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Tex Winter
Fredrick "Tex" Winter (February 25, 1922 – October 10, 2018) was an American retired basketball coach, and innovator of the triangle offense. Winter was born

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Tex Winter Winter in 2009Sport(s) BasketballBiographical detailsBorn (1922-02-25)February 25, 1922
Near Wellington, TexasDied October 10, 2018 (aged 96)Playing career1940–1942 Compton Junior College1942–1943 Oregon State1946–1947 USC Coaching career (HC unless noted)1947–1951 Kansas State (assistant)1951–1953 Marquette1953–1968 Kansas State1968–1971 Washington1971–1973 Houston Rockets1973–1978 Northwestern1978–1983 Long Beach State1985–1998 Chicago Bulls (assistant)1999–2008 Los Angeles Lakers (assistant) Head coaching recordOverall 453–334 (college)
51–78 (NBA) Basketball Hall of Fame
Inducted in 2011 College Basketball Hall of Fame
Inducted in 2010

Morice Fredrick "Tex" Winter (February 25, 1922 – October 10, 2018) was an American retired basketball coach, and innovator of the triangle offense.[1]

Contents
  • 1 Early life
  • 2 College coaching career
  • 3 Professional coaching
  • 4 Health problems
  • 5 Awards and honors
  • 6 Head coaching record
    • 6.1 College
    • 6.2 NBA
  • 7 Bibliography
  • 8 Further reading
  • 9 See also
  • 10 References
Early life

Winter was born near Wellington, Texas (a fact which later provided him with his nickname when his family moved to California) fifteen minutes after twin sister Mona Francis. The Winter family moved to Lubbock, Texas in 1929, where his mechanic father died of an infection when Tex was ten years old. Winter had to work while in elementary school to help his family, one such job was to collect boxes for a local baker in exchange for day-old bread. In 1936, Winter and his sister moved to Huntington Park, California with their mother, who would work as a clothing store sales manager. His older football star brother Ernest remained in Texas to finish high school while his older sister Elizabeth had already married and moved to California first and encouraged them to move there. While attending Huntington Park High School, Winter worked with Phil Woolpert and Pete Newell as a ball boy for Loyola University.

After graduation from high school in 1940, Winter attended college at Compton Community College in Los Angeles for two years, where he became a renowned pole vaulter and earned a scholarship to Oregon State University. He was on the basketball and track teams at both schools. As a pole vaulter, Winter competed against Bob Richards, a 1948 and 1952 olympian. He was considered a strong candidate for the US Olympic team in 1944, but the Olympics were cancelled by World War II.

Winter met his wife Nancy at Oregon State. Both of them entered the United States Navy in early 1943, with Winter going into fighter pilot training and his wife into WAVVES.[2] After his pilot's wings were conferred he was assigned to fighter pilot duty in the Pacific. However, his orders were rescinded after his brother's plane was shot down, and Winter remained at Naval Air Station Glenview in Illinois for the duration of the war. After the war, he was assigned to NAS Corpus Christi as a test pilot for an experimental jet craft. While in the navy, Winter was a starting guard for his basketball team under the commanding officer Chuck Taylor (salesman).[3] He left the Navy with the rank of Ensign in 1946.

Winter returned to college after the war at the University of Southern California, where he learned the triangle offense from his coach Sam Barry. At USC, Winter became an All-American pole vaulter and was a teammate of Bill Sharman, Alex Hannum, and Gene Rock, future professional basketball players.

College coaching career

After graduating college in 1947, Winter immediately entered the coaching profession as an assistant to Hall-of-Famer Jack Gardner at Kansas State University. He would work as a basketball coach for the next 61 years.

Winter as head coach for Marquette University in 1953.

In 1952, Winter began a two-year stint as head coach at Marquette University, becoming the youngest coach in major college basketball. In 1954 Winter returned to Kansas State.[4][5] Winter served as Kansas State's head coach for the following 15 years, posting a 261-118 (.689) record. He still owns the record for most league titles (eight) in school history and twice led the Wildcats to the Final Four (1958 and 1964). Winter guided K-State to postseason play seven times overall, including six trips to the NCAA Tournament, and boasts one of the highest winning percentages in K-State's history.

Winter was named UPI National Coach of the Year in 1958 after he led Kansas State to the Final Four by knocking off Oscar Robertson and second-ranked Cincinnati in an 83-80 double-overtime thriller. Junior center Bob Boozer was one of three Wildcats to be named a first team All-America, along with teammates Jack Parr and Roy DeWitz. K-State advanced to their fourth Final Four in 1964. Winter’s Wildcats knocked off Texas Western and Wichita State to reach Municipal Auditorium in Kansas City, Missouri. Two-time Big Eight selection Willie Murrell averaged 25.3 points per game during the run, which ended in a 90-82 loss to eventual national champion UCLA.

