The Axe
The Axe
 
Search
The Axe
Custom Search
The Axe
 
 
 
 
 
Go Back

Smartphone









Free the Animation VR / AR
Play to reveal 3D images and 3D models!
Demonstration A-Frame / Multiplayer
Android app on Google Play
 
vlrPhone / vlrFilter
Project of very low consumption, radiation and bitrate softphones, with the support of the spatial audio, of the frequency shifts and of the ultrasonic communications / Multifunction Audio Filter with Remote Control!



 

Vectors and 3D Models

City Images, Travel Images, Safe Images

Howto - How To - Illustrated Answers

 

Axe
symbol. The axe has many forms and specialised uses but generally consists of an axe head with a handle, or helve. Before the modern axe, the stone-age

View Wikipedia Article

For other uses, see Axe (disambiguation) and AX (disambiguation). This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (July 2016) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Double- and single-bit felling axes A hoard of bronze socketed axes from the Bronze Age found in modern Germany. This was the top tool of the period, and also seems to have been used as a store of value

An axe (British English) or ax (American English; see spelling differences) is an implement that has been used for millennia to shape, split and cut wood; to harvest timber; as a weapon; and as a ceremonial or heraldic symbol. The axe has many forms and specialised uses but generally consists of an axe head with a handle, or helve.

Before the modern axe, the stone-age hand axe was used from 1.5 million years BP without a handle. It was later fastened to a wooden handle. The earliest examples of handled axes have heads of stone with some form of wooden handle attached (hafted) in a method to suit the available materials and use. Axes made of copper, bronze, iron and steel appeared as these technologies developed. Axes are usually composed of a head and a handle.

The axe is an example of a simple machine, as it is a type of wedge, or dual inclined plane. This reduces the effort needed by the wood chopper. It splits the wood into two parts by the pressure concentration at the blade. The handle of the axe also acts as a lever allowing the user to increase the force at the cutting edge—not using the full length of the handle is known as choking the axe. For fine chopping using a side axe this sometimes is a positive effect, but for felling with a double bitted axe it reduces efficiency.

Generally, cutting axes have a shallow wedge angle, whereas splitting axes have a deeper angle. Most axes are double bevelled, i.e. symmetrical about the axis of the blade, but some specialist broadaxes have a single bevel blade, and usually an offset handle that allows them to be used for finishing work without putting the user's knuckles at risk of injury. Less common today, they were once an integral part of a joiner and carpenter's tool kit, not just a tool for use in forestry. A tool of similar origin is the billhook.

Most modern axes have steel heads and wooden handles, typically hickory in the US and ash in Europe and Asia, although plastic or fibreglass handles are also common. Modern axes are specialised by use, size and form. Hafted axes with short handles designed for use with one hand are often called hand axes but the term hand axe refers to axes without handles as well. Hatchets tend to be small hafted axes often with a hammer on the back side (the poll). As easy-to-make weapons, axes have frequently been used in combat.

Contents
  • 1 History
  • 2 Symbolism, ritual, and folklore
  • 3 Parts of the axe
  • 4 Types of axes
    • 4.1 Axes designed to cut or shape wood
    • 4.2 Axes as weapons
    • 4.3 Axes as tools
  • 5 Hammer axe
  • 6 See also
  • 7 References
  • 8 Further reading
  • 9 External links
History Roman axe in an ancient Roman relief in Brescia, Italy

Initially axes were tools of stone called hand axes, used without handles (hafts), and had knapped (chipped) cutting edges of flint or other stone. Stone axes made with ground cutting edges were first developed sometime in the late Pleistocene in Australia, where ground-edge axe fragments from sites in Arnhem Land date back at least 44,000 years;[1][2] ground-edge axes were later invented independently in Japan sometime around 38,000 BP, and are known from several Upper Palaeolithic sites on the islands of Honshu and Kyushu.[3] In Europe, however, the innovation of ground edges occurred much later, in the Neolithic period ending 4,000 to 2,000 BC. The first true hafted axes are known from the Mesolithic period (c. 6000 BC). Few wooden hafts have been found from this period, but it seems that the axe was normally hafted by wedging. Birch-tar and raw-hide lashings were used to fix the blade.

Sometimes a short section of deer antler (an "antler sleeve") was used,[citation needed] which prevented the splitting of the haft and softened the impact on the stone blade itself, helping absorb the impact of each axe blow and lessening the chances of breaking the handle. The antler was hollowed out at one end to create a socket for the axehead. The antler sheath was then either perforated and a handle inserted into it or set in a hole made in the handle instead.

The distribution of stone axes is an important indication of prehistoric trade.[original research?] Thin sectioning is used to determine the provenance of the stone blades. In Europe, Neolithic "axe factories", where thousands of ground stone axes were roughed out, are known from many places, such as:

  • Great Langdale, England (tuff)
  • Rathlin Island, Ireland (porcellanite)
  • Krzemionki, Poland (flint)
  • Plancher-les-Mines, France (pelite)
  • Aosta Valley, Italy (omphacite).

Stone axes are still produced and in use today in parts of Papua, Indonesia. The Mount Hagen area of Papua New Guinea was an important production centre.

From the late Neolithic/Chalcolithic onwards, axes were made of copper or copper mixed with arsenic. These axes were flat and hafted much like their stone predecessors. Axes continued to be made in this manner with the introduction of Bronze metallurgy. Eventually the hafting method changed and the flat axe developed into the "flanged axe", then palstaves, and later winged and socketed axes.

