have won Nobel Prizes; eighty-two have won Pulitzer Prizes.

Jefferson Science Fellows Program

The Jefferson Science Fellows Program was established in 2003 by the DoS to establish a new model for engaging the American academic science, technology, engineering and medical communities in the formulation and implementation of U.S. foreign policy.

Franklin Fellows Program

The Franklin Fellows Program was established in 2006 by the DoS to bring in mid-level executives from the private sector and non-profit organizations to advise the Department and to work on projects. Fellows may also work with other government entities, including the Congress, White House, and executive branch agencies, including the Department of Defense, Department of Commerce, and Department of Homeland Security. The program is named in honor of Benjamin Franklin, and aims to bring mid-career professionals to enrich and expand the Department's capabilities.

Department of State Air Wing Logo of the "Air Wing" of The Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL)- Office of Aviation, U.S. Department of State

In 1978, the Bureau for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) formed an office to use excess military and government aircraft for support of foreign nations' counter-narcotics operations. The first aircraft used was a crop duster used for eradication of illicit crops in Mexico in cooperation with the local authorities. The separate Air Wing was established in 1986 as use of aviation assets grew in the war on drugs.

The aircraft fleet grew from crop spraying aircraft to larger transports and helicopters used to support ground troops and transport personnel. As these operations became more involved in direct combat, a further need for search and rescue and armed escort helicopters was evident. Operations in the 1980s and 1990s were primarily carried out in Colombia, Guatemala, Peru, Bolivia and Belize. Many aircraft have since been passed on to the governments involved, as they became capable of taking over the operations themselves.

Following the events of the September 11 attacks, and the subsequent war on terror, the Air Wing went on to expand their operations from mainly anti-narcotics operations to also support security of United States nationals and interests, primarily in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Safe transport for various diplomatic missions were undertaken, requiring the acquisition of larger aircraft types, such as Sikorsky S-61, Boeing Vertol CH-46, Beechcraft King Air and De Haviland DHC-8-300. Armed escorts were also increased using various helicopters fitted as gunships. In 2011, the Air Wing was operating more than 230 aircraft around the world, the main missions still being counter narcotics and transportation of state officials.

Expenditures

In FY 2010 the Department of State, together with 'Other International Programs' (for example, USAID), had a combined projected discretionary budget of $51.7 billion. The United States Federal Budget for Fiscal Year 2010, entitled 'A New Era of Responsibility', specifically 'Imposes Transparency on the Budget' for the Department of State.

The end-of-year FY 2010 DoS Agency Financial Report, approved by Secretary Clinton on 15 November 2010, showed actual total costs for the year of $27.4 billion. Revenues of $6.0 billion, $2.8 billion of which were earned through the provision of consular and management services, reduced total net cost to $21.4 billion.

Total program costs for 'Achieving Peace and Security' were $7.0 billion; 'Governing Justly and Democratically', $0.9 billion; 'Investing in People', $4.6 billion; 'Promoting Economic Growth and Prosperity', $1.5 billion; 'Providing Humanitarian Assistance', $1.8 billion; 'Promoting International Understanding', $2.7 billion; 'Stengthening Consular and Management Capabilities', $4.0 billion; 'Executive Direction and Other Costs Not Assigned', $4.2 billion.

Audit of expenditures

The Department of State's independent auditors are Kearney & Company. Since in FY 2009 Kearney & Company qualified its audit opinion, noting material financial reporting weaknesses, the DoS restated its 2009 financial statements in 2010. In its FY 2010 audit report, Kearney & Company provided an unqualified audit opinion while noting significant deficiencies, of controls in relation to financial reporting and budgetary accounting, and of compliance with a number of laws and provisions relating to financial management and accounting requirements. In response the DoS Chief Financial Officer observed that "The Department operates in over 270 locations in 172 countries, while conducting business in 150 currencies and an even larger number of languages ... Despite these complexities, the Department pursues a commitment to financial integrity, transparency, and accountability that is the equal of any large multi-national corporation."

Central Foreign Policy File

Since 1973 the primary record keeping system of the Department of State is the Central Foreign Policy File. It consists of copies of official telegrams, airgrams, reports, memorandums, correspondence, diplomatic notes, and other documents related to foreign relations. About 900,000 records spanning the time period from 1973 to 1976 can be accessed online from the National Archives and Records Administration.