In 1962, Winter also wrote the book, entitled The Triple-Post Offense, on the triangle offense – the offense which he utilized with such success at Kansas State. Following his leaving Kansas State to his assistant Cotton Fitzsimmons, Winter served shorter stints as head coach at the University of Washington (where he was hired by then Athletic Director Joseph Kearney), Northwestern University, and Long Beach State. In 1982, LSU’s Dale Brown, who Winter befriended when Brown was a high school coach, hired him as an assistant for one year 1983-84.[6] In total, Winter won 454 games at the collegiate level.

Professional coaching

Winter was hired by Pete Newell as head coach of the Houston Rockets for two seasons, 1971–1973, posting a 51-78 (.395) record.

In 1985, Winter started another chapter of his life after contemplating retirement, serving as an assistant coach with the Chicago Bulls, and teaching the triangle offense to Michael Jordan. He was hired to the position by General Manager Jerry Krause, an old friend he had met while at Kansas State. As an assistant to Phil Jackson, who took over as the Bulls' head coach in 1989, Winter and his triangle offense were an integral part of the Bulls' NBA championships in 1991, 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, and 1998. Winter followed Phil Jackson to the Los Angeles Lakers, where he collected three additional championship rings, in 2000, 2001, and 2002. Winter was also a consultant for the NBA-champion 2008–09 Los Angeles Lakers team.[7]

Health problems

On April 25, 2009, Winter suffered a stroke in Manhattan, Kansas, while attending a Kansas State basketball reunion.[8]

He lives near Kansas State in Manhattan, Kansas with his Alzheimer's-stricken wife[9] and son Brian. He still suffers from the after-effects of his 2009 stroke, counting an uncooperative right side and nerve pain in his neck and shoulder.[10] He has two other sons, Russ and Chris.

Awards and honors

Winter is a member of several halls of fame, including the Kansas Sports Hall of Fame and the National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame, and he was awarded the John Bunn Award for lifetime achievement from the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame.[11] In June 2010 he was given the Chuck Daly Lifetime Achievement Award by the NBA Coaches Association.[12] On his eighth time on the final ballot for the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame, it was announced on April 2, 2011, that Winter had been elected. He was formally inducted on August 12, with his Boston-based physicist son Chris giving a speech in his behalf.[13]

On May 26, 2012 Winter was inducted into the Compton Community College Athletics Hall of Fame, under the category of Basketball.

Head coaching record College Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason Marquette Golden Eagles (Independent) (1951–1953) 1951–52 Marquette 12–14 1952–53 Marquette 13–11 Marquette: 25–25 (.500) Kansas State Wildcats (Big Seven / Big Eight Conference) (1953–1968) 1953–54 Kansas State 11–10 5–7 T–4th 1954–55 Kansas State 11–10 6–6 T–3rd 1955–56 Kansas State 17–8 9–3 1st NCAA Sweet 16 1956–57 Kansas State 15–8 8–4 2nd 1957–58 Kansas State 22–5 10–2 1st NCAA University Division Final Four 1958–59 Kansas State 25–2 14–0 1st NCAA University Division Elite Eight 1959–60 Kansas State 16–10 10–4 T–1st 1960–61 Kansas State 22–5* 13–1* 1st NCAA University Division Elite Eight 1961–62 Kansas State 22–3 12–2 2nd 1962–63 Kansas State 16–9 11–3 T–1st 1963–64 Kansas State 22–7 12–2 1st NCAA University Division Final Four 1964–65 Kansas State 12–13 5–9 T–6th 1965–66 Kansas State 14–11 9–5 3rd 1966–67 Kansas State 17–8 9–5 4th 1967–68 Kansas State 19–9 11–3 1st NCAA University Division Sweet 16 Kansas State: 261–118 (.689) 154–57 (.730) Washington Huskies (Pacific-8 Conference) (1968–1971) 1968–69 Washington 13–13 6–8 4th 1969–70 Washington 17–9 7–7 5th 1970–71 Washington 15–13 6–8 5th Washington: 45–35 (.563) 19–23 (.452) Northwestern Wildcats (Big Ten Conference) (1973–1978) 1973–74 Northwestern 9–15 3–11 9th 1974–75 Northwestern 6–20 4–14 T–9th 1975–76 Northwestern 12–15 7–11 T–7th 1976–77 Northwestern 9–18 7–11 T–7th 1977–78 Northwestern 8–19 4–14 T–9th Northwestern: 44–87 (.336) 25–61 (.291) Long Beach State 49ers (Pacific Coast Athletic Association) (1978–1983) 1978–79 Long Beach State 16–12 7–7 4th 1979–80 Long Beach State 22–12 11–3 2nd NIT Second Round 1980–81 Long Beach State 15–13 9–5 T–3rd 1981–82 Long Beach State 12–16 7–7 T–4th 1982–83 Long Beach State 13–16 6–10 7th Long Beach State: 78–69 (.531) 40–32 (.556) Total: 453–334 (.576)

      National champion         Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

*1960–61 record reflects one win by forfeit over Colorado.