The Proto-Indo-European word for "axe" may have been *pelek'u- (Greek pelekus πέλεκυς, Sanskrit parashu, see also Parashurama), but the word was probably a loan, or a Neolithic wanderwort, ultimately related to Sumerian balag, Akkadian pilaku-.[citation needed]

@media all and (max-width:720px){.mw-parser-output .tmulti>.thumbinner{width:100%!important;max-width:none!important}.mw-parser-output .tmulti .tsingle{float:none!important;max-width:none!important;width:100%!important;text-align:center}}Hand axes from Swanscombe at the British Museum that belongs to Swanscombe Man who lived 200,000–300,000 years agoA bronze axe from the Chinese Shang Dynasty, 12th to 11th centuries BC Symbolism, ritual, and folklore This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (July 2016) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) Axe
in hieroglyphs Axe alternative
in hieroglyphs

At least since the late Neolithic, elaborate axes (battle-axes, T-axes, etc.) had a religious significance and probably indicated the exalted status of their owner. Certain types almost never show traces of wear; deposits of unshafted axe blades from the middle Neolithic (such as at the Somerset Levels in Britain) may have been gifts to the deities.

A collection of old Australian cutting tools including broad axes, broad hatchets, mortising axes, carpenter's and felling axes. Also five adzes, a corner chisel, two froes, and a twibil

In Minoan Crete, the double axe (labrys) had a special significance, used by priestesses in religious ceremonies. The symbol refers to deification ceremonies; part of the leaping over the bull symbol also found at Crete; whereby aspirant becomes able to speak as a god to create any reality; the symbol being a sky map.[citation needed]

In 1998 a labrys, complete with an elaborately embellished haft, was found at Cham-Eslen, Canton of Zug, Switzerland. The haft was 120 cm long and wrapped in ornamented birch-bark. The axe blade is 17.4 cm long and made of antigorite, mined in the Gotthard-area. The haft goes through a biconical drilled hole and is fastened by wedges of antler and by birch-tar. It belongs to the early Cortaillod culture.

In folklore, stone axes were sometimes believed to be thunderbolts and were used to guard buildings against lightning, as it was believed (mythically) that lightning never struck the same place twice. This has caused some skewing of axe distributions.

Steel axes were important in superstition as well. A thrown axe could keep off a hailstorm, sometimes an axe was placed in the crops, with the cutting edge to the skies to protect the harvest against bad weather. An upright axe buried under the sill of a house would keep off witches, while an axe under the bed would assure male offspring.

Basques, Australians and New Zealanders have developed variants of rural sports that perpetuate the traditions of log cutting with axe. The Basque variants, splitting horizontally or vertically disposed logs, are generically called aizkolaritza (from aizkora: axe).

In Yorùbá mythology, the oshe (double-headed axe) symbolises Shango, Orisha (god) of thunder and lightning. It is said to represent swift and balanced justice. Shango altars often contain a carved figure of a woman holding a gift to the god with a double-bladed axe sticking up from her head.

The Arkalochori Axe is a bronze, Minoan, axe from the second millennium BC thought to be used for religious purposes. Inscriptions on this axe have been compared with other ancient writing systems.

Parts of the axe This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (October 2010) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) A diagram showing the main points on an axe

The axe has two primary components: the axe head, and the haft.

The axe head is typically bounded by the bit (or blade) at one end, and the poll (or butt) at the other, though some designs feature two bits opposite each other. The top corner of the bit where the cutting edge begins is called the toe, and the bottom corner is known as the heel. Either side of the head is called the cheek, which is sometimes supplemented by lugs where the head meets the haft, and the hole where the haft is mounted is called the eye. The part of the bit that descends below the rest of the axe-head is called the beard, and a bearded axe is an antiquated axe head with an exaggerated beard that can sometimes extend the cutting edge twice the height of the rest of the head.

The axe haft is sometimes called the handle. Traditionally, it was made of a resilient hardwood like hickory or ash, but modern axes often have hafts made of durable synthetic materials. Antique axes and their modern reproductions, like the tomahawk, often had a simple, straight haft with a circular cross-section that wedged onto the axe-head without the aid of wedges or pins. Modern hafts are curved for better grip and to aid in the swinging motion, and are mounted securely to the head. The shoulder is where the head mounts onto the haft, and this is either a long oval or rectangular cross-section of the haft that is secured to the axe head with small metal or wooden wedges. The belly of the haft is the longest part, where it bows in gently, and the throat is where it curves sharply down to the short grip, just before the end of the haft, which is known as the knob.