Freedom of Information Act processing performance

In the latest Center for Effective Government analysis of 15 federal agencies which receive the most Freedom of Information Act (United States) (FOIA) requests published in 2015 (using 2012 and 2013 data, the most recent years available), the State Department was the lowest performer, earning an F by scoring only 37 out of a possible 100 points, i.e. failed the grade, unchanged from 2013. The State Department's score was dismal due to its extremely low processing score of 23 percent, which was completely out of line with any other agency's performance.

Other

In 2009, the Department of State was the fourth most desired employer for undergraduates according to BusinessWeek.

The Department's blog, started in 2007, is known as Dipnote, and a Twitter account is maintained with the same name. The internal wiki is Diplopedia. The internal suggestion blog within State is called the Sounding Board and their internal professional networking software, "Corridor", is a success. Finally, State has embraced Government crowdsourcing, establishing the Virtual Student Foreign Service.

In 2009, the State Department launched 21st century statecraft. The U.S. Department of State's official explanation of 21st Century Statecraft is: "complementing traditional foreign policy tools with newly innovated and adapted instruments of statecraft that fully leverage the technologies of our interconnected world."

See also
  • Government of the United States portal
  • International relations portal
  • Awards of the United States Department of State
  • Diplomatic missions of the United States
  • Diplomatic Reception Rooms
  • Five Nations Passport Group
  • Shared Values Initiative
  • State Magazine
  • Title 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations
  • United States Foreign Service
  • Stanislas Hernisz
Notes and references
  1. ^ "What We Do: Mission". Retrieved 2014-07-23. 
  2. ^ Office of Management and Budget. "Table 5.2—Budget Authority by Agency: 1976–2021". Obama White House Archives. US government. Retrieved 1 March 2017. 
  3. ^ http://2001-2009.state.gov/g/oes/rlnks/gl/
  4. ^ "Department of State | USAGov". www.usa.gov. Retrieved 2016-11-24. 
  5. ^ "A New Framework for Foreign Affairs". A Short History of the Department of State. U.S. Department of State. March 14, 2015. Retrieved March 14, 2015. 
  6. ^ "1 United States Statutes at Large, Chapter 4, Section 1". 
  7. ^ "United States Statutes at Large, First Congress, Session 1, Chapter 14". 
  8. ^ Bureau of Public Affairs. "1784–1800: New Republic". United States Department of State. Retrieved 11 May 2012. 
  9. ^ a b Plischke, Elmer. U.S. Department of State: A Reference History. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1999, p. 45.
  10. ^ Tinkler, Robert. James Hamilton of South Carolina. Baton Rouge, La.: Louisiana State University Press, 2004, p. 52.
  11. ^ Burke, Lee H. and Patterson, Richard Sharpe. Homes of the Department of State, 1774–1976: The Buildings Occupied by the Department of State and Its Predecessors. Washington, D.C.: US. Government Printing Office, 1977, p. 27.
  12. ^ a b Michael, William Henry. History of the Department of State of the United States: Its Formation and Duties, Together With Biographies of Its Present Officers and Secretaries From the Beginning. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1901, p. 12.
  13. ^ Burke and Patterson, p. 37.
  14. ^ Burke and Patterson, 1977, p. 41.
  15. ^ Plischke, p. 467.
  16. ^ "Definition of Foggy Bottom". The American Heritage Dictionary. Retrieved 2012-11-01. 
  17. ^ Alex Carmine. (2009.) Dan Brown's The Lost Symbol: The Ultimate Unauthorized and Independent Reading Guide, Punked Books, p. 37. ISBN 9781908375018.
  18. ^ Joel Mowbray. (2003.) Dangerous Diplomacy: How the State Department Threatens America's Security, Regnery Publishing, p. 11. ISBN 9780895261106.
  19. ^ This complex is also known as the "Potomac Annex".
  20. ^ Sernovitz, Daniel J. "Boston Firm Picked for State Department Consolidation". Washington Business Journal. January 14, 2014. Accessed 2014-01-14.
  21. ^ United States Department of State, Bureau of Diplomatic Security (July 2011). "Diplomatic and Consular Immunity: Guidance for Law Enforcement and Judicial Authorities" (PDF). United States Department of State. p. 15. Retrieved 11 May 2012. 
  22. ^ a b "United States Department of State FY 2010 Agency Financial Report (vid. p. 5)" (PDF). US Department of State. Retrieved 12 January 2011. 
  23. ^ Sievers, Lisa (June 4, 2013). "State Department submits terrorism report to Congress". BioPrepWatch. Retrieved 6 June 2013. 
  24. ^ "Under Secretary for Management". State.gov. Retrieved 2009-07-26. 
  25. ^ Pincus, Erica (22 December 2014). "The Science and Technology Adviser to the U.S. Secretary of State". Science & Diplomacy. 3 (4). 
  26. ^ "A New Center for Global Engagement", from the Office of the State Department Spokesperson
  27. ^ "Diplomats in Residence". careers.state.gov. Retrieved 2016-11-18. 
  28. ^ "ETA Grant Application Statistics". us.fulbrightonline.org. Retrieved 2015-12-25. 
  29. ^ "Study/Research Grant Application Statistics". us.fulbrightonline.org. Retrieved 2015-12-25. 
  30. ^ "Fulbright Program Fact Sheet" (PDF). U.S. Department of State. 
  31. ^ "IIE Programs". Institute of International Education. Retrieved 2014-07-28. 
  32. ^ "53 Fulbright Alumni Awarded the Nobel Prize" (PDF). U.S. Department of State. 
  33. ^ "Notable Fulbrighters". U.S. Department of State. 
  34. ^ "MacArthur Supports New Science and Security Fellowship Program at U.S. Department of State". MacArthur Foundation. 2002-10-08. Retrieved 2015-02-01. 
  35. ^ "Jefferson Science Fellowship Program – U.S. Department of State". Retrieved February 1, 2015. 
  36. ^ Operation Development Leadership Project, Alumni Corner, September 2007
  37. ^ a b "US Department Of State Magazine, May 2011" (PDF). 
  38. ^ a b "United States Federal Budget for Fiscal Year 2010 (vid. pp.88,89)" (PDF). Government Printing Office. Retrieved 9 January 2011. 