NBA Legend Regular season G Games coached W Games won L Games lost W–L % Win–loss % Post season PG Playoff games PW Playoff wins PL Playoff losses PW–L % Playoff win–loss % Team Year G W L W–L% Finish PG PW PL PW–L% Result Houston 1971–72 82 34 48 .415 4th in Pacific – – – – Missed Playoffs Houston 1972–73 47 17 30 .362 3rd in Central – – – – – Career 129 51 78 .395 – – – – Bibliography
  • The Triple-Post Offense, (1962)
Further reading
  • Bender, Mark (2000). Trial by Basketball: The Life and Times of Tex Winter. .mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"\"""\"""'""'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}ISBN 1-886110-90-5
See also
  • List of NCAA Division I Men's Final Four appearances by coach
References
  1. ^ Coffey, Wayne (15 March 2014). "Master Mind: Meet Tex Winter, the man behind Phil Jackson's Triangle offense". New York Daily News. Retrieved 18 March 2014.
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-07-27. Retrieved 2014-07-19.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ "Tex Winter's basketball philosophy and triangle offense products of equal opportunity - Chicago Bulls". nba.com.
  4. ^ ABC News (49): Former K-State basketball star dies at 72; February 22, 2007. accessed on October 2, 2007.
  5. ^ Canada Basketball: Candidates for the 2007 Class of the FIBA Hall of Fame announced; May 25, 2007 Archived February 12, 2008, at the Wayback Machine. accessed on October 2, 2007.
  6. ^
  7. ^ McMenamin, Dave (April 27, 2009). "Lakers rally around ailing "insultant" Tex Winter". NBA.com. Archived from the original on May 4, 2009.
  8. ^ "Lakers guru Winter, 87, suffers apparent stroke". ESPN.com. 25 April 2009.
  9. ^ PLASCHKE, BILL (15 July 2009). "Lakers legend Tex Winter needs to be encircled with care" – via LA Times.
  10. ^ "Meet the man behind Phil's Triangle offense". nydailynews.com.
  11. ^ Topeka Capital-Journal: College Hall to induct Tex; February 24, 2010. accessed on February 25, 2010
  12. ^ Lopresti, Mike (6 June 2010). "Tex Winter, of triangle offense fame, basks in recognition". USA Today. Retrieved 11 June 2010.
  13. ^ "Tex Winter cuts off his son's horrible Hall speech". ocregister.com. 15 August 2011.
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  • v
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Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame Class of 2011Players
  • Teresa Edwards
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Coaches
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Contributors
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  • v
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Chicago Bulls
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    • Jumpman
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NBA Championships (6)
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Media
TV
WGN (through WGN Sports)
NBC Sports Chicago
CN100
Radio
WSCR
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Neil Funk
Stacey King
Chuck Swirsky
Bill Wennington
  • v
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  • e
Chuck Daly Lifetime Achievement Award
  • 2009: Tom Heinsohn
  • 2010: Jack Ramsay & Tex Winter
  • 2011: Lenny Wilkens
  • 2012: Pat Riley
  • 2013: Bill Fitch
  • 2014: Bernie Bickerstaff
  • 2015: Dick Motta
  • 2016: K. C. Jones & Jerry Sloan
  • 2017: Hubie Brown & Al Attles
  • 2018: Doug Moe
Authority control
  • WorldCat Identities
  • ISNI: 0000 0000 8483 3851
  • LCCN: n99279433
  • VIAF: 119625499


The triple-post offense (sideline triangle)
The triple-post offense (sideline triangle)
"Beautiful." -- Kobe Bryant "The most comprehensive system ever devised for playing basketball." -- Nicholas Dawidoff, New York TimesThis is it. A book just as famous as it has been (until now) nearly impossible to find. The "Triangle Offense," deployed with devastating effect by Phil Jackson as coach of the Chicago Bulls during the 80s and 90s and of the Los Angeles Lakers during the 2000s, was first comprehensively set forth in this classic book by Fred "Tex" Winter. Winter himself was a consultant to Jackson during the Bulls and Lakers years. Now Jackson has brought back the Triangle for the New York Knicks.This book does not merely lay out a strategy for play; it offers a philosophy of coaching and of excellence in team athletics that is as valuable to the player as it is to the coach.Perplexingly, this authoritative classic of the sport has been out of print for decades. No longer. "Tex" is back. "The ball movement is beautiful!" -- Tara VanDerveer, women's basketball coach, Stanford. "[Playing the Triangle, we were] a smooth operating machine. Baryshnikov in action! Picasso painting! A beautiful thing!" -- Horace Grant, forward, Chicago Bulls, 1987-1994.