Types of axes Axes designed to cut or shape wood Splitting axe A Swedish carpenter's axe
  • Felling axe: Cuts across the grain of wood, as in the felling of trees. In single or double bit (the bit is the cutting edge of the head) forms and many different weights, shapes, handle types and cutting geometries to match the characteristics of the material being cut. More so than with for instance a splitting axe, the bit of a felling axe needs to be very sharp, to be able to efficiently cut the fibres.
  • Splitting axe: Used in wood splitting to split with the grain of the wood. Splitting axe bits are more wedge shaped. This shape causes the axe to rend the fibres of the wood apart, without having to cut through them.
  • Broad axe: Used with the grain of the wood in precision splitting or "hewing" (i.e. the squaring-off of round timbers usually for use in construction). Broad axe bits are most commonly chisel-shaped (i.e. one flat and one beveled edge) facilitating more controlled work as the flat cheek passes across the squared timber.
  • Adze: A variation featuring a head perpendicular to that of an axe. Rather than splitting wood side-by-side, it is used to rip a level surface into a horizontal piece of wood. It can also be used as a pickaxe for breaking up rocks and clay.
  • Hatchet: A small, light axe designed for use in one hand specifically while camping or travelling.
  • Carpenter's axe: A small axe, usually slightly larger than a hatchet, used in traditional woodwork, joinery and log-building. It has a pronounced beard and finger notch to allow a "choked" grip for precise control. The poll is designed for use as a hammer.
  • Hand axe: A small axe used for intermediate chopping, similar to hatchets.
  • Mortising axe: Used for creating mortises, a process which begins by drilling two holes at the ends of the intended mortise. Then the wood between the holes is removed with the mortising axe. Some forms of the tool have one blade, which may be pushed, swung or struck with a mallet. Others, such as twybil, bisaigüe and piochon have two, one of which is used for separating the fibres, and the other for levering out the waste.[4]
Axes as weapons The execution of the Duke of Somerset after the Battle of Tewkesbury in 1471
  • Archer's axe: a one-handed axe with bearded head carried by medieval archers serving both as melee weapon and tool. Defensively deployed archers in line used the poll of this axe to hammer wooden stakes into the ground and then sharpened the stakes by chopping the ends with the blade. These stakes were primarily intended to protect against cavalry.
  • Battle axe: In its most common form, an arm-length weapon borne in one or both hands. Compared to a sword swing, it delivers more cleaving power against a smaller target area, making it more effective against armour, due to concentrating more of its weight in the axehead.[original research?]
  • Tomahawk: used almost exclusively by Native Americans, its blade was originally crafted of stone. Along with the familiar war version, which could be fashioned as a throwing weapon, the pipe tomahawk was a ceremonial and diplomatic tool.
  • Spontoon tomahawk: A French trapper and Iroquois collaboration, this was an axe with a knife-like stabbing blade instead of the familiar wedged shape.
  • Shepherd's axe: used by shepherds in the Carpathian Mountains, it could double as a walking stick.
  • Ono: a Japanese weapon wielded by sōhei warrior monks.
  • Dagger-axe (Ji or Ge): A variant of Chinese polearmlike weapon with a divided two-part head, composed of the usual straight blade and a scythe-like blade. The straight blade is used to stab or feint, then the foe's body or head may be cut by pulling the scythe-like horizontal blade backwards. Ge has the horizontal blade but sometimes does not have the straight spear.
  • Halberd: a spearlike weapon with a hooked poll, effective against mounted cavalry.
  • Glaive: a European polearm weapon, consisting of a single-edged blade on the end of a pole.
  • Pollaxe: designed to defeat plate armour. Its axe (or hammer) head is much narrower than other axes, which accounts for its penetrating power.
  • Dane axe: A long-handled weapon with a large flat blade, often attributed to the Norsemen.
  • Throwing axe: Any of a number of ranged weapons designed to strike with a similar splitting action as their melee counterparts. These are often small in profile and usable with one hand.
  • Hurlbat: An entirely metal throwing axe sharpened on every auxiliary end to a point or blade, practically guaranteeing some form of damage against its target.
  • Francisca or Frankish axe: a short throwing weapon of the European Migration Period, the name of which may have become attached to the Germanic tribe associated with it: the Franks (see France).
  • Parashu: The parashu (Sanskrit: paraṣu) is an Indian battle-axe. It is generally wielded with two hands but could also be used with only one. It is depicted as the primary weapon of Parashurama, the 6th Avatar of Lord Vishnu in Hinduism.
  • Sagaris: An ancient weapon used by Scythians.
Axes as tools
  • Double bit axe: A common axe in the ancient world; introduced to America in the 1800s. The heavy head makes it ideal for felling trees. Often one bit is designated for tasks that would more quickly dull the edge such as cutting roots through dirt.
  • Firefighter's axe, fire axe, or pick head axe: It has a pick-shaped pointed poll (area of the head opposite the cutting edge). It is often decorated in vivid colours to make it easily visible during an emergency. Its primary use is for breaking down doors and windows.
  • Crash axe A short lightweight handheld emergency chopping tool with a sharp or serrated blade spanning a quarter circular from the axis of the handle, sometimes with a notch in the blade to catch on sheet metal, and often a short pick opposite the blade, this tool or a prybar is required to be carried in most large aircraft cockpits with 20 seats or more to quickly chop and pry walls and cabinets to gain access when extinguishing a fire while in flight or to escape when exits are unavailable. A crash axe is sometimes also used by crash rescue firefighter crews to chop through the airplane's sheet metal skin for a rescue opening; modern crash axes are often made with an electrically insulated handle.[5]
  • Ice axe or climbing axe: A number of different styles of ice axes are designed for ice climbing and enlarging steps used by climbers.
  • Lathe hammer (also known as a lath hammer, lathing hammer, or lathing hatchet): a tool used for cutting and nailing wood lath which has a small hatchet blade on one side (which features a small lateral nick used for pulling out nails) and a hammer head on the other.[6]
  • Mattock: A dual-purpose axe, combining an adze and axe blade, or sometimes a pick and adze blade.
  • Pickaxe: An axe with a large pointed end, rather than a flat blade. Sometimes exists as a double-bladed tool with a pick on one side and an axe or adze head on the other. Often used to break up hard material, such as rocks or concrete.
  • Pulaski: An axe with a mattock blade built into the rear of the main axe blade, used for digging ('grubbing out') through and around roots as well as chopping. The pulaski is an indispensable tool used in fighting forest fires, as well as trail-building, brush clearance and similar functions.
  • Slater's axe: An axe for cutting roofing slate, with a long point on the poll for punching nail holes, and with the blade offset laterally from the handle to protect the worker's hand from flying slate chips.
  • Splitting maul: A splitting implement that has evolved from the simple "wedge" design to more complex designs. Some mauls have a conical "axehead"; compound mauls have swivelling "sub-wedges", among other types; others have a heavy wedge-shaped head, with a sledgehammer face opposite.
Hammer axe