  39. ^ a b c "United States Department of State FY 2010 Agency Financial Report (vid. pp.3,80)" (PDF). US Department of State. Retrieved 12 January 2011. 
  40. ^ a b c "United States Department of State FY 2010 Agency Financial Report (vid. p.62ff.)" (PDF). US Department of State. Retrieved 12 January 2011. 
  41. ^ "United States Department of State FY 2010 Agency Financial Report (vid. p.76.)" (PDF). US Department of State. Retrieved 12 January 2011. 
  42. ^ "FAQ: Record Group 59: General Records of the Department of State Central Foreign Policy File, 1973–1976" (PDF). National Archives and Records Administration. 2010-08-06. Retrieved 2010-11-26. 
  43. ^ "What's New in AAD: Central Foreign Policy Files, created, 7/1/1973 – 12/31/1976, documenting the period 7/1/1973 ? – 12/31/1976". National Archives and Records Administration. 2009. Retrieved 2010-11-26. 
  44. ^ Making the Grade: Access to Information Scorecard 2015 March 2015, 80 pages, Center for Effective Government, retrieved 21 March 2016
  45. ^ "The Most Desirable Employers". BusinessWeek. Retrieved 2011-01-24. 
  46. ^ "Hillary Clinton Launches E-Suggestion Box..'The Secretary is Listening' – ABC News". Blogs.abcnews.com. 2009-02-10. Retrieved 2012-06-16. 
  47. ^ Lipowicz, Alice (2011-04-22). "State Department to launch "Corridor" internal social network – Federal Computer Week". Fcw.com. Retrieved 2012-06-16. 
  48. ^ "Peering down the Corridor: The New Social Network's Features and Their Uses | IBM Center for the Business of Government". Businessofgovernment.org. 2011-05-05. Retrieved 2012-06-16. 
  49. ^ "21st Century Statecraft". The Office of Electronic Information, Bureau of Public Affairs. Retrieved 2014-07-23. 
External links Wikimedia Commons has media related to United States Department of State.
  • Official website
  • U.S. Department of State in the Federal Register
  • Frontline Diplomacy: The Foreign Affairs Oral History Collection of the Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training from the Library of Congress
  • Works by or about United States Department of State at Internet Archive (historic archives)
  • Works by United States Department of State at LibriVox (public domain audiobooks)
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Agencies under the United States Department of State
  • Headquarters: Harry S Truman Building
  • Rex Tillerson, Secretary of State
  • John Sullivan, Deputy Secretary of State and Deputy Secretary of State for Management and Resources
  • Tom Shannon, Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs
Deputy Secretary of State and
Deputy Secretary of State for Management and Resources
  • Counselor of the Department
  • Executive Secretariat
  • Office of U.S. Foreign Assistance Resources
  • Operations Center
Under Secretary for
Political Affairs
  • Bureau of African Affairs
  • Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs
  • Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs
  • Bureau of International Organization Affairs
  • Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs
  • Bureau of South and Central Asian Affairs
  • Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs
Under Secretary for
Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment
  • Bureau of Economic and Business Affairs
  • Bureau of Energy Resources
  • Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs
  • Office of the Science and Technology Adviser
  • Office of the Chief Economist
Under Secretary for
Arms Control and International Security Affairs
  • Bureau of Arms Control, Verification and Compliance
  • Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation
  • Bureau of Political-Military Affairs
Under Secretary for
Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs
  • Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs
  • Bureau of Public Affairs
  • Bureau of International Information Programs
  • Department Spokesperson
  • Office of the Historian
  • Office of Policy, Planning, and Resources for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs
  • United States Diplomacy Center
Under Secretary for
Management
  • Bureau of Administration
  • Bureau of Budget and Planning
  • Bureau of Consular Affairs
  • Bureau of Diplomatic Security
  • Bureau of Human Resources
  • Bureau of Information Resource Management
  • Bureau of Overseas Buildings Operations
  • Diplomatic Reception Rooms
  • Foreign Service Institute
  • Office of Children's Issues
  • Office of eDiplomacy
  • Office of Foreign Missions
  • Office of Management Policy, Rightsizing, and Innovation
  • Office of Medical Services
  • Office of White House Liaison
Under Secretary for
Civilian Security, Democracy, and Human Rights
  • Bureau of Conflict and Stabilization Operations
  • Bureau of Counterterrorism and Countering Violent Extremism
  • Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor
  • Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
  • Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration
  • Office of Global Criminal Justice
  • Office of Global Youth Issues
  • Office to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism
  • Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons
Bureaus/Offices
reporting directly to the Secretary
  • Bureau of Intelligence and Research
  • Bureau of Legislative Affairs
  • Office of Civil Rights
  • Office of Inspector General
  • Office of the Legal Adviser
  • Office of Policy Planning Staff
  • Office of the Chief of Protocol
  • Office of Global Food Security
  • Office of Global Women's Issues
  • Office of the United States Global AIDS Coordinator
  • Office of Global Partnerships
  • v
  • t
  • e
Federal executive departments of the United States of America Executive
Departments
  • Agriculture
  • Commerce
  • Defense
  • Education
  • Energy
  • Health and Human Services
  • Homeland Security
  • Housing and Urban Development
  • Interior
  • Justice
  • Labor
  • State
  • Transportation
  • Treasury
  • Veterans Affairs
Former
  • Air Force
  • Army
  • Commerce and Labor
  • Health, Education, and Welfare
  • Navy
  • Post Office
  • War