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$34.95



Trial by Basketball: The Life and Times of Tex Winter
Trial by Basketball: The Life and Times of Tex Winter
Known as The Master and Inventor of the triangle offense that made the Chicago Bulls a dynasty and Michael Jordan a superstar, Tex Winter is a man with a story. This authorized biography tells the story of the coach with the longest tenure in the nation.

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The Complete Guide to the Triangle Offense
The Complete Guide to the Triangle Offense
The Triangle Offense is known as the most comprehensive offensive system in basketball and this book is the most comprehensive resource put together on the offense. With over 200 upgraded diagrams on the offense that detail all of the nuances of the offense, you won’t need to look any further for all of your Triangle needs. In “The Complete Guide to the Triangle Offense” you will find every action of the offense (“2 Pass to the Post”, “2 Pass to the Top”, Backdoor Step, and Corner) and how and when to make the proper read, dozens of entries into the offense and how to get each player into their spots, as well as detailing special actions within the Triangle and the counters to go with each of them. You’ll also find how to use the offense to attack zone defenses or utilize any of the 11 sideline out-of-bounds plays that can follow right into the Triangle. With 12 drills included that you’ll be able to implement and build habits for your players, you will see how this book will help you fit the Triangle Offense to your personnel and your own coaching philosophy.

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$19.95



Coach Tex Winter: Triangle Basketball
Coach Tex Winter: Triangle Basketball
The life story of legendary Coach Tex Winter. At the age of ten, Tex experienced the untimely death of his father. What resulted was an awakening belief in the coordinated efforts of family members to work together as a team. His family experiences and resultant skills laid the foundation for what became known as his Triangle Offense, a strategy that revolutionized college and professional basketball. Coach Tex Winter: Triangle Basketball is an inspiring story of overcoming hardship to develop the attitudes and relationships for success at home, school and career. Contains 160 full-color pages of news clips, personal notes, photographs, and Tex's chalkboard sayings. Includes quotes from family, friends and legends such as Kobe Bryant, Phil Jackson and others.

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$14.25
-$12.70(-47%)



Coaching Basketball: Principles of the Triangle Offense
Coaching Basketball: Principles of the Triangle Offense
The Triangle Offense has revolutionized basketball during the past twenty years and is one of the most explosive and effective offenses ever designed! Learn how to implement and utilize all aspects of the Triangle Offense with comprehensive and detailed diagrams and play descriptions covering the following topics: Triangle Offense sets and alignments – Triangle Offense entries and base movements – Individual position-by-position rules and responsibilities – Universal offense with all-purpose sets and movements – Triangle Offense continuity series and resets – Special situations for the Triangle Offense – Coaching keys and progressions – Personnel evaluation – Transition game in and out of the Triangle Offense – 3-point plays for the Triangle Offense – How to defeat any defense with the Triangle Offense - and much more! Winning Facts about the Triangle Offense: Some of the most prolific players, phenomenal talents, and unstoppable NBA scoring champions are direct products of the proven effectiveness of the Triangle Offense! The majority of NBA champions during the past 25 years have utilized the Triangle Offense as their primary attack on offense! The Triangle Offense is now widely implemented on a universal scale at all levels of basketball! You must understand the Triangle Offense! The concepts involved with the Triangle Offense are now central tenets to any successful basketball program! Learn how to implement this offense! Integrating the Triangle Offense within the scope of your basketball program guarantees offensive diversity, explosiveness, efficiency, and productivity! Can you afford not to leverage this remarkable offense? Score more points and win more games with the Triangle Offense! Appropriate for any level of basketball including youth, junior high school, high school, and college! ORDER NOW!

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Tex Mex Easy Meals: Revised
Tex Mex Easy Meals: Revised
Tex-mex cooking is done often in Texas and California. And all over Mexico.Here are a few favorites to get you started.

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Winter Poems Along the Rio Grande
Winter Poems Along the Rio Grande
New poetry by the Champion of the International Poetry Slam and winner of the Before Columbus American Book Award, the International Hispanic Heritage Award, the Pushcart Prize, and the prestigious new International Award. A romantic and a populist, Jimmy Santiago Baca celebrates nature and creativity: the power of "becoming more the river than myself" in Winter Poems Along the Rio Grande. These poems are an expansive meditation on Baca's spiritual life, punctuated always with his feetrepeatedly, rhythmicallyon the ground as he runs every morning along the river. Baca contemplates his old life, his new love, his family and friends, those living and those dead, injustices and victories, and Chicano culture. As Denise Levertov remarked, Baca "writes with unconcealed passion" and "manifests both an intense lyricism and that transformative vision which perceives the mythical and archetypal significance of life events."

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$6.90
-$6.05(-47%)


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