Hammer axes (or axe-hammers) typically feature an extended poll, opposite the blade, shaped and sometimes hardened for use as a hammer. The name axe-hammer is often applied to a characteristic shape of perforated stone axe used in the Neolithic and Bronze Ages. Iron axe-hammers are found in Roman military contexts, e.g. Cramond, Edinburgh, and South Shields, Tyne and Wear.[citation needed]

See also
  • Blade
  • Corded Ware culture
  • Fasces
  • Nzappa zap
  • Sagaris
  • Kaiser blade
  • Axe murder
Related forestry terms
  • Chainsaw
  • Felling
  • Firewood
  • Pruning
  • Hewing
  • Limbing
  • Log bucking
  • Log splitter
  • Logging
  • Splitting maul
  • Woodchopping
References
  1. ^ Hiscock, P.; O'Connor, S.; Balme, J.; Maloney, T. (2016). "World's earliest ground-edge axe production coincides with human colonisation of Australia". Australian Archaeology. 82 (1): 2-11. doi:10.1080/03122417.2016.1164379..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"\"""\"""'""'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  2. ^ Geneste, J.-M.; David, B.; Plisson, H.; Clarkson, C.; Delannoy, J.-J.; Petchey, F.; Whear, R. (2010). "Earliest evidence for ground-edge axes: 35,400 ± 410 cal BP from Jawoyn Country, Arnhem Land". Australian Archaeology. 71 (1): 66-69. doi:10.1080/03122417.2010.11689385.
  3. ^ Takashi, T. (2012). "MIS3 edge-ground axes and the arrival of the first Homo sapiens in the Japanese archipelago". Quaternary International. 248: 70-78. doi:10.1016/j.quaint.2011.01.030.
  4. ^ Johan David. "Notes sur trois outils anciens du charpentier : le bondax, la bisaiguë, le piochon" Archived 28 October 2011 at the Wayback Machine., Revue des archéologues et historiens d'art de Louvain 10. 1977.
  5. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 3 March 2017. Retrieved 3 March 2017.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  6. ^ Farlex. Lathing hammer. The Free Dictionary.
Further reading
Neolithic axes
  • W. Borkowski, Krzemionki mining complex (Warszawa 1995)
  • P. Pétrequin, La hache de pierre: carrières vosgiennes et échanges de lames polies pendant le néolithique (5400 – 2100 av. J.-C.) (exposition musées d'Auxerre Musée d'Art et d'Histoire) (Paris, Ed. Errance, 1995).
  • R. Bradley/M. Edmonds, Interpreting the axe trade: production and exchange in Neolithic Britain (1993).
  • P. Pétrequin/A.M. Pétrequin, Écologie d'un outil: la hache de pierre en Irian Jaya (Indonésie). CNRS Éditions, Mongr. du Centre Rech. Arch. 12 (Paris 1993).
Medieval axes
  • Schulze, André(Hrsg.): Mittelalterliche Kampfesweisen. Band 2: Kriegshammer, Schild und Kolben. Mainz am Rhein.: Zabern, 2007. ISBN 3-8053-3736-1
Superstition
  • H. Bächtold-Stäubli, Handwörterbuch des deutschen Aberglaubens (Berlin, De Gruyter 1987).
External links Look up axe in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Wikimedia Commons has media related to Axe. Wikimedia Commons has media related to Axes.
  • Section about types of axes is originally based on a Quicksilver Wiki article at the timber framing glossary under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License.
  • U.S. Forest Service Ax Manual
  • Texts on Wikisource:
    • "Axe". Encyclopedia Americana. 1920.
    • "Axe". New International Encyclopedia. 1905.
    • "Axe". The American Cyclopædia. 1879.
    • "Axe". Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). 1911.
  • v
  • t
  • e
Cutting and abrasive tools
  • Abrasive saw
  • Axe
  • Blade
  • Bandsaw
  • Bolt cutter
  • Broach
  • Ceramic tile cutter
  • Chainsaw
  • Circular saw
  • Chisel
  • Coping saw
  • Countersink
  • Cutting tool
  • Diagonal pliers
  • Diamond blade
  • Diamond tool
  • Drawknife
  • Drill bit
  • Emery cloth
  • File
  • Fretsaw
  • Froe
  • Glass cutter
  • Grater
  • Grinding wheel
  • Hacksaw
  • Hand saw
  • Hole saw
  • Incisor
  • Knife
  • Laser
  • Lawn mower
  • Machete
  • Meat slicer
  • Mezzaluna
  • Milling cutter
  • Miter saw
  • Nail clipper
  • Nibbler
  • Pencil sharpener
  • Pipecutter
  • Pizza cutter
  • Plasma cutter
  • Plane
  • Pocket knife
  • Rasp
  • Razor
  • Reamer
  • Sandpaper
  • Saw
  • Scalpel
  • Scissors
  • Snips
  • Steel wool
  • Surform
  • Switchblade
  • Tool bit
  • Utility knife
  • Water jet cutter
  • Wire brush
  • Wire stripper
Types of tools
Cleaning
Cutting and abrasive
Forestry
Garden
Hand
Machine and metalworking
Measuring and alignment
Power
  • v
  • t
  • e
Forestry tools and equipmentTree planting/
afforestation
  • Caulk boots
  • Hoedad (hoedag)
  • Groasis Waterboxx
  • Mattock
  • Pottiputki
  • Root trainer
  • Seed trap
  • Tree planting bar (dibble bar)
  • Tree shelter (Tuley tube)
  • Tree spade
Mensuration
  • 3D scanner
  • Angle gauge
  • Biltmore stick
  • Chain
  • Cruising rod
  • Diameter tape
  • Hemispherical photography
  • Inclinometer
  • Increment borer
  • Rangefinder
    • laser
  • Microtome
  • Relascope
  • Tree caliper
  • Wedge prism
Fire suppression
  • Aerial firefighting
    • DC-10
    • UAVs
  • Driptorch
  • Fire flapper
  • Fire rake
  • Fire retardant
  • Helitack
  • McLeod (rakehoe)