War on Peace: The End of Diplomacy and the Decline of American Influence
War on Peace: The End of Diplomacy and the Decline of American Influence
A harrowing exploration of the collapse of American diplomacy and the abdication of global leadership, by the winner of the 2018 Pulitzer Prize in Public Service.US foreign policy is undergoing a dire transformation, forever changing America’s place in the world. Institutions of diplomacy and development are bleeding out after deep budget cuts; the diplomats who make America’s deals and protect its citizens around the world are walking out in droves. Offices across the State Department sit empty, while abroad the military-industrial complex has assumed the work once undertaken by peacemakers. We’re becoming a nation that shoots first and asks questions later.In an astonishing journey from the corridors of power in Washington, DC, to some of the most remote and dangerous places on earth―Afghanistan, Somalia, and North Korea among them―acclaimed investigative journalist Ronan Farrow illuminates one of the most consequential and poorly understood changes in American history. His firsthand experience as a former State Department official affords a personal look at some of the last standard bearers of traditional statecraft, including Richard Holbrooke, who made peace in Bosnia and died while trying to do so in Afghanistan.Drawing on newly unearthed documents, and richly informed by rare interviews with warlords, whistle-blowers, and policymakers―including every living former secretary of state from Henry Kissinger to Hillary Clinton to Rex Tillerson―War on Peace makes a powerful case for an endangered profession. Diplomacy, Farrow argues, has declined after decades of political cowardice, shortsightedness, and outright malice―but it may just offer America a way out of a world at war.