  • Pulaski
Axes
  • Billhook
  • Broadaxe
  • Froe (shake axe)
  • Hatchet
  • Labrys
  • Log splitter
  • Splitting maul
Saws
  • Bow saw
  • Bucksaw
  • Chainsaw
    • safety clothing
    • safety features
  • Crosscut saw
  • Dragsaw
  • Head saw
  • Lumber edger
  • Portable sawmill
  • Resaw
  • Two-man saw
  • Whipsaw
Logging
  • Cant hook
  • Feller buncher
  • Forwarder
  • Go-devil
  • Harvester
  • Helicopter
  • Log truck
  • Lombard Steam Log Hauler
  • Michigan logging wheels
  • Peavey
  • Pickaroon
  • Pike pole
  • Skid cone
  • Skidder
    • Washington winch
  • Steam donkey
  • Yarder
    • swing
Other
  • Denailer
  • Firewood processor
  • Forest railway
  • Forestry mulcher
  • Hand compass
  • Hand hook
  • Hydraulic debarker
  • Log house moulder
  • Machete
  • Stump grinder
  • Chainsaw mill
  • Tree tyer
  • Tsakat
  • Whoopie sling
  • Wood-drying kiln
  • Woodchipper
  • Forestry portal
  • Categories
    • tools
    • equipment
  • Commons
    • tools
    • equipment
  • WikiProject Forestry
  • v
  • t
  • e
Garden tools
  • Averruncator
  • Axe
  • Chainsaw
  • Cultivator
  • Daisy grubber
  • Dibber
  • Earth auger
  • Edger
  • Garden fork
  • Garden hose
  • Grass shears
  • Grass stitcher
  • Hedge trimmer
  • Hoe
  • Hori hori
  • Irrigation sprinkler
  • Lawn aerator
  • Lawn mower
  • Lawn sweeper
  • Leaf blower
  • Loppers
  • Machete
  • Mattock
  • Pickaxe
  • Pitchfork
  • Plough (plow)
  • Post hole digger
  • Potting bench
  • Pruning shears (secateurs)
  • Rake
  • Riddle
  • Rotary tiller
  • Scythe
  • Shovel
  • Sickle
  • Spade
  • String trimmer
  • Trowel
  • Tsakat
  • Watering can
  • Weeder
  • Wheelbarrow
  • v
  • t
  • e
WoodworkingOverviews
  • History
  • Glossary
  • Wood (lumber)
Forms
  • Boat building
  • Bow and arrow
  • Bush carpentry
  • Cabinetry
  • Caning
  • Carpentry
  • Certosina
  • Chainsaw carving
  • Chip carving
  • Clogs
  • Ébéniste
  • Fretwork
  • Intarsia
  • Japanese carpentry
  • Khatam
  • Kohlrosing
  • Log building
  • Marquetry
  • Millwork
  • Parquetry
  • Pyrography
  • Relief carving
  • Root carving
  • Sawdust
  • Segmented turning
  • Shingle weaving
  • Shipbuilding
  • Spindle turning
  • Timber framing
  • Treen
  • Whittling
  • Wood carving
  • Woodturning
  • Wood flour
WoodsSoft
  • Cedar (Calocedrus, Cedrus)
  • Cypress
  • Douglas fir
  • Fir
  • Juniper
  • Larch
  • Kauri
  • Pine
  • Rimu
  • Spruce
  • Yew
Hard
  • Afrormosia
  • Alder
  • Andiroba
  • Anigre
  • Ash
  • Apple
  • Aspen
  • Avodire
  • Balsa
  • Beech
  • Bilinga
  • Birch
  • African Blackwood
  • Australian Blackwood
  • Boxwood
  • Bubinga
  • Camphor
  • Cedrela
  • Cherry
  • Chestnut
  • Cocobolo
  • Cumaru
  • Ebony
  • Elm
  • Eucalyptus
  • Hazel
  • Hickory
  • Hornbeam
  • Idigbo
  • Imbuia
  • Ipê
  • Iroko
  • Jarra
  • Jelutong
  • Lignum vitae
  • Linden (lime, basswood)
  • Merbau
  • Mahogany (American, African)
  • Maple
  • Meranti
  • Oak
  • Padauk
  • Pear
  • Plum
  • Poplar
  • Purpleheart
  • Ovankol
  • Ramin
  • Red Quebracho
  • Rosewood
  • Rubberwood
  • Sapele
  • Teak
  • Totara
  • Utile
  • Walnut
  • Wenge
  • Willow
  • Zebrano
Engineered
  • Cross-laminated
  • Glue laminated
  • Hardboard
  • MDF
  • OSB
  • Particle board
  • Plywood
  • Wood-plastic composite
Tools
  • Abrasives
  • Axe
  • Adze
  • Chisel
  • Clamp
  • Drawknife
  • Drill
  • Float
  • Gimlet
  • Gauge
  • Impact driver
  • Janka hardness test
  • Jointer
  • Mallet
  • Milling machine
  • Mitre box
  • Moulding plane
  • Plane
  • Rasp
  • Router
  • Sandpaper
  • Spokeshave
  • Square (Carpenters, Combination, Speed, Try)
  • Thickness planer
  • Timber-framing
  • Vise
  • Winding sticks
  • Wood scribe
  • Workbench
Saws
  • Backsaw
  • Bandsaw
  • Bow
  • Bucksaw
  • Chainsaw
  • Circular
  • Compass
  • Coping
  • Crosscut
  • Frame
  • Fretsaw
  • Jigsaw
  • Keyhole
  • Miter
  • Rip
  • Scroll
  • Table
  • Veneer
  • Whipsaw
GeometryJoints
  • Birdsmouth
  • Bridle
  • Butt
  • Butterfly
  • Coping
  • Crown of thorns
  • Dado
  • Dovetail
  • Finger
  • Groove
  • Halved
  • Hammer-headed tenon
  • Knee
  • Lap
  • Mason's mitre
  • Miter
  • Mortise and tenon
  • Rabbet/Rebate
  • Scarf
  • Splice
  • Tongue and groove
Profiles
  • Bead
  • Bevel
  • Chamfer
  • Ogee
  • Ogive
  • Ovolo
Treatments
  • Adhesive
  • French polish
  • Heat bending
  • Lacquer
  • Oil
  • Paint
  • Paint stripper
  • Steam bending
  • Thermal
  • Varnish
  • Wax
  • Wood drying
  • Wood preservation
  • Wood stain
  • Wood finishing
Organizations
  • American Association of Woodturners
  • Architectural Woodwork Institute
  • British Woodworking Federation
  • Building and Wood Workers' International
  • Caricature Carvers of America
  • International Federation of Building and Wood Workers
  • National Wood Carvers Association
  • Society of Wood Engravers
  • Timber Framers Guild
Conversion
  • Chainsaw mill
  • Hewing
  • Sawmill
  • Whipsaw
  • Wood splitting
  • Flat sawing
  • Quarter sawing
  • Rift sawing
Techniques
  • Frame and panel
  • Frameless construction
  • Category
  • WikiProject
  • Commons
  • v
  • t
  • e
Prehistoric technology
  • Prehistory
    • Timeline
    • Outline
    • Stone Age
    • Subdivisions
    • New Stone Age
  • Technology
    • history
ToolsFarming
  • Neolithic Revolution
    • founder crops
    • New World crops
  • Ard / plough
  • Celt
  • Digging stick
  • Domestication
  • Goad
  • Irrigation
  • Secondary products
  • Sickle
  • Terracing
Food processing
  • Fire
  • Basket
  • Cooking
    • Earth oven
  • Granaries
  • Grinding slab
  • Ground stone
  • Hearth
    • Aşıklı Höyük
    • Qesem cave
  • Manos
  • Metate
  • Mortar and pestle
  • Pottery
  • Quern-stone
  • Storage pit
Hunting
  • Arrow
  • Boomerang
    • throwing stick
  • Bow and arrow
    • history
  • Nets
  • Spear
    • Spear-thrower
    • baton
    • harpoon
    • woomera
    • Schöningen spears
Projectile points
  • Arrowhead
  • Bare Island
  • Cascade
  • Clovis
  • Cresswell
  • Cumberland
  • Eden
  • Folsom
  • Lamoka
  • Manis Site
  • Plano
  • Transverse arrowhead
Systems
  • Game drive system
    • Buffalo jump
Toolmaking
  • Earliest toolmaking
    • Oldowan
    • Acheulean
    • Mousterian
  • Clovis culture
  • Cupstone
  • Fire hardening
  • Gravettian culture
  • Hafting
  • Hand axe
    • Grooves
  • Langdale axe industry
  • Levallois technique
  • Lithic core
  • Lithic reduction
    • analysis
    • debitage
    • flake
  • Lithic technology
  • Magdalenian culture
  • Metallurgy
  • Microblade technology
  • Mining
  • Prepared-core technique
  • Solutrean industry
  • Striking platform
  • Tool stone
  • Uniface
  • Yubetsu technique
Other tools
  • Adze
  • Awl
    • bone
  • Axe
  • Bannerstone
  • Blade
    • prismatic
  • Bone tool
  • Bow drill
  • Burin
  • Canoe
    • Oar
    • Pesse canoe
  • Chopper
    • tool
  • Cleaver
  • Denticulate tool
  • Fire plough
  • Fire-saw
  • Hammerstone
  • Knife
  • Microlith
  • Quern-stone
  • Racloir
  • Rope
  • Scraper
    • side
  • Stone tool
  • Tally stick
  • Weapons
  • Wheel
    • illustration
ArchitectureCeremonial
  • Göbekli Tepe
  • Kiva
  • Standing stones
    • megalith
    • row
    • Stonehenge
  • Pyramid
Dwellings
  • Neolithic architecture
  • British megalith architecture
  • Nordic megalith architecture
  • Burdei
  • Cave
  • Cliff dwelling
  • Dugout
  • Hut
    • Quiggly hole
  • Jacal
  • Longhouse
  • Mud brick
    • Mehrgarh
  • Neolithic long house
  • Pit-house
  • Pueblitos
  • Pueblo
  • Rock shelter
    • Blombos Cave
    • Abri de la Madeleine
    • Sibudu Cave
  • Stone roof
  • Roundhouse
  • Stilt house
    • Alp pile dwellings
  • Wattle and daub
Water management
  • Check dam
  • Cistern
  • Flush toilet
  • Reservoir
  • Water well
Other architecture
  • Archaeological features
  • Broch
  • Burnt mound
    • fulacht fiadh
  • Causewayed enclosure
    • Tor enclosure
  • Circular enclosure
    • Goseck
  • Cursus
  • Henge
    • Thornborough
  • Oldest buildings
  • Megalithic architectural elements
  • Midden
  • Timber circle
  • Timber trackway
    • Sweet Track
Arts and cultureMaterial goods
  • Baskets
  • Beadwork
  • Beds
  • Chalcolithic
  • Clothing/textiles
    • timeline
  • Cosmetics
  • Glue
  • Hides
    • shoes
    • Ötzi
  • Jewelry
    • amber use
  • Mirrors
  • Pottery
    • Cardium
    • Grooved ware
    • Linear
    • Jōmon
    • Unstan ware
  • Sewing needle
  • Weaving
  • Wine
    • Winery
    • wine press
Prehistoric art
  • Art of the Upper Paleolithic
  • Art of the Middle Paleolithic
    • Blombos Cave
  • List of Stone Age art
  • Bird stone
  • Bradshaw rock paintings
  • Cairn
  • Carved stone balls
  • Cave paintings
    • painting
    • pigment
  • Cup and ring mark
  • Geoglyph
  • Golden hats
  • Guardian stones
  • Megalithic art
  • Petroform
  • Petroglyph
  • Petrosomatoglyph
  • Pictogram
  • Rock art
    • Stone carving
  • Sculpture
  • Statue menhir
  • Stone circle
    • list
    • British Isles and Brittany
  • Venus figurines
Burial
  • Burial mounds
    • Bowl barrow
    • Round barrow
  • Mound Builders culture
    • U.S. sites
  • Chamber tomb
    • Cotswold-Severn
  • Cist
    • Dartmoor kistvaens
  • Clava cairn
  • Court tomb
  • Cremation
  • Dolmen
    • Great dolmen
  • Funeral pyre
  • Gallery grave
    • transepted
    • wedge-shaped
  • Grave goods
  • Jar burial
  • Long barrow
    • unchambered
    • Grønsalen
  • Megalithic tomb
  • Mummy
  • Passage grave
  • Rectangular dolmen
  • Ring cairn
  • Simple dolmen
  • Stone box grave
  • Tor cairn
  • Tumulus
  • Unchambered long cairn
Other cultural
  • Astronomy
    • sites
    • lunar calendar
  • Behavioral modernity
  • Origin of language
    • trepanning
  • Prehistoric medicine
  • Evolutionary musicology
    • music archaeology
  • Prehistoric music
    • Alligator drum
    • flutes
    • Divje Babe flute
    • gudi
  • Prehistoric numerals
  • Origin of religion
    • Paleolithic religion
    • Prehistoric religion
    • Spiritual drug use
  • Prehistoric warfare
  • Symbols
    • symbolism
Portal Authority control
  • GND: 4221413-0
  • NDL: 01190687