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$14.10
-$13.85(-50%)



US Department of State DOS Seal Shirt (Navy, Medium)
US Department of State DOS Seal Shirt (Navy, Medium)
Printed in the USA on a quality 5.30oz Gildan T-Shirt. (Ash Grey is 99% cotton/1% polyester, Sport Grey is 90% cotton/10% polyester, Dark Heather is 50% cotton/50% polyester)

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$22.99



Inside a U.S. Embassy: Diplomacy at Work, The Essential Guide to the Foreign Service
Inside a U.S. Embassy: Diplomacy at Work, The Essential Guide to the Foreign Service
Inside a U.S. Embassy is widely recognized as the essential guide to the Foreign Service. This all-new third edition takes readers to more than fifty U.S. missions around the world, introducing Foreign Service professionals and providing detailed descriptions of their jobs and firsthand accounts of diplomacy in action. In addition to profiles of diplomats and specialists around the world—from the ambassador to the consular officer, the public diplomacy officer to the security specialist—is a selection from more than twenty countries of day-in-the-life accounts, each describing an actual day on the job. Personal reports from the field give a sense of the extraordinary challenges—the coups, the natural disasters, the civil wars—and rewards of representing America to the world.Inside a U.S. Embassy includes new chapters on the highly competitive Foreign Service entrance process, Foreign Service life outside the embassy, and briefings on topics such as handling high-level visits and service in war zones.

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$10.67
-$12.28(-54%)



State Department Counterintelligence: Leaks, Spies, and Lies
State Department Counterintelligence: Leaks, Spies, and Lies
State Department Counterintelligence reveals an insider's account of leaks, spies, and lies and the bureaucratic machinations that accompany them and adversely affect national security. Robert Booth tells the story of his pivotal role in three multiple year counterespionage and numerous unauthorized disclosure investigations including Fidel Castro's most damaging US citizen spy. ''He operated undetected and with impunity for decades before we discovered him. We had been hunting him for years. And now he was about to escape.'' With the narrative style of a thriller, Booth lures readers into the real world of counterintelligence.

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$21.53
-$4.42(-17%)



The State Department - More Than Just Diplomacy: The Personalities, Turf Battles, Danger Zones for Diplomats, Exotic Datelines, Miscast Appointees, the Laughs--And, Sadly, the Occasional Homicide
The State Department - More Than Just Diplomacy: The Personalities, Turf Battles, Danger Zones for Diplomats, Exotic Datelines, Miscast Appointees, the Laughs--And, Sadly, the Occasional Homicide
For the State Department, image is a daily concern. Many constituencies have to be taken into account in its public declarations: the president, the Congress, the media, the taxpaying public and, finally, the many foreign governments attentive to what the State Department says and does. This book attempts, in large measure, to shed light on matters that the Department prefers not to talk about. A reporter has to be on the beat for a long time to accumulate enough anecdotes to fill even a relatively small book. In my case, my tenure in the building lasted just under 40 years. I have brief profiles on all secretaries I covered (except for two who served very briefly). I have highlighted bitter inter-agency policy struggles-Iran and Iraq are examples. Humor is not ignored on these pages. Nor were the rare instances of murder, two involving career diplomats and another occurring on the Department's seventh floor. At times, American diplomats have faced appalling dangers overseas, leading in some instances to assassinations, hostage takings or bombings of embassies. Every secretary of state travels extensively abroad. I was privileged to accompany nine to more than 80 countries. Some anecdotes I recount relate to trips I did not take but heard about from others. I am sure that many priceless stories, regardless of location, have fled from my memory bank. I have resurrected those that didn't. George Gedda, January 2014, Lake Mary, Fl

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$16.95



The Marine Corps and the State Department: Enduring Partners in United States Foreign Policy, 1798-2007
The Marine Corps and the State Department: Enduring Partners in United States Foreign Policy, 1798-2007
This work is a complete history of the partnership between the Department of State and the United States Marine Corps. From its formation in 1775, the Corps developed a close working relationship with the diplomatic service of the Continental Congress and later, in 1798, with the newly created United States Department of State. The Marines accompanied U.S. diplomats to France in 1778 and worked closely with the State Department during the Barbary Wars and the opening of China. In 1905, an executive order by Theodore Roosevelt established a Marine Legation Guard, and the Corps played an increasingly important role in embassies across the globe. Today, the war on terrorism highlights this important relationship as Marines guard some of the most dangerous embassies in the world.