Fiskars x27 Super Splitting Axe 36 Inch, 378841-1002
Fiskars x27 Super Splitting Axe 36 Inch, 378841-1002
Splitting logs is an easier chore when you have the Fiskars 378841-1002 36 in. Super Splitting Axe A long, tapered handle provides the momentum you need to split medium to large logs with ease. A hole on the end of the handle makes this axe easy to hang on a nail or hook in your garage or tool shed. Dimensions: 1.75L x 9.25W x 37.75H in.. Crafted from steel. Black and yellow axe. For splitting medium to large size logs. Power-to-weight and balance ratios increase swing speed. Lightweight DuraFrame handle prevent overstrike breakage. Designed for more 1-strike splits. Ultra-sharp geometric edge. Longer handle provides increased leverage. Less time, effort, and strain per job.

Click Here to view in augmented reality

$44.99
-$25.00(-36%)



Fiskars X15 Chopping Axe 23.5 Inch, 378571-1002
Fiskars X15 Chopping Axe 23.5 Inch, 378571-1002
The all-purpose design of the X15 Chopping Axe makes felling trees quick and easy. Like every X-Series Hatchet or Axe, the X15 combines perfected weight distribution, advanced blade geometry, an ultra-sharp edge and virtually unbreakable design to maximize your performance. This combination of features allows the blade to bite deeper when chopping. With more blade penetration on each swing, you can chop more wood in less time, with less effort and hand strain.

Click Here to view in augmented reality

$33.98



Husqvarna 576926501 19" Wooden Carpenter's Axe
Husqvarna 576926501 19" Wooden Carpenter's Axe
Husqvarna provides a wide range of wooden axes for different kinds of work. These axes are forged in Sweden from Swedish axe steel with a consistently high quality. With good maintenance, your axe will last for a long time. Don't store in too warm conditions, since the handle might Shrink. Always dry of dirt & moisten before putting the axe cover on. If the axe is put away for a longer time, grease it to prevent rust.

Click Here to view in augmented reality

$57.98
-$4.97(-8%)



Estwing Sportsman's Axe - 14" Camping Hatchet with Forged Steel Construction & Genuine Leather Grip - E24A
Estwing Sportsman's Axe - 14" Camping Hatchet with Forged Steel Construction & Genuine Leather Grip - E24A
Estwing's world famous Sportsman's axe is the choice of outdoorsmen everywhere. Both the head and handle of the axe are forged in 1-piece and hand polished to a beautiful finish. This classic axe offers unsurpassed balance and temper. It's genuine leather handle is sanded and lacquered for a durable yet comfortable feel. The Sportsman's axe includes a rugged ballistic nylon sheath with belt loop so it can always have your tool close at hand. It has a tempered 3-1/4 in. cutting edge for easy cutting. A must for all campers and outdoorsman alike! Estwing Axes are proudly forged in the in USA using the finest American steel. Please always wear eye protection while using this tool.

Click Here to view in augmented reality

$34.97
-$10.02(-22%)



AXE Body Spray MIX within available kind ( Pack of 6)(6X 150 ml/5.07 oz )
AXE Body Spray MIX within available kind ( Pack of 6)(6X 150 ml/5.07 oz )
You will get 6 PCS

Click Here to view in augmented reality

$18.95



SOG Tomahawk Throwing Hatchets 3 Pk - “Throwing Hawks” TH1001-CP Black Stainless Steel Throwing Tomahawks with 1.75” Tomahawk Blades + Triple Hatchet Sheath
SOG Tomahawk Throwing Hatchets 3 Pk - “Throwing Hawks” TH1001-CP Black Stainless Steel Throwing Tomahawks with 1.75” Tomahawk Blades + Triple Hatchet Sheath
Take target throwing to the next level with the Throwing Hawk set, three pack of one-piece steel hawks with paracord wrapped handles designed for specifically target throwing. Challenge your friends for supremacy of the back yard. These stylized Throwing Hawks are not only fun to sail through the air, they are practical as well. Protected by SOG's hardcased black coating, they are extremely scratch resistant. Their balance, aerodynamics, and proportions make them great throwing hawks. For the same reasons, they also make great back-up field tools. Handles are wrapped with paracord or use without it and you have three tomahawks for the price of one! Includes nylon sheath that safely carries all three.

Click Here to view in augmented reality

$59.99
-$10.04(-17%)



Estwing Camper's Axe - 16" Hatchet with Forged Steel Construction & Shock Reduction Grip - E44A
Estwing Camper's Axe - 16" Hatchet with Forged Steel Construction & Shock Reduction Grip - E44A
Estwing's world famous Camper's axe is the choice of outdoorsmen everywhere. Both the head and handle of the axe are forged in 1-piece and hand polished to a beautiful finish. This classic axe offers unsurpassed balance and temper. It's patented Shock Reduction Grip reduces impact virbation by 70%. The Camper's axe includes a rugged ballistic nylon sheath with belt loop so it can always have your tool close at hand. It has a tempered 4 in. cutting edge for easy cutting. A must for all campers and outdoorsman alike! Estwing Axes are proudly forged in the in USA using the finest American steel. Please always wear eye protection while using this tool.

Click Here to view in augmented reality

$37.99
-$14.28(-27%)



Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe 19 Inch, 420
Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe 19 Inch, 420
See main description Item Brand: GrAnsfors Bruk Item Number: 33000 See main description Item Brand: GrAnsfors Bruk Item Number: 33000

Click Here to view in augmented reality

$199.00



Estwing Special Edition Camper's Axe - 26" Wood Splitting Tool with All Steel Construction & Shock Reduction Grip - E45ASE
Estwing Special Edition Camper's Axe - 26" Wood Splitting Tool with All Steel Construction & Shock Reduction Grip - E45ASE
Estwing's world famous Camper's axe is the choice of outdoorsmen everywhere. The forged steel head is hand polished and beautifully finished in black for this unique special edition. This classic axe offers unsurpassed balance and temper. It's patented Shock Reduction Grip reduces impact virbation by 70%. The Camper's axe includes a rugged ballistic nylon sheath with belt loop so it can always have your tool close at hand. It has a tempered 4 in. cutting edge for easy cutting. A must for all campers and outdoorsman alike! Estwing Axes are proudly forged in the in USA using the finest American steel. Please always wear eye protection while using this tool.

Click Here to view in augmented reality

$59.89
-$10.10(-14%)



CRKT Freyr Tactical Axe: Outdoor Axe with Deep Beard Design, Forged Carbon Steel Blade, and Hickory Wooden Handle 2746
CRKT Freyr Tactical Axe: Outdoor Axe with Deep Beard Design, Forged Carbon Steel Blade, and Hickory Wooden Handle 2746
IDEAL TACTICAL AXE Norse design with a soul that’s all American. Why meddle with an axe shape that has been tried and true for over a thousand years? That’s the logic designer and veteran Elmer Roush brings to the Freyr tactical axe. The deep beard echoes Viking style but its balance and pure burliness boosts it into a contemporary league all its own. Shield and Viking battle cry not included.

Click Here to view in augmented reality

$57.03
-$2.38(-4%)


Twitter
 
Facebook
 
LinkedIn
 
 

 
 

WhmSoft Moblog
Copyright (C) 2006-2018 WhmSoft
All Rights Reserved