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$49.95



Unisex US STATE DEPARTMENT EMBLEM LON SLEEVE T-SHIRT Large Dark Heather
Unisex US STATE DEPARTMENT EMBLEM LON SLEEVE T-SHIRT Large Dark Heather
US STATE DEPARTMENT T-SHIRT DEPARTMENT OF STATE LONG SLEEVE TEE THIS T-SHIRT IS DECORATED WITH THE US STATE DEPARTMENT SEAL ENCIRCLED WITH THE WORDS VENI, VIDI, VETI, I CAME, I SAW, I SERVED, A LONG SLEEVE T-SHIRT THAT ANY STATE DEPARTMENT EMPLOYEE WITH WEAR WITH PRIDE. CLICK THE CHIEFS GOVERNMENT SHIRTS LINK BELOW THE TITLE ABOVE TO VIEW MORE OF MY DESIGNS.

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$29.99



FOREIGN RELATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES - IRAN, 1951-1954
FOREIGN RELATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES - IRAN, 1951-1954
This volume contains the long-awaited “retrospective” of declassified U.S. government documents on the 1953 coup in Iran. The volume includes fascinating details on Iranian, American and British planning and implementation of the covert operation, as well as information about U.S. contacts with key figures such as Ayatollah Abol-Ghasem Kashani, and insights into U.S. concerns about the growing influence of the communist Tudeh Party.The publication is the culmination of decades of internal debates and public controversy after a previous official collection omitted all references to the role of American and British intelligence in the ouster of Iran’s then-prime minister, Mohammad Mosaddeq. The volume is part of the Department’s venerable Foreign Relations of the United States (FRUS) series.For decades, neither the U.S. nor the British governments would acknowledge their part in Mosaddeq’s overthrow, even though a detailed account appeared as early as 1954 in The Saturday Evening Post, and since then CIA and MI6 veterans of the coup have published memoirs detailing their activities.  Kermit Roosevelt’s Countercoup is the best known and most detailed such account, although highly controversial because of its selective rendering of events.  In 2000, The New York Times posted a 200-page classified internal CIA history of the operation.In 1989, the State Department released what purported to be the official record of the coup period but it made not a single reference to American and British actions in connection with the event.  The omission led to the resignation of the chief outside adviser on the series, and prompted Congress to pass legislation requiring “a thorough, accurate, and reliable documentary record” of U.S. foreign policy.  After the end of the Cold War, the CIA committed to open agency files on the Iran and other covert operations, and the State Department vowed to produce a “retrospective” volume righting the earlier decision. But it took until 2011 for the CIA to – partially – fulfill its commitment, and even then it was only in the form of a previously classified segment of an internal account of the coup that for the first time included an officially released explicit reference to the agency’s role in “TPAJAX,” the U.S. acronym for the operation.  Roughly two years later, after years of research by historian James C. Van Hook, as well as internal negotiations between State and CIA over access to the latter’s records, the Office of the Historian at the Department produced a draft of the retrospective volume, which then had to await top-level clearance.What explains the refusal by two governments to acknowledge their actions, and the inordinate delays in publishing this volume?  Justifications given in the past include protecting intelligence sources and methods, bowing to British government requests and, more recently, avoiding stirring up Iranian hardline elements who might seek to undercut the nuclear deal Iran signed with the United States and other P5+1 members in 2015. (Abstract from the US National Archive) 

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$30.20



Driver's Manual (NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF MOTOR VEHICLES)
Driver's Manual (NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF MOTOR VEHICLES)
NYS current driver's manual

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$25.00



US U.S. Dept Department of State Embroidered Baseball Cap Hat
US U.S. Dept Department of State Embroidered Baseball Cap Hat
US U.S. Dept Department of State Embroidered Baseball Cap Hat

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$4.49


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